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  • 1.
    Abrahamsen Grøndahl, Vigdis
    et al.
    Östfold university Norway.
    Persenius, Mona
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Helgesen, Ann Karin
    Östfold university, Norway.
    The use of life stories and its influence on persons with dementia, their relatives and staff: A systematic mixed studies review2017In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 16, no 28, article id 28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Dementia is an important predictor of nursing home admissions. Due to progressive dementia symptoms, over time it becomes difficult for persons with dementia to communicate their wishes and participate in decisions concerning their everyday lives. Their well-being, sense of dignity, integrity and personhood are at risk. The persons' life stories have been highlighted as particularly important in dementia care and are referred to as seeing the person beyond the dementia. The aim of this study was to explore and describe the use of life stories and its influence on persons with dementia living in nursing homes, their relatives and staff.

    METHODS: A systematic mixed studies review was conducted. The literature searches were performed in the following databases: CINAHL, PubMed and PsycINFO and the Cochrane library, as well as by hand searching references in the studies included. An updated search was performed eight months after the first search. Data was synthesised inspired by integrative analysis.

    RESULTS: Three studies using quantitative design and two studies (presented in three papers) using qualitative design representing research from 2006 to 2015 were included in the review. Life stories generally had a positive influence on the persons with dementia, their relatives, and staff. The use of life stories might contribute to 'Maintenance of the person with dementia as a whole person rather than a demented patient'. On the other hand, enabling persons with dementia to tell their own story could be a challenge. For the staff it could be challenging when sensitive information emerged uninvited. Involving relatives could also be difficult as to whose story were uncovered.

    CONCLUSIONS: The use of person's life story might be of significance, but there is not enough evidence to make any statement about its importance as the research is scarce. Studies, including randomised controlled trials, are needed to measure the impact of life story work on the physiological and psychological aspects of persons with dementia, and also how it influences their relatives and staff.

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  • 2.
    Allvin, Renee
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital;Örebro University.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Ersta Sköndal Bracke University College..
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University .
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Östfold University, NOR.
    Wangensteen, Sigrid
    Norwegian University of Science & Technology, NOR.
    Self-assessed competence and need for further training among registered nurses in somatic hospital wards in Sweden: a cross-sectional survey2020In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Professional competence and continuous professional development is essential for ensuring high quality and safe nursing care, and it might be important for motivating nurses to stay in the profession. Thus, there is a need to identify the developmental process of nursing competency. Assessment of competence and need for further training helps to identify areas for quality improvement, and to design interventions in order to facilitate continuous competence development in different work contexts. The current study aimed to 1) describe registered nurses' self-assessment of clinical competence as well as the need for further training, and 2) explore possible differences between registered nurses with varying lengths of professional experience as a nurse (<= 0,5 year, > 0,5-5 years, and >= 6 years). Methods A cross-sectional survey design was applied, using the Professional Nurse Self-Assessment Scale of clinical core competencies II. Registered nurses (n = 266) working in medical and surgical contexts in hospitals in Sweden responded (response rate 51%). Independent student t-test and analysis of variance were carried out. Results Registered nurses assessed their competence highest in statements related to cooperation with other health professionals; taking full responsibility for own activities; and acting ethically when caring for patients. They assessed their need for further training most for statements related to assessing patients' health needs by telephone; giving health promotion advice and recommendations to patients by telephone; as well as improving a creative learning environment for staff at the workplace. For self-assessed competence and need for further training, differences between the groups for 35 and 46 items respectively, out of 50 were statistically significant. Conclusions Although the registered nurses assessed their competence high for important competence components expected of professionals such as cooperation with other healthcare professionals, it is problematic that knowledge of interactions and side-effects of different types of medication were reported as having the highest need of training. Longitudinal follow up of newly graduated nurses regarding their continuous development of competence as well as further training is needed.

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  • 3.
    Andersson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Eklund, Anna Josse
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilsson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Registered nurse´s perception of staffing in community care – contributing to a sustainable health care workforce2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Population ageing will lead to increased need for care, both as home care and in nursing homes. The time spent in hospital are shorten, so more and more advanced care takes place as community care. To meet this challenges, it will be important to ensure a sustainable health care workforce in which registered nurses (RNs) have a key role. Staffing in community care is related to patient safety and care quality.

    Aim of the study: To describe registered nurse´s perceptions of staffing in community care.

    Methods: A number of 56 RNs (age 26 to 65, median age 47) working in community care answered a questionnaire including questions about staffing. Data were collected in 2019/2020. Descriptive statistical- and qualitative content analyses were used. 

    Results: The majority of the RNs (71%) perceived the planned staffing in community care as acceptable or good. Although, when looking back on the previous week, around half of the RNs (55%) perceived it to be lower that needed. The RNs holds perceptions of staffing in a continuum from positive to negative. The RNs perceptions of staffing are expressed in five sub-themes; “it´s working, it´s all fine,” “the willingness to do good”, “being in a vicious circle”, “having a feeling of resignation”, and “challenging for a vulnerable organization”.

    Conclusions and implications: RNs perceptions on staffing in community care are important in contributing to a sustainable and resilient workforce, they are like the organisation´s band-aid. There is a need to optimise and increase nurse staffing in community care.

     

  • 4.
    Andersson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Ostfold Univ Coll, NOR.
    Nilsson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, NOR.
    Eklund, Anna Josse
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    A scoping review-Missed nursing care in community healthcare contexts and how it is measured2022In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 1943-1966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To examine the extent and nature of missed nursing care in elderly care in community healthcare contexts from the perspective of healthcare staff, and to identify instruments used to measure missed nursing care and the content of these instruments. Design: Scoping review. Methods: Searches were conducted in the CINAHL, PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar databases in March 2020. The selection process followed the PRISMA flow diagram. Results: Sixteen research papers were found from nine countries. The instruments used in the studies were Basel Extent of Rationing of Nursing Care for nursing homes (BERNCA-NH), modified MISSCARE survey and study-specific instruments or items. The item content differed, as did the number of items, which was between one and 44. The studies reported values for missed nursing care, as well as described reasons for and/or the relation between missed nursing care and organization, working climate and patient outcomes.

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  • 5.
    Andersson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilsson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Eklund, Anna Josse
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    [Manuscript] Validation of the Basel Extent of Rationing of Nursing Care for Nursing Homes and Home Care, a Swedish versionManuscript (preprint) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Andersson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilsson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Eklund, Anna Josse
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Validation of the Basel Extent of Rationing of Nursing Care for Nursing Homes and Home Care, a Swedish version2023In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 10, no 7, p. 4504-4514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimThe aim of the study was to translate, adapt and validate the instrument Basel Extent of Rationing of Nursing Care for Nursing Homes and Home Care for use in the Swedish community health care context. DesignA cross-sectional study. Data were collected from October 2019 to January 2020, and the questionnaire was sent to Registered Nurses, Enrolled Nurses and assistant nurses. MethodsThe study was performed in four phases: (1) translation, (2) adaptation of the Basel Extent of Rationing of Nursing Care for Nursing Homes and Home Care to the Swedish context, (3) content validity testing, and (4) evaluation of psychometric properties. The collected data resulted in 611 responses. Explorative factor analysis was performed to explore the interrelationship, and Cronbach's alpha was used to evaluate the internal consistency. ResultsExplorative factor analysis presented six factors/subscales: (1) fundamental care, (2) timely needed-based care, (3) dignity and support, (4) ensuring respectful treatment, (5) social activities, and (6) documentation, planning and reporting. The Cronbach's alpha for the components showed values between 0.7 and 0.9. ConclusionThe analyses indicate an instrument to be usable for Enrolled Nurses and nurse assistants in community health care. Additional tests, can contribute to refining the content of the items and further test reliability and validity of the instrument. No patient or public contributionAs this is a study of translation and validation of the instrument Basel Extent of Rationing of Nursing Care for Nursing Homes and Home Care.

