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  • 1.
    Aarikka-Stenroos, Leena
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Management CITER (Center for Innovation and Technology Research), Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Peltola, Tero
    Department of Industrial Management CITER (Center for Innovation and Technology Research), Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Rikkiev, Andrei
    Department of Industrial Management CITER (Center for Innovation and Technology Research), Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    Department of Industrial Management CITER (Center for Innovation and Technology Research), Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Multiple facets of innovation and business ecosystem research: the foci, methods and future agenda2016In: ISPIM Innovation Symposium, Manchester: The International Society for Professional Innovation Management (ISPIM) , 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An ecosystem approach to innovation and business has become increasingly relevant in contemporary research but research knowledge is scattered across divergent disciplines. The aim of this study is thus, on the basis of an extensive, multidisciplinary literature review to integrate the extant knowledge on innovation and business ecosystems and analyze how they are conceptualized, analyzed, captured and depicted. By conducting a systematic multi-phase content analysis of over 230 articles selected from the Web of Science, we will build a comprehensive picture on the research streams of innovation/business ecosystem research, the used methods, foci, illustrations/visualizations of business/innovation ecosystems and build a research agenda for future research. This article contributes by providing a structured analysis on this multi-disciplinary research area, aggregating the current knowledge and generating a research agenda on innovation/business ecosystems - a theme that is emergent, multifaceted, and crucial to innovative companies as well as researchers in the fields of innovation, management, technology and marketing.

  • 2.
    Aarthi, Aishwarya Devendran
    et al.
    LKAB, Sweden.
    Mainali, Brijesh
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology. Linnaeus University.
    Khatiwada, Dilip
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Golzar, Farzin
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Mahapatra, Krushna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Implementation of GIS-AHP Framework for the Identification of Potential Landfill Sites in Bengaluru Metropolitan Region, India2023In: The 9th International Conference on Energy and Environment Research. ICEER 2022. / [ed] Caetano, N.S., Felgueiras, M.C., Springer, 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Uncontrolled open dumping and burning of municipal solid waste (MSW) has resulted in soil, water, and air pollution in many urban cities in India. Landfills are the most common cost-effective solution for MSW management in many developing countries like India. However, the identification of suitable landfill sites always remains a challenging task as it involves the selection of several environmental criteria set by the local authorities. The objective of this study is to identify the most potential landfill sites proposed by the Government in Bengaluru Metropolitan Region, Karnataka state, India using Geographic Information System enabled Analytical Hierarchy Process based multi-criteria evaluation technique. Several criteria and constraints as recommended by the local authorities along with the proximity to the solid waste processing plants are used to identify the potential landfill sites in the study region. The study identified three highly suitable sites (Neraluru, Gudhatti, Madivala) for landfills which are not only environmentally sustainable but also economically attractive as they are closer to the solid waste processing plants minimizing the transportation cost involved in the disposal of solid waste from the source to the final disposal sites in the study region.

  • 3.
    Abbatelli, Daniele
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Material flows in the waterjet industry: an environmental perspective2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abrasive Waterjet cutting (AWJ) presents many advantages over competing machining techniques, but several issues are related to the high volume of materials (and in particular of abrasive) used in the process.

    In this study, the environmental impact of the material flows in the abrasive waterjet industry has been analyzed adopting a life cycle perspective in order to individuate which phases place the largest burden on the environment. Moreover, three alternative abrasives (crushed rock, recycled glass and synthetic abrasive) and three disposal practices (in-site recycling, off-site recycling and recycling as construction material) have been also evaluated to estimate the benefits that can be achieved if these could be used in place of garnet abrasives and landfilling.

    The transportation of the abrasive resulted to be the phase that has the largest influence in every case and thus should be reduced as much as possible. For what concerns the alternative options, the usage of recycled glass and the in-site recycling of the abrasive were the two alternatives with the best environmental performances. However, crushed rock could be the best option for what concerns the global warming potential if carbon sequestration due to carbonation of silicate rocks is taken into account. Off-site recycling and recycling as construction material are good options only if the transportation to the recycling site can be reduced. Synthetic abrasive are instead found to have a much larger impact compared to every other alternative examined.

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  • 4.
    Abor, Joshua Yindenaba
    et al.
    Centre for Global Finance, SOAS University of London, United Kingdom; University of Stellenbosch Business School, South Africa.
    Karimu, AminUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE). Environmental Policy Research Unit (EPRU), University of Cape Town, South Africa.
    Sustainability management in the oil and gas industry: emerging and developing country perspectives2023Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The oil and gas industry is a complex sector with significant reach in terms of providing the energy needs of the global economy and the security, environmental and development consequences thereof. In particular, the sector is extremely important for the economic growth of emerging markets and developing countries. Furthermore, the life span of oil and gas resources is finite, with high health and safety risks and substantial environmental costs that require careful management and sustainability practices to ensure optimal extraction and utilisation of these resources. This book examines the challenges and opportunities in the oil and gas industry, in the context of emerging markets and developing economies. It provides comprehensive coverage of the management and sustainability practices of the sector, the environmental impact and sustainability of resources as well as the businesses that operate in the sector across the entire value chain. It addresses the current discourse on topics such as the Sustainable Development Goals, the Green Economy, the Paris Agreement and Glasgow Climate Pact and concludes with a chapter on the future of the oil and gas industry. The discussions around energy and energy transitions in particular continue to gain momentum and the book provides a wide-reaching and up-to-date overview of the industry. The book introduces readers to the concepts and formal models of analysis in the oil and gas sector and will serve as a useful resource for students, scholars and researchers in operations, marketing, procurement and supply chain management, project management, health and safety management, environmental economics, natural resource economics, development finance, and development studies. Researchers and practitioners working in these areas will also find the book a useful reference material.

  • 5.
    Abrahamsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Bachofner Gran, Clara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    de Afonseca, Ana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Eriksson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Kalla, Christelle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Lindqvist, Sandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Livscykelanalys av förbrukningsvaror: En studie för minskad klimatpåverkan inom Landstinget i Uppsala län2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Landstinget i Uppsala län (LUL) presenterade år 2014 ett miljöprogram med målet att minskasin klimatpåverkan inom bland annat transport, energi och förbrukningsmaterial. Syftet meddenna studie var att undersöka möjligheten för LUL att minska sina utsläpp av växthusgasergenom att välja mer miljövänliga varianter av två välanvända förbrukningsvaror inom vården:operationsset och tvättlappar. Detta utfördes genom att tillämpa metoden livscykelanalys(LCA), där tre varianter av operationsset, två sorters tvättlappar samt ett jämförbartavtorkningspapper följdes ”från vaggan till graven”.Studiens resultat skulle besvara frågan om vilken produkt inom de två användningsområdenasom avgav minst växthusgaser i form av koldioxid, metan samt lustgas under en livscykel, föratt uppfylla samma funktion inom avdelningarna operation samt geriatrik. Resultatet skullepresenteras i enheten koldioxidekvivalenter (eCO2). Dessutom identifieradesförbrukningsvarorna som medförde de minsta årsförbrukningskostnaderna för LUL.Operationsseten som undersöktes bestod av polylaktid (PLA), polypropen (PP) samt viskos.Avtorkningspappret bestod av pappersmassa och tvättlapparna bestod bland annat av viskossamt skumplast. Studien avgränsades till att inkludera växthusgasutsläpp från tillverkning avråmaterial, tillverkning av förpackningsmaterial, transporter samt förbränning.Efter utförd LCA kunde det observeras att en årsförbrukning av operationssetet i PLA släppteut minst växthusgaser med cirka 11 100 kg eCO2 per år, operationssetet i PP släppte ut mestmed 25 100 kg eCO2 per år och operationssetet i viskos bidrog med 20 300 kg eCO2 per år. Enårsförbrukning av avtorkningspappret bidrog med minst växthusgasutsläpp med 67,1 kg eCO2per år, medan tvättlappen i viskos släppte ut 134 kg eCO2 per år och tvättlappen i skumplastbidrog med det största utsläppsvärdet på 1 150 kg eCO2 per år.En årsförbrukning av båda operationsseten i PLA och PP kostade cirka 127 000 kr medansamma mängd av operationssetet i viskos ungefär kostade 125 000 kr. Avtorkningspappretkostade 4 790 kr för en årsförbrukning, tvättlappen i viskos kostade 21 000 kr och tvättlappeni skumplast kostade 19 800 kr.Resultatet från denna studie tydde på att LUL skulle kunna minska sin klimatpåverkan frånförbrukningsmaterial genom att upphandla operationssetet i PLA samt avtorkningspappretistället för de alternativen som används i dagsläget. Det finns en osäkerhet i resultatet då flertaletantaganden gjordes i brist på tillgänglig information. Resultatet anses dock ge en rimlig bild avmiljöpåverkan från produkterna då de minst klimatpåverkande förbrukningsvarorna till stor delutgjordes av förnyelsebart material.

