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  • 1. Abalaka, J. L.
    et al.
    Ottosson, Ulf
    Tende, Talatu
    Larson, Keith W.
    Rock Firefinch Lagonosticta sanguinodorsalis in the Mandara Mountains, north-east Nigeria: a new subspecies?2010In: African Bird Club Bulletin, ISSN 1352-481X, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 210-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [fr]

    L’Amarante des rochers Lagonosticta sanguinodorsalis dans les Monts Mandara, Nigeria du sud-est: une nouvelle sous-espèce ? Nous fournissons une description d’un mâle et d’une femelle, ainsi que desphotos d’un mâle, d’un amarante capturé dans les Monts Mandara, au nord-est du Nigeria. Le plumage et le cri de cet amarante sont identiques à ceux de l’Amarante des rochers Lagonosticta sanguinodorsalis, une espèce précédemment rapportée de la zone, excepté que le mâle n’a pas la couronne grise typique de l’espèce. Des travaux supplémentaires sur le terrain sont nécessaires pour déterminer s’il agit d’un individu aberrant ou d’une population de l’Amarante des rochers morphologiquement distincte.

  • 2.
    Abalde, Samuel
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Crocetta, Fabio
    Department of Integrative Marine Ecology (EMI), Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Villa Comunale, I-80121 Napoli, Italy.
    Tenorio, Manuel J.
    Departamento CMIM y Q. Inorgánica-INBIO, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cádiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain.
    D'Aniello, Salvatore
    Department of Biology and Evolution of Marine Organisms (BEOM), Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Villa Comunale, I-80121 Napoli, Italy.
    Fassio, Giulia
    Department of Biology and Biotechnologies “Charles Darwin”, Sapienza University of Rome, Zoology–Viale dell’Università 32, 00185 Rome, Italy.
    Rodríguez-Flores, Paula C.
    Museum of Comparative Zoology, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA.
    Uribe, Juan E.
    Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biología Evolutiva, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN-CSIC), José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid, Spain.
    Afonso, Carlos M.L.
    Centre of Marine Sciences (CCMAR), Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005 - 139 Faro, Portugal.
    Oliverio, Marco
    Department of Biology and Biotechnologies “Charles Darwin”, Sapienza University of Rome, Zoology–Viale dell’Università 32, 00185 Rome, Italy.
    Zardoya, Rafael
    Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biología Evolutiva, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN-CSIC), José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid, Spain.
    Hidden species diversity and mito-nuclear discordance within the Mediterranean cone snail, Lautoconus ventricosus2023In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 186, p. 107838-107838, article id 107838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mediterranean cone snail, Lautoconus ventricosus, is currently considered a single species inhabiting the whole Mediterranean basin and the adjacent Atlantic coasts. Yet, no population genetic study has assessed its taxonomic status. Here, we collected 245 individuals from 75 localities throughout the Mediterranean Sea and used cox1 barcodes, complete mitochondrial genomes, and genome skims to test whether L. ventricosus represents a complex of cryptic species. The maximum likelihood phylogeny based on complete mitochondrial genomes recovered six main clades (hereby named blue, brown, green, orange, red, and violet) with sufficient sequence divergence to be considered putative species. On the other hand, phylogenomic analyses based on 437 nuclear genes only recovered four out of the six clades: blue and orange clades were thoroughly mixed and the brown one was not recovered. This mito-nuclear discordance revealed instances of incomplete lineage sorting and introgression, and may have caused important differences in the dating of main cladogenetic events. Species delimitation tests proposed the existence of at least three species: green, violet, and red + blue + orange (i.e., cyan). Green plus cyan (with sympatric distributions) and violet, had West and East Mediterranean distributions, respectively, mostly separated by the Siculo-Tunisian biogeographical barrier. Morphometric analyses of the shell using species hypotheses as factor and shell length as covariate showed that the discrimination power of the studied parameters was only 70.2%, reinforcing the cryptic nature of the uncovered species, and the importance of integrative taxonomic approaches considering morphology, ecology, biogeography, and mitochondrial and nuclear population genetic variation.