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  • 7.
    Andersson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Eklund, Anna Josse
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilsson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    [Manuscript] First-line managers´ perceptions of missed nursing care in municipal health care for older people – a phenomenographic studyManuscript (preprint) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Andersson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Eklund, Anna Josse
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilsson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Inland Norway Univ Applied Science, NOR..
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Östfold University College, NOR.
    Prevalence, type, and reasons for missed nursing care in municipality health care in Sweden: A cross sectional study2022In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background With an ageing population, there is an increasing need for care, both as home care and in nursing homes. However, some needed care is not carried out for different reasons, which can affect patient safety. The aim of the study was to describe prevalence, type, and reasons for missed nursing care in home care and nursing homes, from nurses' perspective. Methods A cross sectional design with quantitative and qualitative approach. A Swedish version of Basel Extent of Rationing of Nursing Care for nursing homes and 15 study specific questions were answered by 624 registered nurses, enrolled nurses, or nurse assistants. Both descriptive and analytical, independent-samples t-test, analyses were used. Qualitative content analysis was used for the open-ended question. Results The care activity most often missed in home care was: 'set up or update care plans' (41.8%), and in nursing homes: 'scheduled group activity' (22.8%). Reasons for missed nursing care were lack of preparedness for unexpected situations, obstacles in a deficient work environment, unsatisfactory planning in the organisation, and/or shortcomings related to the individual. Conclusion Not all care activities needed are performed, due to reasons such as lack of time or organisational issues. Missed nursing care can lead to adverse events and affect patient safety. It is important to be aware of missed nursing care and the reasons for it, which gives a possibility to initiate quality improvement work to ensure patient safety.

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  • 9.
    Anker‐Hansen, Camilla
    et al.
    Østfold University College, Norway.
    Abrahamsen Grøndahl, Vigdis
    Østfold University College, Norway.
    Helgesen, Ann Karin
    Østfold University College, Norway.
    Olsen, Liv Berit
    Østfold University College, Norway.
    Rummelhoff, Guri
    Østfold University College, Norway.
    Halvorsrud, Liv
    Østfold University College, Norway.
    Bååth, Carina
    Østfold University College, Norway.
    Pressure ulcer point prevalence, classification, locations, and preventive measures: Insights from a Norwegian nursing home survey2024In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To report data from a point pressure ulcer (PU) prevalence survey on prevalence, PU categories, locations and preventive interventions at one Norwegian nursing home.

    Methods

    A cross-sectional research design was used. One nursing home in Norway participated in the prevalence survey in 2020. The data were collected on one selected day. A total of 74 out of 88 residents (84.1%) participated. Descriptive statistical analyses were run.

    Results

    The overall prevalence of PUs was 27% amongst all participants in the nursing home, who together had a total of 57 PUs categorised as category I–III. One major finding was that the most common site of the PUs was on the residents' toes. Interestingly, the prevalence of PUs in the residents' sacrum was considerably low. The most frequently used PU preventive interventions were foam chair cushions, nutritional supplements and pressure-reducing heel protection.

    Conclusion

    This study identified a high prevalence of PUs, predominantly on residents' toes. Although preventive strategies were implemented, their application appeared limited. Implementing obligatory care packages and annual nationwide PU surveys might be worth considering in municipalities.

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  • 10.
    Anker-Hansen, Camilla
    et al.
    Østfold University College, NOR.
    Grøndahl, Vigdis Abrahamsen
    Østfold University College, NOR.
    Helgesen, Ann Karin
    Østfold University College, NOR.
    Fagerli, Liv Berit
    Østfold University College, NOR.
    Rummelhoff, Guri
    Østfold University College, NOR.
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Østfold University College, NOR.
    Halvorsrud, Liv
    Østfold University College, NOR; OsloMet, NOR.
    Informal caregivers and assistive technology in Norwegian nursing homes2022In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 17, no 10, article id e0275474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To explore informal caregivers’ experiences and perspectives concerning assistive technology (AT) in two nursing homes, through the conceptual lens of person-centredness. Background The integration and use of AT and a person-centred approach to care are political intentions within healthcare services, both internationally and in Norway. In nursing homes, informal caregivers are often collaborators with the staff, and can be important partners concerning the implementation of AT in a person-centred way. However, there is little knowledge about the informal caregivers’ perspectives on the use of AT in nursing homes, or of whether or how they are included in the integration and use of AT. Methods The study had a qualitative design and comprised eleven informal caregivers of residents in two nursing homes in Norway. In-depth interviews were used for data collection. The data were analysed using content analysis. COREQ reporting guidelines were applied to ensure comprehensive reporting. Results Emerging themes highlighted the slow-going transition from old to new technology, and how the informal caregivers experienced that AT both promoted and degraded the dignity of their family members. Informal caregivers were positive to the use of technology, but have sparse knowledge and information about ATs in the nursing homes. They express a desire for AT to increase activity and safety, which promotes dignity, quality of life, and quality of the care for their family member. The informal caregivers want their family member to be seen, heard, and to get assistance on their own terms, even with regard to technology. Conclusion Before AT can be implemented, informal caregivers need to be informed and listened to and included in the processes. Through their stories, one can form an idea of how important a person-centred approach is to contributing to individually tailored and introduced AT in collaboration with the informal caregivers. 

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  • 11.
    Athlin, Asa Muntlin
    et al.
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Emergency Care & Internal Med, Entrance 40, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.;Univ Adelaide, Sch Nursing, Adelaide, SA, Australia..
    Engstrom, Maria
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.;Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Dept Hlth & Caring Sci, Gavle, Sweden.;Lishui Univ, Sch Med & Hlth, Dept Nursing, Lishui, Peoples R China..
    Gunningberg, Lena
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.;Univ Uppsala Hosp, Qual Dept, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Heel pressure ulcer, prevention and predictors during the care delivery chain - when and where to take action?: A descriptive and explorative study2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 24, article id 134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hazardous healthcare settings, for example acute care, need to focus more on preventing adverse events and preventive actions across the care delivery chain (i.e pre-hospital and emergency care, and further at the hospital ward) should be more studied. Pressure ulcer prevalence is still at unreasonably high levels, causing increased healthcare costs and suffering for patients. Recent biomedical research reveals that the first signs of cell damage could arise within minutes. However, few studies have investigated optimal pressure ulcer prevention in the initial stage of the care process, e.g. in the ambulance care or at the emergency department. The aim of the study was to describe heel pressure ulcer prevalence and nursing actions in relation to pressure ulcer prevention during the care delivery chain, for older patients with neurological symptoms or reduced general condition. Another aim was to investigate early predictors for the development of heel pressure ulcer during the care delivery chain. Methods: Existing data collected from a multi-centre randomized controlled trial investigating the effect of using a heel prevention boot to reduce the incidence of heel pressure ulcer across the care delivery chain was used. Totally 183 patients participated. The settings for the study were five ambulance stations, two emergency departments and 16 wards at two hospitals in Sweden. Results: A total of 39 individual patients (21 %) developed heel pressure ulcer at different stages across the care delivery chain. Findings revealed that 47-64 % of the patients were assessed as being at risk for developing heel pressure ulcer. Preventive action was taken. However, all patients who developed pressure ulcer during the care delivery chain did not receive adequate pressure ulcer prevention actions during their hospital stay. Discussion and Conclusions: In the ambulance and at the emergency department, skin inspection seems to be appropriate for preventing pressure ulcer. However, carrying out risk assessment with a validated instrument is of significant importance at the ward level. This would also be an appropriate level of resource use. Context-specific actions for pressure ulcer prevention should be incorporated into the care of the patient from the very beginning of the care delivery chain.

