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  • 1.
    Aarnivala, Henri
    et al.
    Univ Oulu, Oulu Univ Hosp, Dept Children & Adolescents, Kajaanintie 52, SF-90220 Oulu, Finland;Univ Oulu, PEDEGO Res Unit, Kajaanintie 52, SF-90220 Oulu, Finland.
    Pokka, Tytti
    Univ Oulu, Oulu Univ Hosp, Dept Children & Adolescents, Kajaanintie 52, SF-90220 Oulu, Finland;Univ Oulu, PEDEGO Res Unit, Kajaanintie 52, SF-90220 Oulu, Finland.
    Soininen, Riina
    Univ Oulu, Oulu Univ Hosp, Dept Children & Adolescents, Kajaanintie 52, SF-90220 Oulu, Finland;Univ Oulu, PEDEGO Res Unit, Kajaanintie 52, SF-90220 Oulu, Finland.
    Mottonen, Merja
    Univ Oulu, Oulu Univ Hosp, Dept Children & Adolescents, Kajaanintie 52, SF-90220 Oulu, Finland;Univ Oulu, PEDEGO Res Unit, Kajaanintie 52, SF-90220 Oulu, Finland.
    Harila-Saari, Arja
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Forskargrupper (Inst. för kvinnor och barns hälsa), Barnneurologi/Barnonkologi.
    Niinimaki, Riitta
    Univ Oulu, Oulu Univ Hosp, Dept Children & Adolescents, Kajaanintie 52, SF-90220 Oulu, Finland;Univ Oulu, PEDEGO Res Unit, Kajaanintie 52, SF-90220 Oulu, Finland.
    Trends in age- and sex-adjusted body mass index and the prevalence of malnutrition in children with cancer over 42 months after diagnosis: a single-center cohort study2020Ingår i: European Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0340-6199, E-ISSN 1432-1076, Vol. 179, nr 1, s. 91-98Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The adequate nutritional status of pediatric cancer patients is particularly important to enable them to cope with the demands of the disease and its treatment and to maintain normal growth. Malnutrition and obesity have both been associated with reduced survival and increased drug toxicity. We investigated trends in the age- and sex-adjusted body mass index (ISO-BMI) and the prevalence of malnutrition in a Finnish cohort of 139 consecutive children receiving chemotherapy for cancer, with a follow-up period of 42 months after diagnosis. In total, 28% (39/139) of the patients experienced malnutrition (ISO-BMI < 17 or > 10% weight loss), and 12% (16/139) had a nasogastric tube or underwent gastrostomy. Patients with acute or chronic myeloid leukemia (5/10), central nervous system (CNS) tumors (5/13), or solid tumors (13/31) most frequently suffered from malnutrition. There was a significant increase in the ISO-BMI of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (+ 2.1 kg/m(2)) and lymphomas (+ 2.4 kg/m(2)) during the first 6 months, and the ISO-BMI of patients with ALL remained higher at 42 months compared to baseline (+ 1.9 kg/m(2)). Conclusion: The cumulative incidence of malnutrition in Finnish pediatric cancer patients is comparable to that reported in other populations. The nutritional status of patients with acute myeloid leukemia, CNS tumors, or solid tumors should be monitored with extra care to facilitate early intervention in the case of impending malnutrition.

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  • 2.
    Abdollahi, Farzaneh Zamiri
    et al.
    Univ Social Welf & Rehabil Sci, Iran.
    Ahmadi, Tayebeh
    Univ Social Welf & Rehabil Sci, Iran.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Lotfi, Yones
    Univ Social Welf & Rehabil Sci, Iran.
    Auditory Brainstem Response Improvements in Hyperbillirubinemic Infants2016Ingår i: JOURNAL OF AUDIOLOGY AND OTOLOGY, ISSN 2384-1621, Vol. 20, nr 1, s. 13-16Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objectives: Hyperbillirubinemia in infants have been associated with neuronal damage including in the auditory system. Some researchers have suggested that the bilirubin-induced auditory neuronal damages may be temporary and reversible. This study was aimed at investigating the auditory neuropathy and reversibility of auditory abnormalities in hyperbillirubinemic infants. Subjects and Methods: The study participants included 41 full term hyperbilirubinemic infants (mean age 39.24 days) with normal birth weight (3,2003,700 grams) that admitted in hospital for hyperbillirubinemia and 39 normal infants (mean age 35.54 days) without any hyperbillirubinemia or other hearing loss risk factors for ruling out maturational changes. All infants in hyperbilirubinemic group had serum bilirubin level more than 20 milligram per deciliter and undergone one blood exchange transfusion. Hearing evaluation for each infant was conducted twice: the first one after hyperbilirubinemia treatment and before leaving hospital and the second one three months after the first hearing evaluation. Hearing evaluations included transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) screening and auditory brainstem response (ABR) threshold tracing. Results: The TEOAE and ABR results of control group and TEOAE results of the hyperbilirubinemic group did not change significantly from the first to the second evaluation. However, the ABR results of the hyperbilirubinemic group improved significantly from the first to the second assessment (p=0.025). Conclusions: The results suggest that the bilirubin induced auditory neuronal damage can be reversible over time so we suggest that infants with hyperbilirubinemia who fail the first hearing tests should be reevaluated after 3 months of treatment.

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  • 3.
    Abrahamsson, T. R.
    et al.
    Dept Clin & Expt Med, Div Pediat, Linköping Univ, Linköping, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, H. E.
    Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, A. F.
    Sch Biotechnol, Div Gene Technol, Sci Life Lab, Royal Inst Technol (KTH ), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Engstrand, L.
    Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden; Div Gene Technol, Sci Life Lab, KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Biotechnol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, M. C.
    Dept Clin & Expt Med, Div Pediat, Linköping Univ, Linköping, Sweden; Dept Clin & Expt Med, Div Clin Immunol, Unit Autoimmun & Immune Regulat, Linköping Univ, Linköping, Sweden.
    Low gut microbiota diversity in early infancy precedes asthma at school age2014Ingår i: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 44, nr 6, s. 842-850Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Low total diversity of the gut microbiota during the first year of life is associated with allergic diseases in infancy, but little is known how early microbial diversity is related to allergic disease later in school age. Objective To assess microbial diversity and characterize the dominant bacteria in stool during the first year of life in relation to the prevalence of different allergic diseases in school age, such as asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC) and eczema. Methods The microbial diversity and composition was analysed with barcoded 16S rDNA 454 pyrosequencing in stool samples at 1week, 1month and 12months of age in 47 infants which were subsequently assessed for allergic disease and skin prick test reactivity at 7years of age (ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01285830). Results Children developing asthma (n=8) had a lower diversity of the total microbiota than non-asthmatic children at 1week (P=0.04) and 1month (P=0.003) of age, whereas allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (n=13), eczema (n=12) and positive skin prick reactivity (n=14) at 7years of age did not associate with the gut microbiota diversity. Neither was asthma associated with the microbiota composition later in infancy (at 12months). Children having IgE-associated eczema in infancy and subsequently developing asthma had lower microbial diversity than those that did not. There were no significant differences, however, in relative abundance of bacterial phyla and genera between children with or without allergic disease. Conclusion and Clinical Relevance Low total diversity of the gut microbiota during the first month of life was associated with asthma but not ARC in children at 7years of age. Measures affecting microbial colonization of the infant during the first month of life may impact asthma development in childhood.

  • 4.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för barns och kvinnors hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Using probiotics to prevent necrotising enterocolitis2017Ingår i: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 106, nr 11, s. 1718-1719Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 5.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas R.
    et al.
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Pediatrics, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Hedvig E.
    Department of Preparedness, Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control, Solna, Sweden; Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    Science for Life Laboratory, School of Biotechnology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; .
    Engstrand, Lars
    Department of Preparedness, Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control, Solna, Sweden; Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria C.
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Pediatrics, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Unit of Autoimmunity and Immune Regulation, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Low diversity of the gut microbiota in infants with atopic eczema2012Ingår i: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 129, nr 2, s. 434-440.e2Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It is debated whether a low total diversity of the gut microbiota in early childhood is more important than an altered prevalence of particular bacterial species for the increasing incidence of allergic disease. The advent of powerful, cultivation-free molecular methods makes it possible to characterize the total microbiome down to the genus level in large cohorts.

    Objective: We sought to assess microbial diversity and characterize the dominant bacteria in stool during the first year of life in relation to atopic eczema development.

    Methods: Microbial diversity and composition were analyzed with barcoded 16S rDNA 454-pyrosequencing in stool samples at 1 week, 1 month, and 12 months of age in 20 infants with IgE-associated eczema and 20 infants without any allergic manifestation until 2 years of age (ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01285830).

    Results: Infants with IgE-associated eczema had a lower diversity of the total microbiota at 1 month (P = .004) and a lower diversity of the bacterial phylum Bacteroidetes and the genus Bacteroides at 1 month (P = .02 and P = .01) and the phylum Proteobacteria at 12 months of age (P = .02). The microbiota was less uniform at 1 month than at 12 months of age, with a high interindividual variability. At 12 months, when the microbiota had stabilized, Proteobacteria, comprising gram-negative organisms, were more abundant in infants without allergic manifestation (Empirical Analysis of Digital Gene Expression in R [edgeR] test: P = .008, q = 0.02).

    Conclusion: Low intestinal microbial diversity during the first month of life was associated with subsequent atopic eczema.

  • 6. Abrahamsson, Thomas R.
    et al.
    Jakobsson, Ted
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Oldaeus, Göran
    Jenmalm, Maria C.
    No effect of probiotics on respiratory allergies: a seven-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial in infancy2013Ingår i: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 24, nr 6, s. 556-561Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Supplementation with the probioticLactobacillus reuteri reduced the incidence of IgE-associated allergic disease in infancy. This treatment might therefore also reduce the risk of asthma and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in school age.

    Objective: To evaluate whether perinatal and infant supplementation withL.reuteri reduced the prevalence of respiratory allergic disease in school age and to explore whether this supplementation was associated with any long-term side effects.

    Methods: A randomized, placebo-controlled trial with oral supplementation withL.reuteriATCC 55730 (1x10(8)CFU) during the last month of gestation and through the first year of life comprising 232 families with allergic disease, of whom 184 completed a 7-yr follow-up. The primary outcomes at 7yr of age were allergic disease and skin prick test reactivity (ClinicalTrials.govID NCT01285830).

    Results: The prevalence of asthma (15% in the probiotic vs. 16% in placebo group), allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (27% vs. 20%), eczema (21% vs. 19%) and skin prick test reactivity (29% vs. 26%) was similar in the probiotic and placebo group. Growth indices and gastrointestinal symptoms were similar in the two groups. No severe adverse events were reported.

    Conclusion: The effect ofL.reuteri on sensitization andIgE-associated eczema in infancy did not lead to a lower prevalence of respiratory allergic disease in school age. Thus, the effect ofL.reuteri on the immune system seems to be transient. Administration ofL.reuteri during the last weeks of gestation and in infancy was not associated with any long-term side effects.