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  • 3.
    Abalde, Samuel
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Dutertre, Sébastien
    IBMM, Université de Montpellier CNRS.
    Zardoya, Rafael
    Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales.
    A Combined Transcriptomics and Proteomics Approach Reveals the Differences in the Predatory and Defensive Venoms of the Molluscivorous Cone Snail Cylinder ammiralis (Caenogastropoda: Conidae)2021In: Toxins, ISSN 2072-6651, E-ISSN 2072-6651, Vol. 13, no 9, p. 642-642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Venoms are complex mixtures of proteins that have evolved repeatedly in the animal kingdom. Cone snail venoms represent one of the best studied venom systems. In nature, this venom can be dynamically adjusted depending on its final purpose, whether to deter predators or hunt prey. Here, the transcriptome of the venom gland and the proteomes of the predation-evoked and defensive venoms of the molluscivorous cone snail Cylinder ammiralis were catalogued. A total of 242 venom-related transcripts were annotated. The conotoxin superfamilies presenting more different peptides were O1, O2, T, and M, which also showed high expression levels (except T). The three precursors of the J superfamily were also highly expressed. The predation-evoked and defensive venoms showed a markedly distinct profile. A total of 217 different peptides were identified, with half of them being unique to one venom. A total of 59 peptides ascribed to 23 different protein families were found to be exclusive to the predatory venom, including the cono-insulin, which was, for the first time, identified in an injected venom. A total of 43 peptides from 20 protein families were exclusive to the defensive venom. Finally, comparisons of the relative abundance (in terms of number of peptides) of the different conotoxin precursor superfamilies showed that most of them present similar abundance regardless of the diet.

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  • 4.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Araya-Ajoy, Yimen G.
    Norwegian Univ Sci and Technol, Norway.
    Mouchet, Alexia
    Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Moiron, Maria
    Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Stuber, Erica F.
    Univ Nebraska Lincoln, NE USA.
    Kempenaers, Bart
    Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Dingemanse, Niels J.
    Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany; Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Germany.
    Does perceived predation risk affect patterns of extra-pair paternity? A field experiment in a passerine bird2018In: Functional Ecology, ISSN 0269-8463, E-ISSN 1365-2435, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 1001-1010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-consumptive predator effects have been shown to influence a wide range of behavioural, life history and morphological traits. Extra-pair reproduction is widespread among socially monogamous birds and may incur predation costs. Consequently, altered rates of extra-pair reproduction are expected in circumstances characterized by increased adult perceived predation risk. In addition, extra-pair reproduction is expected to be most affected for birds with phenotypes that generally increase predation risk (such as more active individuals). In two consecutive years, perceived predation risk was manipulated for great tits Parus major breeding in 12 nest-box plots by broadcasting sounds of their main predator (European sparrowhawk Accipiter nisus; six plots). As a control treatment, sounds of a sympatric, avian non-predator species were broadcast (Eurasian blackbird Turdus merula; six plots). Levels of extra-pair paternity did not differ between plots with different predation risk treatments. Males that moved more in a novel environment (more active or faster exploring) tended to have offspring with fewer partners, but this effect did not vary with predation risk treatment. From an adaptive viewpoint, predation costs associated with extra-pair reproduction may be small and may not outweigh the benefits of extra-pair behaviour. Research on a broader range of taxa with different mating strategies is now needed to confirm the generality of our findings.

  • 5.
    Abreu-Vieira, Gustavo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Regulation and measurement of brown adipose tissue blood flow2014Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is an organ specialized in macromolecule combustion in order to produce heat. Because of its high capacity to dissipate energy, it is currently among the best hopes for future treatments of obesity and diabetes. BAT is permeated by a vast capillary network that delivers blood rich in oxygen and nutrients to supply the high metabolic needs of the tissue. At the same time, metabolites, carbon dioxide and warm blood are drained back into systemic circulation. Blood flow is in fact a limiting factor for thermogenesis. Therefore, understanding BAT blood flow regulation is a crucial step for describing the tissue function. This thesis aims to summarize anatomical descriptions, to discuss the methodological evolution of the field, and to synthetize what we have learned about mechanistic regulation of BAT blood flow during the last half century. Manuscript I introduces a new method (high-resolution laser-doppler imaging) for the measurement of BAT blood flow, and gives mechanistic insights about its physiological regulation. Manuscript II focuses on the influence of bombesin receptor subtype-3 on the neurological control of body temperature and thermogenesis.

  • 6.
    Ackefors, Hans
    Stockholm University.
    Studies on the ecology of the zooplankton fauna in the Baltic proper1971Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Ackefors, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology.
    The evolution of a worldwide shrimp industry2009In: World Aquaculture, ISSN 1041-5602, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 46-55Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Affonso, Igor de Paiva
    et al.
    Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Maringá, Brazil; Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná, Campus Ponta Grossa, Brazil.
    Karling, Leticia Cucolo
    Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Maringá, Brazil.
    Takemoto, Ricardo Massato
    Núcleo de Pesquisas em Limnologia Ictiologia e Aqüicultura – Nupélia, Maringá, Brazil.
    Gomes, Luiz Carlos
    Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Maringá, Brazil; Núcleo de Pesquisas em Limnologia Ictiologia e Aqüicultura – Nupélia, Maringá, Brazil.
    Nilsson, Per Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Department of Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Light-induced eye-fluke behavior enhances parasite life cycle2017In: Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, ISSN 1540-9295, E-ISSN 1540-9309, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 340-341Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 9.
    Ageheim, Sofia
    et al.
    Executive, Länsstyrelser, Länsstyrelsen Gävleborg.
    Nordin, Hans
    Executive, Länsstyrelser, Länsstyrelsen Gävleborg.
    Sundin, Sara
    Executive, Länsstyrelser, Länsstyrelsen Gävleborg.
    Inventering av stora rovdjur i Gävleborgs län 2014-20152015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

