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  • 1.
    Björkenfeldt, Oscar
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Linnea
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science.
    Impoliteness and morality as instruments of destructive informal social control in online harassment targeting Swedish journalists2023In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 93, p. 172-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the interplay between morality, impoliteness, and moral order in the online harassment of Swedish journalists on Twitter. It reveals how impoliteness serves as a tool to harm the media's epistemic credibility, rooted in anti-press and populist rhetoric, and exert destructive informal social control. The highlighted paradox is that provisions for freedom of speech, designed to protect, are paradoxically used to suppress journalists' voices through targeted insults and derogatory language. The study uncovers that such harassment is systematic, politically motivated, and morally grounded. We emphasize the urgent need to recognize and confront these subtle tactics that threaten journalistic freedom and, consequently, access to information in Sweden and internationally under growing criticism that seeks to delegitimize the media. © 2023 The Author(s). 

  • 2.
    Broth, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping Universitet.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping Universitet.
    Levin, Lena
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Mobility, actors and planning processes.
    Telling the Other's side. Formulating others' mental states in driver training2018In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines ascriptions of mental states to other road users in live traffic driver training. Through this practice, instructors formulate how others make sense of the trainee driver's car. Using multimodal conversation analysis, we demonstrate how others' side formulations support trainee drivers' communicative handling of the car during ongoing coordination events. In contrast, formulations occurring after coordination events serve educational ends, yielding the generic inferential practices by which competent drivers make contextual sense of others' actions. Therefore, others' side formulations comprise an important instructional resource for introducing neophyte drivers into the real-world theorizing, rendering traffic its orderly social character.

  • 3.
    Broth, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Literature. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Levin, Lena
    Swedish Natl Rd and Transport Res Inst VTI, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Telling the Others side: Formulating others mental states in driver training2019In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines ascriptions of mental states to other road users in live traffic driver training. Through this practice, instructors formulate how others make sense of the trainee drivers car. Using multimodal conversation analysis, we demonstrate how others side formulations support trainee drivers communicative handling of the car during ongoing coordination events. In contrast, formulations occurring after coordination events serve educational ends, yielding the generic inferential practices by which competent drivers make contextual sense of others actions. Therefore, others side formulations comprise an important instructional resource for introducing neophyte drivers into the real-world theorizing, rendering traffic its orderly social character. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    De Stefani, Elwys
    et al.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Broth, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Literature. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Deppermann, Arnulf
    Inst Deutsch Sprache, Germany.
    On the road: Communicating traffic2019In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 65Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    How do people communicate in mobile settings of interaction? How does mobility affect the way we speak? How does mobility exert influence on the manner in which talk itself is consequential for how we move in space? Recently, questions of this sort have attracted increasing attention in the human and social sciences. This Special Issue contributes to the emerging body of studies on mobility and talk by inspecting an ordinary and ubiquitous phenomenon in which communication among mobile participants is paramount: participation in traffic. This editorial presents previous work on mobility in natural settings, as carried out by interactionally oriented researchers. It also shows how the investigation into traffic participation adds new perspectives to research on language and communication. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    Forsberg, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Where's the disagreement?: The significance of the ordinary in Austin and Ayer2016In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 49, p. 45-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    J. L Austin is commonly known as an 'ordinary language philosopher'. Ordinary language philosophy, in turn, is generally known as a philosophy of language which employs everyday language as a standard of correctness - an arbiter between meaningful speech and nonsense. By means of a return to the somewhat heated debate between Austin and A. J. Ayer, this paper challenges this picture. I argue that if there is one philosophical tradition that encourages us to turn 'ordinary language' into a problem for philosophy, it is ordinary language philosophy. There is no simple instruction of the form 'If you are philosophically troubled, then turn to ordinary language and you will see the true sense' coming out of Austin's work (rightly construed).

