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  • 1.
    Bertills, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology.
    Att anpassa idrottsundervisningen – Hur ska vi göra för att du ska kunna vara med?2023In: Idrott & hälsa, ISSN 1653-1124, Vol. 1, p. 7-8Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Bertills, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Praktiknära utbildningsforskning (PUF), Didactics in Social Sciences.
    Different is cool! Self-efficacy and participation of students with and without disabilities in school-based Physical Education2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Self-efficacy predicts school achievement. Participation is important for life outcomes. Functioning affects to what degree you can participate in everyday life situations. Participation-related constructs such as self-efficacy and functioning work both as a means of participation and as an end outcome. Learning takes place in this interrelationship. How relationships between participation and these constructs vary, depending on whether impacted by disability or not, how they develop over time and outcomes of these processes need to be explored.

    Method: In this three-year longitudinal study developmental processes of student self-efficacy (PE specific and general), aptitude to participate and functioning were explored. The context is school-based Physical Education (PE) in mainstream inclusive secondary school in Sweden. Data was collected from student and teacher questionnaires and observations of PE lessons. Students self-rated their perceived self-efficacy, aptitude to participate and functioning in school years seven and nine. Teachers self-rated their teaching skills. Student engagement, teaching behaviors, interactions and activities in Swedish school-based PE were observed in year eight. Relationships between the constructs and how they develop over time were studied in a total sample of 450 students (aged 12,5-15,5). Specifically focusing on three student groups, students with diagnosed disabilities (n=30), students with low grades in PE (n=36), and students with high grades (n=53) in PE.

    Results: Adapted instruments to measure self-efficacy (PE specific and general), aptitude to participate in PE, and functional skills (physical and socio-cognitive were developed and validated. PE specific self-efficacy is closely related to the aptitude to participate and has effects on student engagement and general self-efficacy. Over time PE specific self-efficacy increase in adolescents, but students with disabilities initially responded negatively if their PE teachers rated their teaching skills high. They were also more sensitive to the social environment, which was associated with PE grades over time. During this time the relationship between perceived physical functional skills and PE specific self-efficacy accelerated for students with disabilities. They were observed to be equally highly engaged in PE lessons as their peers. However, students with disabilities were observed to be closer to their teacher and tended to be less social and alone than their peers. Observed teaching skills as measured by level of alignment with syllabus, and affective tone when giving instructions showed differences in complexity and efficiency. Students in the study sample were more engaged in high-level teaching and were more frequently in communicative proximity to their teacher. In conditions of high-level teaching, teachers gave more instructions and used more materials for teaching purposes. Lessons were more often structured into whole group activities and lessons were more focused.

    Conclusion: PE specific self-efficacy measures students’ perceived knowledge and skills in PE and is related to students’ aptitude to participate, general self-efficacy and functioning. The overall findings imply that the developmental processes of perceived self-efficacy (PE specific and general), aptitude to participate and functioning differ between the student groups. PE specific self-efficacy and socio-cognitive functioning improve over time in all groups. Stronger associations of PE specific self-efficacy with aptitude to participate and functional skills, and weaker with general self-efficacy were found in students with disabilities compared to their typically functioning peers. Individual factors are vital to learning, but students with disabilities seem to be more sensitive to environmental factors than their peers. The aptitude to participate declines in students with disabilities, probably due to their experience of having physical restrictions. However, while participating in PE, they were similarly relatively highly engaged as their typically functioning peers. Instructions in PE indicate differences in complexity and efficiency of PE teaching. More complex lesson content requires more  instructions and more purposeful materials. Time was used more efficiently in high-level teaching conditions. Lessons were more focused and had more flow, leaving students with less time to socialize. Space was also used more efficiently, and teachers were closer to their students. Indicating that more individual support, feed-back and feedforward was provided. Students with disabilities were more frequently close to their teacher than their typically functioning peers. The use of more whole group formats indicate that teaching is more differentiated in high-level teaching. When activating students physically, teachers may choose simpler self-sustaining activities, i.e. sports games. Small group formats may be used for individual development of motor skills or drills.