  • 12.
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Trycksår. en utmaning i vården?2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Vara steget före: Bedömning av patienters smärta, näringstillstånd och hudkostym2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim was to describe and compare registered nurses’ (RNs’) and enrolled nurses’ (ENs’) assessments of pain, nutrition and skin and their perceptions of using assessment tools. Further to describe RNs’ and ENs’ perceptions of how they assess patients’ pain, nutrition and skin. Methods: One hundred and seventy patient records were reviewed for patients with hip fracture. Interviews were conducted with RNs (n=9) and ENs (n=9). Results of the RNs’ (n=34) and ENs’ (n=43) assessments of patients with hip fracture were compared. Interrater reliability was examined between and among RNs (n=50) and ENs (n=61) using assessment tools for assessments (n=228) of patients with hip fracture and stroke. Results: Sixty percent of patient records on admission and 78% at discharge had documentation of the patient’s skin status. Pressure ulcers were documented in 15% and 20% of patient records respectively. Patients at risk for developing pressure ulcers according to the Modified Norton Scale (MNS) received a mean of 4.6 nursing interventions, while those not at risk received a mean of 3.8. There were no established boundaries between RNs’ and ENs’ assessment who performed it and in what way it was done. There were no differences between RNs’ and ENs’ as­sessments of risk for malnutrition and pressure ulcer regarding screening or total scores. However, there were differences regarding their assessments on the subscales and patients’ pain.  RNs’ and ENs’ perceptions of using assessment tools varied. Interrater reliability regarding MNS total score was very good among RNs, good among ENs and between RNs and ENs. For Short- Form Mini Nutritional Assessment screening score, interrater reliability was good between RNs and ENs and among RNs, while it was moderate among ENs. Interrater reliability between and among RNs and ENs varied for Pressure Ulcer Card. Conclusions: RNs do not always document assessment of patients’ skin and risk for pressure ulcer. Patients at risk for pressure ulcers receive more nursing interventions than patients not at risk. There are both similarities and differences between RNs and ENs regarding how they perform their assessments and what the results of their assessments are. Interrater reliability between and among RNs and ENs varies regarding the different assessment tools. An important part of the work in establishing patient safety and high quality of care is to be one step ahead and continuously assess the patients’ pain, nutrition and skin.

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  • 14.
    Bååth, Carina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Östfold University College, Norway.
    Brent, Louise
    National Office of Clinical Audit, Ireland.
    Santy-Tomlinson, Julie
    Odense University Hospitals, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Hommel, Ami
    Malmö University; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Pressure Ulcer Prevention2024In: Fragility Fracture and Orthogeriatric Nursing: Holistic Care and Management of the Fragility Fracture and Orthogeriatric Patient / [ed] Karen Hertz, Julie Santy-Tomlinson, Springer, 2024, 2, p. 147-157Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preventing pressure ulcers is fundamental in managing and caring for the patient following a fragility fracture. Patients who have sustained a hip fracture and have had associated surgery are at high risk as ageing skin, frailty, immobility, and multiple comorbidities are significant factors in skin injury.

    The causes of pressure ulcers are complex, and their prevention is the responsibility of the entire multidisciplinary team. Accessing evidence and education for practitioners is vital to making a difference in all aspects of care.

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  • 15.
    Bååth, Carina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Engström, Maria
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Gunningberg, Lena
    Uppsala universitet.
    Muntlin Athlin, Åsa
    Uppsala universitet.
    Prevention of heel pressure ulcers among older patients-from ambulance care to hospital discharge: A multi-centre randomized controlled trial2016In: Applied Nursing Research, ISSN 0897-1897, E-ISSN 1532-8201, Vol. 30, p. 170-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    The aim was to investigate the effect of an early intervention, a heel suspension device boot, on the incidence of heel pressure ulcers among older patients (aged 70+).

    BackgroundPressure ulcers are a global healthcare issue; furthermore, the heel is an exposed location. Research indicates that preventive nursing interventions starting during the ambulance care and used across the acute care delivery chain are seldom used.

    MethodsA multi-centre randomized control study design was used. Five ambulance stations, two emergency departments and 16 wards at two Swedish hospitals participated. Altogether, 183 patients were transferred by ambulance to the emergency department and were thereafter admitted to one of the participating wards.

    ResultsSignificantly fewer patients in the intervention group (n=15 of 103; 14.6%) than the control group (n=24 of 80; 30%) developed heel pressure ulcers during their hospital stay (p=0.017).

    ConclusionsPressure ulcer prevention should start early in the acute care delivery chain to increase patient safety.

  • 16.
    Bååth, Carina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Hall-Lord, Marie-Louise
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Hedman-Wiberg, Katarina
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Interrater reliability using Modified Norton Scale and Pressure Ulcer Card in clinical practice2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Bååth, Carina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Hall-Lord, Mari-Louise
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Linköpings universitet.
    Wiberg-Hedman, Katarina
    Landstinget i Värmland.
    Wilde Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Interrater reliability using Modified Norton Scale, Pressure Ulcer Card, Short Form- Mini Nutritional Assessment by registered and enrolled nurses in clinical practice2008In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 618-626Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim.  Examine the interrater reliability between and among registered and enrolled nurses using Modified Norton Scale, Pressure Ulcer Card and Short Form-Mini Nutritional Assessment.

    Background.  In Sweden, registered nurses and enrolled nurses usually co-operate in patient care. National guidelines emphasize that reliable and valid assessment tools should be used. Interrater reliability for regular use of assessment tools is seldom studied.

    Design cross-sectional.  Registered nurses and enrolled nurses made 228 assessments of patients’ skin, risk for pressure ulcer and malnutrition, in patients with hip fracture and patients who had suffered a stroke.

    Results.  The interrater reliability of the Modified Norton Score total score was very good among registered nurses, good among enrolled nurses and between both groups. There was good, moderate and fair agreement on the subscales. Interrater reliability of Short Form Mini-Nutritional Assesment screening score was very good between both groups, good among registered nurses and moderate among enrolled nurses. There was good and moderate agreement on the items. There was good, moderate and fair agreement between and among registered nurses and enrolled nurses when using the Pressure Ulcer Card.

    Conclusion.  The Modified Norton Scale and Short Form Mini-Nutritional Assessment were reasonably understandable and easy to utilize in clinical care. Therefore, it seems possible for nurses to accomplish assessment using these tools. The agreement level was low for most skin sites except sacrum when nurses assessed patients’ skin with the Pressure Ulcer Card.