  • 6.
    Hedman, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Magnusson, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Constructing success and hope among migrant students and families: A mother tongue teacher's didactic narratives2021In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 77, p. 93-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Focusing on the narrations of Omid – a Mother Tongue (MT) teacher of Arabic in a Swedish primary school – we analyze discursive constructions of Sweden, multilingualism and MT instruction in interview data and fieldnotes from parenting courses aimed at migrant parents. Omid constructed a performed role model – based in success stories – and a shared transnational identity with the function, we argue, of presenting an exemplum, and building trust and hope among parents in forced migration. This was evident in narrated alignment with the parents and claimed professional membership. The didactic narrations encompassed ideological space for multilingualism, and, we argue, both addressed and defused discourses on MT as a hindrance to integration through recurrent praise of Sweden and Swedish language learning.

  • 7.
    Heuman, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Trivializing language correctness in an online metalinguistic debate2022In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 82, p. 52-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on trivialization as a key strategy for challenging subjects who defend standard language, and for challenging standard language ideology in itself. While previous research has emphasized trivialization as a strategy for perpetuating the status quo, this study exemplifies the opposite function. Drawing on stance theory, the analysis focuses on the formation of the participating subjects and the stance object (linguistic correctness), and the link between them. The data consist of 157 posts from two blog comments sections, 32 of which trivialize linguistic correctness. The analysis shows that interlocutors mainly trivialize linguistic correctness through negative other-positioning, thus avoiding explicit metalinguistic arguments. Furthermore, the study illustrates and underlines how language ideological meaning is created in contention by emphasizing differences.

  • 8.
    Hofstetter, Emily
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Language, Culture and Interaction. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Language, Culture and Interaction. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Prosody is used for real-time exercising of other bodies2023In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 88, p. 52-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the lexico-grammatical and embodied practices in various instructional activities have been explored in-depth (Keevallik, 2013; Simone & Galatolo, 2020), the vocal capacities deployed by instructors have not been in focus. This study looks at how a Pilates instructor coaches student bodies by modulating the prosodic production of verbal instructions and adjusting vocal quality in reflexive coordination with the students ongoing movements. We show how the body of one participant can be expressed and enhanced by anothers voice in a simultaneous assembly of action and argue for the dialogical conceptualization of a speaker. These voice-body assemblies constitute evidence of how actions were brought about jointly rather than constructed individually.

  • 9.
    Ivanova (Anatoli Smith), Olga
    Department of Linguistics, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), UCLA, Linguistics, 3125 Campbell Hall, 335 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.
    Overcoming discursive prohibitions in participatory media: A case study on talk about homosexuality in Tanzania2018In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 58, p. 34-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Novel genres of participatory media often criticized as info- or edutainment are regularly used in developing countries for pursuing liberal ideologies. Conversation and discourse analysis applied to unedited footage of such genre from East Africa reveals how its format and organization introduce participants and audience to the political role of active citizens. A detailed analysis of a selected episode on homosexuality—a crime and a subject of legal censorship in the region—investigates how televised media may contribute to changing discursive norms. By strategically shifting footing and generating a vivid televisual conflict, the hosts open up a discursive space that allows for the transgression of discursive prohibitions without jeopardizing the legal status of the show.

  • 10.
    Jonsson, Rickard
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Gradin Franzén, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Milani, Tommaso M.
    Making the threatening other laughable: Ambiguous performances of urban vernaculars in Swedish media2020In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 71, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The threatening young man who speaks Rinkeby Swedish has become a culturally recognizable ‘figure of personhood’ (Agha, 2007) of linguistic and ethnic otherness in Sweden. Drawing upon Billig's theory of humour, we illustrate how this characterological persona is not monolithic; nor does it remain uncontested but is constantly being (re)negotiated in the media. By drawing attention to those humorous performances that rhetorically make fun of entrenched stereotypes, the article explores the subversive, as well as disciplinary, potentials of this kind of humour. Read together, the examples in this article indicate that the ‘exemplary speaker’ (Androutsopoulos, 2016) of Swedish contemporary urban vernaculars can be laughed at and with but cannot easily be fixed into a unified homogenous figure.

