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  • 1.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Nygårdh, Annette
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    The nurse anesthetist perioperative dialog2020In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background In the perioperative dialogue, pre-, intra- and postoperatively, the patient shares their history. In the dialogue, the nurse anesthetist (NA) gets to witness the patient's experiences and can alleviate the patients' suffering while waiting for, or undergoing surgery. The aim of this study was to describe the nurse anesthetist's experiences of the perioperative dialogue. Methods The study had a qualitative design. Interviews were conducted with 12 NA and analyzed with interpretive content analysis. The methods were conducted in accordance with the COREQ guidelines. Results In the result, three categories emerge: A mutual meeting (the preoperative dialogue) where the patient and the NA through contact create a relationship. The NA is present and listens to the patient, to give the patient confidence in the NA. In the category, On the basis of the patient's needs and wishes (the intraoperative dialogue), the body language of the NA, as well as the ability to read the body language of the patient, is described as important. In the category, To create a safe situation (the postoperative dialogue) the NA ensures that the patient has knowledge of what has happened and of future care in order to restore the control to the patient. Conclusion The patient is met as a person with their own needs and wishes. It includes both a physical and a mental meeting. In a genuine relationship, the NA can confirm and unreservedly talk with the patient. When the patients leave their body and life in the hands of the NA, they can help the patients to find their inherent powers, which allows for participation in their care. Understanding the patient is possible when entering in a genuine relationship with the patient and confirm the patient. The perioperative dialogue forms a safety for the patients in the operating environment.

  • 2.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, HHJ, Avdelningen för omvårdnad.
    Nygårdh, Annette
    Jönköping University, HHJ, Avdelningen för omvårdnad.
    The nurse anesthetist perioperative dialog2020In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background In the perioperative dialogue, pre-, intra- and postoperatively, the patient shares their history. In the dialogue, the nurse anesthetist (NA) gets to witness the patient's experiences and can alleviate the patients' suffering while waiting for, or undergoing surgery. The aim of this study was to describe the nurse anesthetist's experiences of the perioperative dialogue. Methods The study had a qualitative design. Interviews were conducted with 12 NA and analyzed with interpretive content analysis. The methods were conducted in accordance with the COREQ guidelines. Results In the result, three categories emerge: A mutual meeting (the preoperative dialogue) where the patient and the NA through contact create a relationship. The NA is present and listens to the patient, to give the patient confidence in the NA. In the category, On the basis of the patient's needs and wishes (the intraoperative dialogue), the body language of the NA, as well as the ability to read the body language of the patient, is described as important. In the category, To create a safe situation (the postoperative dialogue) the NA ensures that the patient has knowledge of what has happened and of future care in order to restore the control to the patient. Conclusion The patient is met as a person with their own needs and wishes. It includes both a physical and a mental meeting. In a genuine relationship, the NA can confirm and unreservedly talk with the patient. When the patients leave their body and life in the hands of the NA, they can help the patients to find their inherent powers, which allows for participation in their care. Understanding the patient is possible when entering in a genuine relationship with the patient and confirm the patient. The perioperative dialogue forms a safety for the patients in the operating environment.

  • 3.
    Abrahamsen Grøndahl, Vigdis
    et al.
    Östfold university Norway.
    Persenius, Mona
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Helgesen, Ann Karin
    Östfold university, Norway.
    The use of life stories and its influence on persons with dementia, their relatives and staff: A systematic mixed studies review2017In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 16, no 28, article id 28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Dementia is an important predictor of nursing home admissions. Due to progressive dementia symptoms, over time it becomes difficult for persons with dementia to communicate their wishes and participate in decisions concerning their everyday lives. Their well-being, sense of dignity, integrity and personhood are at risk. The persons' life stories have been highlighted as particularly important in dementia care and are referred to as seeing the person beyond the dementia. The aim of this study was to explore and describe the use of life stories and its influence on persons with dementia living in nursing homes, their relatives and staff.

    METHODS: A systematic mixed studies review was conducted. The literature searches were performed in the following databases: CINAHL, PubMed and PsycINFO and the Cochrane library, as well as by hand searching references in the studies included. An updated search was performed eight months after the first search. Data was synthesised inspired by integrative analysis.

    RESULTS: Three studies using quantitative design and two studies (presented in three papers) using qualitative design representing research from 2006 to 2015 were included in the review. Life stories generally had a positive influence on the persons with dementia, their relatives, and staff. The use of life stories might contribute to 'Maintenance of the person with dementia as a whole person rather than a demented patient'. On the other hand, enabling persons with dementia to tell their own story could be a challenge. For the staff it could be challenging when sensitive information emerged uninvited. Involving relatives could also be difficult as to whose story were uncovered.

    CONCLUSIONS: The use of person's life story might be of significance, but there is not enough evidence to make any statement about its importance as the research is scarce. Studies, including randomised controlled trials, are needed to measure the impact of life story work on the physiological and psychological aspects of persons with dementia, and also how it influences their relatives and staff.

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  • 4.
    Al Qadire, Mohammad
    et al.
    Oman; Jordanien.
    Ballad, Cherry Ann C.
    Oman.
    Al Omari, Omar
    Oman.
    Aldiabat, Khaldoun M.
    Oman.
    Shindi, Yousef Abu
    Oman.
    Khalaf, Atika
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Department of Nursing and Integrated Health Sciences. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO). Oman.
    Prevalence, student nurses’ knowledge and practices of needle stick injuries during clinical training: a cross-sectional survey2021In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-7, article id 187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The incidence of needle stick injuries is higher among nurses with a low level of knowledge on the prevention of needle stick injury, and who have not received the relevant training during their undergraduate study. The aim of this study was to determine the level of knowledge of the prevention guidelines and the prevalence of needle stick injury among students in Oman.

    Methods: An online cross-sectional survey using a questionnaire and involving 167 students from a governmental university was conducted. The questionnaire consists of 30 questions; eight general questions, knowledge related questions, and questions about risk factors, prevention measures, and actions in a case of needle stick injury. Ethical approval was obtained and the link to the survey was shared with students using their university email portal.

    Results: Of the participants, 81.2% were females; mean age was 23.3 (SD = 4.5) years. The mean total knowledge score was 6.6 out of 10 (SD = 2.1). In addition, 18.2% (n = 32) of the students experienced needle stick injury. Most of the injuries 71.9% (n = 24) occurred during medication preparation and administration. The main cause of NSI as reported by students was recapping the needles (59%, n = 19).

    Conclusions: This study demonstrates that student nurses have a moderate level of knowledge about needle stick injury prevention measures and lack many facets of safe infection control practice. These findings require the collaborative effort of nursing administrators from both academic and clinical areas, to develop effective strategies to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of needle stick injury.

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  • 5.
    Allvin, Renee
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital;Örebro University.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Ersta Sköndal Bracke University College..
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University .
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Östfold University, NOR.
    Wangensteen, Sigrid
    Norwegian University of Science & Technology, NOR.
    Self-assessed competence and need for further training among registered nurses in somatic hospital wards in Sweden: a cross-sectional survey2020In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Professional competence and continuous professional development is essential for ensuring high quality and safe nursing care, and it might be important for motivating nurses to stay in the profession. Thus, there is a need to identify the developmental process of nursing competency. Assessment of competence and need for further training helps to identify areas for quality improvement, and to design interventions in order to facilitate continuous competence development in different work contexts. The current study aimed to 1) describe registered nurses' self-assessment of clinical competence as well as the need for further training, and 2) explore possible differences between registered nurses with varying lengths of professional experience as a nurse (<= 0,5 year, > 0,5-5 years, and >= 6 years). Methods A cross-sectional survey design was applied, using the Professional Nurse Self-Assessment Scale of clinical core competencies II. Registered nurses (n = 266) working in medical and surgical contexts in hospitals in Sweden responded (response rate 51%). Independent student t-test and analysis of variance were carried out. Results Registered nurses assessed their competence highest in statements related to cooperation with other health professionals; taking full responsibility for own activities; and acting ethically when caring for patients. They assessed their need for further training most for statements related to assessing patients' health needs by telephone; giving health promotion advice and recommendations to patients by telephone; as well as improving a creative learning environment for staff at the workplace. For self-assessed competence and need for further training, differences between the groups for 35 and 46 items respectively, out of 50 were statistically significant. Conclusions Although the registered nurses assessed their competence high for important competence components expected of professionals such as cooperation with other healthcare professionals, it is problematic that knowledge of interactions and side-effects of different types of medication were reported as having the highest need of training. Longitudinal follow up of newly graduated nurses regarding their continuous development of competence as well as further training is needed.

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  • 6.
    Allvin, Renée
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Clinical Skills Center, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Department of Health Science, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Department of Health care Sciences, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Bååth, Carina
    Department of Health Science, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Faculty of Health and Welfare, Östfold University College Fredrikstad, Halden, Norway.
    Wangensteen, Sigrid
    Department of Health Sciences in Gjøvik, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Self-assessed competence and need for further training among registered nurses in somatic hospital wards in Sweden: a cross-sectional survey2020In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Professional competence and continuous professional development is essential for ensuring high quality and safe nursing care, and it might be important for motivating nurses to stay in the profession. Thus, there is a need to identify the developmental process of nursing competency. Assessment of competence and need for further training helps to identify areas for quality improvement, and to design interventions in order to facilitate continuous competence development in different work contexts. The current study aimed to 1) describe registered nurses' self-assessment of clinical competence as well as the need for further training, and 2) explore possible differences between registered nurses with varying lengths of professional experience as a nurse (≤ 0,5 year, > 0,5-5 years, and ≥ 6 years).

    Methods: A cross-sectional survey design was applied, using the Professional Nurse Self-Assessment Scale of clinical core competencies II. Registered nurses (n = 266) working in medical and surgical contexts in hospitals in Sweden responded (response rate 51%). Independent student t-test and analysis of variance were carried out.

    Results: Registered nurses assessed their competence highest in statements related to cooperation with other health professionals; taking full responsibility for own activities; and acting ethically when caring for patients. They assessed their need for further training most for statements related to assessing patients' health needs by telephone; giving health promotion advice and recommendations to patients by telephone; as well as improving a creative learning environment for staff at the workplace. For self-assessed competence and need for further training, differences between the groups for 35 and 46 items respectively, out of 50 were statistically significant.