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  • 3.
    Bertills, Karin
    Jönköping University, Didaktik i Samhällsämnena, Sweden.
    Different is cool! Self-efficacy and participation of students with and without disabilities in school-based Physical Education2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Self-efficacy predicts school achievement. Participation is important for life outcomes. Functioning affects to what degree you can participate in everyday life situations. Participation-related constructs such as self-efficacy and functioning work both as a means of participation and as an end outcome. Learning takes place in this interrelationship. How relationships between participation and these constructs vary, depending on whether impacted by disability or not, how they develop over time and outcomes of these processes need to be explored.

    Method: In this three-year longitudinal study developmental processes of student self-efficacy (PE specific and general), aptitude to participate and functioning were explored. The context is school-based Physical Education (PE) in mainstream inclusive secondary school in Sweden. Data was collected from student and teacher questionnaires and observations of PE lessons. Students self-rated their perceived self-efficacy, aptitude to participate and functioning in school years seven and nine. Teachers self-rated their teaching skills. Student engagement, teaching behaviors, interactions and activities in Swedish school-based PE were observed in year eight. Relationships between the constructs and how they develop over time were studied in a total sample of 450 students (aged 12,5-15,5). Specifically focusing on three student groups, students with diagnosed disabilities (n=30), students with low grades in PE (n=36), and students with high grades (n=53) in PE.

    Results: Adapted instruments to measure self-efficacy (PE specific and general), aptitude to participate in PE, and functional skills (physical and socio-cognitive were developed and validated. PE specific self-efficacy is closely related to the aptitude to participate and has effects on student engagement and general self-efficacy. Over time PE specific self-efficacy increase in adolescents, but students with disabilities initially responded negatively if their PE teachers rated their teaching skills high. They were also more sensitive to the social environment, which was associated with PE grades over time. During this time the relationship between perceived physical functional skills and PE specific self-efficacy accelerated for students with disabilities. They were observed to be equally highly engaged in PE lessons as their peers. However, students with disabilities were observed to be closer to their teacher and tended to be less social and alone than their peers. Observed teaching skills as measured by level of alignment with syllabus, and affective tone when giving instructions showed differences in complexity and efficiency. Students in the study sample were more engaged in high-level teaching and were more frequently in communicative proximity to their teacher. In conditions of high-level teaching, teachers gave more instructions and used more materials for teaching purposes. Lessons were more often structured into whole group activities and lessons were more focused.

    Conclusion: PE specific self-efficacy measures students’ perceived knowledge and skills in PE and is related to students’ aptitude to participate, general self-efficacy and functioning. The overall findings imply that the developmental processes of perceived self-efficacy (PE specific and general), aptitude to participate and functioning differ between the student groups. PE specific self-efficacy and socio-cognitive functioning improve over time in all groups. Stronger associations of PE specific self-efficacy with aptitude to participate and functional skills, and weaker with general self-efficacy were found in students with disabilities compared to their typically functioning peers. Individual factors are vital to learning, but students with disabilities seem to be more sensitive to environmental factors than their peers. The aptitude to participate declines in students with disabilities, probably due to their experience of having physical restrictions. However, while participating in PE, they were similarly relatively highly engaged as their typically functioning peers. Instructions in PE indicate differences in complexity and efficiency of PE teaching. More complex lesson content requires more  instructions and more purposeful materials. Time was used more efficiently in high-level teaching conditions. Lessons were more focused and had more flow, leaving students with less time to socialize. Space was also used more efficiently, and teachers were closer to their students. Indicating that more individual support, feed-back and feedforward was provided. Students with disabilities were more frequently close to their teacher than their typically functioning peers. The use of more whole group formats indicate that teaching is more differentiated in high-level teaching. When activating students physically, teachers may choose simpler self-sustaining activities, i.e. sports games. Small group formats may be used for individual development of motor skills or drills.