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  • 11.
    Karlander, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Register and artefact: Enregistering authenticity in an engagement with Övdalsk descriptivist texts2015In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 45, p. 12-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the symbolic and material formation of an authenticated register of Ovdalsk - a Scandinavian local language - unfolding in a situated engagement with grammatical artefacts. Seeking to refine the often underspecified category of the indexically 'pre-shift,' traditional,' 'old' or, in some other way, temporally authenticated register, it intercalates an analysis of linguistic exchanges with histories of production of authoritative discourse. Through a stepwise analysis of the production of metapragmatic discourse, it explores the indexically presupposing and entailing relationship between artefactual objectivation and novel registers of language. Thus examining the enregistering interpretation of genred regimentations of language-as-form, it argues that such focus is apt for creating a reflexive and less essentializing understanding of linguistic authenticity.

  • 12.
    Karlander, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Roads to regimentation: Place, authenticity and the metapragmatics of naming2017In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 53, p. 11-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social agents often stake claims to the naming operations that are embedded in officialdiscourse. The present article explores the metapragmatics of such investments. Drawingon post-Austinian theories of naming (Kripke, Harris, Bourdieu, Silverstein), the articleanalyses the contentious process of naming roads in a rural community in Sweden. In thisprocess, one major stake was the entextualisation of names in Övdalsk, a locally used formof Scandinavian. Focusing on an extended exchange over spatial and linguistic authenticity,the article elucidates several ways in which the semiotics of place are bound up with arange of symbolic struggles and antagonisms. More generally, the article argues that suchfocus is necessary for grasping the semiotisation of space and spatialisation of semiosis.

  • 13.
    Karlander, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Uppsala University, Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study (SCAS).
    Up from Babel: On the (r)evolutionary linguistic thought of Eugène Lanti2024In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 96, p. 13-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Esperantist radical Eugène Lanti (1879–1947) anticipated a total ‘unification’ of humankind, envisioning that national, linguistic, and social differences would soon give way to a global, stateless, monolingual, postcapitalist utopia. This vision was grounded in Lanti's understanding of history as teleological progress toward increased rationality, social integration, and demythologization, as well as in his cosmopolitan reinterpretation of the social utility of Esperanto, which prioritised anti-nationalism, revolutionary tactics, and class-struggle over humanism and language rights. Lanti's linguistic–political thought is, consequently, an enticing and a reflexively potent example of a non-canonical approach to linguistic community, progress, and radical equality. A critical reading of it – as is laid out here – casts light on some of the tensions immanent in any linguistic universalism.

  • 14. Keevallik, Leelo
    et al.
    Hofstetter, Emily
    Sounding for others: Vocal resources for embodied togetherness2023In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 90, p. 33-40Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Language, Culture and Interaction. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hofstetter, Emily
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Language, Culture and Interaction. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sounding for others: Vocal resources for embodied togetherness2023In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 90, p. 33-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Standard models of language and communication depart from the assumption that speakers encode and receive messages individually, while interaction research has shown that utterances are composed jointly (C. Goodwin, 2018), dialogically designed with and for others (Linell, 2009). Furthermore, utterances only achieve their full semantic potential in concrete interactional contexts. This SI investigates various practices of human sounding that achieve their meaning through self and others ongoing bodily actions. One person may vocalize to enact someone elses ongoing bodily experience, to coordinate with another body, or to convey embodied knowledge about something that is ostensibly only accessible to anothers individual body. This illustrates the centrality of distributed action and collaborative agency in communication.

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  • 16.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Manual backchannel responses in signers' conversations in Swedish Sign Language2016In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 50, p. 22-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study aims to determine the manual backchannel responses that signers use in Swedish Sign Language discourse by analyzing a subset of the SSL Corpus. The investiga- tion found 20% of the backchannel responses in this data to be manual. The study focuses on the manual backchannel responses that consist of signs (mostly the sign gloss YES) and gesture-like signs (PU “palms up”), and other manual activities, which can occur at a relatively low height in signing space. With respect to age groups, younger signers engage in more weak manual activity than older signers.