    Conclusions: Although the registered nurses assessed their competence high for important competence components expected of professionals such as cooperation with other healthcare professionals, it is problematic that knowledge of interactions and side-effects of different types of medication were reported as having the highest need of training. Longitudinal follow up of newly graduated nurses regarding their continuous development of competence as well as further training is needed.

  • 7.
    Allvin, Renée
    et al.
    Örebro universitetssjukhus; Örebro universitet.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Karlstads universitet.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro universitet.
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstads universitet; Høgskolen i Østfold, Norway.
    Wangensteen, Sigrid
    NTNU - Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet, Norway.
    Self-assessed competence and need for further training among registered nurses in somatic hospital wards in Sweden: a cross-sectional survey.2020In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 19, p. 1-11, article id 74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Professional competence and continuous professional development is essential for ensuring high quality and safe nursing care, and it might be important for motivating nurses to stay in the profession. Thus, there is a need to identify the developmental process of nursing competency. Assessment of competence and need for further training helps to identify areas for quality improvement, and to design interventions in order to facilitate continuous competence development in different work contexts. The current study aimed to 1) describe registered nurses' self-assessment of clinical competence as well as the need for further training, and 2) explore possible differences between registered nurses with varying lengths of professional experience as a nurse (≤ 0,5 year, > 0,5-5 years, and ≥ 6 years).

    Methods: A cross-sectional survey design was applied, using the Professional Nurse Self-Assessment Scale of clinical core competencies II. Registered nurses (n = 266) working in medical and surgical contexts in hospitals in Sweden responded (response rate 51%). Independent student t-test and analysis of variance were carried out.

    Results: Registered nurses assessed their competence highest in statements related to cooperation with other health professionals; taking full responsibility for own activities; and acting ethically when caring for patients. They assessed their need for further training most for statements related to assessing patients' health needs by telephone; giving health promotion advice and recommendations to patients by telephone; as well as improving a creative learning environment for staff at the workplace. For self-assessed competence and need for further training, differences between the groups for 35 and 46 items respectively, out of 50 were statistically significant.

    Conclusions: Although the registered nurses assessed their competence high for important competence components expected of professionals such as cooperation with other healthcare professionals, it is problematic that knowledge of interactions and side-effects of different types of medication were reported as having the highest need of training. Longitudinal follow up of newly graduated nurses regarding their continuous development of competence as well as further training is needed.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Ewa K.
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden;Lund University, Sweden.
    Willman, Ania
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden;Malmö University, Sweden.
    Sjöstrom-Strand, Annica
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Malmö University, Sweden;Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Registered nurses’ descriptions of caring: a phenomenographic interview study2015In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nursing has come a long way since the days of Florence Nightingale and even though no consensus exists it would seem reasonable to assume that caring still remains the inner core, the essence of nursing. In the light of the societal, contextual and political changes that have taken place during the 21st century, it is important to explore whether these might have influenced the essence of nursing. The aim of this study was to describe registered nurses’ conceptions of caring. Methods: A qualitative design with a phenomenographic approach was used. The interviews with twenty-one nurses took place between March and May 2013 and the transcripts were analysed inspired by Marton and Booth’s description of phenomenography. Results: The analysis mirrored four qualitatively different ways of understanding caring from the nurses’ perspective: caring as person-centredness, caring as safeguarding the patient’s best interests, caring as nursing interventions and caring as contextually intertwined. Conclusion: The most comprehensive feature of the nurses’ collective understanding of caring was their recognition and acknowledgment of the person behind the patient, i.e. person-centredness. However, caring was described as being part of an intricate interplay in the care context, which has impacted on all the described conceptions of caring. Greater emphasis on the care context, i.e. the environment in which caring takes place, are warranted as this could mitigate the possibility that essential care is left unaddressed, thus contributing to better quality of care and safer patient care.

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  • 9. Andersson, Ewa Kazimiera
    et al.
    Willman, Ania
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sjostrom-Strand, Annica
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Registered nurses' descriptions of caring: a phenomenographic interview study2015In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 14, no 16, article id 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Nursing has come a long way since the days of Florence Nightingale and even though no consensus exists it would seem reasonable to assume that caring still remains the inner core, the essence of nursing. In the light of the societal, contextual and political changes that have taken place during the 21st century, it is important to explore whether these might have influenced the essence of nursing. The aim of this study was to describe registered nurses' conceptions of caring. METHODS: A qualitative design with a phenomenographic approach was used. The interviews with twenty-one nurses took place between March and May 2013 and the transcripts were analysed inspired by Marton and Booth's description of phenomenography. RESULTS: The analysis mirrored four qualitatively different ways of understanding caring from the nurses' perspective: caring as person-centredness, caring as safeguarding the patient's best interests, caring as nursing interventions and caring as contextually intertwined. CONCLUSION: The most comprehensive feature of the nurses' collective understanding of caring was their recognition and acknowledgment of the person behind the patient, i.e. person-centredness. However, caring was described as being part of an intricate interplay in the care context, which has impacted on all the described conceptions of caring. Greater emphasis on the care context, i.e. the environment in which caring takes place, are warranted as this could mitigate the possibility that essential care is left unaddressed, thus contributing to better quality of care and safer patient care.

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  • 10.
    Andersson, Ewa Kazimiera
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology; Lund University.
    Willman, Ania
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Malmö University.
    Sjöström-Strand, Annica
    Lund University.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Malmö University.
    Registered nurses’ descriptions of caring: A phenomenographic interview study2015In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 14, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nursing has come a long way since the days of Florence Nightingale and even though no consensus exists it would seem reasonable to assume that caring still remains the inner core, the essence of nursing. In the light of the societal, contextual and political changes that have taken place during the 21st century, it is important to explore whether these might have influenced the essence of nursing. The aim of this study was to describe registered nurses’ conceptions of caring. Methods: A qualitative design with a phenomenographic approach was used. The interviews with twenty-one nurses took place between March and May 2013 and the transcripts were analysed inspired by Marton and Booth’s description of phenomenography. Results: The analysis mirrored four qualitatively different ways of understanding caring from the nurses’ perspective: caring as person-centredness, caring as safeguarding the patient’s best interests, caring as nursing interventions and caring as contextually intertwined. Conclusion: The most comprehensive feature of the nurses’ collective understanding of caring was their recognition and acknowledgment of the person behind the patient, i.e. person-centredness. However, caring was described as being part of an intricate interplay in the care context, which has impacted on all the described conceptions of caring. Greater emphasis on the care context, i.e. the environment in which caring takes place, are warranted as this could mitigate the possibility that essential care is left unaddressed, thus contributing to better quality of care and safer patient care. 

  • 11.
    Andersson, Ewa
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health.
    Willman, Ania
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health.
    Sjöstrom-Strand, Annica
    Lunds universitet, SWE.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Malmö högskola, SWE.
    Registered nurses’ descriptions of caring: a phenomenographic interview study2015In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 14, no 1, article id Article number 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nursing has come a long way since the days of Florence Nightingale and even though no consensus exists it would seem reasonable to assume that caring still remains the inner core, the essence of nursing. In the light of the societal, contextual and political changes that have taken place during the 21st century, it is important to explore whether these might have influenced the essence of nursing. The aim of this study was to describe registered nurses’ conceptions of caring. Methods: A qualitative design with a phenomenographic approach was used. The interviews with twenty-one nurses took place between March and May 2013 and the transcripts were analysed inspired by Marton and Booth’s description of phenomenography. Results: The analysis mirrored four qualitatively different ways of understanding caring from the nurses’ perspective: caring as person-centredness, caring as safeguarding the patient’s best interests, caring as nursing interventions and caring as contextually intertwined. Conclusion: The most comprehensive feature of the nurses’ collective understanding of caring was their recognition and acknowledgment of the person behind the patient, i.e. person-centredness. However, caring was described as being part of an intricate interplay in the care context, which has impacted on all the described conceptions of caring. Greater emphasis on the care context, i.e. the environment in which caring takes place, are warranted as this could mitigate the possibility that essential care is left unaddressed, thus contributing to better quality of care and safer patient care.

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  • 12.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lindholm, Maria
    Pettersson, Margareta
    Jonasson, Lise-Lotte
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Nurses competencies in Home health care: An interview study.2017In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 16, no 65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Nurses working in Home health care (HHC) are facing major challenges when more advanced care and treatment are performing in the patient's home. The aim of this study was to explore how nurses experiencing their competencies in HHC. 

    Methods:This study has a qualitative and explorative design. Ten nurses were interviewed and data were analysed by content analysis.

    Results:The themes “Being a capable nurse”, “Being a useful nurse” and “Being a subordinate and dependent nurse” were identified. Nurses want to be capable to take care of patients, develop their competencies and perform their duties in the way that are requested. They also want to be useful in their work and providing good and safe HHC. Finally, nurses want to improve the care in HHC with their competencies. Simultaneously, they are subordinate and dependent in the relation with their manager and manager's interest to encourage nurses’ competence development.

    Conclusions:Nurses in HHC are responsible for many seriously ill patients and they want to contribute to a good and safe patient care. To maintain patient safety, reduce the risk for burnout and staff turnover as well as to contribute to a sustainable development of the work, strategies for transfer competencies between nurses and efforts for competence development are needed. 

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  • 13.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Lindholm, Maria
    Pettersson, Margareta
    Jonasson, Lise-Lotte
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Nurses competencies in Home health care: An interview study2017In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 16, no 65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nurses working in Home health care (HHC) are facing major challenges when more advanced care and treatment are performing in the patient’s home. The aim of this study was to explore how nurses experiencing their competencies in HHC. 

    Methods: This study has a qualitative and explorative design. Ten nurses were interviewed and data were analysed by content analysis.

    Results: The themes “Being a capable nurse”, “Being a useful nurse” and “Being a subordinate and dependent nurse” were identified. Nurses want to be capable to take care of patients, develop their competencies and perform their duties in the way that are requested. They also want to be useful in their work and providing good and safe HHC. Finally, nurses want to improve the care in HHC with their competencies. Simultaneously, they are subordinate and dependent in the relation with their manager and manager’s interest to encourage nurses’ competence development.