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  • 6.
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    et al.
    Univ Trento, Dept Civil Environm & Mech Eng.
    Geneletti, Davide
    Univ Trento, Dept Civil Environm & Mech Eng.
    Albert, Christian
    Leibniz Univ Hannover, Inst Environm Planning, Herrenhauser Str 2, D-30419 Hannover, Germany; UFZ Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Dept Environm Polit, Permoserstr 15, D-04318 Leipzig, Germany.
    Boundary work for implementing adaptive management: A water sector application2017In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 593-594, p. 274-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Boundary work, defined as effort to mediate between knowledge and action, is a promising approach for facilitating knowledge co-production for sustainable development. Here, we investigate a case study of knowledge co-production, to assess the applicability of boundary work as a conceptual framework to support implementing adaptive management in the water sector. We refer to a boundary work classification recently proposed by Clark et al., (2016), based on three types of knowledge uses, i.e. enlightenment, decision-, and negotiation-support, and three types of sources, i.e. personal expertise, single, and multiple communities of expertise. Our empirical results confirm boundary work has been crucial for the three types of knowledge use. For enlightenment and decision support, effective interaction among knowledge producers and users was achieved through diverse boundary work practices, including joint agenda setting, and sharing of data and expertise. This initial boundary work eased subsequent knowledge co-production for decision-support and negotiations, in combination with stepping up of cooperation between relevant actors, suitable legislation and pressure for problem solving. Our analysis highlighted the temporal dimension matters-building trust around enlightenment first, and then using this as a basis for managing knowledge co-production for decision-, and negotiation support. We reconfirmed that boundary work is not a single time achievement, rather is a dynamic process, and we emphasized the importance of key actors driving the process, such as water utilities. Our results provide a rich case study of how strategic boundary work can facilitate knowledge co-production for adaptive management in the water sector. The boundary work practices employed here could also be transferred to other cases. Water utilities, as intermediaries between providers and beneficiaries of the important water-related ecosystem service of clean water provision, can indeed serve as key actors for initiating such boundary work practices. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

  • 7. Affatati, Alice
    et al.
    Scaini, Chiara
    Scaini, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Bolin Centre for Climate Research (together with KTH & SMHI).
    The role of operators in sustainable whale-watching tourism: Proposing a continuous training framework2024In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 19, no 1, article id e0296241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whale watching is considered a form of green tourism, but can affect marine ecosystems, impacting cetaceans’ behavior and potentially increasing acoustic pollution. A more sustainable whale-watching practice should employ a comprehensive approach involving all stakeholders, but whale-watching operators are rarely involved. We propose a method to assess whale–watching operators’ perceptions regarding the possible effects of their activity on marine fauna and preferred mitigation solutions, by means of online questionnaires and website communication strategies. Results from Canadian whale-watching operators show that they observe regulations regarding distance to whales but only partially perceive general vessels’ impacts on fauna. Three recognized whale-watching experts identify the need for continuous training targeted at operators, which should include the impacts on marine ecosystems. A continuous training framework is proposed that targets whale-watching operators in addition to tourists, and involves scientists in several steps of the approach. This study serves as a starting point to involve operators’ in order to advance towards a sustainable whale-watching tourism.

  • 8.
    Ahenkan, Albert
    et al.
    Department of Public Administration and Health Services Management, University of Ghana Business School, Ghana.
    Cudjoe, Mawuena A.
    Department of Accounting, University of Ghana Business School, Ghana.
    Karimu, Amin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE). Environmental Policy Research Unit (EPRU), University of Cape Town, South Africa.
    Abekah-Nkrumah, Gordon
    Department of Public Administration and Health Services Management, University of Ghana Business School, Ghana.
    Environmental and sustainability management in the oil and gas industry2023In: Sustainability management in the oil and gas industry: emerging and developing country perspectives / [ed] Joshua Yindenaba Abor; Amin Karimu, Routledge, 2023, p. 223-239Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability management in the oil and gas industry in emerging and developing countries has become essential to the sustainable development discourse because of the growing interest regarding the compatibility of the industry to a sustainable future. This chapter examines the management of environmental and sustainability issues in oil and gas industry in developing countries. The chapter comprises five sections. The first section presents the introduction and overview of the oil and gas industry in Africa. The second section presents sustainability challenges of the industry. The third section discusses environmental governance, ethics, and management of environmental impacts. The fourth section discusses how environmental impacts of the oil and gas industry are being managed and the regulatory framework for pollution prevention. The fifth section highlights corporate environmentalism in industry, the efforts to reduce pollution, and the greening of the sector. The chapter reveals that although the oil and gas sector has improved the economies of most developing countries over the years, the oil and gas sector activities have had significant environmental impacts. The chapter notes that several pressures from regulators and individuals force firms to behave ethically. What has helped mitigate the effect of the activities of the industry is the sense of duty towards the environment.

  • 9.
    Ahlfors, Charlotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Bergkrantz, Malin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Energieffektivisering av en bandybana: Analys av kompressorkylteknik och fjärrvärmedriven absorptionskylteknik2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today, the energy consumption in the world is increasing and Sweden is not an exception. Therefore, the continued work towards a sustainable development is essential in order for future generations to have the same opportunities as the people today. An important step towards this goal is to improve the energy efficiency until the next generations technology has been developed. As a result of this the energy resources of the earth could be saved which would lead to cost savings, due to the fact that operating costs would decrease with reduced energy consumption. A reduced electrical power generation would lead to reduced emissions of substances that affect the environment as well. The municipality of Västervik has worked towards a sustainable development for a long time; therefore energy efficiency in the public sector has been implemented.

    An analysis is done, based on a literature study and calculations, in purpose to decide if a change of the cooling system used for the outdoor ice rink in Gamleby would lead to reduced energy consumption and cost savings. The two different machines analysed are the existing compressor cooling machine and an alternative absorption cooling machine in combination with district heat from a local source. If excess of distinct heat could be used as heat source it would be positive for the environment and for sustainable development.

    Through calculations of the cooling demand, the sustainable economy and the CO2-emissions the following conclusions have been made. Since the coefficient of cooling performance is lower for the absorption cooling machine a switch of cooling system would result in a higher demand of energy (heat and power). Due to the different CO2-emission coefficients of the two energy sources a switch would lead to increase of CO2-emissions as well as reduce the efficiency of the resources of the earth.

    The investment cost for an absorption cooling machine is double the investment cost for a commercial compressor cooling machine. Therefore, calculations have shown that it would take 18 years until a change of the cooling system can be seen as cost-effective. This calculation is based on the most optimal conditions such as free district heating and a high value on the coefficient of performance. As well if the district heat would cost, a change would never be cost-effective. The life span of a cooling machine is approximately 25 years and due to the fact that the calculations for the optimal case are based on assumptions that are not confirmed, for instance the energy from the district heat would be free of charge, the authors of this study cannot recommend the change of cooling method for the ice rink seen through an economical perspective. To sum up, the conclusion is that a switch to absorption cooling will not result in an improvement in terms of energy efficiency, cost benefits or emission reduction. Instead, an analysis of the existing system should be made in order to identify efficiency improvement opportunities in areas such as optimization of the control system and reducing the cooling demand of the bandy ice by reducing heat transfer from the environment. 

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  • 10.
    Ahlgren, Ellen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Nordborg, Mikael
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Rainwater harvesting på Storsudret: Potential för implementering på södra Gotland2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Many places around the world, including parts of Sweden, suffers from seasonal lack of water. This can be dealt with by storing precipitation in times when the availability is good. One example of such an area is Storsudret on the southernmost part of Gotland. The focus of this report was to analyze the potential of implementing rainwater harvesting methods in Storsudret. The project was initiated with a literature study of existing methods for rainwater harvesting and an evaluation was made whether or not they were suited for the area and data from SMHI and Lantmäteriet was analyzed and compiled in Excel and ArcMap to assess the potential for rainwater harvesting. What this report shows, according to the calculations and map analysis made, is that there is potential in applying rainwater harvesting methods to the area Storsudret, Gotland. The main factors include the meteorological conditions, more specifically, the general spread of precipitation over a year and to the total amount of precipitation in a year. This together with the other factors is needed to evaluate if rainwater harvesting is a viable option for water supply at Storsudret. The other factors are mainly the size of rooftops in relation to the amount of people living in this area. Depending on each households’ own conditions, mainly water usage, rooftop size and storage capacity, the extent of which rainwater harvesting can be applied, varies. These types of solutions can not only help with a less stress on the groundwater storage, but it can also help those households that doesn’t have acceptable groundwater quality or cannot be connected to the municipal water systems. What this comes to show is that rainwater harvesting is an engineering technique that could help solve problems concerning shortage of water, not only at Storsudret, but also in other places in Sweden or in the world.

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  • 11.
    Aid, Graham
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Operationalizing Industrial Ecology in the Waste Sector: Roles and tactics for circular value innovation2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The take-make-waste approach to resource management in human production and consumption systems is contributing to a variety of environmental and social problems worldwide. Additionally, as the world’s population and affluence increase, so do the negative impacts of poor resource management. Lifting the waste management (WM) sector into a new phase of development, which takes its lead from the ideals of Industrial Ecology and circular economy, is seen by many scholars and practitioners as one potential to assist in alleviating these impacts. While there are many studies on how more efficient inter-organizational resource management is (or could be) constructed, there are relatively few business development studies which have explored novel approaches (from roles to tactics) that WM organizations might operationalize toward more efficient resource management.

    The aim of this thesis is to contribute to the development of knowledge and understanding of how the waste management sector can operationalize more effective and efficient resource management. In approaching this aim, two research questions guided the exploration of: 1) novel roles for WM and 2) support tactics for such roles. Grounded in the broader context of Industrial Ecology (IE) and Business Development, five studies were performed. Two studies, focused on the novel roles of inter-organizational resource management and high value secondary resource extraction, were performed through literature review and interviews, and market driver analysis respectively. In exploring support tactics, two design and proof of concept studies were carried out to investigate data analysis tools for inter-organizational resource management, and one long-term action research engagement project was coordinated to study hands-on inter-organizational collaboration tactics.

    The studies highlighted that the Swedish WM sector holds some key capacities for operationalizing (and in some cases, is already developing) the novel resource management roles identified: industrial symbiosis facilitator, eco-industrial park manager, holistic facility management, and high value resource extractor. However, depending on the portfolio of services to be performed in such roles, several capacities may need to be developed or strengthened. Main opportunities seen for these roles were – staying ahead of market developments, and aligning activities with organizational goals. The main general risk related to these roles was insufficient returns on investment. Looking forward, the main enablers identified were policy leadership for more balanced market mechanisms, increasing use of external knowledge, developing long term partnerships, lobbying, stockpiling resources, and carefully crafting new business models.

    The tools developed for strategically applying external information toward the identification of opportunities within new roles showed tactical potential. However, their implementation in broader development processes has yet to be fully validated. The hands-on exploration of change oriented collaboration, highlighted collective system framing and goal setting and face-to-face interaction as key activities for inter-organizational approaches within roles such as industrial symbiosis facilitator.

    Throughout the studies, several novel roles were investigated. Each of these roles will need to be individually evaluated by directing bodies of WM organizations, and evaluated from the organization’s vision and strategy. If certain roles are chosen to be explored in more detail, they will need to be developed within full business models - addressing issues such as income structure, internal processes and capacities to be developed, and key customers. Through applying IE and business development concepts and findings, WM organizations have possibilities to translate ambitious visions into novel offerings.