  • 4.
    Bertills, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Får jag också vara med?2020In: Idrott & hälsa, ISSN 1653-1124, Vol. 1, p. 6-9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Bertills, Karin
    Jönköping University, HLK, CHILD.
    Får jag också vara med?2020In: Idrott & hälsa, ISSN 1653-1124, Vol. 1, p. 6-9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Bertills, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    INCLUSION OF CHILDREN WITH PHYSICAL RESTRICTIONS IN OUT-OF-THE-CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES2023In: The Routledge Handbook of Inclusive Education for Teacher Educators: Issues, Considerations, and Strategies, Taylor & Francis, 2023, p. 456-466Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Opportunity and ability to join in are features that impact the participation of children with disabilities. Attendance is a prerequisite for participation, but simply integrating students with disabilities into mainstream schooling does not automatically mean that the student experiences the feeling of being included. Students with disabilities report participation barriers in out-of-classroom activities related to environmental aspects of availability and accessibility. Also, barriers related to teachers’ knowledge and attitudes, class size, personal limitations, and scheduling. Inclusive compulsory education provides opportunities for all students to engage in their own learning. Inclusive education is therefore an important context for children with disabilities to share participatory benefits with peers. To meet specific needs of diverse learners, special support such as environmental adjustments, contextual modifications and individual assistance need to be provided. In everyday classroom practices this means an attitudinal shift towards adapting the environment to accommodate the learner rather than for the learner to adapt to the teaching. This chapter focuses on aspects of the successful inclusion of students with physical disabilities in activities outside the classroom.

  • 7.
    Bertills, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Inclusive Physical Education (PE) environments – PE teachers’ views on how they facilitate participation for students with disabilities2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Bertills, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Jönköping university.
    Looking outside the box: Sweden, structured interview2022In: Umgang mit Heterogenität und Inklusion: Chancen und Herausforderungen für die schulpraktische Prefessionalisierung / [ed] Marcel Veber, Patrick Gollub, Silvia Greiten, Teresa Schkade, Kempten: Verlag Julius Klinkhardt, 2022, p. 211-218Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Bertills, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Student engagement and high-quality teaching in PE2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Bertills, Karin
    Jönköping University, HLK, CHILD, Sweden.
    Student engagement and high-quality teaching in PE2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Inclusive teaching skills and student engagement in physical education2019In: Frontiers in Education, E-ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 4, article id 74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Including students with disabilities in school-based Physical Education (PE) is common practice. However, little is known about students’ engagement and interaction in this environment and how it is related to PE teaching skills. Student engagement and interaction patterns were therefore observed. A multiple time-sampling method was used to perform observations of individual, contextual and environmental aspects of student engagement in school-based PE lessons. Three groups of students, aged 14 (n = 94), with: (1) Disabilities (n = 23), (2) Low grades (n = 27), and (3) High grades (n = 44) were compared. Students, independent of group, showed relatively high engagement in PE. The observed frequency of linking lesson content to PE syllabus in combination with using a vibrant affective tone when instructing was used as an indicator of high-/low-level teaching skills. Higher student engagement was observed in environments with high-level PE teaching skills, which included more whole group teaching, a higher frequency of student-teacher communicative proximity and more instructions. Students with disabilities and with low grades were more often observed in whole group activities, students with high grades in small group activities. The primary type of support provided to students with disabilities in PE seemed to consist of communicative proximity to the teacher. They were more often observed to be close to the teacher. Our results suggest that proximity to the teacher may serve as an indicator of inclusive teaching. In high-level teaching environments, teachers were more frequently in communicative proximity to all students, which facilitates learning. Lessons were also more focused (physically and academically) and technical devices and music were used for teaching purposes. More complex lesson content requires more instructions and our results show that, despite more instructions, all student groups were more on-task. Implied from our observations is that lesson complexity, the structuring of whole/small group formats, teacher proximity, and student engagement are aspects to consider when studying school-based PE. More instructions, closer communicative proximity and higher student engagement in high-level teaching provide students with more learning opportunities and facilitate feed-back and feed-forward, and individual support to students with disabilities.