    Conclusions: Nurses in HHC are responsible for many seriously ill patients and they want to contribute to a good and safe patient care. To maintain patient safety, reduce the risk for burnout and staff turnover as well as to contribute to a sustainable development of the work, strategies for transfer competencies between nurses and efforts for competence development are needed. 

  • 14.
    Andersson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Eklund, Anna Josse
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilsson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Inland Norway Univ Applied Science, NOR..
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Östfold University College, NOR.
    Prevalence, type, and reasons for missed nursing care in municipality health care in Sweden: A cross sectional study2022In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background With an ageing population, there is an increasing need for care, both as home care and in nursing homes. However, some needed care is not carried out for different reasons, which can affect patient safety. The aim of the study was to describe prevalence, type, and reasons for missed nursing care in home care and nursing homes, from nurses' perspective. Methods A cross sectional design with quantitative and qualitative approach. A Swedish version of Basel Extent of Rationing of Nursing Care for nursing homes and 15 study specific questions were answered by 624 registered nurses, enrolled nurses, or nurse assistants. Both descriptive and analytical, independent-samples t-test, analyses were used. Qualitative content analysis was used for the open-ended question. Results The care activity most often missed in home care was: 'set up or update care plans' (41.8%), and in nursing homes: 'scheduled group activity' (22.8%). Reasons for missed nursing care were lack of preparedness for unexpected situations, obstacles in a deficient work environment, unsatisfactory planning in the organisation, and/or shortcomings related to the individual. Conclusion Not all care activities needed are performed, due to reasons such as lack of time or organisational issues. Missed nursing care can lead to adverse events and affect patient safety. It is important to be aware of missed nursing care and the reasons for it, which gives a possibility to initiate quality improvement work to ensure patient safety.

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  • 15.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. University of Borås.
    Norberg Boysen, Gabriella
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Sterner, Anders
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Simulation-based education as a provider of fieldwork insights – experiences of ambulance nurse specialist students2023In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Medicine is facing a global shortage of nurses, including those with postgraduate education. One suggested educational method for undergraduate and postgraduate education, such as specialist ambulance nurse education, is simulation-based education (SBE). The implementation of SBE is motivated, in part, by the desire to attract and retain students, but also to contribute to student learning. Consequently, the use of SBE is increasing in specialist ambulance nurse education. The aim of this study was to explore how specialist ambulance nursing students experience SBE.

    Methods: This qualitative survey study involved the collection of study data using a purposefully designed, paper-based survey comprising five open-ended questions that required participant free-text answers. The answers were analysed using inductive content analysis and searching for descriptions of the participants’ experiences. The survey was presented to 35 specialist ambulance nursing students.

    Results: The results are presented in two themes: SBE as learning and SBE as an educational method. Participating in SBE during the programme provides students with a realistic understanding of their future profession and its expected demands. The learning experience disregards prior work experience in ambulance services.

    Conclusions: Based on the findings, conclusions are that SBE is an appreciated educational method among nursing students, regardless of their prior experience in the field of prehospital care. To some extent, this differs from previous research findings related to this subject. Furthermore, SBE contributes to the provision of field work insights, preparing the ambulance nurse specialist students.

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  • 16.
    Appelgren, Marie
    et al.
    Malmö univeristet, City Malmö Borough Adm Operat Support Management.
    Bahtsevani, Christel
    Mamö universitet.
    Persson, Karin
    Malmö universitet.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Malmö universitet.
    Nurses' experiences of caring for patients with intellectual developmental disorders: a systematic review using a meta-ethnographic approach2018In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 17, article id 51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundResearch suggests that registered nurses (RNs) do not feel adequately prepared to support patients with intellectual disability disorder (IDD). This is unsurprising, as few European health sciences curricula include undergraduate and graduate training courses in IDD. As RNs are often in the front line of care, eliciting in-depth knowledge about how they experience nursing this group of patients is vital. Our aim in this study was to develop a conceptual understanding about RNs' experiences of nursing patients with IDD.MethodWe undertook a systematic review and meta-ethnography to synthesise qualitative research studies found in PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ERIC databases and by manual searching to identify additional studies. We condensed translatable second-order constructs, and developed an idiomatic translation. Finally, we formulated line of argument (LOA) syntheses to capture the core of the idiomatic translations.ResultsWe included eighteen published studies from eight countries involving 190 RNs. The RNs' experience of nursing patients with IDD were reflected in 14 LOAs. Six of these reflected a tentatively more distinctive and at times unique conceptualisation of RNs' experience of nursing this group of patients. The remaining eight LOAs represented a conceptualisation of nursing per se, a conceptualisation of nursing that was interpreted as a universal experience regardless of context and patient group.ConclusionLack of awareness and knowledge are likely breeding grounds for the otherness' that still surrounds this group of patients. In encounters between patients and RNs, focusing on the person behind the disability label could be one way to secure relevant nursing care for patients with IDD. Undertaking appropriate under- and postgraduate education alongside the implementation of nursing models focusing on patient-centred care would help RNs in reducing the health and care inequalities this group of patients still face.Trial registrationPROSPERO 2017: CRD42017077703.

  • 17.
    Appelgren, Marie
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). City of Malmö, Borough Administration Operation Support Management, Malmö, SE-205 80, Sweden.
    Bahtsevani, Christel
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Persson, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Nurses’ experiences of caring for patients with intellectual developmental disorders: a systematic review using a meta-ethnographic approach2018In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 17, article id 51Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Research suggests that registered nurses (RNs) do not feel adequately prepared to support patients with intellectual disability disorder (IDD). This is unsurprising, as few European health sciences curricula include undergraduate and graduate training courses in IDD. As RNs are often in the front line of care, eliciting in-depth knowledge about how they experience nursing this group of patients is vital. Our aim in this study was to develop a conceptual understanding about RNs’ experiences of nursing patients with IDD. Method: We undertook a systematic review and meta-ethnography to synthesise qualitative research studies found in PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ERIC databases and by manual searching to identify additional studies. We condensed translatable second-order constructs, and developed an idiomatic translation. Finally, we formulated line of argument (LOA) syntheses to capture the core of the idiomatic translations. Results: We included eighteen published studies from eight countries involving 190 RNs. The RNs’ experience of nursing patients with IDD were reflected in 14 LOAs. Six of these reflected a tentatively more distinctive and at times unique conceptualisation of RNs’ experience of nursing this group of patients. The remaining eight LOAs represented a conceptualisation of nursing per se, a conceptualisation of nursing that was interpreted as a universal experience regardless of context and patient group. Conclusion: Lack of awareness and knowledge are likely breeding grounds for the ‘otherness’ that still surrounds this group of patients. In encounters between patients and RNs, focusing on the person behind the disability label could be one way to secure relevant nursing care for patients with IDD. Undertaking appropriate under- and postgraduate education alongside the implementation of nursing models focusing on patient-centred care would help RNs in reducing the health and care inequalities this group of patients still face.

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  • 18.
    Arakelian, Erebouni
    et al.
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala (SWE).
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. Faculty of Nursing and Health Sciences, Nord University, Bodø, Norway (NOR).
    Managerial challenges faced by Swedish nurse managers in perioperative settings: a qualitative study2021In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-10, article id 117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Nurse managers need to create cultures that are worthy, not only of the commitment of everyone who comes to work but also of the trust of everyone who comes to be served. The aim of our study was to describe the challenges faced by Swedish nurse managers in a perioperative setting.

    METHODS: A qualitative study was conducted. The participants were chosen by convenience sampling, and individual in-depth interviews were conducted. Data were analysed by Systematic Text Condensation. The COREQ checklist was consulted throughout the study to optimise the quality.

    RESULTS: Nineteen nurse managers (all women) participated. Six themes were identified: "striving to treat employees with consideration and solicitude"; "the obligation to take care of each employee's individual needs"; "convincing others was an uphill battle", "finding solutions when things seem impossible"; "staff recruitment, allocation, and management"; "working with constantly changing planning".

    CONCLUSIONS: The nurse managers faced challenges because of the overwhelming amount of work tasks, with almost no time for reflection. Having carefully chosen tasks and a realistic time schedule for each work task, plus time to find one's own path to inner peace, are essential for nurse managers. Organisations that provide these prerequisites show that they care about their nurse managers. The results of this study indicate the need for time to reflect, as well as support from superior managers and from the human resources department.

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  • 19.
    Arakelian, Erebouni
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    Nord Univ, Fac Nursing & Hlth Sci, N-8049 Bodo, Norway.;Univ West, Div Nursing, Dept Hlth Sci, SE-46186 Trollhättan, Sweden..
    Managerial challenges faced by Swedish nurse managers in perioperative settings: a qualitative study2021In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 20, article id 117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nurse managers need to create cultures that are worthy, not only of the commitment of everyone who comes to work but also of the trust of everyone who comes to be served. The aim of our study was to describe the challenges faced by Swedish nurse managers in a perioperative setting.

    Methods: A qualitative study was conducted. The participants were chosen by convenience sampling, and individual in-depth interviews were conducted. Data were analysed by Systematic Text Condensation. The COREQ checklist was consulted throughout the study to optimise the quality.

    Results: Nineteen nurse managers (all women) participated. Six themes were identified: "striving to treat employees with consideration and solicitude"; "the obligation to take care of each employee's individual needs"; "convincing others was an uphill battle", "finding solutions when things seem impossible"; "staff recruitment, allocation, and management"; "working with constantly changing planning".

    Conclusions: The nurse managers faced challenges because of the overwhelming amount of work tasks, with almost no time for reflection. Having carefully chosen tasks and a realistic time schedule for each work task, plus time to find one's own path to inner peace, are essential for nurse managers. Organisations that provide these prerequisites show that they care about their nurse managers. The results of this study indicate the need for time to reflect, as well as support from superior managers and from the human resources department.