     

    Länsstyrelsen ansvarar för att årliga rovdjursinventeringar genomförs i Gävleborgs län. Syftet är att

    övervaka rovdjursstammarnas storlek, utbredning, genetiska status och hur stammarna utvecklas

    över tiden.

     

    I den här rapporten redovisas resultaten från inventeringar av lodjur, varg, järv och kungsörn, samt

    länsstyrelsens bedömning av förekomsten av björn i Gävleborg under inventeringssäsongen

    2014/2015.

     

    Vid lodjursinventeringen 2014/2015 kvalitetssäkrades 15 familjegrupper, det vill säga 15 honor som

    fött ungar 2014. Lodjursstammen i Gävleborg kan därmed uppskattas till cirka 83 individer vintern

    2014/2015. Fyra av familjegrupperna delades med angränsande län.

     

    Gävleborg berördes av tio vargrevir vintern 2014/2015: Prästskogen/Haverö, Naggen, Kukumäki,

    Sjösveden, Tandsjön, Lingbo, Åmot/Ockelbo, Bondskog, Björnås och Glamsen. I sju av reviren

    bekräftades att föryngring skett våren 2014. Sex av reviren delades med andra län. Det innebär att

    Gävleborg anses ha haft 4,7 familjegrupper vintern 2014/2015, enligt Viltskadecenters fördelning.

    Vargarna i Korsåreviret, som tidigare delades mellan Gävleborg och Dalarna, har denna säsong vistats

    väster om länsgränsen och har inte spårats i Gävleborg. Tandsjö-reviret försvann under

    inventeringssäsongen genom skyddsjakt i februari 2015.

     

    Ingen inventering av björn har genomförts denna säsong. Länsstyrelsen bedömer att björnstammens

    storlek och spridning i länet sannolikt överensstämmer med resultatet från 2012 års spillningsinventering. Björnstammen uppskattades då till cirka 380 individer i Gävleborgs län.

     

    En riktad järvinventering har för första gången på många år genomförts i Gävleborgs län vintern

    2014/2015. Med hjälp av fotostationer har bilder på järv erhållits på flera ställen i hela norra delen av

    Gävleborg och en föryngring 2014 har kvalitetssäkrats.

     

    Vid inventeringen av kungsörn i Gävleborg 2014 konstaterades totalt 25 revir, varav 8 hade lyckade

    häckningar och 3 av dessa var dubbelkullar, det vill säga kullar med två ungar. Storleken på länets

    fasta kungsörnspopulation 2014 uppskattas till 50-65 individer.

     

    Inventeringarna av lo, järv och varg utfördes av länsstyrelsens personal, medan kungsörn

    inventerades av Kungsörnsgruppen Gävleborg på uppdrag av länsstyrelsen. Allmänhetens

    rapportering av rovdjursobservationer har varit till stor hjälp i arbetet med att göra så bra

    inventeringar som möjligt utifrån de resurser som finns.

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  • 10. Agianian, Bogos
    et al.
    Lesch, Christine
    Loseva, Olga
    Dushay, Mitchell S.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences. Uppsala University.
    Preliminary characterization of hemolymph coagulation in Anopheles gambiae larvae2007In: Developmental and Comparative Immunology, ISSN 0145-305X, E-ISSN 1879-0089, Vol. 31, no 9, p. 879-888Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hemolymph coagulation is a first response to injury, impeding infection, and ending bleeding. Little is known about its molecular basis in insects, but clotting factors have been identified in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we have begun to study coagulation in the aquatic larvae of the malaria vector mosquito Anopheles gambiae using methods developed for Drosophila. A delicate clot was seen by light microscopy, and pullout and proteomic analysis identified phenoloxidase and apolipophorin-I as major candidate clotting factors. Electron microscopic analysis confirmed clot formation and revealed it contains fine molecular sheets, most likely a result of lipophorin assembly. Phenoloxidase appears to be more critical in clot formation in Anopheles than in Drosophila. The Anopheles larval clot thus differs in formation, structure, and composition from the clot in Drosophila, confirming the need to study coagulation in different insect species to learn more about its evolution and adaptation to different lifestyles.