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    Operationalizing Industrial Ecology in the Waste Sector: Roles and tactics for circular value innovation
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  • 12.
    Aid, Graham
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Brandt, Nils
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Action Research In Waste Management: Application to construction and demolition waste in the Stockholm region2010In: Linnaeus ECO-TECH ´10 / [ed] Fabio Kaczala, Linnaeus University , 2010, p. 1009-1019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The action research methodology and several of its methods have previously been highlighted and described by the authors as a fitting and rigorous framework approach for complex waste management systems.  This was in response to criticism of the ex ante selection of traditional empiric systems analysis tools to provide decision support and ‘sustainable improvement’ in such complex systems which often involve strong human and political factors.   Several of the action research methods described have recently been utilized in a case study around mineral (aggregate) construction and demolition waste in the Stockholm region.  These methods were integrated through a series of workshops and work areas undergone together with project members from several private and public sectors.  Leaving the problem fuzzy (loosely defined) in the beginning; utilizing convergent interviewing, rich pictures and focus groups allowed the researchers and partner stakeholders to identify not one but several problem areas within the system of focus.  Indicator creation and a dialectic processes were then used to identify qualitative and quantitative aspects of salience around these problem areas.  These resulting indicators were strengthened through a process of verification.  Each indicator was then analyzed by what was deemed to be appropriate and transparent means.  It is argued that this approach may create better communication, transparency, and understanding by the stakeholders.  These factors in turn allowing stronger stakeholder ownership of the process and assisting in more informed decisions and help to provide stability for desired change. However the process was not without its drawbacks such as intense communication and time requirements.

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    Action Research for Waste Management
  • 13.
    Aid, Graham
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Ragn-Sells AB.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Baas, Leo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Expanding roles for the Swedish waste management sector in interorganizational resource management2017In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 124, p. 85-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several waste management (WM) professionals see an ongoing shift in the focus of the industry, from that of atransport and treatment sector to that of a more integrated sustainable service provision and material productionsector. To further develop such transitional ambitions, WM organizations are increasingly looking toward interorganizationalresource network concepts (such as the circular economy and industrial symbiosis) as models ofhow they would like to create new value together with their customers and partners.This article aims to take a step in addressing uncertainties behind such transitions by analyzing barriers forinter-organizational resource management and in turn uncovering some potential opportunities and risks ofnovel offerings from the WM sector. Obstacles for developing innovative inter-organizational resource networkshave been identified based on studies of implementing industrial symbiosis networks. Subsequently, managingexecutives from Swedish private and public WM organizations were interviewed regarding the sector’s capacityto overcome such barriers – opportunities and risks of providing new resource management services – and howtheir organizations might approach the role of actively facilitating more resource efficient regions.Eco-Industrial park management and contracting out holistic resource management are some areas in whichthe respondents see WM organizations offering new services. In relation to such approaches, various risks (e.g.being cut out of investment benefits, or unstable supply) and opportunities (e.g. new markets and enhancedsustainability profiles) were identified. Additionally, it was seen that WM companies would need to makesubstantial changes to their business approach, becoming less dependent on flows of mixed materials forexample, if they are to become even more central value chain actors. To strengthen such approaches, it was seenthat the sector will need to find methods to strategically build strong, long term partnerships, expand upon andtake advantage of available knowledge resources (i.e. best practice technologies and regional material flows),and explore new business models (i.e. stockpiling, park management, or waste minimization). Additionally,working with sector representatives to argue for a more balanced market conditions next to primary productionshould assist the viability of new offerings in the wider market.

  • 14.
    al Rawaf, Rawaf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Social-Ecological Urbanism: Lessons in Design from the Albano Resilient Campus2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Currently there is a demand for practical ways to integrate ecological insights into practices of design, which previously have lacked a substantive empirical basis. In the process of developing the Albano Resilient Campus, a transdisciplinary group of ecologists, design scholars, and architects pioneered a conceptual innovation, and a new paradigm of urban sustainability and development: Social-Ecological Urbanism.  Social-Ecological Urbanism is based on the frameworks of Ecosystem Services and Resilience thinking. This approach has created novel ideas with interesting repercussions for the international debate on sustainable urban development. From a discourse point of view, the concept of SEU can be seen as a next evolutionary step for sustainable urbanism paradigms, since it develops synergies between ecological and socio-technical systems. This case study collects ‘best practices’ that can lay a foundational platform for learning, innovation, partnership and trust building within the field of urban sustainability. It also bridges gaps in existing design approaches, such as Projective Ecologies and Design Thinking, with respect to a design methodology with its basis firmly rooted in Ecology.

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  • 15.
    Alamerew, Yohannes A.
    et al.
    Univ Grenoble Alpes, France.
    Kambanou, Marianna Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brissaud, Daniel
    Univ Grenoble Alpes, France.
    A Multi-Criteria Evaluation Method of Product-Level Circularity Strategies2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, SUSTAINABILITY, Vol. 12, no 12, article id 5129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The circular economy (CE) can drive sustainability. For companies to select and implement circularity strategies, they need to evaluate and compare the performance of these strategies both in terms of progress towards CE but also based on their feasibility and business outcomes. However, evaluation methods for circularity strategies at the product level are lacking. Therefore, this research proposes a multi-criteria evaluation method of circularity strategies at the product level which can be used by business decision-makers to evaluate and compare the initial business of the company, transformative and future circularity strategies. This multi-criteria evaluation method aims to assist business decision-makers to identify a preferred strategy by linking together a wide variety of criteria, i.e., environmental, economic, social, legislative, technical, and business, as well as by proposing relevant indicators that take into consideration, where possible, the life cycle perspective. It also allows for flexibility so that criteria, sub-criteria, and weighing factors can be altered by the business decision-makers to fit the needs of their specific case or product. Two illustrative examples based on case companies are presented to verify and illustrate the proposed method.

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  • 16.
    Al-Hazmi, Hussein E.
    et al.
    Gdańsk University of Technology, Poland.
    Łuczak, Justyna
    Gdańsk University of Technology, Poland.
    Habibzadeh, Sajjad
    Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Iran.
    Hasanin, Mohamed S.
    National Research Centre, Egypt.
    Mohammadi, Ali
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Esmaeili, Amin
    College of the North Atlantic—Qatar, Qatar.
    Kim, Seok-Jhin
    Oklahoma State University, United States.
    Khodadadi Yazdi, Mohsen
    Gdańsk University of Technology, Poland.
    Rabiee, Navid
    Murdoch University, Australia; Macquarie University, Australia.
    Badawi, Michael
    Universit´e de Lorraine, France.
    Saeb, Mohammad Reza
    Medical University of Gdańsk, Poland.
    Polysaccharide nanocomposites in wastewater treatment: A review2024In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 347, article id 140578Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In modern times, wastewater treatment is vital due to increased water contamination arising from pollutants such as nutrients, pathogens, heavy metals, and pharmaceutical residues. Polysaccharides (PSAs) are natural, renewable, and non-toxic biopolymers used in wastewater treatment in the field of gas separation, liquid filtration, adsorption processes, pervaporation, and proton exchange membranes. Since addition of nanoparticles to PSAs improves their sustainability and strength, nanocomposite PSAs has gained significant attention for wastewater treatment in the past decade. This review presents a comprehensive analysis of PSA-based nanocomposites used for efficient wastewater treatment, focusing on adsorption, photocatalysis, and membrane-based methods. It also discusses potential future applications, challenges, and opportunities in adsorption, filtration, and photocatalysis. Recently, PSAs have shown promise as adsorbents in biological-based systems, effectively removing heavy metals that could hinder microbial activity. Cellulose-mediated adsorbents have successfully removed various pollutants from wastewater, including heavy metals, dyes, oil, organic solvents, pesticides, and pharmaceutical residues. Thus, PSA nanocomposites would support biological processes in wastewater treatment plants. A major concern is the discharge of antibiotic wastes from pharmaceutical industries, posing significant environmental and health risks. PSA-mediated bio-adsorbents, like clay polymeric nanocomposite hydrogel beads, efficiently remove antibiotics from wastewater, ensuring water quality and ecosystem balance. The successful use of PSA-mediated bio-adsorbents in wastewater treatment depends on ongoing research to optimize their application and evaluate their potential environmental impacts. Implementing these eco-friendly adsorbents on a large scale holds great promise in significantly reducing water pollution, safeguarding ecosystems, and protecting human health. 

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  • 17. Alhola, Katriina
    et al.
    Salmenperä, Hanna
    Ryding, Sven-Olof
    Busch, Niels J.
    Circular Public Procurement in the Nordic Countries2017Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report provides a framework for circular procurement and discusses its possibilities to promote circular economy. Several best practice examples in Denmark, Finland, Sweden and Norway illustrate how and in which sectors and product groups circular procurement could be applicable. Different approaches to circular procurement and tendering criteria supporting circular aspects are also illustrated.The study was carried out in Nordic co-operation by Finnish Environment Institute, IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute and Copenhagen Resource Institute. The project was financed by the Nordic Council of Ministers (NCM), administrated by the NCM Sustainable Consumption and Production Working Group and guided by a steering group consisting representatives from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden.

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  • 18.
    Alipour, Alireza
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Rahimpour, Mehdi
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Sustainability Barriers in SMEs: A study of strength of sustainability barriers and practical solutions in Green product lifecycle at SMEs2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Small and medium-sized firms (SMEs) have their impact on the environment besides their benefits.  While a business grows, naturally destroying impacts are also growing. SMEs have a variety of barriers to be green and sustainable. There are some simple and non-complicated actions that firms can take, to reduce their destructive impacts on the environment.  This study analyses the existing barriers and focuses on small and medium sizes firms (SMEs) around Jonkoping. Besides, this study includes interviews with successful and sustainable companies and reflects their solutions to overcome those barriers in a different step of the green product lifecycle.

    Purpose: This is a practical study of how sustainability process in SMEs can drive product lifecycle greener. The purpose of this thesis is to study the existing practical and simple solutions for different environmental sustainability barriers in SMEs which located in Jonkoping region. Also, it goals to reveal solutions which applies by sustainable businesses to overcome to the sustainability barriers.

    Method: To fulfil the purpose of the thesis, an experimental research design was applied, and the data was provided from in-depth, semi-structured interviews. Ten interviews were conducted with successful businesses in sustainability practice in the Jonkoping region. The data analysis for this study was created by an inductive approach.