  • 12.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, HLK, CHILD, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete, Sweden.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, HLK, CHILD, Sweden.
    Inclusive teaching skills and student engagement in physical education2019In: Frontiers in Education, E-ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 4, article id 74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Including students with disabilities in school-based Physical Education (PE) is common practice. However, little is known about students’ engagement and interaction in this environment and how it is related to PE teaching skills. Student engagement and interaction patterns were therefore observed. A multiple time-sampling method was used to perform observations of individual, contextual and environmental aspects of student engagement in school-based PE lessons. Three groups of students, aged 14 (n = 94), with: (1) Disabilities (n = 23), (2) Low grades (n = 27), and (3) High grades (n = 44) were compared. Students, independent of group, showed relatively high engagement in PE. The observed frequency of linking lesson content to PE syllabus in combination with using a vibrant affective tone when instructing was used as an indicator of high-/low-level teaching skills. Higher student engagement was observed in environments with high-level PE teaching skills, which included more whole group teaching, a higher frequency of student-teacher communicative proximity and more instructions. Students with disabilities and with low grades were more often observed in whole group activities, students with high grades in small group activities. The primary type of support provided to students with disabilities in PE seemed to consist of communicative proximity to the teacher. They were more often observed to be close to the teacher. Our results suggest that proximity to the teacher may serve as an indicator of inclusive teaching. In high-level teaching environments, teachers were more frequently in communicative proximity to all students, which facilitates learning. Lessons were also more focused (physically and academically) and technical devices and music were used for teaching purposes. More complex lesson content requires more instructions and our results show that, despite more instructions, all student groups were more on-task. Implied from our observations is that lesson complexity, the structuring of whole/small group formats, teacher proximity, and student engagement are aspects to consider when studying school-based PE. More instructions, closer communicative proximity and higher student engagement in high-level teaching provide students with more learning opportunities and facilitate feed-back and feed-forward, and individual support to students with disabilities.

  • 13.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Augustine, Lilly
    School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad university, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Measuring self-efficacy, aptitude to participate and functioning in students with and without impairments2018In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 572-583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Including vulnerable groups of students such as students with learning disabilities in mainstream school research, require ethical considerations and questionnaire adaptation. These students are often excluded, due to low understanding or methodologies generating inadequate data. Students with disability need be studied as a separate group and provided accessible questionnaires. This pilot study aims at developing and evaluating student self-reported measures, rating aspects of student experiences of school-based Physical Education (PE). Instrument design, reliability and validity were examined in Swedish secondary school students (n = 47) including students, aged 13, with intellectual disability (n = 5) and without impairment and test–retested on 28 of these students. Psychometric results from the small pilot-study sample were confirmed in analyses based on replies from the first wave of data collection in the main study (n = 450). Results show adequate internal consistency, factor structure and relations between measures. In conclusion, reliability and validity were satisfactory in scales to measure self-efficacy in general, in PE, and aptitude to participate. Adapting proxy ratings for functioning into self-reports indicated problems. Adequacy of adjustments made were confirmed and a dichotomous scale for typical/atypical function is suggested for further analyses.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Fulltext
  • 14.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, HLK, CHILD, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, HHJ. CHILD, Sweden.
    Augustine, Lilly
    School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad university, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Measuring self-efficacy, aptitude to participate and functioning in students with and without impairments2018In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 572-583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Including vulnerable groups of students such as students with learning disabilities in mainstream school research, require ethical considerations and questionnaire adaptation. These students are often excluded, due to low understanding or methodologies generating inadequate data. Students with disability need be studied as a separate group and provided accessible questionnaires. This pilot study aims at developing and evaluating student self-reported measures, rating aspects of student experiences of school-based Physical Education (PE). Instrument design, reliability and validity were examined in Swedish secondary school students (n = 47) including students, aged 13, with intellectual disability (n = 5) and without impairment and test–retested on 28 of these students. Psychometric results from the small pilot-study sample were confirmed in analyses based on replies from the first wave of data collection in the main study (n = 450). Results show adequate internal consistency, factor structure and relations between measures. In conclusion, reliability and validity were satisfactory in scales to measure self-efficacy in general, in PE, and aptitude to participate. Adapting proxy ratings for functioning into self-reports indicated problems. Adequacy of adjustments made were confirmed and a dichotomous scale for typical/atypical function is suggested for further analyses.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad.
    Quality teaching and student perceived self-efficacy, function and aptitude to participate in PE2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Students with disability show a trajectory of higher incidence of school failure. High quality teaching and proper support may foster high self-efficacy, as protective factors for successful school outcomes. Physical Education (PE) can provide students with a context in which self-efficacy is promoted. At transition into high school with higher cognitive stakes, developmental changes and individual social identification coinciding, a disability may add to the challenge of success. Investigating self-efficacy as a predictor of achievement operationalized as grade points, student perceived self-efficacy, function and aptitude to participate in PE, and teacher rated teaching quality are examined.