  • 11.
    Agnvall, Beatrix
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bélteky, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jensen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brain size is reduced by selectionfor tameness in Red Junglefowl–correlated effects in vital organs2017In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 3306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During domestication animals have undergone changes in size of brain and other vital organs. We hypothesize that this could be a correlated effect to increased tameness. Red Junglefowl (ancestors of domestic chickens) were selected for divergent levels of fear of humans for five generations. The parental (P0) and the fifth selected generation (S5) were culled when 48–54 weeks old and the brains were weighed before being divided into telencephalon, cerebellum, mid brain and optic lobes. Each single brain part as well as the liver, spleen, heart and testicles were also weighed. Brains of S5 birds with high fear scores (S5 high) were heavier both in absolute terms and when corrected for body weight. The relative weight of telencephalon (% of brain weight) was significantly higher in S5 high and relative weight of cerebellum was lower. Heart, liver, testes and spleen were all relatively heavier (% of body weight) in S5 high. Hence, selection for tameness has changed the size of the brain and other vital organs in this population and may have driven the domesticated phenotype as a correlated response.

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  • 12.
    Agnvall, Beatrix
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Katajamaa, Rebecca
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Altimiras, Jordi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jensen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Is domestication driven by reduced fear of humans? Boldness, metabolism and serotonin levels in divergently selected red junglefowl (Gallus gallus)2015In: Biology Letters, ISSN 1744-9561, E-ISSN 1744-957X, Vol. 11, no 9, article id 20150509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Domesticated animals tend to develop a coherent set of phenotypic traits. Tameness could be a central underlying factor driving this, and we therefore selected red junglefowl, ancestors of all domestic chickens, for high or low fear of humans during six generations. We measured basal metabolic rate (BMR), feed efficiency, boldness in a novel object (NO) test, corticosterone reactivity and basal serotonin levels (related to fearfulness) in birds from the fifth and sixth generation of the high- and low-fear lines, respectively (44-48 individuals). Corticosterone response to physical restraint did not differ between selection lines. However, BMR was higher in low-fear birds, as was feed efficiency. Low-fear males had higher plasma levels of serotonin and both low-fear males and females were bolder in an NO test. The results show that many aspects of the domesticated phenotype may have developed as correlated responses to reduced fear of humans, an essential trait for successful domestication.

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  • 13. Aguirre, A. A.
    et al.
    Angerbjörn, A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology.
    Tannerfeldt, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Mörner, T.
    Health evaluation of arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) cubs in Sweden2000In: Journal of zoo and wildlife medicine, ISSN 1042-7260, E-ISSN 1937-2825, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 36-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hematologic. serum biochemistry, and serum cortisol reference ranges were established and tonsil/rectal bacterial and fecal parasite examinations were performed on 21 wild arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) cubs during July 1996. Several of the hematologic and serum biochemistry values fell within normal ranges for other wild canids or domestic dogs of the same age class. Serum alanine transaminase and creatine phosphokinase values were significantly higher in the youngest cubs. Proteus vulgaris and Escherichia coli were isolated from both tonsilar and rectal swabs of several cubs in all dens. The most common gastrointestinal parasite ova were Toxascaris leonina (59%), Isospora spp. (52%), Uncinaria stenocephala (33%), and Capillaria spp. (26%). Prevalence of T. leonina differed significantly between dens and between age groups. Hematologic and serum biochemistry values and degree of parasitism may be indicators of health, stress, and nutritional status of arctic foxes.

  • 14. Aguirre, A. Alonso
    et al.
    Principe, B.
    Tannerfeldt, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Angerbjörn, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Mörner, Torsten
    Field anesthesia of wild arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) cubs in the Swedish lapland using medetomidine-ketamine-atipamezole2000In: Journal of zoo and wildlife medicine, ISSN 1042-7260, E-ISSN 1937-2825, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 244-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A safe and effective anesthetic regime for use in arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) cubs was developed. During July 1996, six free-ranging 6-8-wk-old cubs were captured near their den in Vindelfjallen Nature Reserve, Sweden. Medetomidine and ketamine HCl, followed by atipamezole, were selected for the anesthetic trial because of the well-documented safety and efficacy of this drug combination in a broad range of species. The dosage regimen used was 50 mu g/kg medetomidine combined with 2.5 mg/kg ketamine followed by reversal with 250 mu g/kg atipamezole. induction was rapid, with a mean induction time of 1 min and 32 sec (range: 58-150 sec). The cubs were anesthetized for a mean time of 18 +/- 5 min (range: 13-25 min). Serially recorded heart rate, respiratory rate, temperature, and pulse oximetry were stable throughout the anesthetic period for all cubs. Anesthetic depth was suitable for safe handling and minor clinical procedures, including venipuncture. Following atipamezole, all cubs were standing within 12 +/- 7 min (range: 5-24 min) and fully recovered at 27 +/- 5 min (range: 19-36 min). This information will be useful for future captive breeding and management programs involving the endangered arctic fox.