  • 7.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för barns och kvinnors hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Linköping.
    Wu, Richard Y.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Sherman, Philip M.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Microbiota in Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in Infancy: Implications for Management2017Ingår i: INTESTINAL MICROBIOME: FUNCTIONAL ASPECTS IN HEALTH AND DISEASE, KARGER , 2017, Vol. 88, s. 107-115Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The complex and diverse intestinal microbiome is recognized as important in promoting human health. An altered gut microflora, referred to as dysbiosis, is increasingly recognized as having an etiologic role in a variety of conditions, including functional gastrointestinal disorders: colic in infants and irritable bowel syndrome in older children. Probiotics are defined as live microorganisms that, if ingested in sufficient amounts, restore microbial homeostasis and have a benefit on health. Randomized controlled trials indicate that probiotics can be effective in a variety of intestinal conditions, including colic and irritable bowel syndrome. Probiotics may promote gut microbial diversity, but timing of the intervention appears crucial. Strain-specific effects on colonization resistance, epithelial barrier integrity, modulation of signal transduction, impacts on innate and adaptive immune responses, and effects on visceral hyperalgesia likely explain the observed variability in various probiotic strains. In the future, probiotics are likely to be chosen for use in a defined clinical setting based on underlying mechanism(s) of action. The precise component of the probiotic agent mediating observed effects is the subject of current research. Unresolved issues relate to optimal dosages, timing of ingestion, single versus combination formulations, maintenance of viability in storage, and the merits of employing probiotic- derived products. (C) 2017 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel

  • 8.
    Abu-Ata, Amani
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för rehabilitering. Jönköping University, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Sopher, Ran
    Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Portnoy, Sigal
    Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Ratzon, Navah Z.
    Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Upper Limb Kinematics of Handwriting among Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder2022Ingår i: Sensors, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 22, nr 23, artikel-id 9224Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) often experience difficulties with handwriting legibility and speed. This study investigates the relationship between handwriting and upper limb kinematics to characterize movement patterns of children with DCD and typically developing (TD) children.

    Methods: 30 children with and without DCD matched for age, gender, and parent education were compared across handwriting abilities using a standardized handwriting assessment of both copied and dictated tasks (A-A Handwriting). The 3D motion capture system (Qualysis) was used to analyze upper limb kinematics and characterize movement patterns during handwriting and contrasted with written output.

    Results: Children with DCD wrote fewer legible letters in both copying and dictation. Children with DCD also showed poor automatization of key writing concepts. Atypical wrist postures were associated with reduced legibility for children with DCD (F (1,27) 4.71, p = 0.04, p = 0.04, p-η2  0.15); whereas for TD children, better legibility was associated with greater variations in movement speed, particularly of the wrist (rho = −0.578, p < 0.05).

    Conclusion: Results reflect different movement parameters influencing handwriting in children with DCD. An improved understanding of the movement characteristics during handwriting of these children may assist intervention design.

  • 9. Acuña Mora, Mariela
    et al.
    Sparud-Lundin, Carina
    Burström, Åsa
    Hanseus, Katarina
    Rydberg, Annika
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Moons, Philip
    Bratt, Ewa-Lena
    Patient empowerment and its correlates in young persons with congenital heart disease2019Ingår i: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 18, nr 5, s. 389-398, artikel-id 1474515119835434Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:: The objective of this study was to measure the level of empowerment and identify its correlates in young persons with congenital heart disease.

    STUDY DESIGN:: Patients aged 14-18 years with congenital heart disease, and under active follow-up in one of four paediatric cardiology centres in Sweden were invited to participate in a cross-sectional study. A total of 202 young persons returned the questionnaires. Patient empowerment was measured with the Gothenburg Young Persons Empowerment Scale that allows the calculation of total and subscale scores. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were undertaken to analyse possible correlates, including: sex, age, health behaviours, knowledge of congenital heart disease, quality of life, patient-reported health, congenital heart disease complexity, transition readiness and illness perception.

    RESULTS:: The mean empowerment score was 54.6±10.6 (scale of 15-75). Univariate analyses showed that empowerment was associated with age, quality of life, transition readiness, illness perception, health behaviours and patient-reported health (perceived physical appearance, treatment anxiety, cognitive problems and communication issues). However, multivariable linear regression analyses identified that only transition readiness (β=0.28, P<0.001) and communication (β=0.36, P<0.001) had a positive association with patient empowerment. These variables were also significantly associated with the subscale scores of the empowerment scale of knowledge and understanding ( P<0.001), shared decision-making ( P<0.001) and enabling others ( P<0.01). The overall models' explained variance ranged from 8% to 37%.

    CONCLUSION:: Patient empowerment was associated with transition readiness and fewer problems communicating. While it is not possible to establish the directionality of the associations, interventions looking to increase empowerment could benefit from using these variables (or measurements) for evaluation purposes.

  • 10.
    Acuña Mora, Mariela
    et al.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Sparud-Lundin, Carina
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fernlund, Eva
    Division of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Crown Princess Victoria Children's Hospital, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Fadl, Shalan
    Department of Children and Young Adults, University Hospital Örebro, Sweden.
    Kalliopi, Kazamia
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rydberg, Annika
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Burström, Åsa
    Karolinska Institute, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hanseus, Katarina
    Children's Heart Center, Skåne University Hospital Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Moons, Philip
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Bratt, Ewa-Lena
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The longitudinal association between patient empowerment and patient-reported outcomes: what is the direction of effect?2022Ingår i: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 17, nr 11, artikel-id e0277267Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Theoretical literature and cross-sectional studies suggest empowerment is associated with other patient-reported outcomes (PROs). However, it is not known if patient empowerment is leading to improvements in other PROs or vice versa. AIMS: The present study aimed to examine the direction of effects between patient empowerment and PROs in young persons with congenital heart disease (CHD). METHODS: As part of the STEPSTONES-CHD trial, adolescents with CHD from seven pediatric cardiology centers in Sweden were included in a longitudinal observational study (n = 132). Data were collected when patients were 16 (T0), 17 (T1) and 18 ½ years old (T2). The Gothenburg Young Persons Empowerment Scale (GYPES) was used to measure patient empowerment. Random intercepts cross-lagged panel models between patient empowerment and PROs (communication skills; patient-reported health; quality of life; and transition readiness) were undertaken. RESULTS: We found a significant cross-lagged effect of transition readiness over patient empowerment between T1 and T2, signifying that a higher level of transition readiness predicted a higher level of patient empowerment. No other significant cross-lagged relationships were found. CONCLUSION: Feeling confident before the transition to adult care is necessary before young persons with CHD can feel in control to manage their health and their lives. Clinicians interested in improving patient empowerment during the transitional period should consider targeting transition readiness.

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  • 11.
    Adaikina, Alena
    et al.
    Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Derraik, José G. B.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa. Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand.;Chiang Mai Univ, Res Inst Hlth Sci, Environm Occupat Hlth Sci & Noncommunicable Dis Re, Chiang Mai, Thailand..
    Hofman, Paul L.
    Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Gusso, Silmara
    Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand.;Univ Auckland, Exercise Sci Dept, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Vibration therapy in young children with mild to moderate cerebral palsy: does frequency and treatment duration matter? A randomised-controlled study2023Ingår i: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 23, artikel-id 4Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Vibration therapy (VT) has been increasingly studied in children with cerebral palsy (CP) over the last years, however, optimal therapeutic VT protocols are yet to be determined. The present study compared the effects of side-alternating VT protocols varying in frequency and treatment duration on the health of young children with mild-to-moderate CP.

    Methods: Thirty-four participants aged 6.0 to 12.6 years with CP acted as their own controls and underwent two consecutive study periods: a 12-week lead-in (control) period prior to the intervention period of 20-week side-alternating VT (9 min/session, 4 days/week), with the frequency either 20 Hz or 25 Hz, determined by randomisation. Participants had 4 assessment visits: baseline, after the control period, after 12-week VT (12VT), and after further 8 weeks of VT (20VT). Assessments included 6-minute walk test (6MWT); dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; gross motor function; muscle function testing on the Leonardo mechanography plate and by hand-held dynamometry, and a quality-of-life questionnaire (CP QOL). Analysis was carried out using linear mixed models based on repeated measures.

    Results: Side-alternating VT was well-tolerated, with occasional mild itchiness reported. The median compliance level was 99%. VT led to improvements in 6MWT (+ 23 m; p = 0.007 after 20VT), gross motor function in standing skills (+ 0.8 points; p = 0.008 after 12VT; and + 1.3 points; p = 0.001 after 20VT) and in walking, running and jumping skills (+ 2.5 points; p < 0.0001 after 12VT; and + 3.7 points; p < 0.0001 after 20VT), spine bone mineral density z-score (+ 0.14; p = 0.015 after 20VT), velocity rise maximum of the chair rising test (+ 0.14 m/s; p = 0.021 after 20VT), force maximum of the single two-leg jump test (+ 0.30 N/kg; p = 0.0005 after 12VT; and + 0.46 N/kg; p = 0.022 after 20VT) and in the health module of CP QOL (+ 7 points; p = 0.0095 after 20VT). There were no observed differences between the two VT frequencies (i.e., 20 Hz vs 25 Hz) on study outcomes.

    Conclusions: The study confirms that side-alternating VT has positive effects on mobility, gross motor function, body composition, muscle function, and quality of life, independent of VT frequencies tested. Long-term, 20VT appears to be a more efficient treatment duration than a short-term, 12VT.

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  • 12.
    Adaikina, Alena
    et al.
    Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Derraik, José G. B.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Perinatal, neonatal och barnkardiologisk forskning. Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand.;Univ Auckland, Sch Med, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Paediat Child & Youth Hlth, Auckland, New Zealand.;Chiang Mai Univ, Res Inst Hlth Sci, Environm Occupat Hlth Sci & Noncommunicable Dis Re, Chiang Mai, Thailand..
    Mcmillan, Janene
    Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Colle, Patricia
    Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Hofman, Paul L.
    Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Gusso, Silmara
    Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand.;Univ Auckland, Exercise Sci Dept, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Feasibility study on a longer side-alternating vibration therapy protocol (15 min per session) in children and adolescents with mild cerebral palsy2023Ingår i: Frontiers in Pediatrics , E-ISSN 2296-2360, Vol. 11, artikel-id 1231068Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Previous studies on side-alternating vibration therapy (sVT) have usually used a 9 min intervention protocol. We performed a feasibility study aimed at assessing the safety, acceptability, and potential effectiveness of a longer sVT protocol (15 min per session) in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP).

    Methods: Fifteen participants aged 5.2-17.4 years (median = 12.4 years) with CP GMFCS level II underwent 20 weeks of sVT consisting of 15 min sessions 4 days/week. Participants were assessed at baseline and after the intervention period, including mobility (six-minute walk-test; 6MWT), body composition (whole-body dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans), and muscle function (force plate).

    Results: Adherence level to the 15 min VT protocol was 83% on average. There were no adverse events reported. After 20 weeks, there was some evidence for an increase in the walking distance covered in 6MWT (+43 m; p = 0.0018) and spine bone mineral density (+0.032 g/cm(2); p = 0.012) compared to baseline.