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  • 20.
    Arakelian, Erebouni
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    Nord Univ, Fac Nursing & Hlth Sci, N-8049 Bodo, Norway.;Univ West, Div Nursing, Dept Hlth Sci, SE-46186 Trollhättan, Sweden..
    Managerial challenges faced by Swedish nurse managers in perioperative settings: a qualitative study2021In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 20, article id 117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nurse managers need to create cultures that are worthy, not only of the commitment of everyone who comes to work but also of the trust of everyone who comes to be served. The aim of our study was to describe the challenges faced by Swedish nurse managers in a perioperative setting.

    Methods: A qualitative study was conducted. The participants were chosen by convenience sampling, and individual in-depth interviews were conducted. Data were analysed by Systematic Text Condensation. The COREQ checklist was consulted throughout the study to optimise the quality.

    Results: Nineteen nurse managers (all women) participated. Six themes were identified: "striving to treat employees with consideration and solicitude"; "the obligation to take care of each employee's individual needs"; "convincing others was an uphill battle", "finding solutions when things seem impossible"; "staff recruitment, allocation, and management"; "working with constantly changing planning".

    Conclusions: The nurse managers faced challenges because of the overwhelming amount of work tasks, with almost no time for reflection. Having carefully chosen tasks and a realistic time schedule for each work task, plus time to find one's own path to inner peace, are essential for nurse managers. Organisations that provide these prerequisites show that they care about their nurse managers. The results of this study indicate the need for time to reflect, as well as support from superior managers and from the human resources department.

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  • 21.
    Arén, Cilmara
    et al.
    Dalarna University.
    Jaçelli, Armand
    Dalarna University.
    Gesar, Berit
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    From, Ingrid
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    The work-related stress experienced by registered nurses at municipal aged care facilities during the COVID-19 pandemic: a qualitative interview study.2022In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Stress can originate from many different unsatisfying work situations. Registered nurses working in municipal care have experience of work-related stress in different ways.

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to describe the work-related stress experienced by registered nurses caring for older people at municipal aged care facilities.

    METHODS: Qualitative semi-structured interviews according to Polit and Beck were carried out in clinical work at six different municipal aged care facilities in Sweden. Twelve registered nurses participated in the study.

    RESULTS: The results outlined in one main central theme: Feelings of inadequacy and dissatisfaction contribute to work-related stress and three categories: Difficulty coping with work tasks, Insufficient support, Work-related stress affects private lives. Areas identified were lack of time, staff shortages, high number of patients, lack of communication and teamwork in the working group, showing that inadequacy and dissatisfaction can contribute to work-related stress. This can contribute to work-related stress, and it can be a result of problems in the organizational and social work environment.

    CONCLUSION: This study showed the everyday experiences of registered nurses' stress at work. The reasons that registered nurses experience a heavy workload were found to be similar in several municipal care facilities. Future interventions should consider the areas of stress found in this study to reduce the risk of further increasing the work-related stress experienced by registered nurses working in municipal aged care.

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  • 22.
    Audulv, Åsa
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Kneck, Åsa
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola.
    How to analyze time and change in qualitative longitudinal materials?: Insights from a literature review of longitudinal qualitative studies in nursing.2017In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 16, p. 10-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Longitudinal qualitative research can give new insights in social processes and experiences over time. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in conducting longitudinal qualitative research within nursing. However, the definition of what constitutes longitudinal qualitative research is unclear, the methodological literature scarce, and the variation of procedures great. This review of longitudinal qualitative articles within the nursing field aims to identify and describe various types of qualitative longitudinal approaches. Materials and Method Searches in pubmed identified over a hundred qualitative nursing articles with data collection over time. These articles were analyzed regarding 1) described analysis procedure, 2) how the results related to aspects of time and change, and 3) if results were person oriented vs category oriented. Results Five different types of longitudinal qualitative approaches were identified. In total, a large part of the papers described as having a longitudinal design performed a data collection over time, but did not integrate ideas of time or change in their analysis or results. Four fruitful approaches to analyzing longitudinal qualitative data were identified; time-line, pool, phase and pattern-oriented approaches. Articles classified as using any of these approaches have a clear perspective of time or change in the results. However, depending on type of approach different aspects of time, change, and process are in focus. Further, using different approaches yielded different kinds of results. Conclusion All approaches have pros and cons and researchers need to make informed decisions when choosing which approach they will take when analyzing qualitative longitudinal material.

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  • 23.
    Backman, Annica C.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sjögren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    The influence of nursing home managers’ leadership on person-centred care and stress of conscience: A cross-sectional study2021In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Leadership and stress are common concepts in nursing, and this study explores empirically the connection between leadership and stress of conscience in the context of aged care practice. Previous literature has shown that when staff are unable to carry out their ethical liabilities towards the residents, feelings of guilt may occur among staff, which may be an expression of stress of conscience. Although leadership has been described as crucial for staff’s work perceptions of stress as well as for person-centred practices, the influence of nursing home managers’ leadership on stress of conscience among staff and person-centred practices is still not fully explored. This study attempts to address that knowledge gap by exploring the relationship between leadership, person-centred care, and stress of conscience.

    Methods: This study was based on a cross-sectional national survey of 2985 staff and their managers in 190 nursing homes throughout Sweden. Descriptive statistics and regression modelling were used to explore associations.

    Results: Leadership was associated with a higher degree of person-centred care and less stress of conscience. A higher degree of person-centred care was also associated with less stress of conscience. The results also showed that leadership as well as person-centred care were individually associated with lower levels of stress of conscience when adjusting for potential confounders.

    Conclusion: Nursing home managers’ leadership was significantly associated with less staff stress of conscience and more person-centred care. This indicates that a leadership most prominently characterised by coaching and giving feedback, relying on staff and handling conflicts constructively, experimenting with new ideas, and controlling work individually can contribute to less staff stress as well as higher degree of person-centred care provision.

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  • 24. Ballangrud, Randi
    et al.
    Husebo, Sissel Eikeland
    Aase, Karina
    Aaberg, Oddveig Reiersdal
    Vifladt, Anne
    Berg, Geir Vegard
    Hall-Lord, Marie Louise
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    "Teamwork in hospitals": a quasi-experimental study protocol applying a human factors approach2017In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 16, article id 34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Effective teamwork and sufficient communication are critical components essential to patient safety in today's specialized and complex healthcare services. Team training is important for an improved efficiency in inter-professional teamwork within hospitals, however the scientific rigor of studies must be strengthen and more research is required to compare studies across samples, settings and countries. The aims of the study are to translate and validate teamwork questionnaires and investigate healthcare personnel's perception of teamwork in hospitals (Part 1). Further to explore the impact of an inter-professional teamwork intervention in a surgical ward on structure, process and outcome (Part 2). Methods: To address the aims, a descriptive, and explorative design (Part 1), and a quasi-experimental interventional design will be applied (Part 2). The study will be carried out in five different hospitals (A-E) in three hospital trusts in Norway. Frontline healthcare personnel in Hospitals A and B, from both acute and non-acute departments, will be invited to respond to three Norwegian translated teamwork questionnaires (Part 1). An inter-professional teamwork intervention in line with the TeamSTEPPS recommend Model of Change will be implemented in a surgical ward at Hospital C. All physicians, registered nurses and assistant nurses in the intervention ward and two control wards (Hospitals D and E) will be invited to to survey their perception of teamwork, team decision making, safety culture and attitude towards teamwork before intervention and after six and 12 months. Adult patients admitted to the intervention surgical unit will be invited to survey their perception of quality of care during their hospital stay before intervention and after six and 12 month. Moreover, anonymous patient registry data from local registers and data from patients' medical records will be collected (Part 2). Discussion: This study will help to understand the impact of an inter-professional teamwork intervention in a surgical ward and contribute to promote healthcare personnel's team competences with an opportunity to achieve changes in work processes and patient safety.

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  • 25.
    Ballangrud, Randi
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Teknologivn. 22, Gjøvik, 2815, Norway .
    Persenius, Mona
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Hedelin, Birgitta
    Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Gjövik Univeristy College, Norway.
    Hall-Lord, Marie Louise
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Teknologivn. 22, Gjøvik, 2815, Norway .
    Exploring intensive care nurses' team performance in a simulation-based emergency situation, − expert raters' assessments versus self-assessments: an explorative study2014In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 13, no 47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Effective teamwork has proven to be crucial for providing safe care. The performance of emergencies in general and cardiac arrest situations in particular, has been criticized for primarily focusing on the individual's technical skills and too little on the teams' performance of non-technical skills. The aim of the study was to explore intensive care nurses' team performance in a simulation-based emergency situation by using expert raters' assessments and nurses' self-assessments in relation to different intensive care specialties.

    Methods

    The study used an explorative design based on laboratory high-fidelity simulation. Fifty-three registered nurses, who were allocated into 11 teams representing two intensive care specialties, participated in a videotaped simulation-based cardiac arrest setting. The expert raters used the Ottawa Crisis Resource Management Global Rating Scale and the first part of the Mayo High Performance Teamwork Scale to assess the teams' performance. The registered nurses used the first part of the Mayo High Performance Teamwork Scale for their self-assessments, and the analyses used were Chi-square tests, Mann–Whitney U tests, Spearman's rho and Intraclass Correlation Coefficient Type III.

    Results

    The expert raters assessed the teams' performance as either advanced novice or competent, with significant differences being found between the teams from different specialties. Significant differences were found between the expert raters' assessments and the registered nurses' self-assessments.

    Conclusions

    Teams of registered nurses representing specialties with coronary patients exhibit a higher competence in non-technical skills compared to team performance regarding a simulated cardiac arrest. The use of expert raters' assessments and registered nurses' self-assessments are useful in raising awareness of team performance with regard to patient safety.

  • 26.
    Baxter, Rebecca
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Björk, Sabine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Sköldunger, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Neurobiology, Division of Neurogeriatrics, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Recognizing expressions of thriving among persons living in nursing homes: a qualitative study2021In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Thriving has emerged as a contemporary and health-promoting concept for older people living in nursing homes; however, there has been limited research to explore how nursing home staff identify thriving in their everyday practice. The aim of this study was to explore how staff recognize expressions of thriving among persons living in nursing homes.

    METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 nurses working at a nursing home in Victoria, Australia. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: The analysis resulted in six sub-categories and three main categories. Expressions of thriving were recognized in relation to how staff understood thriving, observed thriving and sensed thriving. Staff described comparing and contrasting clinical assessment indicators with their own personal and professional understandings of thriving, as well as their overall sense of the individual person within the wider situational and environmental context.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our results illuminate how staff recognize everyday expressions of thriving for people living in nursing homes and emphasizes the importance of utilizing person-centred care principles in clinical assessments. These findings have practical implications with regards to how thriving is identified and assessed in long-term care, and could be used to inform and guide staff education, person-centred care strategies, and organizational policies to better support and promote thriving in nursing homes.

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  • 27.
    Bengtsson, Mariette
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Knowledge and skills needed to improve as preceptor: development of a continuous professional development course: a qualitative study part I2015In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 14, article id 51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Preceptors are expected to have the skills to be able to form an effective learning environment and facilitate a constructive clinical learning experience for students and new employees. Internationally, access to education for preceptors varies, with preceptors worldwide requesting more education in preceptorship. This article is based on a two-part study focusing on both the development and evaluation of a continuous, credit-bearing professional development course. The aim of this part of the study was to investigate and include preceptors’ requests and educational needs when developing a continuous professional development course on an advanced level. Methods: This study used a qualitative research approach. In total, 64 preceptors (62 women and two men) answered one single written, self-administered global question online. The participants were all interested in teaching and had completed an undergraduate training in preceptorship. The collected data was analysed by content analysis inspired by Burnard’s description of themethod. Results: The participating preceptors illuminated two main themes: ‘Tools for effective precepting of students and healthcare professionals’ and ‘in-depth knowledge and understanding of preceptorship in an academic setting’. The results suggest that vital components for preceptor preparation could be a) teaching and learning strategies, b) reflective and critical reasoning, c) communication models, d) the role of the preceptor, and e) preceptorship. Conclusion: Using the results from this study as a guide, a continuous professional development course was designed to assist preceptors in deepening their knowledge of preceptorship in regard to planning, leading and implementing educational activities directed at students, healthcare professionals, patients and their families. The course content focuses on skills needed for preceptorship and is based on adult learning principles. A continuous, credit-bearing professional development course must include an exam by which participants are formally assessed and graded; therefore, a written assignment was included as part of the course.

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  • 28.
    Bengtsson, Mariette
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Ivarsson Ekedahl, Ann-Britt
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sjöström, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Errors linked to medication management in nursing homes: an interview study2021In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The number of errors in medication management in nursing homes is increasing, which may lead to potentially life-threatening harm. Few studies on this subject are found in the municipal nursing home setting, and causes need to be identified. The aim of this study was to explore perceptions of errors connected to medication management in nursing homes by exploring the perspective of first-line registered nurses, registered nurses, and non-licensed staff involved in the care of older persons.

    METHODS: A qualitative research approach was applied based on semi-structured interviews with 21 participants at their workplaces: Seven in each of the occupational categories of first-line registered nurses, registered nurses, and non-licensed staff. Subcategories were derived from transcribed interviews by content analysis and categorized according to the Man, Technology, and Organization concept of error causation, which is as a framework to identify errors.

    RESULTS: Mistakes in medication management were commonly perceived as a result of human shortcomings and deficiencies in working conditions such as the lack of safe tools to facilitate and secure medication management. The delegation of drug administration to non-licensed staff, the abandonment of routines, carelessness, a lack of knowledge, inadequate verbal communication between colleagues, and a lack of understanding of the difficulties involved in handling the drugs were all considered as risk areas for errors. Organizational hazards were related to the ability to control the delegation, the standard of education, and safety awareness among staff members. Safety issues relating to technology involved devices for handling prescription cards and when staff were not included in the development process of new technological aids. A lack of staff and the lack of time to act safely in the care of the elderly were also perceived as safety hazards, particularly with the non-licensed staff working in nursing homes.

    CONCLUSIONS: The staff working in nursing homes perceive that the risks due to medication management are mainly caused by human limitations or technical deficiencies. Organizational factors, such as working conditions, can often facilitate the occurrence of malpractice. To minimize mistakes, care managers need to have a systemwide perspective on safety issues, where organizational issues are essential.

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  • 29.
    Berg, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Postoperative recovery and its association with health-related quality of life among day surgery patients2012In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 11, no 24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Day surgery holds advantages for both the patient and the health care organization. However, recovery beyond the first Postoperative week and following different types of surgery has not been explored to any greater degree. The current aims were to prospectively describe Postoperative recovery and health-related quality of life among different groups of day surgery patients and to explore the association between Postoperative recovery and healthrelated quality of life 30 days after discharge.

    METHODS: A consecutive sample of 607 adult day surgery patients undergoing orthopaedic, gynaecological or general surgery was included. Postoperative recovery was assessed on days 1, 7 and 14 using the Swedish Post-discharge Surgery recovery scale and the quality of recovery-23 scale. The EQ-5D was used to assess health-related quality of life preoperatively and 30 days following discharge. A repeated measure ANOVA was conducted to evaluate Postoperative recovery from day 1 to day 14 and between different surgical groups. Hierarchical multiple linear regression models were used to explore the association between Postoperative recovery and health-related quality of life.

    RESULTS: Postoperative recovery improved from day 1 to 14 in all surgical groups (p<0.001). The orthopaedic patients had lower Postoperative recovery on day 14 compared to the general and the gynaecological patients (p<0.001). health-related quality of life was lower among orthopaedic patients (p<0.001), even if significant improvements over time were seen in all groups. recovery on day 7 was associated with health-related quality of life 30 days after the day surgery (p<0.05).

    CONCLUSION: Particularly orthopaedic day surgical patients seem to favour a closer follow-up in order to support recovery and thereby also positively influence health-related quality of life.

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  • 30. Berg, Katarina
    et al.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Unosson, Mitra
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Postoperative recovery and its association with health-related quality of life among day surgery patients.2012In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 11, no 1, p. Article ID: 24-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Day surgery holds advantages for both the patient and the health care organization. However, recovery beyond the first postoperative week and following different types of surgery has not been explored to any greater degree. The current aims were to prospectively describe postoperative recovery and health-related quality of life among different groups of day surgery patients and to explore the association between postoperative recovery and health-related quality of life 30 days after discharge.

    METHODS: A consecutive sample of 607 adult day surgery patients undergoing orthopaedic, gynaecological or general surgery was included. Postoperative recovery was assessed on days 1, 7 and 14 using the Swedish Post-discharge Surgery Recovery scale and the Quality of Recovery-23 scale. The EQ-5D was used to assess health-related quality of life preoperatively and 30 days following discharge. A repeated measure ANOVA was conducted to evaluate postoperative recovery from day 1 to day 14 and between different surgical groups. Hierarchical multiple linear regression models were used to explore the association between postoperative recovery and health-related quality of life.

    RESULTS: Postoperative recovery improved from day 1 to 14 in all surgical groups (p<0.001). The orthopaedic patients had lower postoperative recovery on day 14 compared to the general and the gynaecological patients (p<0.001). Health-related quality of life was lower among orthopaedic patients (p<0.001), even if significant improvements over time were seen in all groups. Recovery on day 7 was associated with health-related quality of life 30 days after the day surgery (p<0.05).

    CONCLUSION: Particularly orthopaedic day surgical patients seem to favour a closer follow-up in order to support recovery and thereby also positively influence health-related quality of life.

  • 31.
    Bergbom, Ingegerd
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences at the Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Veronika
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Ringdal, Mona
    University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences at the Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Developing and evaluating an instrument to measure Recovery After INtensive care: the RAIN instrument2018In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measuring and evaluating patients' recovery, following intensive care, is essential for assessing their recovery process. By using a questionnaire, which includes spiritual and existential aspects, possibilities for identifying appropriate nursing care activities may be facilitated. The study describes the development and evaluation of a recovery questionnaire and its validity and reliability.

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  • 32.
    Berntsson, K.
    et al.
    Karlstad University.
    Eliasson, M.
    Karlstad University.
    Beckman, Linda
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Patient safety when receiving telephone advice in primary care – a Swedish qualitative interview study2022In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A lack of patient safety is a significant global public health challenge and is one of the leading causes of death and disability, entailing significant financial and economic costs. However, patient safety can be improved and patients can avoid being harmed if more knowledge could be gained about what it is that impacts patient safety. Patient safety when receiving telephone advice is an important issue given the increase in digitalization in healthcare services. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore district nurses’ (“telenurses”) experiences and perceptions of patient safety when providing health advice over the phone. Methods: Data collection was performed using semi-structured interviews and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The participants (n = 12) were telnurses in primary care. Results: The theme “Being able to make the right decision” was formed based on two categories: “Communication” and “Assessment”. Through effective communication with the right conditions to make an assessment, the correct decision can be made when a patient calls, and the district nurse feels that their telephone advice is safe for the patient. Conclusions: Patient safety can be challenged when receiving telephone advice, particularly when they feel stressed due to organizational factors. There is a need to shift from the individual to the organization. Further, while computerized knowledge support generally results in safe decisions, there may also be problems. Hence, it is imperative to develop computerized knowledge support as a part of improved patient safety in telephone advice.