    Method: Three groups were studied, students with 1. Diagnosed disability, 2. Low grades and 3. High grades in PE in year 6. Questionnaires were completed by students in 26 classes including classmates (n=450, 228 boys) and their PE-teachers (n=25). Correlations were analyzed, differentiating groups of students.

    Results: Students with disabilities experience lower general self-efficacy and in PE, and are less apt to participate in PE. Their PE self-efficacy is higher if the classroom climate is good. PE-teachers systematic work with grading has positive effects on academic and movement self-efficacy for students with low grades and on health self-efficacy for students with high grades. Highest effect of perceived socio-cognitive function is displayed in students with low grades, the correlation is stronger in general self-efficacy than in self-efficacy in PE. Students with high grades have higher self-efficacy in general and in PE.

    Conclusions: Student perceived socio-cognitive function is of major importance to students experience of self-efficacy. Most impact is seen on subscales measuring academic and movement self-efficacy.

  • 16.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, HLK, CHILD, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete, Sweden.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, HLK, CHILD, Sweden.
    Quality teaching and student perceived self-efficacy, function and aptitude to participate in PE2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Students with disability show a trajectory of higher incidence of school failure. High quality teaching and proper support may foster high self-efficacy, as protective factors for successful school outcomes. Physical Education (PE) can provide students with a context in which self-efficacy is promoted. At transition into high school with higher cognitive stakes, developmental changes and individual social identification coinciding, a disability may add to the challenge of success. Investigating self-efficacy as a predictor of achievement operationalized as grade points, student perceived self-efficacy, function and aptitude to participate in PE, and teacher rated teaching quality are examined.

    Method: Three groups were studied, students with 1. Diagnosed disability, 2. Low grades and 3. High grades in PE in year 6. Questionnaires were completed by students in 26 classes including classmates (n=450, 228 boys) and their PE-teachers (n=25). Correlations were analyzed, differentiating groups of students.

    Results: Students with disabilities experience lower general self-efficacy and in PE, and are less apt to participate in PE. Their PE self-efficacy is higher if the classroom climate is good. PE-teachers systematic work with grading has positive effects on academic and movement self-efficacy for students with low grades and on health self-efficacy for students with high grades. Highest effect of perceived socio-cognitive function is displayed in students with low grades, the correlation is stronger in general self-efficacy than in self-efficacy in PE. Students with high grades have higher self-efficacy in general and in PE.

    Conclusions: Student perceived socio-cognitive function is of major importance to students experience of self-efficacy. Most impact is seen on subscales measuring academic and movement self-efficacy.