    Conclusions: The 15 min sVT protocol is feasible and well tolerated. The results also suggest potential benefits of this protocol to mobility and bone health. Randomized controlled trials are needed to reliably ascertain the potential effectiveness of a longer sVT protocol on physical function and body composition in young people with CP.

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  • 13.
    Adaikina, Alena
    et al.
    Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand.;Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Bldg 505 level 2, 85 Pk Rd, Auckland 1042, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Derraik, José G. B.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Perinatal, neonatal och barnkardiologisk forskning. Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand.;Chiang Mai Univ, Res Inst Hlth Sci, NCD Ctr Excellence, Chiang Mai, Thailand..
    Taylor, Janice
    Starship Childrens Hosp, Child Dev Unit, Auckland, New Zealand.;Starship Childrens Hosp, Newborn Serv, Auckland, New Zealand..
    O'Grady, Gina L.
    Starship Childrens Hosp, Paediat Neurol Dept, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Hofman, Paul L.
    Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Gusso, Silmara
    Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand.;Univ Auckland, Exercise Sci Dept, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Vibration Therapy as an Early Intervention for Children Aged 2-4 Years with Cerebral Palsy: A Feasibility Study2023Ingår i: Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, ISSN 0194-2638, E-ISSN 1541-3144, Vol. 43, nr 5, s. 564-581Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of vibration therapy (VT) in preschool children with cerebral palsy (CP) and obtain preliminary data on its potential effectiveness.

    Methods: Nine children aged 2.5-4.8 years (4 boys) with CP GMFCS levels I-III participated in a single-group feasibility study, undergoing a 12-week control period without intervention, followed by 12 weeks of home-based VT (four times/week, 9 min/day, frequency 20 Hz). We assessed adherence to VT protocol, adverse events, and family acceptability of VT. Clinical assessments included motor function (GMFM-66), body composition (DXA), mobility (10-meter walk/run test), and health-related quality of life (PedsQL).

    Results: VT was well tolerated and acceptable to families, with high adherence levels reported (mean = 93%). There were no observed between-period differences (Delta Control vs Delta VT) except for an improvement in the PedsQL "Movement & Balance" dimension with VT (p = 0.044). Nonetheless, changes after the VT but not the Control period were suggestive of potential treatment benefits for mobility, gross motor function, and body composition (lean mass and legs bone mineral density).

    Conclusion: Home-based VT is feasible and acceptable for preschool children with CP. Our preliminary data suggest potential health benefits from VT for these children, supporting larger randomized trials to assess its effectiveness properly.

  • 14.
    Adair, Brooke
    et al.
    School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Keen, Deb
    Autism Centre of Excellence, Griffith University, Mt Gravatt, Qld, Australia.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för beteendevetenskap och socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD.
    Imms, Christine
    School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    The effect of interventions aimed at improving participation outcomes for children with disabilities: a systematic review2015Ingår i: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 57, nr 12, s. 1093-1104Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    Enhancement of participation has been described as the ultimate outcome for health and educational interventions. The goal of this systematic review was to identify and critically appraise studies that aimed to improve the participation outcomes of children with disabilities.

    Method

    Nine databases that index literature from the fields of health, psychology, and education were searched to retrieve information on research conducted with children with disabilities aged between 5 years and 18 years. Articles were included if the author(s) reported that participation was an intended outcome of the intervention. The articles included were limited to those reporting high-level primary research, as defined by Australia's National Health and Medical Research Council evidence hierarchy guidelines. No restrictions were placed on the type of intervention being investigated.

    Results

    Seven randomized controlled or pseudo-randomized studies were included. Only three of these studies identified participation as a primary outcome. Both individualized and group-based approaches to enhancing participation outcomes appeared to be effective. Studies of interventions with a primary focus on body function or activity level outcomes did not demonstrate an effect on participation outcomes.

    Intepretation

    Few intervention studies have focused on participation as a primary outcome measure. Approaches using individually tailored education and mentoring programmes were found to enhance participation outcomes, while exercise programmes, where participation was a secondary outcome, generally demonstrated little effect.

  • 15.
    Adair, Brooke
    et al.
    Centre for Disability and Development Research, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    Physiotherapy Department, Mälardalens University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Rosenbaum, Peter
    McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Granlund, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Biomedicinsk plattform.
    Keen, Deb
    Autism Centre of Excellence, Griffith University, Mt Gravatt, Qld, Australia.
    Imms, Christine
    Centre for Disability and Development Research, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    Measures used to quantify participation in childhood disability and their alignment with the family of participation-related constructs: a systematic review2018Ingår i: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 60, nr 11, s. 1101-1116Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    We aimed to identify measures used to assess the participation of disabled children and to map the measures' content to the family of participation-related constructs (fPRC) to inform future research and practice.

    METHOD:

    Six databases were searched to identify measures used to assess participation in health, psychology, and education research. Included studies involved children aged 0 to 18 years with a permanent impairment or developmental disability and reported use of a quantitative measure of participation. A second search sought relevant literature about each identified measure (including published manuals) to allow a comprehensive understanding of the measure. Measurement constructs of frequently reported measures were then mapped to the fPRC.

    RESULTS:

    From an initial yield of 32 767 articles, 578 reported one or more of 118 participation measures. Of these, 51 measures were reported in more than one article (our criterion) and were therefore eligible for mapping to the fPRC. Twenty-one measures quantified aspects of participation attendance, 10 quantified aspects of involvement as discrete scales, and four quantified attendance and involvement in a manner that could not be separated.

    INTERPRETATION:

    Improved understanding of participation and its related constructs is developing rapidly; thoughtful selection of measures in research is critical to further our knowledge base.

    WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS:

    The fPRC can support our rapidly evolving and expanding understanding of participation. Instruments selected to measure participation do not always align with emerging concepts. Matching research aims to a chosen measure's content will improve understanding of participation. Opportunities exist to develop validated participation measures, especially self-reported measures of involvement.

  • 16.
    Adair, Brooke
    et al.
    Australian Catholic Univ, Ctr Disabil & Dev Res, Fitzroy, Vic, Australia..
    Ullenhag, Anna
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd, Hälsa och välfärd.
    Rosenbaum, Peter
    McMaster Univ, Hamilton, ON, Canada..
    Granlund, Mats
    Jonkoping Univ, CHILD, SIDR, Sch Hlth Sci, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Keen, Deb
    Griffith Univ, Autism Ctr Excellence, Mt Gravatt, Qld, Australia..
    Imms, Christine
    Australian Catholic Univ, Ctr Disabil & Dev Res, Fitzroy, Vic, Australia..
    Measures used to quantify participation in childhood disability and their alignment with the family of participation-related constructs: a systematic review2018Ingår i: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 60, nr 11, s. 1101-1116Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    AimWe aimed to identify measures used to assess the participation of disabled children and to map the measures' content to the family of participation-related constructs (fPRC) to inform future research and practice. MethodSix databases were searched to identify measures used to assess participation in health, psychology, and education research. Included studies involved children aged 0 to 18 years with a permanent impairment or developmental disability and reported use of a quantitative measure of participation. A second search sought relevant literature about each identified measure (including published manuals) to allow a comprehensive understanding of the measure. Measurement constructs of frequently reported measures were then mapped to the fPRC. ResultsFrom an initial yield of 32 767 articles, 578 reported one or more of 118 participation measures. Of these, 51 measures were reported in more than one article (our criterion) and were therefore eligible for mapping to the fPRC. Twenty-one measures quantified aspects of participation attendance, 10 quantified aspects of involvement as discrete scales, and four quantified attendance and involvement in a manner that could not be separated. InterpretationImproved understanding of participation and its related constructs is developing rapidly; thoughtful selection of measures in research is critical to further our knowledge base.

  • 17.
    Aden, U.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hugoson, P.
    Karolinska Inst, Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kostilainen, K.
    Univ Helsinki, Childrens Hosp, Helsinki, Finland..
    Mikkola, K.
    Univ Helsinki, Childrens Hosp, Helsinki, Finland..
    Mårtensson, G.
    Karolinska Inst, Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lagercrantz, H.
    Karolinska Inst, Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Westrup, B.
    Karolinska Inst, Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fellman, V.
    Lund Univ, Pediat, Lund, Sweden..
    Huotilainen, Minna
    Uppsala universitet, Kollegiet för samhällsforskning (SCAS).
    The impacts of maternal singing during kangaroo care on mothers and infants2016Ingår i: European Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0340-6199, E-ISSN 1432-1076, Vol. 175, nr 11, s. 1425-1425Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 18.
    Adjorlolo, Samuel
    et al.
    Department of Mental Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery, College of Health Sciences University of Ghana Accra Ghana;Research and Grant Institute of Ghana Accra Ghana.
    Awortwe, Victoria
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Hälsovetenskap och e-hälsa.
    Anum, Adote
    Department of Psychology, School of Social Sciences, College of Humanities University of Ghana Accra Ghana.
    Huang, Keng‐Yen
    Department of Population Health New York University School of Medicine New York NY USA;Child and Adolescent Psychiatry New York University School of Medicine New York NY USA.
    Mamah, Daniel
    Department of Psychiatry Washington University Medical School St. Louis MO USA.
    Psychotic‐like experiences and adverse life events in young people: Does gender matter?2023Ingår i: Child and Adolescent Mental Health, ISSN 1475-357X, E-ISSN 1475-3588Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) and adverse life events (ALEs) are highly prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa where gendered practices are also common. There is, however, a paucity of data on how the relationship between PLEs and life adversities is influenced by gender. The current study addressed this gap.

    Method

    Data were collected from 1886 school-based young people (1174 females) in Ghana, West Africa using a cross-sectional survey methodology and analyzed using Chi-square, independent t-test, Pearson correlation, and multivariate regression.

    Results

    The results showed that victimization experiences, school stress and having a family member with mental illness were significantly associated with PLEs in both males and females. In contrast, substance misuse and experiences of head trauma correlated significantly with PLEs in females only.

    Conclusion

    Life adversities constitute major risk factors for PLEs among school-based young people in Ghana, who could benefit from gender neutral and gender-sensitive intervention programming to remediate the effects of life adversities on PLEs.

  • 19.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD.
    ICF-CY in habilitation services for children2017Ingår i: An emerging approach for education and care: Implementing a worldwide classification of functioning and disability / [ed] S. Castro & O. Palikara, London: Routledge, 2017, s. 187-203Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Habilitation services is the name for interdisciplinary health care organisations in Sweden serving children and young people aged 0 to17 years with a wide range of disabilities categorised as mobility, behavioural, intellectual and multiple disabilities, their families and other networks. The construct of habilitation is used in childhood since it focuses on acquiring skills, whereas rehabilitation focuses on regaining lost skills. Despite this difference, the objective of services is consistent and the WHO definition of rehabilitation can apply to both: “A process aimed at enabling people with disabilities to reach and maintain their optimal physical, sensory, intellectual, psychological and social functional levels. Rehabilitation provides disabled people with the tools they need to attain independence and self-determination” (WHO, 2016). Habilitation teams include social, psychological, pedagogical and medical competencies with a marked preponderance of the latter (Figure 12.1).