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  • 33.
    Björkman, A.
    et al.
    University of Gavle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Engström, M.
    University of Gavle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Winblad, U.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Holmström, Inger
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Malpractice claimed calls within the Swedish Healthcare Direct: a descriptive – comparative case study2021In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Medical errors are reported as a malpractice claim, and it is of uttermost importance to learn from the errors to enhance patient safety. The Swedish national telephone helpline SHD is staffed by registered nurses; its aim is to provide qualified healthcare advice for all residents of Sweden; it handles normally about 5 million calls annually. The ongoing Covid-19 pandemic have increased call volume with approximate 30%. The aim of the present study was twofold: to describe all malpractice claims and healthcare providers’ reported measures regarding calls to Swedish Healthcare Direct (SHD) during the period January 2011–December 2018 and to compare these findings with results from a previous study covering the period January 2003–December 2010. Methods: The study used a descriptive, retrospective and comparative design. A total sample of all reported malpractice claims regarding calls to SHD (n = 35) made during the period 2011–2018 was retrieved. Data were analysed and compared with all reported medical errors during the period 2003–2010 (n = 33). Results: Telephone nurses’ failure to follow the computerized decision support system (CDSS) (n = 18) was identified as the main reason for error during the period 2011–2018, while failure to listen to the caller (n = 12) was the main reason during the period 2003–2010. Staff education (n = 21) and listening to one’s own calls (n = 16) were the most common measures taken within the organization during the period 2011–2018, compared to discussion in work groups (n = 13) during the period 2003–2010. Conclusion: The proportion of malpractice claims in relation to all patient contacts to SHD is still very low; it seems that only the most severe patient injuries are reported. The fact that telephone nurses’ failure to follow the CDSS is the most common reason for error is notable, as SHD and healthcare organizations stress the importance of using the CDSS to enhance patient safety. The healthcare organizations seem to have adopted a more systematic approach to handling malpractice claims regarding calls, e.g., allowing telephone nurses to listen to their own calls instead of having discussions in work groups in response to events. This enables nurses to understand the latent factors contributing to error and provides a learning opportunity.

  • 34.
    Björkman, Annica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research. Univ Gävle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Gävle, Sweden..
    Engström, Maria
    Univ Gävle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Gävle, Sweden..
    Winblad, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research.
    Holmström, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research. Mälardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Västerås, Sweden..
    Malpractice claimed calls within the Swedish Healthcare Direct: a descriptive - comparative case study2021In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 20, article id 21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Medical errors are reported as a malpractice claim, and it is of uttermost importance to learn from the errors to enhance patient safety. The Swedish national telephone helpline SHD is staffed by registered nurses; its aim is to provide qualified healthcare advice for all residents of Sweden; it handles normally about 5 million calls annually. The ongoing Covid-19 pandemic have increased call volume with approximate 30%. The aim of the present study was twofold: to describe all malpractice claims and healthcare providers' reported measures regarding calls to Swedish Healthcare Direct (SHD) during the period January 2011-December 2018 and to compare these findings with results from a previous study covering the period January 2003-December 2010.

    Methods: The study used a descriptive, retrospective and comparative design. A total sample of all reported malpractice claims regarding calls to SHD (n = 35) made during the period 2011-2018 was retrieved. Data were analysed and compared with all reported medical errors during the period 2003-2010 (n = 33).

    Results: Telephone nurses' failure to follow the computerized decision support system (CDSS) (n = 18) was identified as the main reason for error during the period 2011-2018, while failure to listen to the caller (n = 12) was the main reason during the period 2003-2010. Staff education (n = 21) and listening to one's own calls (n = 16) were the most common measures taken within the organization during the period 2011-2018, compared to discussion in work groups (n = 13) during the period 2003-2010.

    Conclusion: The proportion of malpractice claims in relation to all patient contacts to SHD is still very low; it seems that only the most severe patient injuries are reported. The fact that telephone nurses' failure to follow the CDSS is the most common reason for error is notable, as SHD and healthcare organizations stress the importance of using the CDSS to enhance patient safety. The healthcare organizations seem to have adopted a more systematic approach to handling malpractice claims regarding calls, e.g., allowing telephone nurses to listen to their own calls instead of having discussions in work groups in response to events. This enables nurses to understand the latent factors contributing to error and provides a learning opportunity.

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  • 35.
    Björkman, Annica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science. Uppsala universitet.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.
    Winblad, Ulrika
    Uppsala universitet.
    Holmström, Inger K
    Uppsala universitet; Mälardalens högskola.
    Malpractice claimed calls within the Swedish Healthcare Direct: a descriptive – comparative case study2021In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 20, article id 21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Medical errors are reported as a malpractice claim, and it is of uttermost importance to learn from the errors to enhance patient safety. The Swedish national telephone helpline SHD is staffed by registered nurses; its aim is to provide qualified healthcare advice for all residents of Sweden; it handles normally about 5 million calls annually. The ongoing Covid-19 pandemic have increased call volume with approximate 30%. The aim of the present study was twofold: to describe all malpractice claims and healthcare providers’ reported measures regarding calls to Swedish Healthcare Direct (SHD) during the period January 2011–December 2018 and to compare these findings with results from a previous study covering the period January 2003–December 2010.

    Methods

    The study used a descriptive, retrospective and comparative design. A total sample of all reported malpractice claims regarding calls to SHD (n = 35) made during the period 2011–2018 was retrieved. Data were analysed and compared with all reported medical errors during the period 2003–2010 (n = 33).

    Results

    Telephone nurses’ failure to follow the computerized decision support system (CDSS) (n = 18) was identified as the main reason for error during the period 2011–2018, while failure to listen to the caller (n = 12) was the main reason during the period 2003–2010. Staff education (n = 21) and listening to one’s own calls (n = 16) were the most common measures taken within the organization during the period 2011–2018, compared to discussion in work groups (n = 13) during the period 2003–2010.

    Conclusion

    The proportion of malpractice claims in relation to all patient contacts to SHD is still very low; it seems that only the most severe patient injuries are reported. The fact that telephone nurses’ failure to follow the CDSS is the most common reason for error is notable, as SHD and healthcare organizations stress the importance of using the CDSS to enhance patient safety. The healthcare organizations seem to have adopted a more systematic approach to handling malpractice claims regarding calls, e.g., allowing telephone nurses to listen to their own calls instead of having discussions in work groups in response to events. This enables nurses to understand the latent factors contributing to error and provides a learning opportunity.

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  • 36.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Eriksson, Miia
    Skåne University Hospital.
    Rosen, Madeleine
    Skåne University Hospital.
    Axelsson, Malin
    Malmö University.
    Registered nurses' experiences of providing respiratory care in relation to hospital aquired pneumonia at in-patient stroke units: a qualitative descriptive study2020In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 19, no 124, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aimed to describe registered nurses’ (RNs) experiences of providing respiratory care in relation to hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP), specifically among patients with acute stroke being cared for at in-patient stroke units. Background: One of the most common and serious respiratory complications associated with acute stroke is HAP. Respiratory care is among the fundamentals of patient care, and thus competency in this field is expected as part of nursing training. However, there is a paucity of literature detailing RNs’ experiences with respiratory care in relation to HAP, specifically among patients with acute stroke, in the context of stroke units. As such, there is a need to expand the knowledge base relating to respiratory care focusing on HAP, to assist with evidence-based nursing.Design: A qualitative descriptive study.Method: Eleven RNs working in four different acute stroke units in Southern Sweden participated in the current study. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews, and the transcribed interviews were analysed using inductive content analysis.Results: Three overarching categories were identified: (1), awareness of risk assessments and risk factors for HAP (2) targeting HAP through multiple nursing care actions, and (3) challenges in providing respiratory care to patients in risk of HAP. These reflected the similarities and differences in the experiences that RNs had with providing respiratory care in relation to HAP among in-patients with acute stroke.Conclusions: The findings from this study suggest that the RNs experience organisational challenges in providing respiratory care for HAP among patients with acute stroke. Respiratory care plays a vital role in the identification and prevention of HAP, but our findings imply that RNs’ knowledge needs to be improved, the fundamentals of nursing care need to be prioritised, and evidence-based guidelines must be implemented. RNs would also benefit from further education and support, in order to lead point-of-care nursing in multidisciplinary stroke teams.

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  • 37.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Department of Nursing Education, Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, 0456, Oslo, Norway.
    Eriksson, Miia
    Department of Neurology, Skåne University Hospital, SE-222 42, Malmö, Sweden.
    Rosén, Madeleine
    Department of Neurology, Skåne University Hospital, SE-222 42, Malmö, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Malin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Registered nurses' experiences of providing respiratory care in relation to hospital- acquired pneumonia at in-patient stroke units: a qualitative descriptive study2020In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to describe registered nurses' (RNs) experiences of providing respiratory care in relation to hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP), specifically among patients with acute stroke being cared for at in-patient stroke units.

    BACKGROUND: One of the most common and serious respiratory complications associated with acute stroke is HAP. Respiratory care is among the fundamentals of patient care, and thus competency in this field is expected as part of nursing training. However, there is a paucity of literature detailing RNs' experiences with respiratory care in relation to HAP, specifically among patients with acute stroke, in the context of stroke units. As such, there is a need to expand the knowledge base relating to respiratory care focusing on HAP, to assist with evidence-based nursing.

    DESIGN: A qualitative descriptive study.

    METHOD: Eleven RNs working in four different acute stroke units in Southern Sweden participated in the current study. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews, and the transcribed interviews were analysed using inductive content analysis.

    RESULTS: Three overarching categories were identified: (1), awareness of risk assessments and risk factors for HAP (2) targeting HAP through multiple nursing care actions, and (3) challenges in providing respiratory care to patients in risk of HAP. These reflected the similarities and differences in the experiences that RNs had with providing respiratory care in relation to HAP among in-patients with acute stroke.

    CONCLUSIONS: The findings from this study suggest that the RNs experience organisational challenges in providing respiratory care for HAP among patients with acute stroke. Respiratory care plays a vital role in the identification and prevention of HAP, but our findings imply that RNs' knowledge needs to be improved, the fundamentals of nursing care need to be prioritised, and evidence-based guidelines must be implemented. RNs would also benefit from further education and support, in order to lead point-of-care nursing in multidisciplinary stroke teams.