    Relevance to clinical practice.  The utilize of reliable and valid assessment tools is important in clinical practice. The tools could be used as an aid to the clinical judgement and therefore identify patients at risk for pressure ulcers and malnutrition. Pressure ulcer grading is a difficult skill that requires training and time to develop.

  • 18.
    Bååth, Carina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Hall-Lord, M-L.
    Wilde-Larsson, B.
    Nurses Perceptions in assessment of Pressure Ulcer2003In: European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, Review 2003 (6),10Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Bååth, Carina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Östfold University College, Norway.
    Hommel, Ami
    Malmö University; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Wound Management2024In: Fragility Fracture and Orthogeriatric Nursing: Holistic Care and Management of the Fragility Fracture and Orthogeriatric Patient / [ed] Karen Hertz, Julie Santy-Tomlinson, Springer, 2024, 2, p. 159-170Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wound healing is the process by which the function of damaged tissue is restored following surgery, trauma or other sources of tissue damage. The management of wounds is a fundamental aspect of the management of the patient following a fragility fracture, especially following a hip fracture and associated surgery. Ageing skin and multiple comorbidities are significant factors in skin injury and wound healing problems.

    The effective evidence-based management of surgical wounds following surgery after a fragility fracture can be challenging as ageing and comorbidities affect wound healing. Skin and wound care involves careful skin and wound assessment and attention to infection prevention measures while managing the factors affecting wound healing. Clinical considerations in wound management also include maintaining adequate nutrition, moisture, treating oedema and preventing further injury.

    This chapter aims to provide an overview of skin and wound assessment and evidence-based care interventions that can optimise wound healing in older people with fragility fractures.

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  • 20.
    Bååth, Carina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University.
    Gunningberg, Lena
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Hommel, Ami
    Lund University.
    Pressure reducing intervention among persons with pressure ulcers: results from the first three national pressure ulcer prevalence surveys in Sweden2014In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 58-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale, aims and objectivesThe overall aim of this study was to describe preventive interventions among persons with pressure ulcer (PU) in three nationwide PU prevalence surveys in Sweden.

    Methods

    A cross-sectional research design was used; more than 70 000 persons from different hospitals and nursing homes participated in the three prevalence surveys conducted in March 2011, October 2011 and March 2012.

    The methodology used was that recommended by the European Pressure Ulcers Advisory Panel.

    Results

    The overall prevalence of PU categories I–IV in hospitals was 16.6%, 14.4% and 16.1%, respectively. Corresponding figures for nursing homes were 14.5%, 14.2% and 11.8%, respectively. Heel protection/floating heels and sliding sheets were more frequently planned for persons with PU category I.

    Conclusions

    Despite the three prevalence studies that have showed high prevalence of PU the use of preventing interventions is still not on an acceptable level. Heel protection/floating heels and sliding sheets were more frequently planned for persons with PUs, and individual-planned repositioning also increased. However, when persons already have a PU they should all have pressure-reducing preventive interventions to prevent the development of more PUs. Preventing PUs presents a challenge even when facilities have prevention programmes. A PU prevention programme requires an enthusiastic leader who will maintain the team's focus and direction for all staff involved in patient care.

  • 21.
    Bååth, Carina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Akuten och omvärlden – ett förbättringsprojekt i samarbete mellan Landstinget i Värmland och Karlstads universitet2014In: Universitetens, Högskolornas och Svensk sjuksköterskeförenings årliga konferens, Verksamhetsförlagd utbildning: Lärande i en föränderlig värld, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Bååth, Carina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Akuten och omvärlden- ett förbättringsprojekt i samarbete mellan Landstinget i Värmland och Karlstads universitet, Malmö 20142014In: Akuten och omvärlden- ett förbättringsprojekt i samarbete mellan Landstinget i Värmland och Karlstads universitet, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Bååth, Carina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013).
    Mårtensson, Gunila
    University of Gävle.
    Mamhaidir, Anna-Greta
    University of Gävle.
    Florin, Jan
    Dalarna University.
    Munthlin Athlin, Åsa
    Gunningberg, Lena
    Uppsala.
    Pressure Ulcer prevention-is nursing knowledge appropiate or not? A descriptive multicentre study in Sweden2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Bååth, Carina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Stensson, M
    Sund, A-K
    Preventative care: knowledge and attitudes among nurses for pressure ulcers prevention2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Bååth, Carina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Wentzel-Persenius, Mona
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Hall-Lord, Marie-Louise
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Sjuksköterskors uppfattningar om bedömning av malnutrition och tryckrodnad/trycksår2005Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Bååth, Carina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Wentzel-Persenius, Mona
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Hall-Lord, Marie-Louise
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Nurses' Perception of Prevalence and Assessment of Pressure Damage2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Bååth, Carina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Wentzel-Persenius, Mona
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Hall-Lord, Marie-Louise
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Nurses' Perceptions of Assessment of Pressure Ulcer2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Bååth, Carina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Wentzel-Persenius, Mona
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Hall-Lord, Marie-Louise
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Sjuksköterskors uppfattningar om bedömning av tryckrodnader/trycksår2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Bååth, Carina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Malmö högskola.
    Hall-Lord, Marie Louise
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Assessment of patients´pain, nutrition and skin in clinical practice: Registered and Enrolled Nurses Perceptions2012In: International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing, ISSN 1878-1241, E-ISSN 1878-1292, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 3-12Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Bååth, Carina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Linköpings universitet.
    Hall-Lord, Marie Louise
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Registered nurses and enrolled nurses assessment of postoperative pain and risk for malnutrition and pressure ulcers in patients with hip fracture2010In: International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing, ISSN 1878-1241, E-ISSN 1878-1292, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 30-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe and compare registered (RNs’) and enrolled nurses’ (ENs’) assessments of postoperative pain, risk for malnutrition and pressure ulcers in patients with hip fracture. Furthermore, the aim was to describe and compare their perceptions of using assessment tools. Thirty-four (34) RNs and forty-three (43) ENs, working on orthopaedic wards in Sweden, took part in the study. The assessments were carried out on 82 patients with hip fracture. The assessment tools included the numerical rating scale (NRS), short-form nutritional assessment tool (MNA-SF), modified Norton scale (MNS) and pressure ulcer card. Many patients were assessed to be in postoperative pain and at possible risk for malnutrition. Around 50% were assessed as being at risk for pressure ulcer formation (PU). There is a difference between RNs and ENs assessments of patients’ postoperative pain, risk for malnutrition and PU. ENs assessed to a greater degree that patients were in intense pain currently. RNs assessed to a greater degree that patients had been in intense pain in the past 24 h. Single items on the tools showed differences. However, there was no statistically difference for MNA-SF screening score and MNS total score. ENs found it easier to assess postoperative pain with the NRS compared to RNs.