  • 20.
    af Klinteberg, Maja
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Dermatologi och venereologi.
    Winberg, Anna
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Andersson, Martin
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Avdelningen för hållbar hälsa.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Avdelningen för hållbar hälsa.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Avdelningen för hållbar hälsa.
    Decreasing prevalence of atopic dermatitis in Swedish schoolchildren: three repeated population-based surveys2024Ingår i: British Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0007-0963, E-ISSN 1365-2133, Vol. 190, nr 2, s. 191-198Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD) has increased over several decades and now affects about one-fifth of all children in high-income countries (HICs). While the increase continues in lower-income countries, the prevalence of AD might have reached a plateau in HICs.

    Objectives: To investigate trends in the prevalence of AD and atopic comorbidity in schoolchildren in Sweden.

    Methods: The study population consisted of three cohorts of children (median age 8 years) in Norrbotten, Sweden, for 1996 (n = 3430), 2006 (n = 2585) and 2017 (n = 2785). An identical questionnaire that included questions from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) protocol was used in all three cohorts. Trends in AD prevalence were estimated, as well as trends in atopic comorbidity. AD prevalence was estimated both according to the ISAAC definition of AD and by adding the reported diagnosis by a physician (D-AD).

    Results: The prevalence of AD decreased in the last decade, from 22.8% (1996) and 21.3% (2006) to 16.3% (2017; P < 0.001). The prevalence of D-AD was lower, but the same pattern of decrease was seen, from 9.3% (1996) and 9.4% (2006) to 5.7% (2017; P < 0.001). In all three cohorts, AD was more common among girls than boys (18.9% vs. 13.8% in 2017; P < 0.001). Children from the mountain inlands had a higher prevalence of AD than children from coastal cities (22.0% vs. 15.1% in 2017; P < 0.001). In comparing D-AD, there were no significant differences between the sexes or between inland or coastal living. Concomitant asthma increased over the years from 12.2% (1996) to 15.8% (2006) to 23.0% (2017; P < 0.001). Concomitant allergic rhinitis and allergic sensitization increased from 1996 (15.0% and 27.5%) to 2006 (24.7% and 49.5%) but then levelled off until 2017 (21.0% and 46.7%).

    Conclusions: The prevalence of AD among schoolchildren in Sweden decreased over the study period, whereas atopic comorbidity among children with AD increased. Although a decrease was seen, AD is still common and the increase in atopic comorbidity among children with AD, especially the increase in asthma, is concerning.

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  • 21.
    Afsharnejad, Bahareh
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Works and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Kent street, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, HLK, CHILD. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy, Social Works and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Kent street, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Black, Melissa H.
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Works and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Kent street, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Alach, Tasha
    Autism Association of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Lenhard, Fabian
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Centre for Psychiatry Research, Division of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Stockholm Health Care Services, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fridell, Anna
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Centre for Psychiatry Research, Division of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Stockholm Health Care Services, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Coco, Christina
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Centre for Psychiatry Research, Division of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Stockholm Health Care Services, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Milne, Kelly
    Autism Association of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Chen, Nigel T. M.
    Curtin Autism Research Group (CARG), Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Bölte, Sven
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Works and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Kent street, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    School of Occupational Therapy, Social Works and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Kent street, Perth, WA, Australia.
    KONTAKT© for Australian adolescents on the autism spectrum: Protocol of a randomized control trial2019Ingår i: Trials, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 20, nr 1, artikel-id 687Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience impairing challenges in social communication and interaction across multiple contexts. While social skills group training (SSGT) has shown moderate effects on various sociability outcomes in ASD, there is a need for (1) replication of effects in additional clinical and cultural contexts, (2) designs that employ active control groups, (3) calculation of health economic benefits, (4) identification of the optimal training duration, and (5) measurement of individual goals and quality of life outcomes.

    METHOD/DESIGN:

    With the aim of investigating the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a SSGT, KONTAKT©, a two-armed randomized control trial with adolescents aged 12-17 years (N = 90) with ASD and an intelligence quotient (IQ) of over 70 will be undertaken. Following stratification for centre and gender, participants will be randomly assigned to either KONTAKT© or to an active control group, a group-based cooking programme. Participants will attend both programmes in groups of 6-8 adolescents, over 16 one-and-a-half-hour sessions. The primary outcome examined is adolescent self-rated achievement of personally meaningful social goals as assessed via the Goal Attainment Scaling during an interview with a blinded clinician. Secondary outcomes include adolescent self-reported interpersonal efficacy, quality of life, social anxiety, loneliness, face emotion recognition performance and associated gaze behaviour, and parent proxy reports of autistic traits, quality of life, social functioning, and emotion recognition and expression. Cost-effectiveness will be investigated in relation to direct and indirect societal and healthcare costs.

    DISCUSSION:

    The primary outcomes of this study will be evidenced in the anticipated achievement of adolescents' personally meaningful social goals following participation in KONTAKT© as compared to the active control group. This design will enable rigorous evaluation of the efficacy of KONTAKT©, exercising control over the possibly confounding effect of exposure to a social context of peers with a diagnosis of ASD.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION:

    Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR). ACTRN12617001117303. Registered on 31 July 2017. anzctr.org.au ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03294668. Registered on 22 September 2017. https://clinicaltrials.gov.

  • 22. Agnafors, S.
    et al.
    Sydsjö, G.
    Comasco, Erika
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Neuropsykofarmakologi. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Obstetrik & gynekologi.
    Bladh, M.
    Oreland, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Neuropsykofarmakologi.
    Svedin, C.
    Behaviour problems in children-a longitudinal study of genetic and environmental factors2015Ingår i: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 24, s. S35-S35Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 23.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för barns och kvinnors hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för barns och kvinnors hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Kvinnokliniken i Linköping.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Barnafrid. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Barn- och ungdomspsykiatriska kliniken.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för barns och kvinnors hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Kvinnokliniken i Linköping.
    Mental health in young mothers, single mothers and their children2019Ingår i: BMC Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 19, artikel-id 112Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Parenthood is a life transition that can be especially demanding for vulnerable individuals. Young maternal age and maternal single status have been reported to increase the risk for adverse outcomes for both mother and child. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of young maternal age and maternal single status on maternal and child mental health and child development at age 3. Methods: A birth-cohort of 1723 mothers and their children were followed from birth to age 3. Sixty-one mothers (3.5%) were age 20 or younger, and 65 (4.0%) reported single status at childbirth. The mothers filled out standardized instruments and medical information was retrieved from the standardized clinical assessment of the children at Child Welfare Centers, (CWC). Results: Young maternal age was associated with symptoms of postpartum depression whereas single status was not. Young mothers were more prone to report internalizing and externalizing problems in their children, while there was no association between single status and child behavioral problems. No differences were seen on child development (CWC scores). School drop-out was, however, a more influential factor on depressive symptoms postpartum than maternal age. Conclusion: Young mothers are at increased risk for symptoms of postpartum depression which indicates the need for attention in pre- and postnatal health care programs. Single mothers and their children were not found to be at increased risk for adverse outcomes. The importance of schooling was demonstrated, indicating the need for societal support to encourage adolescents to remain in school.

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  • 24.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, IKE, Div Child & Adolescent Psychiat, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Comasco, Erika
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Neuropsykofarmakologi.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linkoping Univ, Div Obstet & Gynecol IKE, Fac Hlth Sci, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linkoping Univ, Div Obstet & Gynecol IKE, Fac Hlth Sci, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Dekeyser, Linda
    Linkoping Univ, Div Obstet & Gynecol IKE, Fac Hlth Sci, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Oreland, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Neuropsykofarmakologi.
    Svedin, Carl-Göran
    Linkoping Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, IKE, Div Child & Adolescent Psychiat, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Effect of gene, environment and maternal depressive symptoms on pre-adolescence behavior problems: a longitudinal study2013Ingår i: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, E-ISSN 1753-2000, Vol. 7, artikel-id 10Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Depression is a common and disabling condition with a high relapse frequency. Maternal mental health problems and experience of traumatic life events are known to increase the risk of behavior problems in children. Recently, genetic factors, in particular gene-by-environment interaction models, have been implicated to explain depressive etiology. However, results are inconclusive.

    METHODS:

    Study participants were members of the SESBiC-study. A total of 889 mothers and their children were followed during the child's age of 3 months to 12 years. Information on maternal depressive symptoms was gathered postpartum and at a 12 year follow-up. Mothers reported on child behavior and traumatic life events experienced by the child at age 12. Saliva samples were obtained from children for analysis of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms.

    RESULTS:

    Multivariate analysis showed a significant association between maternal symptoms of depression and anxiety, and internalizing problems in 12-year-old children (OR 5.72, 95% CI 3.30-9.91). Furthermore, carriers of two short alleles (s/s) of the 5-HTTLPR showed a more than 4-fold increased risk of internalizing problems at age 12 compared to l/l carriers (OR 4.73, 95% CI 2.14-10.48). No gene-by-environment interaction was found and neither depressive symptoms postpartum or traumatic experiences during childhood stayed significant in the final model.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Concurrent maternal symptoms of depression and anxiety are significant risk factors for behavior problems in children, which need to be taken into account in clinical practice. Furthermore, we found a main effect of 5-HTTLPR on internalizing symptoms in 12-year-old children, a finding that needs to be confirmed in future studies.

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  • 25.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Fac Hlth Sci, Div Child & Adolescent Psychiat, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linkoping Univ, Div Obstet & Gynaecol, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Fac Hlth Sci, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Comasco, Erika
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Neuropsykofarmakologi.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linkoping Univ, Div Obstet & Gynaecol, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Fac Hlth Sci, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Oreland, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Neuropsykofarmakologi.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Fac Hlth Sci, Div Child & Adolescent Psychiat, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Early predictors of behavioural problems in pre-schoolers: a longitudinal study of constitutional and environmental main and interaction effects2016Ingår i: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 16, artikel-id 76Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The early environment is important for child development and wellbeing. Gene-by-environment studies investigating the impact of the serotonin transporter gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphisms by life events on mental health and behaviour problems have been inconclusive. Methodological differences regarding sample sizes, study population, definitions of adversities and measures of mental health problems obstacle their comparability. Furthermore, very few studies included children. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between a broad range of risk factors covering pregnancy and birth, genetic polymorphism, experience of multiple life events and psychosocial environment, and child behaviour at age 3, using a comparably large, representative, population-based sample. Methods: A total of 1,106 children, and their mothers, were followed from pregnancy to age 3. Information on pregnancy and birth-related factors was retrieved from the Medical Birth Register. Questionnaires on depressive symptoms, child behaviour and child experiences of life events were filled in by the mothers. Child saliva samples were used for genotyping the 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms. Multiple logistic regression was used to investigate the association between psychological scales and genetic polymorphisms. Results: Symptoms of postpartum depression increased the risk of both internalizing and externalizing problems. Experience of multiple life events was also a predictor of behavioural problems across the scales. No gene-by-environment or gene-by-gene-by-environment interactions were found. Children of immigrants had an increased risk of internalizing problems and parental unemployment was significantly associated with both internalizing and externalizing type of problems. Conclusion: This study shows the importance of the psychosocial environment for psychosocial health in preschool children, and adds to the literature of null-findings of gene-by-environment effects of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF in children.