  • 17.
    Parthemore, Joel
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Consciousness, semiosis, and the unbinding problem2017In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 54, p. 36-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Any wider discussion of semiosis must address not only how semiosis came about, in terms of evolutionary pressures and requisite cognitive infrastructure, but also – as importantly, and too easily forgotten – how human beings experience and have experienced it, and how that experience reflects (at the same time shaping) its development. Much discussion has focused on resolving how inputs from external sensory modalities combine with internal brain processes to produce unified consciousness: the so-called binding problem. One might wish to distinguish between the coming together of conscious experience in terms of underlying mechanics and the seemingly unavoidable reality that human beings experience a consciousness that is, from the onset, phenomenally unified. The unbinding problem is shown to be potentially just as important to telling the story.

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  • 18.
    Salö, Linus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hanell, Linnea
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Performance of unprecedented genres: interdiscursivity in the writing practices of a Swedish researcher2014In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 37, p. 12-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the sociolinguistic repertoire and writing practices of a Swedish computer science researcher and his first-time performance of unprecedented genres. Since the use of written computerese Swedish has no historical anchorage in the social practices of his discipline, texts-to-text relationships cannot be drawn from as models of action. Lacking this option, the researcher construes type and token interdiscursive connectivity from iconic Swedish and English texts and from prior discursive events of using academic Swedish orally. The resources comprising an individual’s repertoire are, thus, significantly transposable across languages, modes and genres, when they are enacted in new discursive events.

  • 19.
    Segerdahl, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    The rhetoric and prose of the human/animal contrast2015In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 42, p. 36-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The opposition in philosophy between humans as thinkers and animals as non-thinkers is often considered to stem from anthropocentrism. In this paper I try to demonstrate that philosophers don't really place "us" at the centre, but rather their own thinking and the philosophical language they develop as thinkers. The human/animal contrast functions rhetorically to communicate that philosophical self-centredness to an audience that recognises itself as "human." I try to dismantle the contrast between humans and animals by exposing what I see as its true core: forgetfulness of how philosophical language (and thinking in that language) is generated by idealisation and sublimation of the reflexive uses of language.

  • 20.
    Skogmyr Marian, Klara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of Neuchâtel, Switzerland.
    Malabarba, Taiane
    Weatherall, Ann
    Multi-unit turns that begin with a resaying of a prior speaker's turn2021In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 78, p. 77-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the interactional workings of multi-unit turns that have an initial turn-constructional unit that re-says the immediately prior single-unit turn produced by another speaker. Based on cases in English, Portuguese, and French, our analysis shows that resayings do confirming and also 1) index the speaker's rights over the propositional component of the words, and 2) support the extension of the turn. In addition to confirming, resayings thus claim rights to what has been said and demonstrate an entitlement to say more. The resayings thereby have both a retrospective and prospective function, the latter being closely related to turn-taking management. Our findings contribute to the existing literature on other-repeats by considering what these do in a multi-unit turn environment.

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  • 21.
    Weatherall, Ann
    et al.
    School of Psychology, Victoria University, P.O. Box 600, Wellington, New Zealand.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Language, Culture and Interaction. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    La, Jessica
    Kings College London, England, UK.
    Dowell, Tony
    University of Otago, New Zealand.
    Stubbe, Maria
    University of Otago, New Zealand.
    The multimodality and temporality of pain displays2021In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 80, p. 56-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper takes an interactional approach to the problem of communicating pain. We ask how a shared understanding of this subjective and internal experience is accom- plished. The focus is on the multimodal features of pain displays and the way they emerge and progress at the micro level of turn construction and sequence organisation within health care interactions. The setting of the study is family doctor-patient primary care consultations. Using multimodal conversation analysis, we show the emergent, temporal unfolding nature of pain displays. Initially there is an embodied reflex-like action where an immediately prior cause can be attributed retrospectively. An interjection or non-lexical vocalization may follow. An expression of stance on the pain is routinely made as talk is resumed. The other party’s understanding can be shown early in the pain display shaping its unfolding with empathetic vocalizations and/or comforting touch which results in a jointly produced change in the trajectory of action. The implications of the findings for theoretical understandings of sound objects, language and communication, and for clinical practice, are discussed.