    Conclusion: This study has revealed that the successful green businesses categorizing their barriers into general, segmental, and individual groups. After that, by evaluating the strength of obstacles in different steps of GPL and considering their available resources they plan to apply proper solution. The other main finding in this thesis was a practical framework according to what have been done in our research.

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  • 19.
    Alkaradaghi, Karwan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering. Department of Geology, College of Science, Sulaimani University, Sulaimaniyah, Iraq. Kurdistan Institution for Strategic Studies and Scientific Research, Sulaimaniyah, Iraq.
    Ali, Salahalddin Saeed
    Department of Geology, College of Science, Sulaimani University, Sulaimaniyah, Iraq. Komar University of Science and Technology, Sulaimaniyah, Iraq. Komar Research Center, Sulaimaniyah, Iraq.
    Al-Ansari, Nadhir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Ali, Tara
    Kurdistan Institution for Strategic Studies and Scientific Research, Sulaimaniyah, Iraq.
    Laue, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Quantitative Estimation of Municipal Solid Waste in Sulaimaniyah Governorate, Iraq2021In: Recent Advances in Environmental Science from the Euro-Mediterranean and Surrounding Regions (2nd Edition): Proceedings of 2nd Euro-Mediterranean Conference for Environmental Integration (EMCEI-2), Tunisia 2019 / [ed] Mohamed Ksibi; Achraf Ghorbal; Sudip Chakraborty; Helder I. Chaminé; Maurizio Barbieri; Giulia Guerriero; Olfa Hentati; Abdelazim Negm; Anthony Lehmann; Jörg Römbke; Armando Costa Duarte; Elena Xoplaki; Nabil Khélifi; Gilles Colinet; João Miguel Dias; Imed Gargouri; Eric D. Van Hullebusch; Benigno Sánchez Cabrero; Settimio Ferlisi; Chedly Tizaoui; Amjad Kallel; Sami Rtimi; Sandeep Panda; Philippe Michaud; Jaya Narayana Sahu; Mongi Seffen; Vincenzo Naddeo, Springer, 2021, p. 265-270Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the world’s population has grown, waste generation has increased rapidly. Solid waste management requires a greater knowledge of the composition, generation quantity, physical properties, and impacts of economic aspects. This paper clarified the status of municipal solid waste management across Sulaimaniyah governorate and presented a comprehensive overview and implication of poor solid waste management in the study area. The core aspects covered were the future estimations of the cumulative solid waste amount with population growth by 2040 using brief calculations of the waste generation rate from 2016. The results revealed that the daily per capita waste generation in the Sulaimaniyah governorate is 1.32 kg by 2040, a cumulative solid waste of about 10,445,829 tons, and an estimated volume of 9,146,368 m3 which will be required for the disposal site in the future. 

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  • 20.
    Almgren, Richard
    et al.
    Green Business AB, Täby, Sweden.
    Skobelev, Dmitry
    Research Institute “Environmental Industrial Policy Centre”, Moscow, Russia.
    Evolution of Technology and Technology Governance2020In: Journal of Open Innovation, ISSN 2199-8531, Vol. 6, no 22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is based on the concept of Kondratiev’s technological waves as an analytical instrument for examining the processes of technological evolution. It aims at setting feasible indicators for this evolutionary development in order to provide a regulatory instrument for policy makers. In order to do so, the authors analyze approaches used for resource efficiency improvement in several European countries (i.e., implementation of Best Available Techniques, BAT). They emphasize that in Russia, the BAT concept is seen primarily as an industrial policy instrument. While BAT-based legislation is enforced by the environmental authorities, technological innovations making it possible to achieve performance better than that required by BAT are supported by the industrial development authorities. In the conclusions, the authors state that BAT-based solutions could be used as drivers for developing and implementing new technological solutions (innovations) and should become the basis for working out state industrial and environmental policies. The results of policies currently being developed will be assessed by the end of 2024.

  • 21.
    Almulla, Youssef
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Energy-Water and Agriculture Nexus to Support the Sustainable Management of Shared Water Resources2023Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Throughout history, major rivers and shared water bodies have allowed civilizations to flourish, and the effective management of shared water bodies has always been a priority for societies and nations. Today, about 40% of the world’s population lives in proximity to the 286 transboundary river and lake basins that supply 60% of the world’s freshwater flows and make up about half of the Earth’s land area. Moreover, around 2 billion people in the world depend on groundwater sources, which include over 460 transboundary aquifer systems.

    The mismanagement of water resources can result in catastrophic disasters that are often exacerbated by a domino effect so that the impacts of poor water management often extend beyond the water system. The interdependency of the water system with other systems such as energy and food, or with land-use, highlights the importance of ”systems thinking and planning” in resource management. Such a concept is not easily encapsulated into policy-making processes in many parts of the world because consideration of the resource systems in isolation as individual entities and ‘silo” thinking still dominate. Climate change adds another layer of complexity and exacerbates the issue of water management. Another important factor is geographical location because precipitation varies among and within continents. This results in some regions suffering from water shortages and some regions facing the risks of water redundancy and floods. 

    The concept of the Water-Energy-Food (WEF) nexus was introduced in 2011 as a response to help address some of the issues mentioned above. Over the last decade, research on the WEF nexus has gained momentum in both the policy and academic areas and several methods have been introduced to operationalize the nexus in different contexts. One of the flagship methodologies is the Transboundary Basins Nexus Approach (TBNA) introduced by the United Nations Economic Commission of Europe (UNECE) in 2015 and designed to assess the nexus in shared (transboundary) water basins.

    The aim of this thesis is to support shared water management by using the WEF-nexus approach to quantify the benefits of coordinated management, motivate cooperation, and identify trade-offs in the optimal use of resources. To achieve this aim, four research questions are explored over the course of four academic publications.  

    The first question explores the role of the energy sector in motivating shared water cooperation. The second question studies the risks and opportunities emerging from the interplay between climate and renewable energy in shared basins. The third question focuses on groundwater management and explores what benefits the consideration of the energy-water-agriculture nexus could bring to shared groundwater management in water-scarce areas. The fourth question examines how consideration of the energy-water-agriculture nexus could accelerate the low-carbon transition in the agricultural sector. 

    These research questions are examined in two different, yet complementing, geographic locations. One is the Balkans in Southeastern Europe, which faces water redundancy and flood issues and the other is the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region which suffers from water scarcity. In the first region, the Drina and the Drin River Basins represent the characteristics of Southeastern Europe while the North Western Sahara Aquifer System (NWSAS) and the Souss-Massa basin represent the characteristics of the MENA region. Three of the case applications are transboundary (Drina, Drin and NWSAS) while the last application (Souss-Massa Basin) is a subnational basin.  

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  • 22.
    Almulla, Youssef
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Zaimi, Klodian
    Polytechnic University of Tirana (UPT).
    Fejzic, Emir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Sridharan, Vignesh
    Imperial College London.
    De Strasser, Lucia
    UNECE.
    Gardumi, Francesco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Hydropower and Climate Change, insights from the Integrated Water-Energy modelling of the Drin Basin.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The understanding of the transboundary impact of Climate Change on hydropower is not well-established in the literature, where few studies take a system perspective to understand the relative roles of different technological solutions for coordinated water and energy management. This study contributes to addressing this gap by introducing an open-source, long-term, technologically-detailed water and energy resources cost-minimisation model for the Drin River Basin, built in OSeMOSYS. 

    The analysis shows that climate change results in a 15-52% annual decline in hydro generation from the basin by mid-century. Albania needs to triple its investments in solar and wind to mitigate the risk of climate change. Changing the operational rules of hydropower plants has a minor impact on the electricity supply. However, it can spare significant storage volume for flood control. 

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  • 23.
    Almusaed, Amjad
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Yitmen, Ibrahim
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Myhren, Jonn Are
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Almssad, Asaad
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Assessing the Impact of Recycled Building Materials on Environmental Sustainability and Energy Efficiency: A Comprehensive Framework for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions2024In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 14, no 6, article id 1566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we critically examine the potential of recycled construction materials, focusing on how these materials can significantly reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and energy usage in the construction sector. By adopting an integrated approach that combines Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and Material Flow Analysis (MFA) within the circular economy framework, we thoroughly examine the lifecycle environmental performance of these materials. Our findings reveal a promising future where incorporating recycled materials in construction can significantly lower GHG emissions and conserve energy. This underscores their crucial role in advancing sustainable construction practices. Moreover, our study emphasizes the need for robust regulatory frameworks and technological innovations to enhance the adoption of environmentally responsible practices. We encourage policymakers, industry stakeholders, and the academic community to collaborate and promote the adoption of a circular economy strategy in the building sector. Our research contributes to the ongoing discussion on sustainable construction, offering evidence-based insights that can inform future policies and initiatives to improve environmental stewardship in the construction industry. This study aligns with the European Union's objectives of achieving climate-neutral cities by 2030 and the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals outlined for completion by 2030. Overall, this paper contributes to the ongoing dialogue on sustainable construction, providing a fact-driven basis for future policy and initiatives to enhance environmental stewardship in the industry.

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  • 24. Alnaami, Zurya
    et al.
    Duenas, José
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Wind Power Integration and Operational Challenges2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Wind power generation has gained considerable relevance in global energy markets in the last few decades. The technology behind wind turbines and their integration to the power grid are still the focus of considerable research. How exactly does this energy source influence the existing power distribution grid is still a matter of interest to many parties. The method used in this report is based on a literature study which intends to examine what is the current state of energy generation based on wind power in Sweden. In the report we have analyzed some of the integration and operational challenges of connecting a large amount of wind generated electricity to the power grid and attempted to provide an accurate and up to date summary of what these challenges will entail in the coming decade. Our results show that further research would greatly improve the current technology used in wind power generation to allow such a high level penetration. 