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  • 26.
    Agrasada, Grace V.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa.
    Postnatal Peer Counseling on Exclusive Breastfeeding of Low-birthweight Filipino Infants: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial2005Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    In a Manila hospital, 204 mothers were randomized into three groups: two intervention groups receiving home-based counseling visits, one of them (n=68) by counselors trained to use a locally developed, two-tiered program of breastfeeding counseling, and the other by counselors trained in general childcare (n=67), were compared with a control group of mothers (n=69) who did not receive any counseling. All infants were scheduled for seven visits to the hospital for follow-up. During hospital visits, maternal and infant body measurements were made and an independent interviewer asked the mothers individually to recall how the infant had been fed. One study physician, blind to participant groups, was consulted at all scheduled and unscheduled infant visits.

    At six months, 44% of the breastfeeding-counseled mothers, 7% of the childcare-counseled mothers and none of the mothers in the control group were exclusively breastfeeding. Twenty- four mothers breastfed exclusively during the first six months, of whom 22 received breastfeeding counseling and 2 had no breastfeeding counseling. Among 24 infants who were exclusively breastfed from birth to six months there were no episodes of diarrhea. All infants had gained in weight, length and head circumference. Mean maternal weight loss at six months was similar whether her breastfeeding was exclusive or partial.

    The reasons why mothers without breastfeeding counseling introduced non-breast milk feeding before six months reflected lack of knowledge and support. Breastfeeding support during the first six months focusing on how to prevent and solve breastfeeding problems, particularly during the first two weeks, will enable mothers to choose to breastfeed exclusively up to six months.

    This study has provided fundamental evidence of successful intervention by breastfeeding counseling to achieve six months of exclusive breastfeeding among term, low-birthweight infants. The locally developed training program in breastfeeding counseling, which successfully prepared volunteers to counsel mothers at home, could be incorporated into primary health care in the Philippines. Mothers who received breastfeeding counseling appreciated how this helped them to achieve their breastfeeding goals for the first six months. Improved breastfeeding practices as a result of breastfeeding counseling provided infants with protection from diarrhea and respiratory infections, contributing to their health and development.

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  • 27.
    Ahl, Hanna
    et al.
    Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Norman, Elisabeth
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sjöström Strand, Annica
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Olsson, Emma
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bruschettini, Matteo
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Pain scales in clinical trials in newborn infants: a mapping of the evidence2018Övrigt (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 28.
    Ahle, Margareta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för radiologiska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Röntgenkliniken i Linköping.
    Necrotising Enterocolitis: epidemiology and imaging2017Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) is a potentially devastating intestinal inflammation of multifactorial aetiology in premature or otherwise vulnerable neonates. Because of the broad spectrum of presentations, diagnosis and timing of surgical intervention may be challenging, and imaging needs to be an integrated part of management.

    The first four studies included in this thesis used routinely collected, nationwide register data to describe the incidence of NEC in Sweden 1987‒2009, its variation with time, seasonality, space-time clustering, and associations with maternal, gestational, and perinatal factors, and the risk of intestinal failure in the aftermath of the disease.

    Early infant survival increased dramatically during the study period. The incidence rate of NEC was 0.34 per 1,000 live births, rising from 0.26 per 1,000 live births in the first six years of the study period to 0.57 in the last five. The incidence rates in the lowest birth weights were 100‒160 times those of the entire birth cohort. Seasonal variation was found, as well as space-time clustering in association with delivery hospitals but not with maternal residential municipalities.

    Comparing NEC cases with matched controls, some factors, positively associated with NEC, were isoimmunisation, fetal distress, caesarean section, persistent ductus arteriosus, cardiac and gastrointestinal malformations, and chromosomal abnormalities. Negative associations included maternal pre-eclampsia, maternal urinary infection, and premature rupture of the membranes. Intestinal failure occurred in 6% of NEC cases and 0.4% of controls, with the highest incidence towards the end of the study period.

    The last study investigated current practices and perceptions of imaging in the management of NEC, as reported by involved specialists. There was great consensus on most issues. Areas in need of further study seem mainly related to imaging routines, the use of ultrasound, and indications for surgery.

    Developing alongside the progress of neonatal care, NEC is a complex, multifactorial disease, with shifting patterns of predisposing and precipitating causes, and potentially serious long-term complications. The findings of seasonal variation, spacetime clustering, and negative associations with antenatal exposure to infectious agents, fit into the growing understanding of the central role of bacteria and immunological processes in normal maturation of the intestinal canal as well as in the pathogenesis of NEC. Imaging in the management of NEC may be developed through future studies combining multiple diagnostic parameters in relation to clinical outcome.

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    Necrotising Enterocolitis: epidemiology and imaging
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  • 29.
    Ahle, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för radiologiska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Röntgenkliniken i Linköping.
    Drott, Peder
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för Kirurgi, Ortopedi och Onkologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Centrum för kirurgi, ortopedi och cancervård, Kirurgiska kliniken US.
    Elfvin, Anders
    Department of Pediatrics, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Roland E.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för Kirurgi, Ortopedi och Onkologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Department of Surgery, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Maternal, fetal and perinatal factors associated with necrotizing enterocolitis in Sweden: A national case-control study2018Ingår i: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, nr 3, artikel-id e0194352Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To analyze associations of maternal, fetal, gestational, and perinatal factors with necrotizing enterocolitis in a matched case-control study based on routinely collected, nationwide register data.

    Study design

    All infants born in 1987 through 2009 with a diagnosis of necrotizing enterocolitis in any of the Swedish national health care registers were identified. For each case up to 6 controls, matched for birth year and gestational age, were selected. The resulting study population consisted of 720 cases and 3,567 controls. Information on socioeconomic data about the mother, maternal morbidity, pregnancy related diagnoses, perinatal diagnoses of the infant, and procedures in the perinatal period, was obtained for all cases and controls and analyzed with univariable and multivariable logistic regressions for the whole study population as well as for subgroups according to gestational age.

    Results

    In the study population as a whole, we found independent positive associations with necrotizing enterocolitis for isoimmunization, fetal distress, cesarean section, neonatal bacterial infection including sepsis, erythrocyte transfusion, persistent ductus arteriosus, cardiac malformation, gastrointestinal malformation, and chromosomal abnormality. Negative associations were found for maternal weight, preeclampsia, maternal urinary infection, premature rupture of the membranes, and birthweight. Different patterns of associations were seen in the subgroups of different gestational age.

    Conclusion

    With some interesting exceptions, especially in negative associations, the results of this large, population based study, are in keeping with earlier studies. Although restrained by the limitations of register data, the findings mirror conceivable pathophysiological processes and underline that NEC is a multifactorial disease.

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  • 30.
    Ahle, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för radiologiska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Röntgenkliniken i Linköping.
    Magnusson, Amanda
    Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Elfvin, Anders
    Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Roland
    Department of Surgery, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Space-time clustering of necrotizing enterocolitis supports the existence of transmissible causes.2017Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Problem Statement: Despite great efforts to prevent necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) the incidence may in fact be increasing, and changes in the patient population over time seem to lead to changes in clinical presentation and risk factor spectrum as well. The presence of bacteria is an important prerequisite in the pathogenesis, but, rather than being caused by specific pathogens, inflammation and bacterial invasion are thought to be mediated through erroneous interaction between microbiota and innate immunity during colonization of the gut. There are, however, reports of episodic outbreaks of NEC, seasonal variation in incident rates, and clustering, suggesting a role for transmissible infectious agents or other environmental factors around the pregnant mother or newborn infant. In order to investigate evidence for such factors we have analyzed the occurrence of space-time clusters in Sweden over 23 years. Methods: A national register-based cohort of all children born between 1987 and 2009 in Sweden, diagnosed with NEC, was identified. The Knox test and Kulldorff’s scan method were used to analyze signs of space-time clusters at two geographical levels; the mother’s residential address and the delivery hospital. Time windows of seven, 14 and 21 days were used for closeness in time. Results: The Knox test showed clustering on hospital level in all studied temporal windows; seven days (p=0.022) 14 days (p=0.011) and 21 days (p=0.006), and Kulldorff’s scan method found seven significant clusters. On residential level, there was no indication of space-time interaction. When comparing two time periods, significant clustering on hospital level was found during 1987-1997, but not during 1998-2009. Conclusion: Space-time clustering was found on hospital level, but not on community level, suggesting a contagious environmental effect at and after delivery but not in the materno-fetal environment outside the hospital before birth. The decrease in clustering over time suggests that improved routines in neonatal care have minimized the risk of NEC precipitating contagions spreading between patients in the neonatal intensive care unit. The importance of such routines should not be forgotten while our efforts to bring down NEC incidence are directed towards other challenges.

  • 31.
    Ahle, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för radiologiska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Röntgenkliniken i Linköping.
    Ringertz, Hans G.
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, USA; Division of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rubesova, Erika
    Department of Radiology, Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, USA.
    The role of imaging in the management of necrotising enterocolitis: a multispecialist survey and a review of the literature2018Ingår i: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 28, nr 9, s. 3621-3631Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    To investigate current practices and perceptions of imaging in necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) according to involved specialists, put them in the context of current literature, and identify needs for further investigation.

    Methods

    Two hundred two neonatologists, paediatric surgeons, and radiologists answered a web-based questionnaire about imaging in NEC at their hospitals. The results were descriptively analysed, using proportion estimates with 95% confidence intervals.

    Results

    There was over 90% agreement on the value of imaging for confirmation of the diagnosis, surveillance, and guidance in decisions on surgery as well as on abdominal radiography as the first-choice modality and the most important radiographic signs. More variation was observed regarding some indications for surgery and the use of some ultrasonographic signs. Fifty-eight per cent stated that ultrasound was used for NEC at their hospital. Examination frequency, often once daily or more but with considerable variations, and projections used in AR were usually decided individually rather than according to fixed schedules. Predicting the need of surgery was regarded more important than formal staging.

    Conclusion

    Despite great agreement on the purposes of imaging in NEC and the most important radiographic signs of the disease, there was considerable diversity in routines, especially regarding examination frequency and the use of ultrasound. Apart from continuing validation of ultrasound, important objectives for future studies include definition of the supplementary roles of both imaging modalities in relation to other diagnostic parameters and evaluation of various imaging routines in relation to timing of surgery, complications, and mortality rate.