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  • 38.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    et al.
    Malmö university, Sweden; Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, Norway.
    Rathel, Kristina
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Paulsson, Helena
    Åstorp Primary Care Centre, Region Skåne, Sweden.
    Sjögren Forss, Katarina
    Malmö university, Sweden.
    Registered nurses experiences of managing depressive symptoms at care centres for older people: a qualitative descriptive study2019In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 1-12, article id 43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Depressive symptoms and/or depression are commonly experienced by older people. Both are underdiagnosed, undertreated and regularly overlooked by healthcare professionals. Healthcare facilities for people aged >= 75 years have been in place in Sweden since 2015. The aim of these care centres, which are managed by registered nurses (RNs), is to offer care adjusted to cater to the complex needs and health problems of older people. Although the mental health of older people is prioritised in these centres, research into the experience of RNs of depressive symptoms and/or depression in older people in this setting is limited. Therefore, this study aimed to illuminate RNs, working at care centres for older people, experience of identifying and intervening in cases of depressive symptoms. Methods The data for this qualitative descriptive study were collected through interviews (n = 10) with RNs working at 10 care centres for older people in southern Sweden. The transcribed texts were analysed using inductive content analysis. Results The participants' experiences could be understood from four predominant themes: (1) challenging to identify, (2) described interventions, (3) prerequisites for identification, and (4) contextual influences. Key findings were that it was difficult to identify depression as it often manifested as physical symptoms; evidence-based nursing interventions were generally not the first-line treatment used; trust, continuity and the ability of RNs to think laterally; and the context influenced the ability of RNs to manage older people's depressive symptoms and/or depression. Conclusions The process of identifying depressive symptoms and performing an appropriate intervention was found to be complex, especially as older people were reluctant to present at the centres and provided obscure reasons for doing so. A nurse-patient relationship that was built on trust and was characterised by continuity of care was identified as a necessary prerequisite. Appropriate nursing interventions-afforded the same status as pharmacological treatment-are warranted as the first-line treatment of depression. Further research is also needed into efficacious nursing interventions targeting depressive symptoms and/or depression.

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  • 39.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Lovisenberg Diaconal Univ Coll, Dept Nursing Educ, N-0456 Oslo, Norway.
    Räthel, Kristina
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Geriatr, SE-22185 Lund, Sweden.
    Helene, Paulsson
    Astorp Primary Care Ctr, Reg Skåne, SE-26534 Astorp, Sweden.
    Sjögren Forss, Katarina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Registered nurse’s working at elderly care centers experience of depressive symptoms among older people: a qualitative descriptive study2019In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 18, article id 43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Depressive symptoms and/or depression are commonly experienced by older people. Both are underdiagnosed, undertreated and regularly overlooked by healthcare professionals. Healthcare facilities for people aged ≥ 75 years have been in place in Sweden since 2015. The aim of these care centres, which are managed by registered nurses (RNs), is to offer care adjusted to cater to the complex needs and health problems of older people. Although the mental health of older people is prioritised in these centres, research into the experience of RNs of depressive symptoms and/or depression in older people in this setting is limited. Therefore, this study aimed to illuminate RNs, working at care centres for older people, experience of identifying and intervening in cases of depressive symptoms. Methods: The data for this qualitative descriptive study were collected through interviews (n = 10) with RNs working at 10 care centres for older people in southern Sweden. The transcribed texts were analysed using inductive content analysis. Results: The participants’ experiences could be understood from four predominant themes: (1) challenging to identify, (2) described interventions, (3) prerequisites for identification, and (4) contextual influences. Key findings were that it was difficult to identify depression as it often manifested as physical symptoms; evidence-based nursing interventions were generally not the first-line treatment used; trust, continuity and the ability of RNs to think laterally; and the context influenced the ability of RNs to manage older people’s depressive symptoms and/or depression. Conclusions: The process of identifying depressive symptoms and performing an appropriate intervention was found to be complex, especially as older people were reluctant to present at the centres and provided obscure reasons for doing so. A nurse-patient relationship that was built on trust and was characterised by continuity of care was identified as a necessary prerequisite. Appropriate nursing interventions—afforded the same status as pharmacological treatment—are warranted as the first-line treatment of depression. Further research is also needed into efficacious nursing interventions targeting depressive symptoms and/or depression.

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  • 40.
    Bos (Sparén), Elisabeth
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Silén, Charlotte
    Karolinska institutet.
    Kail, Päivi
    Karolinska institutet.
    Clinical supervision in primary health care: experiences of district nurses as clinical supervisors - a qualitative study2015In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 14, no 39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Learning in the clinical environment is an important part of nursing education. Several recent studies focusing on clinical learning have been based on hospital settings. Little is known about primary health care (PHC) as clinical environment where district nurses (DNs) or nurses supervise students. It is important to understand more about opportunities and difficulties in supervising in this area in order to develop PHC as an optimal learning environment for nursing students. The main objective of this study was to gain an understanding of supervisors’ experiences of supervising undergraduate students at PHC units.

    Methods A qualitative research approach was used to collect data and analyse supervisors’ experiences. Six focus groups were carried out with 24 supervisors. Focus group data were audio-taped. The data were analysed using an inductive content analysis.

    Results Three themes illustrated supervisors’ experiences: abandonment, ambivalence and sharing the holistic approach. Supervisors felt abandoned by their managers, colleagues and nurse teachers from universities. They experienced ambivalence due to simultaneously being supervisors for students and carrying out their daily work with patients. At the same time, they were proud to be DNs and willing to share their unique role to apply a holistic approach and continuity in patient care with students.

    Conclusion When supervising students in PHC, social support and communication between supervisors and their colleagues and management as well as nurse teachers need to be taken into consideration both at universities and at primary health care units.

  • 41.
    Boström, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Ali, Lilas
    Fors, Andreas
    Ekman, Inger
    Andersson, Annette Erichsen
    Registered nurses' experiences of communication with patients when practising person-centred care over the phone: a qualitative interview study2020In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To explore registered nurses’ (RNs’) experiences of practising person-centred care (PCC) by telephone with people diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and/or chronic heart failure.

    Methods: Qualitative interview study. Four RNs were individually interviewed before, during, and after participating in an intervention practising PCC by telephone. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The results reflect three categories of their experience: realize the complexity of practising PCC by distance, gain insight into what PCC communication meant to RNs and their approach, and develop the professional role by practising PCC theory and ethics.

    Conclusions: PCC over the telephone facilitate healthcare and support patients. Through careful listening, the RNs (1) created space for the individual patients to express their thoughts and feelings and (2) emphasized each patient’s capabilities and resources. The RNs also gained an understanding of PCC and what it means to patients and to themselves as practitioners. Potential implications are that it is important for RNs practising PCC by telephone to remould their role, to listen carefully, and to communicate as equals in conversations that respect both parties’ knowledge and expertise. Health professionals need supervision and support to fully understand the person-centred approach and provide communications that support it.

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  • 42.
    Bouwmeester Stjernetun, Björn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare. School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Gillsjö, Catharina
    School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden; College of Nursing, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    ”It´s like walking in a bubble”, nursing students´ perspectives on age suit simulation in a home environment – group interviews from reflection seminars2024In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 23, article id 124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older persons with age-related and complex health problems will increasingly depend on care provision from nurses in their own homes. However, a barrier to quality care is ageism and nursing students´ disinterest in geriatrics. In addition, nurse education often falls short in preparing students for the complexity of geriatric care. Welfare technology (WT) is progressively implemented in home care to help older persons live at home despite their health problems. However, this process is intricate and requires acceptance and digital literacy among caregivers and older persons. Despite these challenges, nurse education can address and change negative attitudes through innovative teaching methods such as age suit simulation. Therefore, the study aims to describe nursing students´ experiences of age suit simulation in a home-like environment with WT and technical aids, and will reveal their perspective on ageing and providing care to older adults.

  • 43.
    Bouwmeester Stjernetun, Björn
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Gillsjö, Catharina
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). College of Nursing, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    ”It´s like walking in a bubble”, nursing students´ perspectives on age suit simulation in a home environment – group interviews from reflection seminars2024In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Older persons with age-related and complex health problems will increasingly depend on care provision from nurses in their own homes. However, a barrier to quality care is ageism and nursing students´ disinterest in geriatrics. In addition, nurse education often falls short in preparing students for the complexity of geriatric care. Welfare technology (WT) is progressively implemented in home care to help older persons live at home despite their health problems. However, this process is intricate and requires acceptance and digital literacy among caregivers and older persons. Despite these challenges, nurse education can address and change negative attitudes through innovative teaching methods such as age suit simulation. Therefore, the study aims to describe nursing students´ experiences of age suit simulation in a home-like environment with WT and technical aids, and will reveal their perspective on ageing and providing care to older adults.

    Methods

    A qualitative explorative design using semi-structured group interviews (n=39) among nursing students. Data was analysed through reflexive thematic analysis.

    Results

    The analysis generated three main themes; “It’s like walking in a bubble”, “An eye opener” and “Concerns about ageing and the current structure of geriatric care”. The main themes included eight subthemes. Adapting to the sensory and physical limitations of the age suit was an immersive experience and caused feelings of frustration, loneliness and disconnection. A prominent result was a raised awareness of cognitive loss, especially impaired vision, and students felt the simulations had made them aware of the everyday challenges older persons faced. Students highlighted the importance of patience and giving enough time in care situations by being present and having a critical perspective of WT. The students were mostly negative towards their own ageing and could better relate to older persons´ vulnerability.

    Conclusions

    Age suit simulation was described as an embodied and eye-opening experience, raising nursing students´ awareness of older persons´ functional limitations and the consequences for dignity and independence. Coping with cognitive loss was especially difficult. Students were motivated to apply their new knowledge to clinical practice. Age suit simulation can complement geriatric education, preparing students for the complex care needs of older persons.

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  • 44.
    Bringsén, Åsa
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Ejlertsson, Göran
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Människa - Hälsa - Samhälle (MHS).
    Andersson, H. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Flow situations during everyday practice in a medical hospital ward: results from a study based on experience sampling method2011In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 10, p. 3-3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nursing is a constant balance between strain and stimulation and work and health research with a positive reference point has been recommended. A health-promoting circumstance for subjective experience is flow, which is a psychological state, when individuals concurrently experience happiness, motivation and cognitive efficiency. Flow situations can be identified through individuals' estimates of perceived challenge and skills. There is, to the best of our knowledge, no published study of flow among health care staff. The aim of this study was to identify flow-situations and study work-related activities and individual factors associated with flow situations, during everyday practice at a medical emergency ward in Sweden, in order to increase the knowledge on salutogenic health-promoting factors.The respondents consisted of 17 assistant nurses and 14 registered nurses, who randomly and repeatedly answered a small questionnaire, through an experience sampling method, during everyday nursing practice. The study resulted in 497 observations. Flow situations were defined as an exact match between a high challenge and skill estimation and logistic regression models were used to study different variables association to flow situations.The health care staff spent most of its working time in individual nursing care and administrative and communicative duties. The assistant nurses were more often occupied in individual nursing care, while the registered nurses were more involved in medical care and administrative and communicative duties. The study resulted in 11.5% observations of flow situations but the relative number of flow situations varied between none to 55% among the participants. Flow situations were positively related to medical care activities and individual cognitive resources. Taking a break was also positively associated with flow situations among the assistant nurses.The result showed opportunities for work-related interventions, with an adherent increase in flow situations, opportunity for experience of flow and work-related health among the nursing staff in general and among the assistant nurses in particular.