  • 17.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Student engagement and high quality teaching in PE2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, HLK, CHILD, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete, Sweden.
    Student engagement and high quality teaching in PE2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Student Self-Efficacy and Aptitude to Participate in Relation to Perceived Functioning and Achievement in Students in Secondary School With and Without Disabilities2021In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 12, article id 607329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    School-based Physical Education (PE) is important, especially to students with disabilities whose participation in physical activities out of school is limited. The development over time of participation-related constructs in relation to students' perceived functioning and achievement is explored. Students in mainstream inclusive secondary school self-rated their PE-specific self-efficacy, general school self-efficacy, aptitude to participate in PE, and perceived physical and socio-cognitive functional skills at two timepoints, year 7 and year 9. Results were compared between three groups of students with: disabilities (n = 28), high grades (n = 47), or low grades (n = 30) in PE. Over time, perceived physical skills of students with disabilities became strongly associated with self-efficacy and aptitude to participate. Perceived socio-cognitive skills in the study sample improved and had a positive effect on PE-specific self-efficacy. Efforts should be made to limit the accelerated negative impact of perceived restricted functioning of students with disabilities. Grading criteria need to be developed to comply with standards adapted to fit abilities of students with disabilities. Meaningful learning experiences appear to be created when participation is promoted and capacity beliefs (PE-specific self-efficacy) are boosted. Allocating resources to support the development of students' socio-cognitive skills seem to have potential for overall positive school outcome.

  • 20.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, HLK, CHILD, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete, Sweden.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete, Sweden.
    Student Self-Efficacy and Aptitude to Participate in Relation to Perceived Functioning and Achievement in Students in Secondary School With and Without Disabilities2021In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 12, article id 607329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    School-based Physical Education (PE) is important, especially to students with disabilities whose participation in physical activities out of school is limited. The development over time of participation-related constructs in relation to students' perceived functioning and achievement is explored. Students in mainstream inclusive secondary school self-rated their PE-specific self-efficacy, general school self-efficacy, aptitude to participate in PE, and perceived physical and socio-cognitive functional skills at two timepoints, year 7 and year 9. Results were compared between three groups of students with: disabilities (n = 28), high grades (n = 47), or low grades (n = 30) in PE. Over time, perceived physical skills of students with disabilities became strongly associated with self-efficacy and aptitude to participate. Perceived socio-cognitive skills in the study sample improved and had a positive effect on PE-specific self-efficacy. Efforts should be made to limit the accelerated negative impact of perceived restricted functioning of students with disabilities. Grading criteria need to be developed to comply with standards adapted to fit abilities of students with disabilities. Meaningful learning experiences appear to be created when participation is promoted and capacity beliefs (PE-specific self-efficacy) are boosted. Allocating resources to support the development of students' socio-cognitive skills seem to have potential for overall positive school outcome.

  • 21.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    SIDR, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad.
    Quality teaching and student perceived self-efficacy, function and aptitude to participate in Physical Education2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, HLK, CHILD, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, HLK, CHILD, Sweden.
    Quality teaching and student perceived self-efficacy, function and aptitude to participate in Physical Education2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Relationships between physical education (PE) teaching and student self-efficacy, aptitude to participate in PE and functional skills: with a special focus on students with disabilities2018In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 387-401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Students with disability show an increasing incidence of school failure. Quality teaching and appropriate support may foster high self-efficacy, a predictive factor for successful school outcomes. Physical Education (PE) can provide students with a context in which self-efficacy and participation are promoted leading to improved academic achievement. The transition into secondary school can be challenging for many students with increased educational demands, developmental changes and individual social identification coinciding. A disability may add to the challenge of success.

    Methods: Three groups of students, aged 13 years and enrolled in Swedish mainstream schools were targeted (n = 439). Groups included students with 1. A diagnosed disability, 2. Low grades in PE (D–F) and 3. High grades (A–C) in PE. Questionnaires were collected and analyzed from 30/439 students with a diagnosed disability (physical, neuro-developmental and intellectual) from 26 classes, their classmates and their PE-teachers (n = 25). Relationships between student self-reports and PE-teachers’ self-ratings were investigated. Also examined was the potential to which students’ functional skills could predict elevated general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. Results were compared with the total sample and between the three target groups (n = 121).