  • 15. Agustí, J.
    et al.
    Werdelin, LarsSwedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Influence of climate on faunal evolution in the Quaternary of Europe1995Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Ahi, Ehsan Pashay
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology. Univ Helsinki, Organismal & Evolutionary Biol Res Programme, Helsinki, Finland..
    Brunel, Mathilde
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Mol Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Tsakoumis, Emmanouil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Physiology and Environmental Toxicology.
    Chen, Junyu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Schmitz, Monika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Physiology and Environmental Toxicology.
    Appetite regulating genes in zebrafish gut; a gene expression study2022In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 17, no 7, article id e0255201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The underlying molecular pathophysiology of feeding disorders, particularly in peripheral organs, is still largely unknown. A range of molecular factors encoded by appetite-regulating genes are already described to control feeding behaviour in the brain. However, the important role of the gastrointestinal tract in the regulation of appetite and feeding in connection to the brain has gained more attention in the recent years. An example of such inter-organ connection can be the signals mediated by leptin, a key regulator of body weight, food intake and metabolism, with conserved anorexigenic effects in vertebrates. Leptin signals functions through its receptor (lepr) in multiple organs, including the brain and the gastrointestinal tract. So far, the regulatory connections between leptin signal and other appetite-regulating genes remain unclear, particularly in the gastrointestinal system. In this study, we used a zebrafish mutant with impaired function of leptin receptor to explore gut expression patterns of appetite-regulating genes, under different feeding conditions (normal feeding, 7-day fasting, 2 and 6-hours refeeding). We provide evidence that most appetite-regulating genes are expressed in the zebrafish gut. On one hand, we did not observed significant differences in the expression of orexigenic genes (except for hcrt) after changes in the feeding condition. On the other hand, we found 8 anorexigenic genes in wild-types (cart2, cart3, dbi, oxt, nmu, nucb2a, pacap and pomc), as well as 4 genes in lepr mutants (cart3, kiss1, kiss1r and nucb2a), to be differentially expressed in the zebrafish gut after changes in feeding conditions. Most of these genes also showed significant differences in their expression between wild-type and lepr mutant. Finally, we observed that impaired leptin signalling influences potential regulatory connections between anorexigenic genes in zebrafish gut. Altogether, these transcriptional changes propose a potential role of leptin signal in the regulation of feeding through changes in expression of certain anorexigenic genes in the gastrointestinal tract of zebrafish.

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  • 17.
    Ahi, Ehsan Pashay
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Brunel, Mathilde
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, BioCentrum, Dept Mol Sci, Allmas Alle 5, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Tsakoumis, Emmanouil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Schmitz, Monika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Transcriptional study of appetite regulating genes in the brain of zebrafish (Danio rerio) with impaired leptin signalling2019In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 20166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hormone leptin is a key regulator of body weight, food intake and metabolism. In mammals, leptin acts as an anorexigen and inhibits food intake centrally by affecting the appetite centres in the hypothalamus. In teleost fish, the regulatory connections between leptin and other appetite-regulating genes are largely unknown. In the present study, we used a zebrafish mutant with a loss of function leptin receptor to investigate brain expression patterns of 12 orexigenic and 24 anorexigenic genes under different feeding conditions (normal feeding, 7-day fasting, 2 and 6-hours refeeding). Expression patterns were compared to wild-type zebrafish, in order to identify leptin-dependent differentially expressed genes under different feeding conditions. We provide evidence that the transcription of certain orexigenic and anorexigenic genes is influenced by leptin signalling in the zebrafish brain. We found that the expression of orexigenic genes was not affected by impaired leptin signalling under normal feeding conditions; however, several orexigenic genes showed increased transcription during fasting and refeeding, including agrp, apln, galr1a and cnr1. This suggests an inhibitory effect of leptin signal on the transcription of these orexigenic genes during short-term fasting and refeeding in functional zebrafish. Most pronounced effects were observed in the group of anorexigenic genes, where the impairment of leptin signalling resulted in reduced gene expression in several genes, including cart family, crhb, gnrh2, mc4r, pomc and spx, in the control group. This suggests a stimulatory effect of leptin signal on the transcription of these anorexigenic genes under normal feeding condition. In addition, we found multiple gain and loss in expression correlations between the appetite-regulating genes, in zebrafish with impaired leptin signal, suggesting the presence of gene regulatory networks downstream of leptin signal in zebrafish brain. The results provide the first evidence for the effects of leptin signal on the transcription of various appetite-regulating genes in zebrafish brain, under different feeding conditions. Altogether, these transcriptional changes suggest an anorexigenic role for leptin signal, which is likely to be mediated through distinct set of appetite-regulating genes under different feeding conditions.