  • 31.
    Bååth, Carina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Hall-Lord, Marie-Louise
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Registered nurses and enrolled nurses assessment of postoperative pain, risk for malnutrition and risk for pressure ulcers in patients with hip fracture2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Deprez, Julie
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kottner, Jan
    Ghent University, Belgium; Charité Universitätsmedizin, Germany.
    Eilegård Wallin, Alexandra
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Ohde, Nils
    Charité Universitätsmedizin, Germany.
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Østfold University College, Norway.
    Hommel, Ami
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Hultin, Lisa
    Upsalla University, Sweden.
    Josefson, Anna
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Beeckman, Dimitri
    Örebro University, Sweden; Ghent University, Belgium.
    What are the prognostic factors for the development of incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD): a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis2023In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 7, article id e073115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is irritant contact dermatitis and skin damage associated with prolonged skin contact with urine and/or faeces. Identifying prognostic factors for the development of IAD may improve management, facilitate prevention and inform future research. Methods and analysis This protocol follows the guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Protocols. Prospective and retrospective observational studies or clinical trials in which prognostic factors associated with the development of IAD are described are eligible. There are no restrictions on study setting, time, language, participant characteristics or geographical regions. Reviews, editorials, commentaries, methodological articles, letters to the editor, cross-sectional and case-control studies, and case reports are excluded. MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library will be searched from inception until May 2023. Two independent reviewers will independently evaluate studies. The Quality in Prognostic Studies tool will be used to assess the risk of bias, and the Checklist for Critical Appraisal and Data Extraction for Systematic Reviews of Prediction Modelling Studies-Prognostic Factors checklist will be used for data extraction of the included studies. Separate analyses will be conducted for each identified prognostic factor, with adjusted and unadjusted estimated measures analysed separately. Evidence will be summarised with a meta-analysis when possible, and narratively otherwise. The Q and I 2 statistics will be calculated in order to quantify heterogeneity. The quality of the evidence obtained will be evaluated according to the Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation guidance. Ethics and dissemination No ethical approval is needed since all data is already publicly accessible. The results of this work will be published in a peer-reviewed scientific journal. 

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  • 33.
    Duhalde, Henrik
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bjuresäter, Kaisa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Karlsson, Ingela
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Østfold University College, Norway.
    Missed nursing care in emergency departments: A scoping review2023In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 69, article id 101296Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patient safety is a global health priority. Errors of omission, such as missed nursing care in hospitals, are frequent and may lead to adverse events. Emergency departments (ED) are especially vulnerable to patient safety errors, and the significance missed nursing care has in this context is not as well known as in other contexts. Aim: The aim of this scoping review was to summarize and disseminate research about missed nursing care in the context of EDs. Method: A scoping review following the framework suggested by Arksey and O’Malley was used to (1) identify the research question; (2) identify relevant studies; (3) select studies; (4) chart the data; (5) collate, summarize, and report the results; and (6) consultation. Results: In total, 20 themes were derived from the 55 included studies. Missed or delayed assessments or other fundamental care were examples of missed nursing care characteristics. EDs not staffed or dimensioned in relation to the patient load were identified as a cause of missed nursing care in most included studies. Clinical deteriorations and medication errors were described in the included studies in relation to patient safety and quality of care deficiencies. Registered nurses also expressed that missed nursing care was undignified and unsafe. Conclusion: The findings from this scoping review indicate that patients’ fundamental needs are not met in the ED, mainly because of the patient load and how the ED is designed. According to registered nurses, missed nursing care is perceived as undignified and unsafe.

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  • 34.
    Falk-Brynhildsen, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Raepsaet, Charlotte
    Ghent University, BEL.
    Wistrand, Camilla
    Örebro universitet.
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Östfold University College, NOR.
    Swenne, Christine Leo
    Uppsala universitet.
    Gifford, Mervyn
    Örebro universitet.
    Gunningberg, Lena
    Uppsala universitet.
    von Vogelsang, Ann-Christin
    Karolinska universitetssjukhuset; Karolinska Institutet.
    Björn, Catrine
    Uppsala universitet.
    Beeckman, Dimitri
    Örebro universitet; Ghent University, BEL.
    Swedish translation, cultural adaptation and psychometric evaluation of the pressure ulcer knowledge assessment tool for use in the operating room2023In: International Wound Journal, ISSN 1742-4801, E-ISSN 1742-481X, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 1534-1543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to psychometrically evaluate the Swedish operating room version of PUKAT 2.0. In total, 284 Swedish operating room nurses completed the survey of whom 50 completed the retest. The item difficulty P-value of 14 items ranged between 0.38 and 0.96 (median 0.65). Three items were found to be too easy (0.90-0.96). The D-value of 14 items ranged between 0.00 and 0.42 (median 0.46). Three items had a D-value lower than 0.20 (0.11-0.16) and eight items scored higher than 0.40 (0.45-0.61). The quality of the response alternatives (a-value) ranged between 0.00 and 0.42. This showed that nurses with a master's degree had a higher knowledge than nurses with a professional degree (respectively 9.4/14 versus 8.6/14; t = -2.4, df = 199, P = 0.02). The ICC was 0.65 (95% CI 0.45-0.78). The ICCs for the domains varied from 0.12 (95% CI = -0.16-0.39) to 0.59 (95% CI = 0.38-0.75). Results indicated that 11 of the original items contributed to the overall validity. However, the low participation in the test-retest made the reliability of the instrument low. An extended evaluation with a larger sample should be considered in order to confirm aspects of the psychometric properties of this instrument.

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  • 35.
    Falk-Brynhildsen, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University.
    Raepsaet, Charlotte
    Univ Ghent, Belgium.
    Wistrand, Camilla
    Örebro University.
    Swenne, Christine Leo
    Uppsala University.
    Gifford, Mervyn
    Örebro University.
    Gunningberg, Lena
    Uppsala University.
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Ostfold Univ Coll, Fac Hlth & Welf, Fredrikstad, Norway..
    Von Vogelsang, Ann-Christin
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosurg, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bjorn, Catrine
    Uppsala University.
    Beeckman, Dimitri
    Örebro University; Univ Ghent, Belgium..
    The Swedish version of the attitude towards pressure ulcer prevention instrument for use in an operating room context (APUP-OR): A nationwide psychometric evaluation2022In: JOURNAL OF TISSUE VIABILITY, ISSN 0965-206X, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 46-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: To assess operating room (OR) nurses' attitudes towards pressure ulcer prevention, the Attitude towards Pressure Ulcer Prevention (APuP) instrument was developed. Aim: The aim of this study was to psychometrically evaluate the Attitude towards Pressure Ulcer Prevention (APuP) instrument in a Swedish OR context. Materials and methods: A psychometric evaluation study was conducted, using a convenience sample, between February and August 2020. Validity (content, construct, discriminatory power) and reliability (stability and internal consistency) were evaluated. Results: The first survey (test) was completed by 284 Swedish OR nurses, of whom n = 50 (17.6%) completed the second survey (retest). A Principal Component Analysis was conducted for the 13-item instrument. The KMO value for this model was 0.62. Bartlett's test for sphericity was statistically significant (p 0.001). Five factors were identified which accounted for 56% of the variance in responses related to attitudes toward pressure ulcer prevention. The Cronbach's a for the instrument "attitude towards Pressure Ulcer Prevention" was 0.66. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.49 (95% CI = 0.25-0.67). Conclusion: This Swedish version of the APuP- OR is the first step in the development of an instrument to measure OR nurses' attitudes towards PU prevention in a Swedish OR context. The reliability of the instrument was low and the validity moderate. A larger sample and the revision or addition of items related to the context of the operating room should be considered in order to confirm aspects of the psychometric properties.