    Results: For students with disabilities, better self-rated teaching skills were related to lower student perceived general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. The impact of classroom climate in PE was more obvious among students with disabilities. Perceived functional skills were associated with elevated general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. Better socio-cognitive functional skills had an overall positive effect on all outcomes. Students with disabilities reported results similar to the total sample, the D–F group scored lower and the A–C group higher than the total sample and the disability group. Elevated self-efficacy in PE is six times less probable in students with disabilities, compared to the A–C group.

    Conclusions: Our findings that better teacher planning and grading skills, are detrimental to students disadvantaged by disability is contradictive. Improving the establishment and communication of adapted learning standards at the transition to secondary school is a crucial and a predictive factor for promoting positive school experiences for students with disability. Students with disabilities need to be assured that the intended learning outcomes can be reached by doing activities differently than their typically functioning peers. Consideration of class composition is suggested as a means of promoting a positive learning climate, which would particularly benefit students with disabilities. Allocation of resources to support student socio-cognitive skills would improve experiences for the D–F group and likely promote a positive learning environment.

  • 24.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Kristianstad Univ, Sweden.
    Relationships between physical education (PE) teaching and student self-efficacy, aptitude to participate in PE and functional skills: with a special focus on students with disabilities2018In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 387-401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Students with disability show an increasing incidence of school failure. Quality teaching and appropriate support may foster high self-efficacy, a predictive factor for successful school outcomes. Physical Education (PE) can provide students with a context in which self-efficacy and participation are promoted leading to improved academic achievement. The transition into secondary school can be challenging for many students with increased educational demands, developmental changes and individual social identification coinciding. A disability may add to the challenge of success.Methods: Three groups of students, aged 13 years and enrolled in Swedish mainstream schools were targeted (n=439). Groups included students with 1.A diagnosed disability, 2.Low grades in PE (D-F) and 3.High grades (A-C) in PE. Questionnaires were collected and analyzed from 30/439 students with a diagnosed disability (physical, neuro-developmental and intellectual) from 26 classes, their classmates and their PE-teachers (n=25). Relationships between student self-reports and PE-teachers self-ratings were investigated. Also examined was the potential to which students functional skills could predict elevated general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. Results were compared with the total sample and between the three target groups (n=121).Results: For students with disabilities, better self-rated teaching skills were related to lower student perceived general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. The impact of classroom climate in PE was more obvious among students with disabilities. Perceived functional skills were associated with elevated general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. Better socio-cognitive functional skills had an overall positive effect on all outcomes. Students with disabilities reported results similar to the total sample, the D-F group scored lower and the A-C group higher than the total sample and the disability group. Elevated self-efficacy in PE is six times less probable in students with disabilities, compared to the A-C group.Conclusions: Our findings that better teacher planning and grading skills, are detrimental to students disadvantaged by disability is contradictive. Improving the establishment and communication of adapted learning standards at the transition to secondary school is a crucial and a predictive factor for promoting positive school experiences for students with disability. Students with disabilities need to be assured that the intended learning outcomes can be reached by doing activities differently than their typically functioning peers. Consideration of class composition is suggested as a means of promoting a positive learning climate, which would particularly benefit students with disabilities. Allocation of resources to support student socio-cognitive skills would improve experiences for the D-F group and likely promote a positive learning environment.