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  • 32.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa.
    Kaijser, Magnus
    Clincial Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Adami, Johanna
    Clincial Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Maria
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa.
    Palme, Mårten
    Department of Economics, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    School performance after preterm birth2015Ingår i: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 26, nr 1, s. 106-111Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: An increased risk of poor school performance for children born preterm has been shown in many studies, but whether this increase is attributable to preterm birth per se or to other factors associated with preterm birth has not been resolved. METHODS: We used data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register, the Longitudinal Integration Database for Sickness Insurance and Labor Market Study, the Swedish Multigeneration Register, and the National School Register to link records comprising the Swedish birth cohorts from 1974 through 1991. Linear regression was used to assess the association between gestational duration and school performance, both with and without controlling for parental and socioeconomic factors. In a restricted analysis, we compared siblings only with each other. RESULTS: Preterm birth was strongly and negatively correlated with school performance. The distribution of school grades for children born at 31-33 weeks was on average 3.85 (95% confidence interval = -4.36 to -3.35) centiles lower than for children born at 40 weeks. For births at 22-24 weeks, the corresponding figure was -23.15 (-30.32 to -15.97). When taking confounders into account, the association remained. When restricting the analysis to siblings, however, the association between school performance and preterm birth after week 30 vanished completely, whereas it remained, less pronounced, for preterm birth before 30 weeks of gestation. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that the association between school performance and preterm birth after 30 gestational weeks is attributable to factors other than preterm birth per se.

  • 33.
    Ahrens, Angelica P.
    et al.
    Department of Microbiology and Cell Science, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32603, USA.
    Hyötyläinen, Tuulia
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Petrone, Joseph R.
    Department of Microbiology and Cell Science, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32603, USA.
    Igelström, Kajsa
    Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology, Linköping University, Linköping 58185, Sweden.
    George, Christian D.
    Department of Microbiology and Cell Science, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32603, USA.
    Garrett, Timothy J.
    Department of Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA.
    Oresic, Matej
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Turku Bioscience Centre, University of Turku and Åbo Akademi University, Turku 20520, Finland; Department of Life Technologies, University of Turku, Turku 20014, Finland.
    Triplett, Eric W.
    Department of Microbiology and Cell Science, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32603, USA.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Crown Princess Victoria Children's Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping 58185, Sweden.
    Infant microbes and metabolites point to childhood neurodevelopmental disorders2024Ingår i: Cell, ISSN 0092-8674, E-ISSN 1097-4172Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study has followed a birth cohort for over 20 years to find factors associated with neurodevelopmental disorder (ND) diagnosis. Detailed, early-life longitudinal questionnaires captured infection and antibiotic events, stress, prenatal factors, family history, and more. Biomarkers including cord serum metabolome and lipidome, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype, infant microbiota, and stool metabolome were assessed. Among the 16,440 Swedish children followed across time, 1,197 developed an ND. Significant associations emerged for future ND diagnosis in general and for specific ND subtypes, spanning intellectual disability, speech disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and autism. This investigation revealed microbiome connections to future diagnosis as well as early emerging mood and gastrointestinal problems. The findings suggest links to immunodysregulation and metabolism, compounded by stress, early-life infection, and antibiotics. The convergence of infant biomarkers and risk factors in this prospective, longitudinal study on a large-scale population establishes a foundation for early-life prediction and intervention in neurodevelopment.

  • 34.
    Aili, Katarina
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd.
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd.
    Olsson, Maria
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jarfelt, Marianne
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Health Outcomes in Adult Survivors of Childhood All and Their Siblings – A National Long Term Follow Up2022Ingår i: Pediatric Blood & Cancer, ISSN 1545-5009, E-ISSN 1545-5017, Vol. 69, nr S5, s. S173-S173, artikel-id e29952Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 35.
    Ajiko, Mary Margaret
    et al.
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Solna, Sweden; Soroti Regional Referral Hospital, Soroti, Uganda.
    Weidman, Viking
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nordin, Pär
    Department of Surgery and Perioperative Sciences, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Wladis, Andreas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för kirurgi, ortopedi och onkologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Katastrofmedicinskt centrum.
    Löfgren, Jenny
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Solna, Sweden.
    Correction: Prevalence of Paediatric Surgical Conditions in Eastern Uganda: A Cross-Sectional Study (Jan, 10.1007/s00268-021-06378-9, 2022)2022Ingår i: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 46, nr 4, s. 966-966Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
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  • 36.
    Al-Azzawi, Sana Sabah
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för system- och rymdteknik, EISLAB. College of Engineering, University of Information Technology and Communications, Baghdad 10013, Iraq.
    Khaksar, Siavash
    School of Electrical Engineering, Computing and Mathematical Sciences, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102, Australia.
    Hadi, Emad Khdhair
    Rehabilitation Medical Center and Joint Diseases, Baghdad 10001, Iraq.
    Agrawal, Himanshu
    School of Electrical Engineering, Computing and Mathematical Sciences, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102, Australia.
    Murray, Iain
    School of Electrical Engineering, Computing and Mathematical Sciences, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102, Australia.
    HeadUp: A Low-Cost Solution for Tracking Head Movement of Children with Cerebral Palsy Using IMU2021Ingår i: Sensors, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 21, nr 23, artikel-id 8148Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a common reason for human motor ability limitations caused before birth, through infancy or early childhood. Poor head control is one of the most important problems in children with level IV CP and level V CP, which can affect many aspects of children's lives. The current visual assessment method for measuring head control ability and cervical range of motion (CROM) lacks accuracy and reliability. In this paper, a HeadUp system that is based on a low-cost, 9-axis, inertial measurement unit (IMU) is proposed to capture and evaluate the head control ability for children with CP. The proposed system wirelessly measures CROM in frontal, sagittal, and transverse planes during ordinary life activities. The system is designed to provide real-time, bidirectional communication with an Euler-based, sensor fusion algorithm (SFA) to estimate the head orientation and its control ability tracking. The experimental results for the proposed SFA show high accuracy in noise reduction with faster system response. The system is clinically tested on five typically developing children and five children with CP (age range: 2-5 years). The proposed HeadUp system can be implemented as a head control trainer in an entertaining way to motivate the child with CP to keep their head up.

  • 37.
    Albertsen, Birgitte Klug
    et al.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Children & Adolescent Hlth, Palle Juul Jensens Blvd 99, DK-8200 Aarhus N, Denmark.
    Harila-Saari, Arja
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Forskargrupper (Inst. för kvinnor och barns hälsa), Barnneurologi/Barnonkologi.
    Jahnukainen, Kirsi
    Univ Helsinki, Childrens Hosp, Helsinki, Finland;Univ Helsinki, Cent Hosp, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lahteenmaki, Paivi
    Turku Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat & Adolescent Med, Turku, Finland;Turku Univ, Turku, Finland.
    Riikonen, Pekka
    Kuopio Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat, Kuopio, Finland.
    Mottonen, Merja
    Univ Oulu, PEDEGO Res Ctr, Oulu, Finland;Univ Oulu, Med Res Ctr Oulu, Oulu, Finland;Oulu Univ Hosp, Dept Children & Adolescents, Oulu, Finland.
    Lausen, Birgitte
    Univ Hosp, Rigshosp, Dept Pediat & Adolescent Med, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Asparaginase treatment in infants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia; pharmacokinetics and asparaginase hypersensitivity in Interfant-062019Ingår i: Leukemia and Lymphoma, ISSN 1042-8194, E-ISSN 1029-2403, Vol. 60, nr 6, s. 1469-1475Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a rare disease in infants. Asparaginase is an essential part of the treatment, and there Acute is a need to evaluate the efficiency and safety of this drug in this age group. We evaluated the pharmacokinetics of intramuscularly administered native E. coli asparaginase (Asparaginase Medac((R))) and PEG-asparaginase (Oncaspar((R))) as well as hypersensitivity reactions during treatment in Interfant-06 (www.clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01025804). All patients without hypersensitivity had sufficiently high enzyme activity levels during treatment with both preparations. Patients with hypersensitivity reactions during treatment, characterized by the presence of either or not of clinical symptoms and no measurable enzyme activity, received ineffective therapy. For optimization of the bad prognosis in infant ALL, therapeutic drug monitoring should be performed for identification of patients who should be switched to a different asparaginase preparation because of inactivation of the drug.

  • 38. Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin
    et al.
    Kriström, Berit
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Jonsson, Björn
    Hochberg, Zeʼev
    Long-term response to growth hormone (GH) therapy in short children with a delayed infancy childhood transition (DICT)2011Ingår i: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 69, s. 504-510Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Transition of growth from infancy to childhood is associated with activation of the GH-IGF-I axis. Children with a delayed infancy-childhood-transition (ICT) are short as adults. Thus, age at ICT may impact on growth response to GH. The objective was to investigate associations between growth response to GH-treatment and ICT-timing in children with idiopathic short stature (ISS) in a randomized, controlled, multicenter trial, TRN 88-080. 147 pre-pubertal children (mean age, 11.5±1.4 yrs) were randomized to receive GH 33μg/kg/d (GH33, n=43), GH 67μg/kg/d (GH67, n=61) or no treatment (n=43). Data on growth to final height (FH) were analyzed after categorization into those with normal (n=76) or delayed ICT (n=71). Within the GH33 group, significant height gain at FH was only observed in children with a delayed ICT (p<0.001) with each month of delay corresponding to gain of 0.13 standard deviation score (SDS). For the GH67 group, the timing of the onset of the ICT had no impact on growth response. In conclusion, ISS children with a delayed ICT responded to standard-GH-dose (better responsiveness), whereas those with a normal ICT required higher doses to attain a significant height gain to FH.

  • 39. Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin
    et al.
    Kriström, Berit
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik. berit.kristrom@umu.se.
    Lundberg, Elena
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Aronson, A. Stefan
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Hagenäs, Lars
    Ivarsson, Sten-A.
    Jonsson, Bjorn
    Ritzen, Martin
    Tuvemo, Torsten
    Westgren, Ulf
    Westphal, Otto
    Åman, Jan
    Growth Hormone Dose-Dependent Pubertal Growth: A Randomized Trial in Short Children with Low Growth Hormone Secretion2014Ingår i: Hormone Research in Paediatrics, ISSN 1663-2818, E-ISSN 1663-2826, Vol. 82, nr 3, s. 158-170Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims: Growth hormone (GH) treatment regimens do not account for the pubertal increase in endogenous GH secretion. This study assessed whether increasing the GH dose and/or frequency of administration improves pubertal height gain and adult height (AH) in children with low GH secretion during stimulation tests, i. e. idiopathic isolated GH deficiency. Methods: A multicenter, randomized, clinical trial (No. 88-177) followed 111 children (96 boys) at study start from onset of puberty to AH who had received GH(33) mu g/kg/day for >= 1 year. They were randomized to receive 67 mu g/kg/day (GH(67)) given as one (GH(67x1); n = 35) or two daily injections (GH(33x2); n = 36), or to remain on a single 33 mu g/kg/day dose (GH(33x1); n = 40). Growth was assessed as height SDS gain for prepubertal, pubertal and total periods, as well as AH SDS versus the population and the midparental height. Results: Pubertal height SDS gain was greater for patients receiving a high dose (GH(67), 0.73) than a low dose (GH(33x1), 0.41, p < 0.05). AH(SDS) was greater on GH(67) (GH(67x1), -0.84; GH(33x2), -0.83) than GH(33) (-1.25, p < 0.05), and height SDS gain was greater on GH(67) than GH(33) (2.04 and 1.56, respectively; p < 0.01). All groups reached their target height SDS. Conclusion: Pubertal height SDS gain and AH SDS were dose dependent, with greater growth being observed for the GH(67) than the GH(33) randomization group; however, there were no differences between the once-and twice-daily GH(67) regimens. (C) 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  • 40.
    Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin
    et al.
    Goteborg Pediat Growth Res Ctr, Dept Pediat, Inst Clin Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kriström, Berit
    Dept Clin Sci, Pediat Unit, Umeå Univ, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Elena
    Dept Clin Sci, Pediat Unit, Umeå Univ, Umeå, Sweden.
    Aronson, A. Stefan
    Dept Pediat, Halmstad Cty Hosp, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hagenäs, Lars
    Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Sten-A.
    Dept Pediat, Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Björn
    Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ritzen, Martin
    Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tuvemo, Torsten
    Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Westgren, Ulf
    Dept Pediat, Lund Univ, Malmo, Sweden.
    Westphal, Otto
    Goteborg Pediat Growth Res Ctr, Dept Pediat, Inst Clin Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Åman, Jan
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Growth hormone dose-dependent pubertal growth: a randomized trial in short children with low growth hormone secretion2014Ingår i: Hormone Research in Paediatrics, ISSN 1663-2818, E-ISSN 1663-2826, Vol. 82, nr 3, s. 158-170Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims: Growth hormone (GH) treatment regimens do not account for the pubertal increase in endogenous GH secretion. This study assessed whether increasing the GH dose and/or frequency of administration improves pubertal height gain and adult height (AH) in children with low GH secretion during stimulation tests, i. e. idiopathic isolated GH deficiency.