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  • 25. Alonso Vicario, S.
    et al.
    Mazzoleni, Maurizio
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Centrum för naturkatastrofslära, Uppsala.
    Bhamidipati, S.
    Gharesifard, M.
    Ridolfi, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Centrum för naturkatastrofslära, Uppsala.
    Pandolfo, C.
    Alfonso, L.
    Unravelling the influence of human behaviour on reducing casualties during flood evacuation2020In: Hydrological Sciences Journal, ISSN 0262-6667, E-ISSN 2150-3435, Vol. 65, no 14, p. 2359-2375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Floods are the natural hazards that are causing the most deaths worldwide. Flood early warning systems are one of the most cost-efficient methods to reduce death rates, triggering decisions about the evacuation of exposed population. Although previous studies have investigated the effect of human behaviours on evacuation processes, studies analysing a combination of behaviours, flood onset and warning timing are limited. Our objective is to explore how changes on the aforementioned factors can affect casualties. This is done within a modelling framework that includes an agent-based model, a hydraulic model, and a traffic model, which is implemented for the case study of Orvieto (Italy). The results show that the number of casualties is most impacted by people's behaviour. Besides, we found that a delay of 30 min in releasing the warning can boost the number of casualties up to six times. These results may help managers to propose effective emergency plans.

  • 26.
    Al-Sallami, Omer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    CABLES DECOMMISSIONING IN OFFSHORE WIND FARMS: ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMICAL PERSPECTIVE2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Addressing the decommissioning issues is vital to ensure a sustainable and effective process of such an essential part of the project life cycle. While there is a set of good practices and regulations that govern most of the decommissioning activities, the cable decommissioning issue is still in a big debate and often left abandoned at the seabed due to environmental concerns, as justified by most developers. This paper is aiming to understand the environmental and economic consequences of cable decommissioning.

    The available research papers and reports that are dealing with cable decommissioning issues have been reviewed. The cables are often decommissioned using similar methods to installation. However, there are no regulatory obligations to removing the cables in most countries. Cable installation will be associated with environmental impacts, but they are considered to be negligible. Additionally, Recycling cables’ copper is beneficial in both aspects environmentally and economically as copper prices are on the rise.

    A comparison between the ESs and decommissioning programs in a number of OWFSs have been conducted to understand the justification used for abandoning the cables. Most of the decommissioning reports have considered cable decommissioning to cause “considerable damage to seabed ecology”. However, that contradicts what was found in the ESs, where the impact level was considered negligible and anticipated to be similar to installation. It was unclear whether the abandonment of cables was driven by environmental considerations or not.

    A case study has been selected to compare cable and monopile decommissioning costs and the contribution of each component to the total decommissioning cost, including possible revenue generated from recycling. It was found that the cost-benefit of cable decommissioning is incomparable to monopile decommissioning as the latter is very costly, and the possible residual value is insignificant when compared to cables. Moreover, it is possible that the total cable decommissioning cost to be largely offset by the revenue generated from copper resell. Additionally, the cable decommissioning total cost can be almost paid by recycling cables if copper prices increase in the near future.

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    Offshore wind energy
  • 27.
    Amankwah-Amoah, Joseph
    et al.
    Kent Business School, University of Kent, UK.
    Sjögren, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ottosson, Jan
    Department of Economic History, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    United We Stand, Divided We Fall.: Historical Trajectory of Strategic Renewal Activities at Scandinavian Airlines System, 1946-2012.2017In: Business History, ISSN 0007-6791, E-ISSN 1743-7938, Vol. 59, no 4, p. 572-606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the second half of the twentieth century saw the rise and fall of ‘multi-flag companies’ (MFCs) in the civil aviation industry, our understanding of how some managed to buck the trend and achieve longevity remains limited. This article advances business history and strategic management research by examining the strategic renewal activities of Scandinavian Airlines (formerly Scandinavian Airlines System [SAS]) during the period 1946–2012. The study sheds light on the key roles of private and state owners, rivals as well as banks, in critical financial phases are discussed in terms of longevity in the company. The longevity of the business stems from the leaders’ ability to develop as anticipated and respond to change in their competitive arena in close interaction with the owners. Thus, incumbent firms that strategically renew themselves prior to or during market reform, such as deregulation, enhance their chances of developing the size of their networks and revenue streams. Our main contribution to business history and strategic management literatures is the development of context-specific stages, which shed light on the evolution of strategic renewal activities and shifts from older processes and routines towards customer service and efficiency.

  • 28.
    Ambell, Christine
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Xu, Yixuan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Waste of Opportunities - A Holistic Study of the Current Situation of Municipal Waste Management in Shandong Province, China2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    China’s growth and development have opened the door to a new world. Shandong province’s 90 million inhabitants are entering into a consumption society and the waste stream from households, restaurants and commercials has become a challenge. So far, the waste has mostly been burned in backyards, thrown into rivers, put on open dumps or taken to landfills. The environmental consequence is strong. This study was carried out in Shandong province and presents the current situation of the municipal waste management. The result of the study is organised into social, economical, technical and environmental parameters. It mostly covers the years 2006 to 2010. In the discussion, the strength, weakness, opportunities, and threats to the management are analysed, which gives an overview of the complex situation.

    The final conclusion is that there are a lot of opportunities in developing municipal solid waste management in Shandong province since the work and planning is new and economy is good. Threats are for example a larger waste stream. The municipal waste management has some strengths, such as a lot of projects going on, but also a lot of weakness for instance implementation of the regulations and laws.

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  • 29.
    Amir, Saman
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Salehi, Niloufar
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Manufacturing and Metrology Systems.
    Roci, Malvina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Manufacturing and Metrology Systems.
    Sweet, Susanne
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Manufacturing and Metrology Systems.
    Towards circular economy: A guiding framework for circular supply chain implementation2022In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, E-ISSN 1099-0836Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Closing the loop for resource efficiency is a well-known practice in the industry. Toconcretize the circular economy implementation strategies, closed-loop thinkingrequires innovation and adaptation. Circular supply chains (CSCs) are one of the keyenablers in closing the loop by design or intention for value recovery and profit maxi-mization. CSC is an emerging area, and the view of CSC where forward and reversesupply chain is seamlessly integrated with the overall aim to achieve system-wide cir-cularity is missing in the academic debate. By offering a cross-functional perspectiveof CSC, this paper presents a CSC guiding framework to structure and understandthe underlying complexities and highlight the crucial elements of the CSC implemen-tation. Thus, this framework lays the basis for CSC within the systemic implementa-tion of CE by closing the loop by design or intention. The framework categorizes theCSC into four building blocks, namely, systemic approach, main drivers, levels of deci-sion making, and mechanisms to manage the full loop closure and minimize the inher-ent uncertainties of a complex system. The building blocks of the framework aresynthesized from various streams of supply chain literature and recurring concepts inthe circular economy literature. The CSC framework applicability is illustrated usingtwo industrial cases that are transitioning towards the circular economy.

  • 30.
    Amjadi, Golnaz
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration. STATEC Research, STATEC (National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies), Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Lundgren, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE). Department of Forest Economic, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Zhou, Wenchao
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE).
    A dynamic analysis of industrial energy efficiency and the rebound effect: implications for carbon emissions and sustainability2022In: Energy Efficiency, ISSN 1570-646X, E-ISSN 1570-6478, Vol. 15, no 7, article id 54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy efficiency improvement (EEI) is generally known to be a cost-effective measure for meeting energy, climate, and sustainable growth targets. Unfortunately, behavioral responses to such improvements (called energy rebound effects) may reduce the expected savings in energy and emissions from EEI. Hence, the size of this effect should be considered to help design efficient energy and climate targets. Currently, there are significant differences in approaches for measuring the rebound effect. Here, we used a two-step procedure to measure both short- and long-term energy rebound effects in the Swedish manufacturing industry. In the first step, we used data envelopment analysis (DEA) to measure energy efficiency. In the second step, we use the efficiency scores and estimated a derived energy demand equation including rebound effects using a dynamic panel regression model. This approach was applied to a firm-level panel dataset covering 14 sectors in Swedish manufacturing over the period 1997–2008. We showed that, in the short run, partial and statistically significant rebound effects exist within all manufacturing sectors, meaning that the rebound effect decreased the energy and emission savings expected from EEI. The long-term rebound effect was in general smaller than the short-term effect, implying that within each sector, energy and emission savings due to EEI are larger in the long run compared to the short run. Using our estimates of energy efficiency and rebound effect, we further performed a post-estimation analysis to provide a guide to policy makers by identifying sectors where EEI have the most potential to promote sustainable economic growth with the lowest environmental impact.

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  • 31.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Environmental management systems and environmental performance2007In: Strategic sustainability: the state of the art in corporate environmental management systems / [ed] Robert Sroufe and Joseph Sarkis, Sheffield: Greenleaf Publishing Ltd, 2007, p. 242-257Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental management systems (EMSs) are tools that can be used to steer and controlan organisation’s environmental efforts. This chapter focuses on standardisedEMSs, those that deal with fulfilling the requirements of the international standard ISO14001 (ISO 1996) and/or the EU Eco-Management and Audit Scheme (EMAS) (EC 2001).These standardised EMSs have been applied for about a decade; the number of organisationsthat are certified in accordance with them worldwide is steadily rising and nowhas reached over 100,000 (ISO World 2007).Early EMS work focused on issues relating to implementation. Often, positive environmentaleffects were taken for granted. More recently, however, questions addressingthe effects of standardised EMSs have become more popular in the research literature.The extent and types of effects of a standardised system are critical issues from anenvironmental perspective. The information presented within this chapter will helpuncover and capture some of the nuances of the connection between EMSs and environmentalperformance. Important lessons learned as a result of this study include arelative lack of understanding of EMSs even after more than a decade of practical application.Additional insights include the extent to which EMSs are useful tools in achievingbetter organisational environmental conditions and identification of the importantfactors influencing the effectiveness and efficiency of such systems. While the focus ofthis chapter is on the use of standardised EMSs to reduce environmental impacts, themethods used in this study build on the author’s findings from several earlier studies—a meta-analytic perspective—and are summarised where appropriate. Some key strategicEMS issues addressed here include:

    ● Environmental aspects, their identification, formulation and assessment

    ● The scope of EMSs, including their relationship with product development

    ● Environmental policy, targets and objectives

    ● External environmental auditing

    ● Continual improvement in environmental performance

    ● EMSs and the supply chain

  • 32.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Miljömanagement: miljö- och hållbarhetsarbete i företag och andra organisationer2012 (ed. 2 [rev.])Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Boken ger läsaren kunskap om viktiga förutsättningar när det gällerföretags, och andra typer av organisationers, arbete med miljö- och hållbar utveckling. Det gäller både förutsättningar utanför och inom organisationer. Boken behandlar även relevanta strategier, metoder och koncept inom området.