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  • 36.
    Florin, Jan
    et al.
    Department of Health and Social Sciences, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden..
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Gunningberg, Lena
    Uppsala universitet.
    Mårtenson, Gunilla
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Attitudes towards pressure ulcer prevention: a psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version of the APuP instrument2016In: International Wound Journal, ISSN 1742-4801, E-ISSN 1742-481X, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 655-662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary aim was to conduct a psychometric evaluation of the Attitude towards Pressure ulcer Prevention (APuP) instrument in a Swedish context. A further aim was to describe and compare attitudes towards pressure ulcer prevention between registered nurses (RNs), assistant nurses (ANs) and student nurses (SNs). In total, 415 RNs, ANs and SNs responded to the questionnaire. In addition to descriptive and comparative statistics, confirmatory factor analyses were performed. Because of a lack of support for the instrument structure, further explorative and consecutive confirmatory tests were conducted. Overall, positive attitudes towards pressure ulcer prevention were identified for all three groups, but SNs reported lower attitude scores on three items and a higher score on one item compared to RNs and ANs. The findings indicated no support in this Swedish sample for the previously reported five-factor model of APuP. Further explorative and confirmative factor analyses indicated that a four-factor model was most interpretable: (i) Priority (five items), (ii) Competence (three items), (iii) Importance (three items) and (iv) Responsibility (two items). The five-factor solution could not be confirmed. Further research is recommended to develop a valid and reliable tool to assess nurses' attitudes towards pressure ulcer prevention working across different settings on an international level.

  • 37.
    Gesar, Berit
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Hedin, Hanne
    Falun Hospital.
    Hommel, Ami
    Malmö university.
    Hip fracture; an interruption that has consequences four months later: A qualitative study2017In: International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing, ISSN 1878-1241, E-ISSN 1878-1292, Vol. 26, p. 43-48, article id S1878-1241(16)30100-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Effects following a hip fracture often lead to functional disabilities and increased dependence on others. Although persons sustaining a hip fracture constitute a heterogeneous group in Swedish health care, they tend to be treated as a homogenous one.

    AIM: The aim of this study was to reveal how previously healthy people, aged 65 years and older, described how they had adapted to daily life four months after a hip fracture.

    METHOD: The follow-up interviews were performed by the first author four months after the hip fracture. Data were analysed using conventional inductive content analysis.

    FINDINGS: The results from the interviews highlight that sustaining a hip fracture - even four months later - was seen by the participants as an interruption leading to lasting consequences for everyday life. The recovery process during this period was complex and consisted of both physical and psychological strain. Some were resigned, some strived in order to regain independence and some handled the situation by means of self-confidence and self-efficacy.

    CONCLUSION: Previous healthy and independently-living participants described, in different ways that the hip fracture was an interruption that still affected everyday life. The absence of psychological support may be one of the reasons for dependency after four months.

  • 38.
    Gesar, Berit
    et al.
    Landstinget i Dalarna.
    Hommel, Ami
    Region Skåne.
    Hedin, Hanne
    Landstinget Dalarna.
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Older patients' perception of their own capacity to regain pre-fracture function after hip fracture surgery: an explorative qualitative study2017In: International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing, ISSN 1878-1241, E-ISSN 1878-1292, Vol. 24, p. 50-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore healthy older patients' perceptions of their own capacity to regain pre-fracture function in the acute phase following hip fracture surgery.

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of hip fractures is expected to increase. In Sweden, of the patients who sustain a hip fracture, 40 per cent are healthy and lived independently pre fracture. However, a hip fracture often results in declined functional outcomes for 40 per cent of these patients.

    DESIGN: The study had an explorative inductive qualitative design.

    METHODS: Semi-structured interviews (n = 30) were conducted two to five days after hip fracture surgery. Data were analysed using manifest inductive content analysis.

    RESULTS: As a description of patients' perception of their own capacity to regain pre-fracture function after a hip fracture, one main category emerged: To end up in a new situation with or without control. Patients expressed that they believed in recovery and thought nothing would be altered. However, since they had to adapt to the ward culture at the acute hospital, they became passive and became insecure about their future life situation.

    CONCLUSION: The attitudes of staff at the acute hospital can influence the outcome for hip fracture patients. Patients believe in recovery but do not receive psychological support to regain physical capacity.

  • 39.
    Granrud, M. D.
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Sandsdalen, Tuva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Abrahamsen Grøndahl, Vigdis
    Høgskolen i Østfold, Norway.
    Helgesen, Ann Karin
    Östfold university, Norway.
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Hov, Reidun
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, NOR.
    Tillfors, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Österlind, Jane
    Marie Cederschiöld University, Sweden.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Melin Johansson, Christina
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Helsepersonells erfaringer med kvalitet i palliativ behandling og omsorg under Covid-19-pandemin - en tverrsnittstudie.2022In: Helsepersonells erfaringer med kvalitet i palliativ behandling og omsorg under Covid-19-pandemin - en tverrsnittstudie., 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Granrud, Marie Dahlen
    et al.
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Grondahl, Vigdis Abrahamsen
    Østfold University College, Norway.
    Helgesen, Ann Karin
    Østfold University College, Norway.
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Østfold University College, Norway.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, Norway.
    Tillfors, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Osterlind, Jane
    Marie Cederschiöld University, Sweden.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Hov, Reidun
    Hamar Municipality, Norway.
    Sandsdalen, Tuva
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Health Care Personnel's Perspectives on Quality of Palliative Care During the COVID-19 Pandemic - A Cross-Sectional2023In: Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, ISSN 1178-2390, E-ISSN 1178-2390, Vol. 16, p. 2893-2903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The provision of high-quality palliative care is challenging, especially during a pandemic like COVID-19. The latter entailed major consequences for health care systems and health care personnel (HCP) in both specialist and community health care services, in Norway and worldwide. The aim of this study was to explore how the HCP perceived the quality of palliative care in nursing homes, medical care units, and intensive care units during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: This study had a cross-sectional design. A total of 290 HCP from Norway participated in the study (RR = 25.8%) between October and December 2021. The questionnaire comprised items concerning respondents' demographics and quality of care, the latter measured by the short form of the Quality from the Patient's Perspective-Palliative Care instrument, adapted for HCP. The STROBE checklist was used. Results: This study shows that the HCP scored subjective importance as higher in all dimensions, items and single items than their perception of the actual care received. This could indicate a need for improvement in all areas. Information about medication, opportunity to participate in decisions about medical and nursing care and continuity regarding receiving help from the same physician and nurse are examples of areas for improvement. Conclusion: Study results indicate that HCP from nursing homes, medical care units, and intensive care units perceived that quality of palliative care provided was not in line with what they perceived to be important for the patient. This indicate that it was challenging to provide high-quality palliative care during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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  • 41.
    Granrud, Marie
    et al.
    Department of Social Sciences and Guidance, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Elverum, Norway.
    Grøndahl, Vigdis Abrahamsen
    Department of Nursing, Health and Laboratory Science, Faculty of Health, Welfare and Organization, Østfold University College, Halden, Norway.
    Helgesen, Ann Karin
    Department of Nursing, Health and Laboratory Science, Faculty of Health, Welfare and Organization, Østfold University College, Halden, Norway.
    Bååth, Carina
    Department of Nursing, Health and Laboratory Science, Faculty of Health, Welfare and Organization, Østfold University College, Halden, Norway; Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Science and Technology, Karlstad University.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Science and Technology, Karlstad University; Department of Bachelor Education in Nursing, Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, Oslo, Norway.
    Tillfors, Maria
    Department of Social and Psychological Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Karlstad University.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Östersund.
    Österlind, Jane
    Marie Cederschiöld University, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Larsson, Maria
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Science and Technology, Karlstad University.
    Hov, Reidun
    Centre of Development of Institutional and Home Care Services, Innland (Hedmark), Hamar Municipality, Norway.
    Sandsdalen, Tuva
    Department of Health and Nursing Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Elverum, Norway.
    Health Care Personnel’s Perspectives on Quality of Palliative Care During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Cross-Sectional Study2023In: Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, ISSN 1178-2390, E-ISSN 1178-2390, Vol. 16, p. 2893-2903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The provision of high-quality palliative care is challenging, especially during a pandemic like COVID-19. The latter entailed major consequences for health care systems and health care personnel (HCP) in both specialist and community health care services, in Norway and worldwide. The aim of this study was to explore how the HCP perceived the quality of palliative care in nursing homes, medical care units, and intensive care units during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Methods: This study had a cross-sectional design. A total of 290 HCP from Norway participated in the study (RR = 25.8%) between October and December 2021. The questionnaire comprised items concerning respondents’ demographics and quality of care, the latter measured by the short form of the Quality from the Patient’s Perspective—Palliative Care instrument, adapted for HCP. The STROBE checklist was used.