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  • 18.
    Ahi, Ehsan Pashay
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology. Karl Franzens Univ Graz, Inst Biol, Univ Pl 2, A-8010 Graz, Austria.
    Singh, Pooja
    Karl Franzens Univ Graz, Inst Biol, Univ Pl 2, A-8010 Graz, Austria.
    Lecaudey, Laurene Alicia
    Karl Franzens Univ Graz, Inst Biol, Univ Pl 2, A-8010 Graz, Austria.
    Gessl, Wolfgang
    Karl Franzens Univ Graz, Inst Biol, Univ Pl 2, A-8010 Graz, Austria.
    Sturmbauer, Christian
    Karl Franzens Univ Graz, Inst Biol, Univ Pl 2, A-8010 Graz, Austria.
    Maternal mRNA input of growth and stress-response-related genes in cichlids in relation to egg size and trophic specialization2018In: EvoDevo, E-ISSN 2041-9139, Vol. 9, article id 23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Egg size represents an important form of maternal effect determined by a complex interplay of long-term adaptation and short-term plasticity balancing egg size with brood size. Haplochromine cichlids are maternal mouthbrooders showing differential parental investment in different species, manifested in great variation in egg size, brood size and duration of maternal care. Little is known about maternally determined molecular characters of eggs in fishes and their relation to egg size and trophic specialization. Here we investigate maternal mRNA inputs of selected growth- and stress-related genes in eggs of mouthbrooding cichlid fishes adapted to different trophic niches from Lake Tanganyika, Lake Malawi, Lake Victoria and compare them to their riverine allies.

    Results: We first identified two reference genes, atf7ip and mid1ip1, to be suitable for cross-species quantification of mRNA abundance via qRT-PCR in the cichlid eggs. Using these reference genes, we found substantial variation in maternal mRNA input for a set of candidate genes related to growth and stress response across species and lakes. We observed negative correlation of mRNA abundance between two of growth hormone receptor paralogs (ghr1 and ghr2) across all haplochromine cichlid species which also differentiate the species in the two younger lakes, Malawi and Lake Victoria, from those in Lake Tanganyika and ancestral riverine species. Furthermore, we found correlations between egg size and maternal mRNA abundance of two growth-related genes igf2 and ghr2 across the haplochromine cichlids as well as distinct clustering of the species based on their trophic specialization using maternal mRNA abundance of five genes (ghr1, ghr2, igf2, gr and sgk1).

    Conclusions: These findings indicate that variations in egg size in closely related cichlid species can be linked to differences in maternal RNA deposition of key growth-related genes. In addition, the cichlid species with contrasting trophic specialization deposit different levels of maternal mRNAs in their eggs for particular growth-related genes; however, it is unclear whether such differences contribute to differential morphogenesis at later stages of development. Our results provide first insights into this aspect of gene activation, as a basis for future studies targeting their role during ecomorphological specialization and adaptive radiation.

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  • 19.
    Ah-King, Malin
    Stockholm University.
    Phylogenetic analyses of parental care evolution2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Ahlbert, Inga-Britt
    Stockholm University.
    Organization of the cone cells in the retinae of some teleosts in relation to their feeding habits1975Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Ahlen, Ingemar
    Executive, Universitet, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, skoglig resurshållning.
    Skydd av biotoper för bevarande av vitryggig hackspett i nedre Dalälven1976Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den vitryggiga hackspetten Dendrocopos leucotos, som ursprungligen förekommit över nästan hela landet, har under de senaste hundra åren blivit allt sällsyntare och finns nu, förutom i några spridda förekomster av enstaka par eller ensamma fåglar, i landet endast kvar med en fast population i nedre Dalälvsområdet mellan Avesta och Älvkarleby.

    De hotade hackspettarterna har sedan 1974 varit föremål för ekologisk forskning och inventeringsarbete. I bilagda ”information om projekt hackspettars ekologi” 1976-01-18 redovisas projektets syfte och kortfattad redogörelse för arbetet under 1975 ges. Hänvisning kan också göras till tidskriften Vår Fågelvärlds första nummer 1976 där resultat av 1973 års riksinventering av gråspett och vitryggig hackspett redovisas.