    Methods: A multicenter, randomized, clinical trial (No. 88-177) followed 111 children (96 boys) at study start from onset of puberty to AH who had received GH(33) mu g/kg/day for >= 1 year. They were randomized to receive 67 mu g/kg/day (GH(67)) given as one (GH(67x1); n = 35) or two daily injections (GH(33x2); n = 36), or to remain on a single 33 mu g/kg/day dose (GH(33x1); n = 40). Growth was assessed as height SDS gain for prepubertal, pubertal and total periods, as well as AH SDS versus the population and the midparental height.

    Results: Pubertal height SDS gain was greater for patients receiving a high dose (GH(67), 0.73) than a low dose (GH(33x1), 0.41, p < 0.05). AH(SDS) was greater on GH(67) (GH(67x1), -0.84; GH(33x2), -0.83) than GH(33) (-1.25, p < 0.05), and height SDS gain was greater on GH(67) than GH(33) (2.04 and 1.56, respectively; p < 0.01). All groups reached their target height SDS.

    Conclusion: Pubertal height SDS gain and AH SDS were dose dependent, with greater growth being observed for the GH(67) than the GH(33) randomization group; however, there were no differences between the once-and twice-daily GH(67) regimens. (C) 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  • 41.
    Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin
    et al.
    Göteborg Pediatric Growth Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kriström, Berit
    Pediatrics Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Elena
    Pediatrics Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Aronson, A Stefan
    Department of Pediatrics, Halmstad Hospital, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Pediatrik.
    Hagenäs, Lars
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Sten-A
    Department of Pediatrics, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Björn
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Pediatrik.
    Ritzén, Martin
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tuvemo, Torsten
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Pediatrik.
    Westgren, Ulf
    Department of Pediatrics, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Westphal, Otto
    Göteborg Pediatric Growth Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Aman, Jan
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Growth hormone dose-dependent pubertal growth: a randomized trial in short children with low growth hormone secretion2014Ingår i: Hormone Research in Paediatrics, ISSN 1663-2818, E-ISSN 1663-2826, Vol. 82, nr 3, s. 158-170Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Growth hormone (GH) treatment regimens do not account for the pubertal increase in endogenous GH secretion. This study assessed whether increasing the GH dose and/or frequency of administration improves pubertal height gain and adult height (AH) in children with low GH secretion during stimulation tests, i.e. idiopathic isolated GH deficiency.

    METHODS: A multicenter, randomized, clinical trial (No. 88-177) followed 111 children (96 boys) at study start from onset of puberty to AH who had received GH 33 µg/kg/day for ≥1 year. They were randomized to receive 67 µg/kg/day (GH(67)) given as one (GH(67×1); n = 35) or two daily injections (GH(33×2); n = 36), or to remain on a single 33 µg/kg/day dose (GH(33×1); n = 40). Growth was assessed as heightSDSgain for prepubertal, pubertal and total periods, as well as AHSDS versus the population and the midparental height.

    RESULTS: Pubertal heightSDSgain was greater for patients receiving a high dose (GH(67), 0.73) than a low dose (GH(33×1), 0.41, p < 0.05). AHSDS was greater on GH(67) (GH(67×1), -0.84; GH(33×2), -0.83) than GH(33) (-1.25, p < 0.05), and heightSDSgain was greater on GH(67) than GH(33) (2.04 and 1.56, respectively; p < 0.01). All groups reached their target heightSDS.

    CONCLUSION: Pubertal heightSDSgain and AHSDS were dose dependent, with greater growth being observed for the GH(67) than the GH(33) randomization group; however, there were no differences between the once- and twice-daily GH(67) regimens.

  • 42. Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin
    et al.
    Martensson, Anton
    Savendahl, Lars
    Niklasson, Aimon
    Bang, Peter
    Dahlgren, Jovanna
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Kriström, Berit
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Norgren, Svante
    Pehrsson, Nils-Gunnar
    Oden, Anders
    Mortality Is Not Increased in Recombinant Human Growth Hormone-treated Patients When Adjusting for Birth Characteristics2016Ingår i: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 101, nr 5, s. 2149-2159Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate whether reported high mortality in childhood recombinant human GH (rhGH)-treated patients was related to birth-characteristics and/or rhGH treatment.

    Design and Setting: We sought to develop a mortality model of the Swedish general population born between 1973 and 2010, using continuous-hazard functions adjusting for birth characteristics, sex, age intervals, and calendar year to estimate standardized mortality ratio (SMR) and to apply this model to assess expected deaths in Swedish rhGH-treated patients with idiopathic isolated GH deficiency (IGHD), idiopathic short stature (155) or born small for gestational age (SGA).

    Participants: The general population: Swedish Medical Birth Register (1973-2010: 1 880 668 males; 1 781 131 females) and Cause of Death Register (1985-2010).

    Intervention Population: Three thousand eight hundred forty-seven patients starting rhGH treatment between 1985 and 2010 and followed in the National GH Register and/or in rhGH trials diagnosed with IGHD (n = 1890), ISS (n = 975), or SGA (n=982).

    Main Outcome Measures: Death.

    Results: Using conventional models adjusting for age, sex, and calendar-year, the SMR was 1.43 (95% confidence interval, 0.89-2.19), P = .14, observed/expected deaths 21/14.68. The rhGH population differed (P < .001) from the general population regarding birth weight, birth length, and congenital malformations.

    Application of an Advanced Model: When applying the developed mortality model of the general population, the ratio of observed/expected deaths in rhGH-treated patients was 21/21.99; SMR = 0.955 (0.591-1.456)P = .95.

    Model Comparison: Expected number of deaths were 14.68 (14.35-14.96) using the conventional model, and 21.99 (21.24-22.81) using the advanced model, P < .001, which had at all ages a higher gradient of risk per SD of the model, 24% (range, 18-42%; P < .001).

    Conclusions: Compared with the general Swedish population, the ratio of observed/expected deaths (21/21.99) was not increased in childhood rhGH-treated IGHD, ISS, and SGA patients when applying an advanced sex-specific mortality model adjusting for birth characteristics.

  • 43. Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin
    et al.
    Mårtensson, Anton
    Sävendahl, Lars
    Niklasson, Aimon
    Bang, Peter
    Dahlgren, Jovanna
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Kriström, Berit
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Norgren, Svante
    Pehrsson, Nils-Gunnar
    Oden, Anders
    Birth Characteristics Explain One Third of Expected Deaths in rhGH-treated Patients Diagnosed with IGHD, ISS & SGA2016Ingår i: Hormone Research in Paediatrics, ISSN 1663-2818, E-ISSN 1663-2826, Vol. 86, s. 49-49Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 44. Albrecht, E. C.
    et al.
    Kaelin, Vera C.
    Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612, USA.
    Rigau, B. L.
    Dooling-Litfin, J. K.
    Scully, E. A.
    Murphy, N. J.
    McManus, B. M.
    Khetani, M. A.
    Pilot implementation of an electronic patient-reported outcome measure for planning and monitoring participation-focused care in early intervention2020Ingår i: BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, E-ISSN 1472-6947, Vol. 20, nr 1, artikel-id 199Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Family-centered care is a valued approach to improving child and family outcomes in early intervention (EI), yet there is need to implement interventions that support information exchange for shared decision-making when planning and monitoring EI care. This study aims at estimating the feasibility, acceptability, and value of implementing the Young Children’s Participation and Environment Measure (YC-PEM), a valid electronic patient-reported outcome (e-PRO) that is designed to support family engagement when planning care and monitoring outcomes of care.

    Methods: Data were gathered from caregivers (N = 139) that were enrolled in a Phase 1 trial of the YC-PEM e-PRO as implemented within 1 month of their child’s next EI evaluation of progress. YC-PEM e-PRO feasibility was estimated according to enrollment and completion rates, and mean completion time. Chi-square tests were used to examine parent perceptions of YC-PEM e-PRO acceptability by caregiver education and family income. Caregiver feedback via open-ended responses were content coded to inform intervention and protocol optimizations. YC-PEM e-PRO value was estimated via composite and item-level scores to capture the extent of participation difficulty in home and community activities, and common areas of need regarding caregivers desired change in their child’s participation.

    Results: Feasibility of implementing the YC-PEM e-PRO in routine EI care was mixed, as evidenced by low enrollment rates (21.0–29.2%), a high completion rate (85.3%), and limited missing data (80.6% of completed cases contained no missing data). More than half of the participants reported that the completion of the YC-PEM e-PRO was at least somewhat helpful, regardless of family income or caregiver education, providing support for its acceptability. As for its value, the YC-PEM e-PRO results were viewed by 64% of caregivers, whose desire for change most often pertained to the child’s participation in non-discretionary activities at home and structured activities in the community.

    Conclusions: Results may support the implementation of YC-PEM e-PRO as a feasible, acceptable, and valued option for engaging families in planning the child’s EI care. Results also inform select intervention and protocol optimizations prior to undertaking a multi-site pragmatic trial of its effectiveness on family engagement and shared decision-making within an EI clinical workflow.

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  • 45.
    Alenius Dahlqvist, Jenny
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Heart rate variability and pacemaker treatment in children with Fontan circulation2019Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Fontan surgery is performed in children with univentricular heart defects. Arrhythmias are frequent complications, occasionally requiring pacemaker treatment. Previous data regarding indications and risk factors for pacemaker treatment in Fontan patients is limited and conflicting. Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects autonomous nervous activity controlling the sinus node and has been associated with tachyarrhythmias in both adults and children, as well as in adults with sinus node dysfunction (SND).