    I den första delen – Omvärlden – behandlas områden som främst påverkar företag och andra typer av organisationer utifrån. Inledningsvis beskrivs exempelvis miljöproblematiken och ”hållbar utveckling”. Därefter behandlas miljöpolitik, miljölagstiftning, de ekonomiska systemen samt etiska frågor.

    I den andra delen – Hållbarhetsstrategiskt arbete med fokus på miljö – behandlas delar i miljö- och hållbarhetsarbetet som ofta berör hela organisationen. Först introduceras intressentperspektivet och därefter grunderna avseende strategiskt arbete. Vidare finns en kort introduktion till organisationsteori med en beskrivning av hur miljö- och hållbarhetsarbete kan organiseras och genomföras. Därefter följer två kapitel om ledningssystem, först ges en allmän introduktion för flera olika områden och sedan en mer ingående beskrivning. Den andra delen avslutas med ett kapitel om miljöarbete i olika typer av organisationer.

    I bokens tredje del – Viktiga delar i miljö- och hållbarhetsarbetet – berörs andra ”områden” i miljö- och hållbarhetsarbetet, som kan vara mycket viktiga men ofta inte är lika övergripande. Det innefattar miljörevision; miljöarbete med fokus på produkter; miljökonsekvensbeskrivningar; riskhantering; samt marknadsföring och extern kommunikation.

    Boken är i första hand skriven för kurser i miljömanagement eller miljöledning vid högskolor och universitet, men kan också användas för utbildningar på företag och inom andra typer av organisationer.

  • 33.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lönnqvist, Tomas
    Division of Energy Processes, Department of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grönkvist, Stefan
    Division of Energy Processes, Department of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Thomas
    Department of Industrial Economics and Management, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Biogas in the transport sector: Actor and policy analysis focusing on the demand side in the Stockholm region2018In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 129, p. 70-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden has ambitions to phase out fossil fuels and significantly increase the share of biofuels it uses. This articlefocuses on Stockholm County and biogas, with the aim to increase the knowledge about regional preconditions.Biogas-related actors have been interviewed, focusing on the demand side. Biogas solutions play an essentialrole, especially regarding bus transports and taxis. Long-term development has created well-functioning sociotechnicalsystems involving collaboration. However, uncertainties about demand and policy cause hesitation andsigns of stagnating development.Public organizations are key actors regarding renewables. For example, Stockholm Public Transport procuresbiogas matching the production at municipal wastewater treatment plants, the state-owned company Swedaviasteers via a queuing system for taxis, and the municipalities have shifted to “environmental cars”.There is a large interest in electric vehicles, which is expected to increase significantly, partially due tosuggested national policy support. The future role of biogas will be affected by how such an expansion comesabout. There might be a risk of electricity replacing biogas, making it more challenging to reach a fossil-freevehicle fleet. Policy issues strongly influence the development. The environmental car definition is of importance,but its limited focus fails to account for several different types of relevant effects. The dynamic policylandscape with uncertainties about decision makers’ views on biogas seems to be one important reason behindthe decreased pace of development. A national, long-term strategy is missing. Both the European Union andSweden have high ambitions regarding a bio-based and circular economy, which should favor biogas solutions.

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  • 34.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baas, Leo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Feiz, Roozbeh
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Helgstrand, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Marshall, Richard
    CEMEX Research Group AG, Switzerland.
    Improving the CO2 performance of cement, part III: The relevance of industrial symbiosis and how to measure its impact2015In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 98, p. 145-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cement production contributes to extensive CO2 emissions. However, the climate impact can vary significantly between different production systems and different types of cement products. The market is dominated by ordinary Portland cement, which is based on primary raw materials and commonly associated with combustion of vast amounts of fossil fuels. Therefore, the production of Portland cement can be described as a rather linear process. But there are alternative options, for example, involving large amounts of industrial byproducts and renewable energy which are more cyclic and thus can be characterized as relatively “synergistic”.

    The main purpose of this article is to study how relevant the leading ideas of industrial symbiosis are for the cement industry based on a quantitative comparison of the CO2 emissions from different cement production systems and products, both existing and hypothetical. This has been done by studying a group of three cement plants in Germany, denoted as ClusterWest, and the production of cement clinker and three selected cement products. Based on this analysis and literature, it is discussed to what extent industrial symbiosis options can lead to reduced CO2 emissions, for Cluster West and the cement industry in general.

    Utilizing a simplified LCA model (“cradle to gate”), it was shown that the CO2 emissions from Cluster West declined by 45% over the period 1997e2009, per tonne of average cement. This was mainly due to a large share of blended cement, i.e., incorporation of byproducts from local industries as supplementary cementitious materials. For producers of Portland cement to radically reduce the climate impact it is necessary to engage with new actors and find fruitful cooperation regarding byproducts, renewable energy and waste heat. Such a development is very much in line with the key ideas of industrial ecology and industrial symbiosis, meaning that it appears highly relevant for the cement industry to move further in this direction. From a climate perspective, it is essential that actors influencing the cement market acknowledge the big difference between different types of cement, where an enlarged share of blended cement products (substituting clinker with byproducts such as slag and fly ash) offers a great scope for future reduction of CO2 emissions.

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  • 35.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baas, Leo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Feiz, Roozbeh
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Helgstrand, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Marshall, Richard
    Industrial symbiosis for improving the CO2-performance of cement2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Justification of the paper

    Cement production is one of the largest contributors to global CO2-emissions. However, the context and characteristics of the production and the cement products vary a lot. A significant part of the production must be characterized as rather linear, for example, to a large extent based on fossil fuels and involving material flows that are not closed. But there are also much more synergistic examples, involving industrial by-products, renewable energy, etc. Clearly, there are opportunities for improvement within the cement industry and it is interesting to analyze to what extent increased industrial symbiosis can lead to improved climate performance. This has been done by studying the production of cement clinker and three selected cement products produced within the Cluster West in Germany, consisting of three cement plants that are owned by the multinational company CEMEX. The methodology is mostly based on Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), from cradle-to-gate.

    Purpose

    The overall purpose is to contribute to a better understanding of the climate performance of different ways of producing cement, and different cement products. The climate impact is assessed for “traditional”, rather linear, ways of making cement, but also two more synergistic alternatives, where the by-product granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS) is utilized to a large extent, substituting cement clinker. It is also shown how the climate performance of the West Cluster has changed from 1997 until 2009 (the main year of study), and investigated how further industrial symbiosis measures could improve the performance.

    Theoretical framework

    To a large extent this project has been based on mapping and analysis of relevant flows of material and energy, where LCA methodology has played an important part. Theoretical and methodological aspects related to the fields of Industrial Ecology and Industrial Symbiosis have played an important role. The findings are discussed in relation to some of the key ideas within these fields. The paper generates insight into the methodological challenge of quantifying environmental performance of different production approaches and basically what CO2 improvement potential cement industry has by taking industrial symbiosis measures.

    Results

    The results showed that the cement clinker produced at Cluster West is competitive from a climate perspective, causing CO2-eq missions that are a couple of percent lower than the world average. During the twelve year period from 1997 to 2009 these emissions became about 12 percent lower, which was mainly achieved by production efficiency measures but also via changing fuels. However, the most interesting results concern the blended cement products. It was manifested that it is very advantageous from a climate perspective to substitute clinker with granulated blast furnace slag. For example, the CO2-eq emissions were estimated to be 65 percent lower for the best product compared to “ordinary cement”.

    Conclusions

    Information and measures at the plant level are not sufficient to compare products or to significantly reduce the climate impact related to cement. To achieve important reductions of the emissions, measures and knowledge at a higher industrial symbiosis level are needed.

  • 36.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Biogas Solutions Research Center.
    Bohn, Irene
    Den Kgl. Veterinær- og Landbohøjskole, Denmark.
    Feiz, Roozbeh
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Biogas Solutions Research Center.
    Systematic assessment of feedstock for an expanded biogas production: A multi-criteria approach2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Biogas solutions can contribute to more renewable and local energy systems, and also involve other essential aspects such as nutrient recycling. From a theoretical feedstock perspective there is a great biogas potential in Sweden, but the development has been relatively slow as many biogas producers face challenges of different types. Among the many influencing factors, the choice of feedstocks (biomass) is of strategic importance. Within the Biogas Research Center (BRC), hosted by Linköping University in Sweden, a research project focused on feedstock has been ongoing for several years. It has involved researchers, biogas and biofertilizer producers, agricultural organizations and others. The main aim has been to develop a method to assess the suitability of feedstock for biogas and biofertilizer production, and to apply this method on a few selected feedstocks. A multi-criteria method has been developed that covers potential, feasibility and resource efficiency, operationalized via 17 indicators directed towards cost efficiency, technological feasibility, energy and environmental performance, accessibility, competition, policy and other issues. Thus the method it is relatively comprehensive, yet hopefully simple enough to be used by practitioners.

    The main ambition, applying the method, has been to collect and structure relevant information to facilitate strategic overviews, communication and informed decision making. This is relevant for development within the biogas and biofertilizer industry, for policymakers, to define and prioritize among essential research projects, etc. This report presents some essential parts of this project, focusing on the multi-criteria method and results regarding ley crops, straw, farmed blue mussels and food waste (and stickleback to some extent). It clarifies how the method can be applied and highlights barriers, drivers and opportunities for each feedstock. Comparisons are also made. The results indicate that biogas production from food waste and ley crops is the most straightforward, and for straw and farmed blue mussels there are more obstacles to overcome. For all of them, the dynamic and very uncertain policy landscape is a barrier. In the final chapter, some conclusions about the method and its application are drawn.