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  • 45.
    Bringsén, Åsa
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Forskningsmiljön Man - Health - Society (MHS). Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Department of Public Health.
    Sjöbeck, Johanna
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Department of Public Health.
    Petersson, Pia
    Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Department of Nursing and Integrated Health Sciences. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Forskningsmiljön Man - Health - Society (MHS).
    Nursing staff's experience of appearance issues in various nursing situations2021In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-12, article id 204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Health care professionals frequently interact with unknown patients in a process involving appearance-based judgements and priority-setting, all of which has an effect on health care equality. The healthcare provider-patient interaction is also highly relevant for the awareness and support of patients' appearance concerns, with an associated possibility for improving patients' satisfaction with their appearance and health. The aim was therefore to explore nursing staff's experience of patients' appearance issues in various nursing situations, with the purpose to facilitate awareness raising and knowledge development.

    METHOD: A qualitative research approach with focus group interviews was chosen due to the exploratory aim of the study. Five semi-structured focus group interviews were conducted with 24 nursing staff in total (19 women and five men). The participants' ages varied (20 to 45 years) as did their professional nursing experience. The interviews lasted approximately one hour, were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed through thematic analysis.

    RESULTS: The thematic analysis resulted in the two themes Patient perspective and Professional nursing role, with associated subthemes. The findings showed the importance and impact of appearance issues in nursing situations and how these are linked to the health of the patients. Some groups of patients were identified as more vulnerable than others, which was associated with health care inequalities and health disparities. Value-based strategies along with knowledge, and skills for holistic person-centred care were identified as important resources for the development of appearance-related awareness and support in various nursing situations.

    CONCLUSION: Strategies for improvement can be realised through the educational system for nursing staff, but mainly by using collective reflective learning forums in different workplaces. An empowerment approach is considered a useful framework for the implementation of holistic person-centred care, functioning as a resource for appearance-related awareness and support in various nursing situations. However, more research is needed on the complex and challenging phenomenon of appearance issues in nursing situations. Knowledge development related to successful person-centred strategies for appearance-related awareness and support is important, especially strategies with a salutogenic perspective.

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  • 46.
    Brobeck, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Research, Development and Education, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Odencrants, Sigrid
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Bergh, Håkan
    Department of Research, Development and Education, Varberg, Sweden.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Patients’ experiences of lifestyle discussions based on motivational interviewing: a qualitative study2014In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 13, no 13Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    According to World Health Organization about 75% of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes and 40% of all cases of cancer could be prevented if the risk factors tobacco use, unhealthy diets, physical inactivity and harmful use of alcohol could be eliminated. Patients often need help in monitoring themselves to make the proper lifestyle changes and it is important that adequate support is provided to enable the patients to take control over their health. Motivational interviewing is a framework that can help to facilitate this movement. The aim of this study was to describe how patients in primary health care settings experience lifestyle discussions based on motivationalinterviewing.

    Methods This study has a descriptive design and qualitative content analysis was used as the method. Sixteen patients who had each visited a registered nurse for lifestyle discussions were interviewed.

    Results The results show that the lifestyle discussions could enable self-determination in the process oflifestyle change but that certain conditions were required. Mutual interaction between the patient and the nurse that contributes to a sense of well-being in the patients was a necessary condition for the lifestyle discussion to be helpful. When the discussion resulted in a new way of thinking about lifestyle and when patient initiative was encouraged,the discussion could contribute to change. The patient’s free will to make a lifestyle change and the nurse’s sensitivity in the discussions created fertile soil for change.

    Conclusions This study focuses on MI-based discussions, and the result shows that a subset of patients, who self reported that they are motivated and aware of their role in making lifestyle changes, appreciate these strategies. However, it is not known whether discussions would be experienced in the same way if RNs used another method or if patients who were less motivated, engaged, or aware of their role in making lifestyle changes were interviewed.

  • 47.
    Brobeck, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Department of Research, Development and Education, Halmstad, Sweden & School of Health and Medical Sciences Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Odencrants, Sigrid
    School of Health and Medical Sciences Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bergh, Håkan
    Department of Research, Development and Education, Varberg, Sweden.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Patients' experiences of lifestyle discussions based on motivational interviewing: a qualitative study2014In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: According to World Health Organization about 75% of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes and 40% of all cases of cancer could be prevented if the risk factors tobacco use, unhealthy diets, physical inactivity and harmful use of alcohol could be eliminated. Patients often need help in monitoring themselves to make the proper lifestyle changes and it is important that adequate support is provided to enable the patients to take control over their health. Motivational interviewing is a framework that can help to facilitate this movement. The aim of this study was to describe how patients in primary health care settings experience lifestyle discussions based on motivational interviewing.

    Methods: This study has a descriptive design and qualitative content analysis was used as the method. Sixteen patients who had each visited a registered nurse for lifestyle discussions were interviewed.

    Results: The results show that the lifestyle discussions could enable self-determination in the process of lifestyle change but that certain conditions were required. Mutual interaction between the patient and the nurse that contributes to a sense of well-being in the patients was a necessary condition for the lifestyle discussion to be helpful. When the discussion resulted in a new way of thinking about lifestyle and when patient initiative was encouraged, the discussion could contribute to change. The patient’s free will to make a lifestyle change and the nurse’s sensitivity in the discussions created fertile soil for change.

    Conclusions: This study focuses on MI-based discussions, and the result shows that a subset of patients, who self-reported that they are motivated and aware of their role in making lifestyle changes, appreciate these strategies. However, it is not known whether discussions would be experienced in the same way if RNs used another method or if patients who were less motivated, engaged, or aware of their role in making lifestyle changes were interviewed. © 2014 Brobeck et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

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  • 48.
    Bräutigam Ewe, Marie
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Akademin, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Månsson, Jörgen
    Sahlgrenska Akademin, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lydell, Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Primary care nurses’ perceptions and experiences of patients being overweight or obese as well as visions and attitudes about working with lifestyle issues: a qualitative interview study2021In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 170Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Bökberg, Christina
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Staffan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing. Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Significance of quality of care for quality of life in persons with dementia at risk of nursing home admission: a cross-sectional study2017In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Quality of life in persons with dementia is, in large part, dependent on the quality of care they receive. Investigating both subjective and objective aspects of quality of care may reveal areas for improvement regarding their care, which information may ultimately enable persons with dementia to remain living in their own homes while maintaining quality of life. The aim of this study was to 1) describe self-reported quality of life in persons with dementia at risk of nursing home admission. 2) describe subjective and objective aspects of quality of care, 3) investigate the significance of quality of care for quality of life.

    Methods

    A cross-sectional interview study design was used, based on questionnaires about quality of life (QoL-AD) and different aspects of quality of care (CLINT and quality indicators). The sample consisted of 177 persons with dementia living in urban and rural areas in Skåne County, Sweden. Descriptive and comparative statistics (Mann-Whitney U-test) were used to analyse the data.

    Results

    Based upon Lawton’s conceptual framework for QoL in older people, persons with pain showed significantly lower quality of life in the dimensions behavioural competence (p = 0.026) and psychological wellbeing (p = 0.006) compared with those without pain. Satisfaction with care seemed to have a positive effect on quality of life. The overall quality of life was perceived high even though one-third of the persons with dementia had daily pain and had had a weight loss of ≥4% during the preceding year. Furthermore, 23% of the persons with dementia had fallen during the last month and 40% of them had sustained an injury when falling.

    Conclusion

    This study indicates need for improvements in home care and services for persons with dementia at risk for nursing home admission. Registered nurses are responsible for nursing interventions related to pain, patient safety, skin care, prevention of accidents, and malnutrition. Therefore, it is of great importance for nurses to have knowledge about areas that can be improved to be able to tailor interventions and thereby improve quality of care outcomes such as quality of life in persons with dementia living at home. © 2017 The Author(s).

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  • 50.
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Bengtsson, Mariette
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Perceptions of preceptorship in clinical practice after completion of a continuous professional development course: a qualitative study: Part II2015In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, no 14, article id 41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background For health care professionals, clinical practice is a vital part of education, and in several countries teaching is a regulated part of the role of nurses and health care staff. The added responsibility of taking on the teaching of students during clinical practice; thus, balancing clinical and educational demands, might lead to feelings of stress and burn-out. Being a skilled and experienced professional is not automatically linked to being a skilled educator as teaching of a subject is a whole different story. Preceptors who participate in educational initiatives are better prepared to address challenges and are more satisfied with the preceptor role. The aim of the current study was to evaluate preceptors’ experiences of preceptorship in clinical practice after completion of a credit bearing continuous professional development course on advanced level. Methods This was a small-scale interpretative qualitative study drawing data from focus group interviews and written accounts from reflective journals. Data were analysed through the process of naturalistic inquiry. Results Our findings show that the participants, who took part in and completed the CPD course, had developed skills and competences they believed to be necessary to drive pedagogical development at their respective work-places. This is illustrated by the main category Leading educational development and explained by four sub-categories: 1/ increased ability to give collegial support; 2/ increased trust in one´s abilities; 3/ increased emphasis on reflection; and 4/ increased professional status. Conclusions A well-structured program based on the needs of preceptors and developed in partnership between educational and clinical settings seems to be successful in terms of preceptors’ perceived increase of their competence, abilities and professional status. What seems to be missing, not only from the current study but also from previous research, is to what extent properly prepared preceptors impact on student learning and this needs to be further investigated.

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