    Results: This study shows that the HCP scored subjective importance as higher in all dimensions, items and single items than their perception of the actual care received. This could indicate a need for improvement in all areas. Information about medication, opportunity to participate in decisions about medical and nursing care and continuity regarding receiving help from the same physician and nurse are examples of areas for improvement.

    Conclusion: Study results indicate that HCP from nursing homes, medical care units, and intensive care units perceived that quality of palliative care provided was not in line with what they perceived to be important for the patient. This indicate that it was challenging to provide high-quality palliative care during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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  • 42.
    Granrud, Marie
    et al.
    Department of Social Sciences and Guidance, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Elverum, Norway.
    Grøndahl, Vigdis Abrahamsen
    Department of Nursing, Health and Laboratory Science, Faculty of Health, Welfare and Organization, Østfold University College, Halden, Norway.
    Helgesen, Ann Karin
    Department of Nursing, Health and Laboratory Science, Faculty of Health, Welfare and Organization, Østfold University College, Halden, Norway.
    Bååth, Carina
    Department of Nursing, Health and Laboratory Science, Faculty of Health, Welfare and Organization, Østfold University College, Halden, Norway; Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Science and Technology, Karlstad University.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Science and Technology, Karlstad University; Department of Bachelor Education in Nursing, Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, Oslo, Norway.
    Tillfors, Maria
    Department of Social and Psychological Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Karlstad University.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences (HOV).
    Österlind, Jane
    Marie Cederschiöld högskola, Palliativt forskningscentrum, PFC.
    Larsson, Maria
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Science and Technology, Karlstad University.
    Hov, Reidun
    Centre of Development of Institutional and Home Care Services, Innland (Hedmark), Hamar Municipality, Norway.
    Sandsdalen, Tuva
    Department of Health and Nursing Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Elverum, Norway.
    Health Care Personnel’s Perspectives on Quality of Palliative Care During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Cross-Sectional Study2023In: Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, ISSN 1178-2390, E-ISSN 1178-2390, Vol. 16, p. 2893-2903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The provision of high-quality palliative care is challenging, especially during a pandemic like COVID-19. The latter entailed major consequences for health care systems and health care personnel (HCP) in both specialist and community health care services, in Norway and worldwide. The aim of this study was to explore how the HCP perceived the quality of palliative care in nursing homes, medical care units, and intensive care units during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Methods: This study had a cross-sectional design. A total of 290 HCP from Norway participated in the study (RR = 25.8%) between October and December 2021. The questionnaire comprised items concerning respondents’ demographics and quality of care, the latter measured by the short form of the Quality from the Patient’s Perspective—Palliative Care instrument, adapted for HCP. The STROBE checklist was used.

    Results: This study shows that the HCP scored subjective importance as higher in all dimensions, items and single items than their perception of the actual care received. This could indicate a need for improvement in all areas. Information about medication, opportunity to participate in decisions about medical and nursing care and continuity regarding receiving help from the same physician and nurse are examples of areas for improvement.

    Conclusion: Study results indicate that HCP from nursing homes, medical care units, and intensive care units perceived that quality of palliative care provided was not in line with what they perceived to be important for the patient. This indicate that it was challenging to provide high-quality palliative care during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • 43. Granrud, MD
    et al.
    Grøndahl, VA
    Helgesen, AK
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Tillfors, M
    Melin Johansson, C
    Österlind, J
    Larsson, M
    Hov, R
    Sandsdalen, T
    Health Care Personnel's Perspectives on Quality of Palliative Care During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Cross-Sectional Study2023In: Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, E-ISSN 1178-2390, Vol. 16, p. 2893-2903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The provision of high-quality palliative care is challenging, especially during a pandemic like COVID-19. The latter entailed major consequences for health care systems and health care personnel (HCP) in both specialist and community health care services, in Norway and worldwide. The aim of this study was to explore how the HCP perceived the quality of palliative care in nursing homes, medical care units, and intensive care units during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: This study had a cross-sectional design. A total of 290 HCP from Norway participated in the study (RR = 25.8%) between October and December 2021. The questionnaire comprised items concerning respondents' demographics and quality of care, the latter measured by the short form of the Quality from the Patient's Perspective-Palliative Care instrument, adapted for HCP. The STROBE checklist was used. Results: This study shows that the HCP scored subjective importance as higher in all dimensions, items and single items than their perception of the actual care received. This could indicate a need for improvement in all areas. Information about medication, opportunity to participate in decisions about medical and nursing care and continuity regarding receiving help from the same physician and nurse are examples of areas for improvement. Conclusion: Study results indicate that HCP from nursing homes, medical care units, and intensive care units perceived that quality of palliative care provided was not in line with what they perceived to be important for the patient. This indicate that it was challenging to provide high-quality palliative care during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • 44. Gunningberg, L
    et al.
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Hommel, Ami
    Idvall, Ewa
    Evidence based guidelines on pressure ulcer prevention and feed back of quality indicators - Patient safety on national level in Sweden2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Gunningberg, L.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Sving, E.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Staff's perceptions of a pressure mapping system to prevent pressure injuries in a hospital ward: A qualitative study2018In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 140-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe staff's perceptions of a continuous pressure mapping system to prevent pressure injury in a hospital ward. Background: Pressure injury development is still a problem in hospitals. It is important to understand how new information and communication technologies can facilitate pressure injury prevention. Method: A descriptive design with qualitative focus group interviews was used. Results: Five categories were identified: “Need of information, training and coaching over a long period of time,” “Pressure mapping – a useful tool in the prevention of pressure injury in high risk patients,” “Easy to understand and use, but some practical issues were annoying,” “New way of working and thinking,” and “Future possibilities with the pressure mapping system.”. Conclusion: The pressure mapping system was an eye-opener for the importance of pressure injury prevention. Staff appreciated the real-time feedback on pressure points, which alerted them to the time for repositioning, facilitated repositioning and provided feedback on the repositioning performed. Implications for Nursing Management: A continuous pressure mapping system can be used as a catalyst, increasing staff's competence, focus and awareness of prevention. For successful implementation, the nurse managers should have a shared agenda with the clinical nurse leaders, supporting the sustaining and spread of the innovation.