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  • 22.
    Ahlstrom, Christina A.
    et al.
    US Geol Survey, Alaska Sci Ctr, 4210 Univ Dr, Anchorage, AK 99508 USA..
    Woksepp, Hanna
    Kalmar Cty Hosp, Dept Dev & Publ Hlth, S-39185 Kalmar, Sweden.;Linnaeus Univ, Dept Med & Optometry, S-39185 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Sandegren, Linus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Mohsin, Mashkoor
    Univ Agr Faisalabad, Inst Microbiol, Faisalabad 38040, Pakistan..
    Hasan, Badrul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Anim Bacteriol Sect, Anim Bacteriol Sect Microbial Sci Pests & Dis, Bundoora, Vic, Australia..
    Muzyka, Denys
    Inst Expt & Clin Vet Med, Natl Sci Ctr, UA-61023 Kharkiv, Ukraine..
    Hernandez, Jorge
    Kalmar Cty Hosp, Dept Clin Microbiol, SE-39185 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Aguirre, Filip
    Kalmar Cty Hosp, Dept Clin Microbiol, SE-39185 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Tok, Atalay
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Zoonosis Sci Ctr, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Soderman, Jan
    Linköping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Lab Med, Linköping, Sweden..
    Olsen, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ramey, Andrew M.
    US Geol Survey, Alaska Sci Ctr, 4210 Univ Dr, Anchorage, AK 99508 USA..
    Bonnedahl, Jonas
    Linköping Univ, Dept Biomed & Clin Sci, S-58183 Linköping, Sweden.;Region Kalmar Cty, Dept Infect Dis, S-39185 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Genomically diverse carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae fromwild birds provide insight into global patterns of spatiotemporal dissemination2022In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 824, article id 153632Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are a threat to public health globally, yet the role of the environment in the epidemiology of CRE remains elusive. Given that wild birds can acquire CRE, likely from foraging in anthropogenically impacted areas, and may aid in the maintenance and dissemination of CRE in the environment, a spatiotemporal comparison of isolates from different regions and timepoints may be useful for elucidating epidemiological information. Thus, we characterized the genomic diversity of CRE from fecal samples opportunistically collected from gulls (Larus spp.) inhabiting Alaska (USA), Chile, Spain, Turkey, and Ukraine and from black kites (Milvus migrans) sampled in Pakistan and assessed evidence for spatiotemporal patterns of dissemination. Within and among sampling locations, a high diversity of carbapenemases was found, including Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC), New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase (NDM), oxacillinase (OXA), and Verona integron Metallo beta-lactamase (VIM). Although the majority of genomic comparisons among samples did not provide evidence for spatial dissemination, we did find strong evidence for dissemination among Alaska, Spain, and Turkey. We also found strong evidence for temporal dissemination among samples collected in Alaska and Pakistan, though the majority of CRE clones were transitory and were not repeatedly detected among locations where samples were collected longitudinally. Carbapenemase-producing hypervirulent K. pneumoniae was isolated from gulls in Spain and Ukraine and some isolates harbored antimicrobial resistance genes conferring resistance to up to 10 different antibiotic classes, including colistin. Our results are consistent with local acquisition of CRE by wild birds with spatial dissemination influenced by intermediary transmission routes, likely involving humans. Furthermore, our results support the premise that anthropogenicallyassociated wild birds may be good sentinels for understanding the burden of clinically-relevant antimicrobial resistance in the local human population.

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  • 23.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Adedidran, Funmilola
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A draft transcriptome of a parasite Neocamacolaimus parasiticus (Camacolaimidae, Plectida)2021In: Journal of Nematology, E-ISSN 0022-300X, article id e2021Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Boström, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Revision of the genus Cobbionema Filipjev, 1922 (Nematoda, Chromadorida, Selachinematidae)2020In: European journal of taxonomy, E-ISSN 2118-9773, Vol. 702, p. 1-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on the genus Cobbionema Filipjev, 1922 in Sweden with the description of four species and a revision of the genus. Cobbionema acrocerca Filipjev, 1922 is relatively small in size, with a tail that has a conical proximal and a digitate distal section. Cobbionema cylindrolaimoides Schuurmans Stekhoven, 1950 is similar to C. acrocerca in most characters except having a larger body size and heavily cuticularized mandibles. Cobbionema brevispicula sp. nov. is characterised by short spicules and a conoid tail. Cobbionema acuminata sp. nov. is characterised by a long two-part spicule, a conical tail and three (one mid dorsal and two ventrosublateral) sharply pointed tines in the anterior chamber of the stoma that are located more anterior than in all the other species. We also present a molecular phylogeny of the family based on the nearly full-length 18S and the D2-D3 expansion segment of the 28S rRNA genes. Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian trees inferred from both genes strongly support a clade that included Cobbionema, Demonema Cobb, 1894 and Halichoanolaimus de Man, 1888 and another clade with Gammanema Cobb, 1920 and Latronema Wieser, 1954 nested together. None of the trees supported the monophyly of the subfamilies Choniolaiminae and Selachinematinae.