  • 25.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, HLK, Livslångt lärande/Encell, Sweden.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, HLK, Livslångt lärande/Encell, Sweden.
    Almgren, Susanne
    Jönköping University, HLK, Medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap, Sweden.
    Berglez, Peter
    Jönköping University, HLK, Medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap, Sweden.
    Bergström, Johanna
    Jönköping University, Plats, Identitet, Lärande (PIL), Sweden.
    Bertills, Karin
    Jönköping University, HLK, CHILD, Sweden.
    Bäcklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, KunskapsKulturer & UndervisningsPraktiker, Sweden.
    Dybelius, Anders
    Jönköping University, HLK, Livslångt lärande/Encell, Sweden.
    Florin Sädbom, Rebecka
    Jönköping University, KunskapsKulturer & UndervisningsPraktiker, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Mikael
    Jönköping University, Sustainability Education Research (SER), Sweden.
    Hammarsten, Maria
    Jönköping University, Sustainability Education Research (SER), Sweden.
    Heuman, Johannes
    Jönköping University, Plats, Identitet, Lärande (PIL), Sweden.
    Segolsson, Mikael
    Jönköping University, KunskapsKulturer & UndervisningsPraktiker, Sweden.
    Öhman, Charlotte
    Jönköping University, Förskolepedagogisk-didaktisk forskning, Sweden F.
    Lifelong Learning Through Context Collapse: Higher education Teachers’ Narratives About Online education During The Pandemic2022In: Proceedings of INTED2022 Conference 7th-8th March 2022, 2022, p. 2632-2641Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The COVID-19 pandemic has elicited a shift from campus classrooms to distance education in higher education worldwide, shaping not only students’ experiences, but also those of teachers, especially those who never have taught online. In addition, the pandemic created a meta-context that has positioned distance education as something different from previous efforts. This study aimed to investigate higher education teachers’ experiences during the transition from classroom to online teaching by using a collective auto-ethnography method based on 13 personal stories from Swedish faculty. For the abductive approach in the analysis, a framework that combines lifelong learning theory with the context collapse concept has been applied. The disjuncture that the pandemic has elicited created a situation in which teachers had to make sense of the fact that their previous experiences did not completely fit the new situation. Context collapse, a term used to describe encounters with many audiences in social media, has been introduced to highlight the clash between professional and private contexts in online educational platforms. Based on lifelong learning theories, we suggest that context collapse should be examined in terms of how it can help improve higher education, as it holds the potential to include the entire person – body and mind – in education.

  • 26.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Almgren, Susanne
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies. Karlstad University.
    Berglez, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Bergström, Johanna
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Sustainable Societies (SUS).
    Bertills, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande (IBL), Avdelningen för psykologi (PSY), Linköpings universitet (LIU).
    Bäcklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Practice Based Educational Research, Epistemic Cultures & Teaching Practices. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Communication, Culture and Diversity (CCD).
    Dybelius, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Florin Sädbom, Rebecka
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Practice Based Educational Research, Epistemic Cultures & Teaching Practices.
    Gustafsson, Mikael
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Sustainable Societies (SUS).
    Hammarsten, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Sustainable Societies (SUS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Heuman, Johannes
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Communication, Culture and Diversity (CCD).
    Segolsson, Mikael
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Practice Based Educational Research, Epistemic Cultures & Teaching Practices.
    Öhman, Charlotte
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Practice Based Educational Research, Preschool Education Research.
    Lifelong Learning Through Context Collapse: Higher education Teachers’ Narratives About Online education During The Pandemic2022In: Proceedings of INTED2022 Conference 7th-8th March 2022, 2022, p. 2632-2641Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The COVID-19 pandemic has elicited a shift from campus classrooms to distance education in higher education worldwide, shaping not only students’ experiences, but also those of teachers, especially those who never have taught online. In addition, the pandemic created a meta-context that has positioned distance education as something different from previous efforts. This study aimed to investigate higher education teachers’ experiences during the transition from classroom to online teaching by using a collective auto-ethnography method based on 13 personal stories from Swedish faculty. For the abductive approach in the analysis, a framework that combines lifelong learning theory with the context collapse concept has been applied. The disjuncture that the pandemic has elicited created a situation in which teachers had to make sense of the fact that their previous experiences did not completely fit the new situation. Context collapse, a term used to describe encounters with many audiences in social media, has been introduced to highlight the clash between professional and private contexts in online educational platforms. Based on lifelong learning theories, we suggest that context collapse should be examined in terms of how it can help improve higher education, as it holds the potential to include the entire person – body and mind – in education.

1 - 26 of 26
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