  • 46.
    Gunningberg, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Hommel, Ami
    Lunds university.
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Malmö University.
    The first national pressure ulcer prevalence survey in county council and municipality settings in Sweden2013In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 862-867Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim  To report data from the first national pressure ulcer prevalence survey in Sweden on prevalence, pressure ulcer categories, locations and preventive interventions for persons at risk for developing pressure ulcers. Methods  A cross-sectional research design was used in a total sample of 35 058 persons in hospitals and nursing homes. The methodology used was that recommended by the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel. Results  The prevalence of pressure ulcers was 16.6% in hospitals and 14.5% in nursing homes. Many persons at risk for developing pressure ulcers did not receive a pressure-reducing mattress (23.3-27.9%) or planned repositioning in bed (50.2-57.5%). Conclusions  Despite great effort on the national level to encourage the prevention of pressure ulcers, the prevalence is high. Public reporting and benchmarking are now available, evidence-based guidelines have been disseminated and national goals have been set. Strategies for implementing practices outlined in the guidelines, meeting goals and changing attitudes must be further developed.

  • 47.
    Gunningberg, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Mårtensson, Gunnila
    University of Gävle.
    Mamhaidir, Anna-Greta
    University of Gävle.
    Florin, Jan
    Dalarna University.
    Munthlin Athlin, Åsa
    Uppsala University.
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Pressure ulcer knowledge of registered nurses, assistant nurses and student nurses: a descriptive, comparative multicentre study2015In: International Wound Journal, ISSN 1742-4801, E-ISSN 1742-481X, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 462-468Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Gunningberg, Lena
    et al.
    Akademiska sjukhuset.
    Sving, Eva
    Akademiska sjukhuset.
    Hommel, Ami
    Lund University.
    Ålenius, Carina
    Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions.
    Wiger, Per
    Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions.
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Tracking pressure injuries as adverse events: National use of the Global Trigger Tool over a 4-year period2018In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 21-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To examine the frequency, preventability, and consequences of hospital acquired pressure injuries in acute care hospitals over a 4-year period. Method: A retrospective record review was performed using the Swedish version of the Global Trigger Tool (GTT). A total of 64 917 hospital admissions were reviewed. Data were collected between 2013 and 2016 from all 63 Swedish acute care hospitals. Results: The prevalence of pressure injuries (category 2-4) was 1%. Older patients, "satellite patients", and patients with acute admissions had more pressure injuries. Most pressure injuries (91%) were determined to be preventable. The mean extended length of hospital stay was 15.8 days for patients who developed pressure injuries during hospitalization. Conclusion: The GTT provides a useful and complementary national perspective on hospital acquired pressure injuries across hospitals, informing health care providers on safety priorities to reduce patient harm. Clinical leaders can use information on the preventability and the consequences of pressure injuries, as well as evidence-based arguments for improving the health care organization.

  • 49.
    Hall-Lord, Marie Louise
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Norwegian Univ Science & Technology, NOR.
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Ostfold University College, NOR.
    Ballangrud, Randi
    Norwegian University of Science & Technology, NOR.
    Nordin, Anna
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    The Swedish version of the TeamSTEPPS (R) teamwork attitudes questionnaire (T-TAQ): A validation study2021In: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundEffective teamwork is essential for delivering safe health care. It is important to increase patient safety in healthcare by conducting interprofessional team training with both healthcare professionals and undergraduate students. Validated questionnaires that evaluate team training activities contribute to valuable knowledge regarding changes in attitudes toward teamwork. The aim of the study was to test the reliability and structural validity of the Swedish version of the TeamSTEPPS (R) Teamwork Attitudes Questionnaire (T-TAQ).MethodsThe study had a cross-sectional design. Four hospitals in three health care regions in Sweden participated in the study. In total, 458 healthcare professionals, response rate 39.4%, completed the questionnaire. The T-TAQ, which consists of 30 items and covers five dimensions (Team Structure, Leadership, Situation Monitoring, Mutual Support and Communication), was translated to Swedish. A paper version of the T-TAQ was distributed to healthcare professionals (physicians, registered nurses, midwives, nursing assistants and allied health professionals) from the hospitals. Reliability and validity were tested using Cronbach's alpha and confirmatory factor analysis.ResultsCronbach's alpha was 0.70 for the total T-TAQ and ranged from 0.41 to 0.87 for the individual dimensions. The goodness-of-fit indexes in the confirmatory factor analysis (Model 2) revealed a normed chi-square of 2.96, a root mean square error of approximation of 0.068, a Tucker-Lewis index of 0.785 and a comparative fit index of 0.808.ConclusionsThe Swedish version of the T-TAQ has some potential to measure healthcare professionals' general attitudes toward the core components of teamwork in hospital settings. Further validation studies of the Swedish version of the T-TAQ are required, with samples representing both healthcare professionals and students from various healthcare disciplines and educational levels.

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  • 50.
    Hall-Lord, Marie Louise
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Norwegian University of Science & Technology, NOR.
    Skoogh, Annika
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Ballangrud, Randi
    Norwegian University of Science & Technology, NOR.
    Nordin, Anna
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013). Ostfold University College, NOR.
    The Swedish Version of the TeamSTEPPS (R) Teamwork Perceptions Questionnaire (T-TPQ): A Validation Study2020In: Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, ISSN 1178-2390, E-ISSN 1178-2390, Vol. 13, p. 829-837Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The delivery of effective and safe healthcare to patients is highly dependent on careful collaboration between healthcare professionals. Although teamwork is an important component for patient safety, effective teamwork is not always carried out in hospital wards, leading to negative consequences for the patients. Teamwork measurements can be used to evaluate and provide feedback to healthcare professionals to support team performance and to identify areas for improvement. The TeamSTEPPS (R) Teamwork Perceptions Questionnaire (T-TPQ) evaluates Team Structure and four core competences of teamwork (Leadership, Situation Monitoring, Mutual Support, and Communication) among healthcare professionals in various healthcare settings. The questionnaire was judged to be relevant in a Swedish healthcare context and was translated into Swedish. This study aimed to test the reliability and construct validity of the Swedish version of the T-TPQ. Methods: A total of 450 (of 1176) frontline healthcare professionals working at four hospitals responded to the questionnaire. A confirmatory factor analysis was carried out to test the factor structure. Cronbach's alpha was used to measure internal consistency. Results: The hypothesized five-factor model of the five dimensions showed acceptable goodness-of-fit indexes. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the total T-TPQ was 0.94, and the Cronbach's alpha coefficients for the dimensions ranged from 0.79 to 0.92. The intercorrelation coefficients ranged from 0.27 to 0.74. Conclusion: The Swedish version of the T-TPQ showed acceptable reliability and validity for measuring healthcare professionals' individual perceptions of teamwork at the group level. Due to the low response rate, further studies are required to test the validity of the Swedish T-TPQ.

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