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  • 22. Webster, Jenny
    et al.
    Safar, Josefina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Ideologies behind the scoring of factors to rate sign language vitality2020In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 74, p. 113-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines ideologies underlying the rating of sign language vitality. The discussion is based on a 2011 survey by UNESCO and the International Institute for Sign Languages and Deaf Studies, and a newer survey by UNESCO, released in 2018. Ideologies of biodiversity and culture that appear in discourse about language vitality generally are examined. Three of the factors used to determine the vitality scores of 15 sign languages during the first survey (Safar and Webster, 2014; Webster and Safar, 2019) are considered from an ideological perspective. Further ideological issues that surfaced during this survey are then explored through a case study on endangered village sign languages in Mexico. Lastly, some ideological aspects of UNESCO's 2018 survey are scrutinised, including its accessibility to deaf signers, emphasis on hierarchical globalist structures, and presentation of sign languages as bounded entities that fit into binary categories. We find problems with framing sign languages within endangerment ideologies and relying on academic perceptions of 'language' that differ from the beliefs of language communities themselves. These vitality surveys provide a starting point for more robust mixed-methods assessments, which should take more account of sign language communities' own perspectives.

  • 23.
    Wildfeuer, Janina
    et al.
    University of Groningen, Faculty of Arts, Department of Communication and Information Studies, the Netherlands.
    Stamenković, Dušan
    University of Niš, Faculty of Philosophy, Serbia.
    The discourse structure of video games: A multimodal discourse semantics approach to game tutorials2022In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 82, p. 28-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article proposes a multimodal discourse semantics approach to the analysis of video game tutorials that provides a discourse pragmatic analysis of the game canvases in these tutorials. The study mainly builds on linguistic approaches to formal dynamic discourse semantics that have already been successfully applied to other multimodal artefacts. The article will showcase the application of the resulting ‘logic of multimodal discourse interpretation’ to two specific cases of video game tutorials. This will outline particular discourse relations holding between events and segments in the tutorials as distinctive features of this video game genre and show the discursive patterns of these instructions.

  • 24. Åhlund, Anna
    et al.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Stylizations and alignments in a L2 classroom: Multiparty work in forming a community of practice.2015In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, no 43, p. 11-26Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Åhlund, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Stylizations and alignments in a L2 classroom: Multiparty work in forming a community of practice2015In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 43, p. 11-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a single-case analysis of classroom conversations, Swedish was both the target language and lingua franca. The analyses (based on a corpus of 40 h of video-recordings) document the role of stylizations and alignments in the building of a community of practice in a L2 classroom for migrant students. The analyses cover participants' perspectives as they appeared in their ways of deploying local registers, on the one hand, and standard Swedish, on the other. Stylizations and laughter were important resources for the establishment of local language ideologies. The analyses extend work on classroom performance and communities of practice, documenting in detail how a community is partly talked into being, shaped through stylizations and other alignments.

  • 26.
    Årman, Henning
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Speaking 'the Other'?: Youths' regimentation and policing of contemporary urban vernacular2018In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 58, p. 47-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses youths' commentary on the contemporary urban vernacular Forortssvenska in an inner-city senior high school in Sweden. Combining a linguistic landscape approach with analytical tools from linguistic anthropology, this paper explores how political discourse are articulated in imagery and texts in the high school and refracted in meta-linguistic commentary among the students. The analysis show how the students draw on US-activist discourse as they insert the notion of 'cultural appropriation' into discussions on the use, and policing, of Forortssvenska at the high school. This everyday regimentation of urban vernacular is entangled with negotiations of identity, multiculturalism and space.

  • 27.
    Österman, Tove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy.
    Cultural relativism and understanding difference2021In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 80, p. 124-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper discusses cultural relativism through contrasting views within philosophy and anthropology, drawing parallels to linguistic relativity. Language is commonly perceived as a tool for classifying the world, where the researcher is a detached observer of language or reasoning. This is the starting point for the relativism/rationalism dichotomy in philosophy, which relies on a distinction between language and thought, or the form and content of thought, as separate categories that can be identified from an objective viewpoint. Both the rationalist and the relativist are commonly described as agreeing on the terms of the debate, and disagreeing only on the relations between the categories. This starting point will be challenged through drawing parallels between debates in philosophy, anthropology and linguistics. 

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