    Aim: To study HRV, arrhythmia and pacemaker treatment  in children with Fontan circulation— with the purpose of contributing to the reduction of long term complications in this patient group.

    Methods: We have retrospectively reviewed pacemaker therapy in all Swedish patients who underwent Fontan surgery from 1982 to 2017 (n=599). We have also analysed HRV from 24-hour Holter ECG recordings in 112 children with Fontan circulation and in children with univentricular heart defects before bidirectional Glenn (BDG) procedure (n=47), before and on completion of Fontan surgery (n=47 and 45 respectively). Analysis was performed by power spectral analysis and Poincaré method, and results compared with healthy controls. Furthermore, HRV was analysed in Fontan patients who later required a pacemaker due to severe SND. Results were compared with Fontan patients who had SND, without indication for pacemaker treatment, with patients with Fontan circulation without SND and healthy controls. In addition we evaluated the possibility to analyse arrhythmias and HRV in 27 Fontan children using intermittent ECG recordings with a handheld devices at home during a 14-day period.

    Results: After a mean follow-up of 12 years, 13% (78/599) of patients with Fontan circulation had received a pacemaker. Patients operated with the extracardiac conduit (EC) had a significantly lower prevalence of pacemaker implantation (6%) than patients with a lateral tunnel (LT) (17%). The most common pacemaker indication in patients with Fontan circulation was SND (64%). Children with Fontan circulation showed significant reductions in several HRV parameters, compared with controls. No significant differences were found between patients operated with LT versus EC (paper I). After BDG the RR interval and SD2 (representing changes in heart rate over 24-hours) significantly increased compared to pre-BDG. Compared with healthy controls, patients post-BDG, had significantly longer RR intervals and reduced overall HRV. PHF (reflecting parasympathetic control of the heart) was significantly reduced after TCPC as compared to before (paper II). Fontan patients with SND showed significantly elevated SD2 (representing changes in heart rate over 24-hours), somewhat reduced in patients that later required a pacemaker (Paper V). Handheld ECG analysis revealed frequent ventricular extra systoles in one patient and episodes of supraventricular tachycardia in another. Seven Fontan patients showed reduced HRV recorded with the handheld device over a 14-day period (paper III).

    Conclusions: Overall HRV was reduced in patients with univentricular heart defects during the different surgical stages of Fontan surgery, compared to healthy controls. HRV was reduced in both patients with LT and EC with no significant difference between them. After BDG heart rate was significantly reduced as compared to before. PHF, reflecting the parasympathetic innervation of the heart was reduced after as compared to before TCPC. Pacemaker treatment is commonly needed in patients with Fontan circulation, and SND was the most prevalent indication for implantation. The prevalence of Fontan patients requiring pacemaker treatment was significantly lower in patients with EC. HRV analysis can contribute to management when following-up patients with Fontan circulation.

     

     

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  • 46.
    Alenius Dahlqvist, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Karlsson, Marcus
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Radiofysik.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Radiofysik.
    Hörnsten, Rolf
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, Klinisk fysiologi.
    Strömvall-Larsson, Eva
    Division of Cardiology, Department of Paediatrics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Berggren, Håkan
    Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Department of Paediatrics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hanseus, Katarina
    Department of Paediatrics, Children’s Hospital, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Johansson, Sune
    Paediatric Cardiac Surgical Unit, Children’s Hospital, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Rydberg, Annika
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Heart rate variability in children with fontan circulation: lateral tunnel and extracardiac conduit2012Ingår i: Pediatric Cardiology, ISSN 0172-0643, E-ISSN 1432-1971, Vol. 33, nr 2, s. 307-315Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The technique in Fontan surgery has developed from the lateral tunnel (LT) toward the extracardiac conduit (EC) used to reduce long-term complications such as atrial arrhythmia and sinus node dysfunction. Heart rate variability (HRV) examines cardiac nervous activity controlling the sinus node. This study aimed to investigate HRV in a cohort of children with univentricular hearts, focusing on the relation between HRV and surgical procedure. For 112 children with Fontan circulation, HRV was analyzed using power spectral analysis. Spectral power was determined in three regions: very-low-frequency (VLF), low-frequency (LF), and high-frequency (HF) regions. Patients were compared with 66 healthy controls subject. Patients with LT were compared with patients who had EC. The children with Fontan circulation showed a significantly reduced HRV including total power (P < 0.0001), VLF (P < 0.0001), LF (P < 0.0001), and HF (P = 0.001) compared with the control subjects. The LT and EC patients did not differ significantly. Reduced HRV was found in both the LT and EC patients. In terms of HRV reduction, EC was not superior to LT.

  • 47.
    Alenius Dahlqvist, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Sunnegårdh, Jan
    Department of Cardiology, The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hanséus, Katarina
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Children Heart Center, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Strömvall Larsson, Eva
    Department of Cardiology, The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nygren, Anders
    Department of Cardiology, The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dalén, Magnus
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Department of Cardiac Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berggren, Håkan
    Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Children's Heart Center, The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Johansson Ramgren, Jens
    Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Children´s Heart Center, Skånes University Hospital Lund, Sweden.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Radiofysik.
    Rydberg, Annika
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Pacemaker treatment after Fontan surgery: a Swedish national study2019Ingår i: Congenital Heart Disease, ISSN 1747-079X, E-ISSN 1747-0803, Vol. 14, nr 4, s. 582-589Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Fontan surgery is performed in children with univentricular heart defects. Previous data regarding permanent pacemaker implantation frequency and indications in Fontan patients are limited and conflicting. We examined the prevalence of and risk factors for pacemaker treatment in a consecutive national cohort of patients after Fontan surgery in Sweden.

    Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all Swedish patients who underwent Fontan surgery from 1982 to 2017 (n = 599).

    Results: After a mean follow‐up of 12.2 years, 13% (78/599) of the patients with Fontan circulation had received pacemakers. Patients operated with the extracardiac conduit (EC) type of total cavopulmonary connection had a significantly lower prevalence of pacemaker implantation (6%) than patients with lateral tunnel (LT; 17%). Mortality did not differ between patients with (8%) and without pacemaker (5%). The most common pacemaker indication was sinus node dysfunction (SND) (64%). Pacemaker implantation due to SND was less common among patients with EC. Pacemaker implantation was significantly more common in patients with mitral atresia (MA; 44%), double outlet right ventricle (DORV; 24%) and double inlet left ventricle (DILV; 20%). In contrast, patients with pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum and hypoplastic left heart syndrome were significantly less likely to receive a pacemaker (3% and 6%, respectively).

    Conclusions: Thirteen percent of Fontan patients received a permanent pacemaker, most frequently due to SND. EC was associated with a significantly lower prevalence of pacemaker than LT. Permanent pacemaker was more common in patients with MA, DORV, and DILV.

  • 48.
    Alenius Dahlqvist, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Radiofysik.
    Karlsson, Marcus
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Radiofysik.
    Hanséus, Katarina
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Children Heart Centre, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Strömvall Larsson, Eva
    Department of Cardiology, The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson Ramgren, Jens
    Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Children´s Heart Center, Skånes University Hospital Lund, Sweden.
    Berggren, Håkan
    Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Children's Heart Center, The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rydberg, Annika
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Changes in Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability During Surgical Stages to Completed Fontan Circulation2021Ingår i: Pediatric Cardiology, ISSN 0172-0643, E-ISSN 1432-1971, Vol. 42, nr 5, s. 1162-1169Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Arrhythmia is related to heart rate variability (HRV), which reflects the autonomic nervous regulation of the heart. We hypothesized that autonomic nervous ganglia, located at the junction of the superior vena cava’s entrance to the heart, may be affected during the bidirectional Glenn procedure (BDG), resulting in reduced HRV. We aimed to investigate changes in heart rate and HRV in a cohort of children with univentricular heart defects, undergoing stepwise surgery towards total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC), and compare these results with healthy controls. Twenty four hours Holter-ECG recordings were obtained before BDG (n = 47), after BDG (n = 47), and after total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) (n = 45) in patients and in 38 healthy controls. HRV was analyzed by spectral and Poincaré methods. Age-related z scores were calculated and compared using linear mixed effects modeling. Total HRV was significantly lower in patients before BDG when compared to healthy controls. The mean heart rate was significantly reduced in patients after BDG compared to before BDG. Compared to healthy controls, patients operated with BDG had significantly reduced heart rate and reduced total HRV. Patients with TCPC showed reduced heart rate and HRV compared with healthy controls. In patients after TCPC, total HRV was decreased compared to before TCPC. Heart rate was reduced after BDG procedure, and further reductions of HRV were seen post-TCPC. Our results indicate that autonomic regulation of cardiac rhythm is affected both after BDG and again after TCPC. This may be reflected as, and contribute to, postoperative arrhythmic events.

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  • 49.
    Alenius Dahlqvist, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper.
    Karlsson, Marcus
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper.
    Hanséus, Katarina
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Children Heart Centre, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Strömvall Larsson, Eva
    Department of Cardiology, The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nygren, Anders
    Department of Cardiology, The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Håkan
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rydberg, Annika
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Sinus node dysfunction in patients with Fontan circulation: could heart rate variability be a predictor for pacemaker implantation?Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 50.
    Alenius Dahlqvist, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Radiofysik.
    Karlsson, Marcus
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Radiofysik.
    Hanséus, Katarina
    Strömvall-Larsson, Eva
    Nygren, Anders
    Eliasson, Håkan
    Rydberg, Annika
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Sinus node dysfunction in patients with Fontan circulation: could heart rate variability be a predictor for pacemaker implantation?2019Ingår i: Pediatric Cardiology, ISSN 0172-0643, E-ISSN 1432-1971, Vol. 40, nr 4, s. 685-693Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Sinus node dysfunction (SND) causes significant morbidity in patients after Fontan surgery. Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects the autonomic regulation of the heart, and changes in HRV have been associated with SND in adults. We aimed to study whether changes in HRV could be detected in 24-h electrocardiographic (ECG) recordings in Fontan patients with SND. We compared HRV results from two patient groups; patients with Fontan circulation who later required a pacemaker due to severe SND (n = 12) and patients with Fontan circulation and SND, without indication for pacemaker treatment (n = 11), with two control groups; patients with Fontan circulation without SND (n = 90) and healthy controls (n = 66). The Poincare plot index SD2 (representing changes in heart rate over 24-h) and the very low-frequency (VLF) HRV component were significantly higher in both SND groups, both compared with healthy controls and patients with Fontan circulation without SND. In SND patients with pacemakers, SD2 and VLF were slightly reduced compared to SND patients without pacemaker (p = 0.06). In conclusion, in Fontan patients with SND the HRV is significantly higher compared to healthy controls and Fontan patients without SND. However, in patients with severe SND requiring pacemaker, SD2 and VLF tended to be lower than in patients with SND without pacemaker, which could indicate a reduced diurnal HRV in addition to the severe bradycardia. This is a small study, but our results indicate that HRV analysis might be a useful method in the follow-up of Fontan patients regarding development of SND.

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