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  • 37.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlgren, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sustainability Assessment of Public Transport, Part I-A Multi-Criteria Assessment Method to Compare Different Bus Technologies2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 2, article id 825Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article departs from the perspective of Swedish regional transport authorities and focuses on the public procurement of bus transports. Many of these public organizations on the county level have the ambition to contribute to a transition involving the continued marginalization of fossil fuels and improved sustainability performance. However, there are several renewable bus technologies to choose between and it can be difficult to know what alternative (or combination) is preferable. Prior research and the authors experiences indicate a need for improved knowledge and supportive methods on how sustainability assessments can support public procurement processes. The purpose of this article is to develop a multi-criteria assessment (MCA) method to support assessments of public bus technologies sustainability. The method, which was established in an iterative and participatory process, consists of four key areas and 12 indicators. The article introduces the problem context and reviews selected prior research of relevance dealing with green or sustainable public procurement and sustainability assessments. Further on, the process and MCA method are presented and discussed based on advice for effective and efficient sustainability assessments. In the companion article (Part II), the MCA method is applied to assess several bus technologies involving biodiesel, biomethane, diesel, electricity, ethanol and natural gas.

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  • 38.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Feiz, Roozbeh
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Assessment of Feedstocks for Biogas Production, Part II: Results for Strategic Decision Making2017In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 122, p. 388-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biogas production is essentially based on organic materials and biological processes; hence it can contribute to the transition toward a biobased economy. Biogas is a biofuel that can contribute to a more renewable and local energy system. In comparison with other biofuels, biogas is more flexible and can be produced from many different types of feedstock, including biomass containing various shares of carbohydrates, lipids and, both from primary and secondary raw materials. However, a significantly expanded biogas production is dependent on good business conditions, in turn related to societal acceptance and support. There are many factors that can make a biogas solution more or less suitable for both producers and the broader society. Among the many influencing factors, the choice of feedstocks (biomass) for producing biogas and biofertilizer is of strategic importance. But, to assess the suitability is complicated, because it is linked to many different challenges such as cost, energy balance, environmental impacts, institutional conditions, available technologies, geographical conditions, alternative and competing interest, and so on. Suitability includes aspects related to feasibility for implementation, potential for renewable energy and nutrient recycling, and resource efficiency. In this article, a multi-criteria framework, which is proposed in a companion article (Part II), is used to assess the suitability of four types of feedstocks for producing biogas (considering Swedish conditions). The assessed feedstocks are ley crops, straw, farmed blue mussels, and source-sorted food waste. The results have synthesized and structured a lot of information, which facilitates considerably for those that want an overview and to be able to review several different areas simultaneously. Among the assessed feedstocks, biogas production from household food waste and ley is the most straightforward. For straw and farmed blue mussels, there are more obstacles to overcome including some significant barriers. For all feedstock there are challenges related to the institutional conditions. The assessment contributes to the knowledge about sustainable use of these feedstocks, and the limitations and opportunities for biogas development. It supports more informed decision making, both in industry and policy. Existing, or forthcoming, biogas and biofertilizer producers who are considering altering or expanding their production systems can benefit from a better understanding of different choices of feedstock that are or can be (potentially) at their disposal; thus, identify hotspots, weak points, and possible candidates for implementation in future. This research is performed within the Biogas Research Center (BRC), which is a transdisciplinary center of excellence with the overall goal of promoting resource-efficient biogas solutions in Sweden. The BRC is funded by the Energy Agency of Sweden, Linköping University, and more than 20 partners from academia, industry, municipalities and other several public and private organizations.

  • 39.
    Amon, Francine
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Safety.
    Dahlbom, Sixten
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Safety.
    Blomqvist, Per
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Technology.
    Challenges to transparency involving intellectual property and privacy concerns in life cycle assessment/costing: A case study of new flame retarded polymers2021In: Cleaner Environmental Systems, ISSN 2666-7894, Vol. 3, article id 100045Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work explores the challenges of using life cycle assessment (LCA) and life cycle cost (LCC) analysis to provide easily accessible decision support for early product development in cases where intellectual property (IP) and privacy issues require special consideration. Innovation research projects with partners representing different links along the value chain are potential examples of such cases. A case study in which spreadsheet-based cradle to compounder's gate LCA and LCC screening tools were created for candidate flame retarded polymer formulations exemplifies the need for better solutions to overcome problems associated with lack of transparency due to IP/privacy concerns. These problems affect data quality, scaling up processes, and uncertainty of the results. The consortium in this case study had a common overall goal, although each of the partners had a unique perspective on the polymer development process and different IP/privacy needs. The measures used to overcome the challenges include aggregation, normalisation, and omission of costs and impacts common to all candidate compounds. The resulting LCA and LCC screening tools represent a compromise between providing the requested information at the level of detail required by the partners and reporting results that are as accurate and useful as possible. The findings are: in cases where absolute secrecy must be maintained, no one can learn which materials and processes provide the optimal results; appointing a trusted third party to handle sensitive inventory data can cause increased uncertainty of the results due to lack of peer review; the results of the work cannot be built upon by subsequent research.

  • 40.
    An, Siwen
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Reza, Salim
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Norlin, Börje
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Fröjdh, Christer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Thungström, Göran
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Signal-to-Noise Ratio Optimization in X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry for Chromium Contamination Analysis2021In: Talanta: The International Journal of Pure and Applied Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0039-9140, E-ISSN 1873-3573, Vol. 230, article id 122236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In most cases, direct X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis of solutions entails technical difficulties due to a high X-ray scattering background resulting in a spectrum with a poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Key factors that determine the sensitivity of the method are the energy resolution of the detector and the amount of scattered radiation in the energy range of interest. Limiting the width of the primary spectrum by the use of secondary targets, or filters, can greatly improve the sensitivity for specific portions of the spectrum. This paper demonstrates a potential method for SNR optimization in direct XRF analysis of chromium (Cr) contamination. The suggested method requires minimal sample preparation and achieves higher sensitivity compared to existing direct XRF analysis. Two states of samples, fly ash and leachate from municipal solid waste incineration, were investigated. The effects of filter material, its absorption edge and filter thickness were analyzed using the combination of Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code and energy-dispersive XRF spectrometry. The applied filter removes primary photons with energies interfering with fluorescence photons from the element of interest, thus results in lower background scattering in the spectrum. The SNR of Cr peak increases with filter thickness and reaches a saturation value when further increased thickness only increases the measurement time. Measurements and simulations show that a Cu filter with a thickness between 100 μm and 140 μm is optimal for detecting Cr by taking into account both the SNR and the exposure time. With direct XRF analysis for solutions, the limit of quantitation (LOQ) of the achieved system was 0.32 mg/L for Cr, which is well below the allowed standard limitation for landfills in Sweden. This work shows that XRF can gain enough sensitivity for direct monitoring to certify that the Cr content in leachate is below environmental limits.

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  • 41.
    Ananno, Anan Ashrabi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Product Realisation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Masud, Mahadi Hasan
    RMIT Univ, Australia; Rajshahi Univ Engn & Technol, Bangladesh.
    Chowdhury, Sami Ahbab
    Rajshahi Univ Engn & Technol, Bangladesh.
    Dabnichki, Peter
    RMIT Univ, Australia.
    Ahmed, Nufile
    Rajshahi Univ Engn & Technol, Bangladesh.
    Arefin, Amit Md. Estiaque
    Texas Tech Univ, TX 79409 USA.
    Sustainable food waste management model for Bangladesh2021In: Sustainable Production and Consumption, ISSN 2352-5509, Vol. 27, p. 35-51Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Excessive food waste (nearly 1.3 billion tons per annum) has exacerbated the world hunger crisis. This comprehensive review focuses on the food waste scenario, adverse effects, food waste management, existing waste management policies, and regulations in Bangladesh. Municipalities and urban centers generate 3.78 million tons of waste each year (15.96% of total food waste). This study utilized the national database to analyze food waste generation and projected growth by the year 2050. Yearly an estimated 17215.2 thousand acres of land and a significant amount of natural resources (water, energy) are being used to produce 23691.15 thousand tons of wasted food (45% of total food production). This study critically analyzed the waste management policy gap of Bangladesh and clearly identified each stage of the food loss production supply chain. The study assessed that yearly 481.6 MW energy could be generated from food waste. Focusing on effective policy and sustainability, a national food waste management model has been proposed for Bangladesh in compliance with sustainable development goals 12.3.1 global food loss. Food accumulates 16.7% to 20% of the world economy; therefore, any measures taken to reduce the food waste will be economically beneficial and environmentally sustainable. (C) 2020 Institution of Chemical Engineers. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 42.
    Ananno, Anan Ashrabi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Product Realisation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Masud, Mahadi Hasan
    RMIT Univ, Australia; Rajshahi Univ Engn & Technol, Bangladesh.
    Dabnichki, Peter
    RMIT Univ, Australia.
    Mahjabeen, Mosarrat
    Shaheed Suhrawardy Med Coll, Bangladesh.
    Chowdhury, Sami Ahbab
    Rajshahi Univ Engn & Technol, Bangladesh.
    Survey and analysis of consumers behaviour for electronic waste management in Bangladesh2021In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 282, article id 111943Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to establish consumers perception of electric waste recycling and management on a national scale in Bangladesh. The attitude, willingness to pay (WTP) and consumers behaviour were explored by conducting a questionnaire-based survey. The conclusions are based on 915 valid responses out of 2000 online survey invitations. Interestingly, 37.9% of the respondents indicated that they would accept to pay for electronic waste recycling. Analysis also shows that the preferred WTP would cover 5-10% of the recycling cost. Factors like environmental awareness, monthly income, and education level affect the consumers WTP. Nevertheless, most of the participants believe that the Government should share the recycling cost. The study suggests that e-waste recycling can be stimulated by promoting environmental awareness, educating the public about the benefits of recycling e-waste, and making e-waste recycling more convenient. However, additional measures will likely be needed to tackle the e-waste problem. Thus, support for environmental education is imperative in order to promote environmental awareness and increase the WTP of consumers. The study outlines key characteristics of consumer-focused e-waste management archetypes and proposes an effective road map for Bangladesh.

  • 43. Andersen, Jes Sig
    et al.
    Jespersen, Morten Gottlieb
    A Protocol for Black Carbon Emissions: A Protocol for Measuring Emissions of Elemental Carbon and Organic Carbon from Residential Wood Burning2016Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This protocol was developed and subsequently tested in 2012-2015 by Nordic test and research institutes, with Danish Technological Institute (DTI) as project manager. This protocol describes a potential standardized procedure for measurements of BC (Black Carbon) in terms of both EC (Elemental Carbon) and OC (Organic Carbon) from residential wood burning stoves. Such a standardized test can then be used for voluntary eco-labeling of wood stoves, and by manufacturers interested in testing and developing extremely low-emission, low-black carbon, “climate-friendly” stoves. This testing protocol is part of a project supported by the Nordic Council of Ministers and the Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC), and implemented by the International Cryosphere Climate Initiative (ICCI).

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  • 44.
    Andersen, Lizzi
    et al.
    Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic Council of Ministers Secretariat.
    Sandberg, Kenneth
    Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic Council of Ministers Secretariat.
    Lundqvist, Per
    Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic Council of Ministers Secretariat.
    Thulin, Jens
    Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic Council of Ministers Secretariat.
    Kirkeby, Janus
    Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic Council of Ministers Secretariat.
    Neidel, Trine Lund
    Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic Council of Ministers Secretariat.
    Weidling, Asbjørn
    Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic Council of Ministers Secretariat.
    Plastic sorting at recycling centres: Guideline2015Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a guideline for plastic sorting at recycling centres. The aim is to give assistance to the choices made by the management of recycling centres in order to collect plastic of better quality and in greater quantities. In the guideline, the potential plastic categories are listed and described, also with respect to potential content of hazardous substances. Issues to take into account when choosing how to organise the collection of plastic at the recycling centre are described. A separate chapter looks at how the public could be assisted with the sorting of plastics at the recycling centres.

    The guideline is part of the Nordic Prime Ministers' overall green growth initiative: “The Nordic Region – leading in green growth” - read more in the web magazine “Green Growth the Nordic Way” at www.nordicway.org or at www.norden.org/greengrowth

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  • 45. Andersen, Lizzi
    et al.
    Wejdling, Asbjørn
    Neidel, Trine Lund
    Plastic sorting at recycling centres: Background report2015Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report is a background report for the "Guideline for plastic sorting at recycling centres". The background report describes the methodology used in preparing the guideline, including information from existing systems and the stakeholders that can be used by the recycling centres in their decision process. The report describes the importance of communicating with purchasers about the expected purity and traceability of the plastic further down the value chain.

    The report is part of the Nordic Prime Ministers’ initiative: “The Nordic Region – leading in green growth” – read also more in the web magazine “Green Growth the Nordic Way” at www.nordicway.org

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  • 46. Anderssen, C.
    et al.
    Lindgren, R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Carvalho, R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Malmborg, V.
    Ahlberg, E.
    García-López, N.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Eriksson, A.
    Kristensen, T.B.
    Svenningsson, B.
    Boman, C.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pagels, J.
    SOA Formation and Particle Characteristics in the Emissions from Biomass Cook Stoves Used in the Developing Countries2017In: SOA Formation and Particle Characteristics in the Emissions from Biomass Cook Stoves Used in the Developing Countries, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Andersson, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Olausson, Linus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Identifiering av mervärden i EPC-projekt2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this report a study is carried out with the aim to identify added values of EPC projects implemented in schools in order to increase the interest of EPC projects on the market. The report examines how the planned maintenance, supervision, maintenance and corrective maintenance is affected, how insurance premiums and terms are affected, the indoor environment and how the tasks of the operating staff is changing. A literature study of energy savings, energy use in schools, maintenance and insurance as well as how energy efficiency improvements are related to the Swedish environmental objectives has been made. Visits were carried out in Ludvika, interviews were also carried out with operation technicians and local strategists in Ludvika as well as employees of insurance companies.

    Schools often have neglected maintenance and problems with ventilation and indoor environment. Schools also have a large energy saving potential due to their low utilization, mainly because they are empty parts of the year. All Swedish schools could reduce their electricity consumption by 1 TWh per year, which in money equivalents to the salary costs of about 2,000 teaching positions.

    8 schools in Ludvika and 10 schools in Piteå who has completed EPC projects have been studied. The time periods studied are seven years for Ludvika, 2006 – 2012, and for Piteå five years, 2010 – 2014. The data of fault reports and maintenance costs are taken from the municipalities, and descriptions of schools and EPC projects have been received from Caverion who has carried out the EPC projects. Data for maintenance has to some extent been selected in consultation with employees at the municipalities.

    The number of error reports in Piteå schools have shown a slight downward trend with a peak while the EPC project was carried out and one year after. Ludvika has shown an upward trend in maintenance costs, but this is probably due to previously accumulated maintenance. The amount of corrective maintenance is reduced, but only after the project when newly found errors have been fixed and the systems have been properly adjusted. The tasks related to supervisory and maintenance has changed when remote control of systems was installed which leads to a better overview and simplifies troubleshooting. The indoor temperature got more stable, but only after they fixed the weaknesses revealed in connection with the operational optimization. However, there are complaints in Ludvika of low temperatures, but it is caused the target temperature being set too low by the municipality. Insurance is only marginally affected, and only when damage prevention measures are implemented in the properties, which is not done in the studied properties. However, the underlying data sets are too small and over a too small time period to prove any certain changes.

    An added value identified is the ability to use EPC projects as a tool to address deferred maintenance in the real estate portfolio outside the normal budgetary framework while achieving energy savings. 

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  • 48.
    Andersson, Elin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Borg, Felicia
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Ett nytt perspektiv på plastavfallsflöden - från linjärt till cirkulärt: En kartläggning av plastavfallsflöden i GGVV-regionen2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of the study is to investigate opportunities for improvement in flows around region-based plastic waste management. To be able to answer the purpose of the study, the following two questions were formulated: 

    • What factors should be considered when introducing circular plastic waste streams? 
    • What is the responsibility of regional stakeholders in the introduction of circular plastic flows? 

    Method – The study is of an inductive approach in the form of a qualitative case study with an analysis unit based on two different analysis levels. In the study, the analysis unit is plastic waste management, which is broken down into the regional and actor level. To answer the presented questions, empirical data was collected in the form of interviews, questionnaires, and a document study. The Gioia method was used to transform data from interviews and surveys into themes and common factors with theoretical foundations. The method also makes it easier for the reader to follow the chain of evidence from data to analysis. 

    Findings – The results of the study show that today's plastic waste flows mainly follow a linear value flow and that the necessary flow must be changed towards a circular plastic waste flow. When introducing circular plastic waste streams, the following factors need to be considered for implementation to contribute to improvement: Design, Sorting, Transport and Economy. Furthermore, the study shows that the issue of liability is important for the possibility of claiming within the plastic waste flow and that today it is not clear who is responsible and when. This contributes to the fact that changes in plastic waste management must be clarified and that those responsible need to be named. The conclusions for the study and the result are that the problems surrounding plastic waste management need to be considered from a holistic perspective along the entire supply chain and that all actors involved must take their responsibility. 

    Implications – The study resulted in theoretical and practical contributions based on new knowledge. The theoretical contribution that the study has made is plastic waste management based on a regional approach where the theory today mainly deals with a circular economy based on company cases and national level. Additional theoretical contributions were made through common problem areas that were presented based on four factors, design, sorting, transport, and economy. These factors together with the theory of circular economy contributed to a theoretical contribution based on a developed model of the linear flow, to a more circular and sustainable plastic waste flow. The practical contribution is in the form of an increased understanding of the regional actors in the problem and who carries the responsibility in the various parts of the flow. This study can be used to get other regions to improve and develop their plastic waste flow at a regional level that benefits all actors. 

    Limitations – The current Covid-19 pandemic has affected the implementation of the study in the form of limited opportunities for visits to actors in the value chain. Another limitation is the geographical delimitation where the study only examines the flow based on a selected region, a study comprising several regions would have contributed to a more generalizable result. 

    Keywords – Plastic waste, Circular economy, Sustainable plastic use, Plastic waste flow, Circular plastic flow 

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  • 49.
    Andersson, Emil
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Material Flow and Stakeholder Analysis for a Transfer & Recycling Station in Gaborone, Botswana2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Landfilling waste material is still one of the most common methods to take care of waste in a big part of the world. Gaborone, the capital of Botswana located in the southern part of Africa is no different in this way. The major part of all waste is landfilled in Gaborone and there is only a minor part of all collected material that is recycled. One solution that earlier studies suggest is to build a transfer and recycling station in the city of Gaborone that can contribute to a more sustainable waste management. This study aims to identify the major waste streams of recyclable waste and also the major stakeholders that are active in this area through an exploratory study involving interviews, a workshop and a survey. The result of this thesis can hopefully assist in the preparations for such a transfer station. The conclusions of this study are many and contains of both hard facts and also loose ends that can contribute to pursue further studies. The first important result is that all the waste collection companies transports everything they collects to a landfill and it is only recycling organizations that are working with collection and recycling in Gaborone. These recycling organizations are a few but smaller compared to the waste collection companies in collected amounts of material. Besides these collection organizations, Gaborone City Council, the local municipality works with collection of household waste and the collaboration between these three groups that operates in the same environment is very poor. All the interviewed stakeholders showed a positive interest in the transfer and recycling station but there is only a small part of the commercial business in Gaborone that believes in a more serious waste management than landfilling. Despite that one major shopping mall actually sort out recyclables and saves 30% in waste management costs thanks to that. Another issue is the prevailing cultural contradictions that is obvious among the organizations in Gaborone. The last two bigger issues is the tremendously dull political bureaucracy that is appearing in Botswana and also that voices are raised that corruption is great beneath the surface.

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    Material Flow and Stakeholder Analysis for a Transfer & Recycling Station in Gaborone, Botswana
  • 50.
    Andersson, Maria
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden .
    Eriksson, Ola
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    von Borgstede, Chris
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden .
    The Effects of Environmental Management Systems on Source Separation in the Work and Home Settings2012In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 4, no 6, p. 1292-1308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measures that challenge the generation of waste are needed to address the global problem of the increasing volumes of waste that are generated in both private homes and workplaces. Source separation at the workplace is commonly implemented by environmental management systems (EMS). In the present study, the relationship between source separation at work and at home was investigated. A questionnaire that maps psychological and behavioural predictors of source separation was distributed to employees at different workplaces. The results show that respondents with awareness of EMS report higher levels of source separation at work, stronger environmental concern, personal and social norms, and perceive source separation to be less difficult. Furthermore, the results support the notion that after the adoption of EMS at the workplace, source separation at work spills over into source separation in the household. The potential implications for environmental management systems are discussed.

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