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  • 25.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Description of a new marine predatory nematode Latronema dyngi sp. nov. (Nematoda, Chromadorida, Selachinematidae) from the west coast of Sweden and an updated phylogeny of Chromadoria2020In: Marine Biodiversity, ISSN 1867-1616, E-ISSN 1867-1624, Vol. 50, no 113, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new nematode species, Latronema dyngi sp. nov., is described from Skagerrak off the west coast of Sweden with the type locality near Dyngö island. Latronema dyngi sp. nov. is characterized by multispiral amphideal fovea with circular outline, 0.2– 0.3 corresponding body diameters wide in males and 0.1–0.2 corresponding body diameters wide in females, 12 cuticular longitudinal ridges and 18–27 precloacal supplements in males. Latronema dyngi sp. nov. most closely resembles L. orcinum in terms of body length; demanian ratios a, b, c and c′; number of amphid turns in males; and the ratio of spicule length to cloacal body diameter. The two species can be differentiated by the number longitudinal ridges on the cuticle (12 for Latronema dyngi sp. nov. vs 20–22 for L. orcinum) and spicule length (65–78 μm for L. dyngi vs 60 for L. orcinum) and shape (weakly arcuate for L. dyngi sp. nov. vs strongly arcuate for L. orcinum). We also performed a maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis on over 250 nematodes of the subclass Chromadoria based on their nearly full-length 18S rDNA sequences. In agreement with previous studies, our analysis supported Selachinematidae as a monophyletic group and placed Richtersia Steiner, 1916 within Desmodoridae Filipjev, 1922 or just outside of the main Desmodorida clade with the latter placement not well supported.

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  • 26.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Twenty Years after De Ley and Blaxter—How Far Did We Progress in Understanding the Phylogeny of the Phylum Nematoda?2021In: Animals, E-ISSN 2076-2615, Vol. 11, no 12, p. 3479-3479Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Roberts, Nickellaus G.
    Adediran, Funmilola
    Smythe, Ashleigh B.
    Kocot, Kevin M.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Phylogenomic Analysis of the Phylum Nematoda: Conflicts and Congruences With Morphology, 18S rRNA, and Mitogenomes2022In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2296-701X, Vol. 9, article id 769565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phylogenetic relationships within many lineages of the phylum Nematoda remainunresolved, despite numerous morphology-based and molecular analyses. Weperformed several phylogenomic analyses using 286 published genomes andtranscriptomes and 19 new transcriptomes by focusing on Trichinellida, Spirurina,Rhabditina, and Tylenchina separately, and by analyzing a selection of species fromthe whole phylum Nematoda. The phylogeny of Trichinellida supported the divisionof Trichinella into encapsulated and non-encapsulated species and placed them assister to Trichuris. The Spirurina subtree supported the clades formed by species fromAscaridomorpha and Spiruromorpha respectively, but did not support Dracunculoidea.The analysis of Tylenchina supported a clade that included all sampled species fromTylenchomorpha and placed it as sister to clades that included sampled speciesfrom Cephalobomorpha and Panagrolaimomorpha, supporting the hypothesis thatpostulates the single origin of the stomatostylet. The Rhabditina subtree placed a cladecomposed of all sampled species from Diplogastridae as sister to a lineage consistingof paraphyletic Rhabditidae, a single representative of Heterorhabditidae and a cladecomposed of sampled species belonging to Strongylida. It also strongly supportedall suborders within Strongylida. In the phylum-wide analysis, a clade composedof all sampled species belonging to Enoplia were consistently placed as sister toDorylaimia + Chromadoria. The topology of the Nematoda backbone was consistentwith previous studies, including polyphyletic placement of sampled representatives ofMonhysterida and Araeolaimida.

  • 28.
    Ahnesjo, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Kvarnemo, C
    Merilaita, S
    Using potential reproductive rates to predict mating competition among individuals qualified to mate2001In: BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY, ISSN 1045-2249, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 397-401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential reproductive rate (PRR), which is the offspring production per unit time each sex would achieve if unconstrained by mate availability, often differs between the sexes. An increasing sexual difference in PRR predicts an intensified mating com

  • 29.
    Ahnesjö, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Berglund, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Forsgren, Elisabet
    Norsk institutt for naturforskning i Trondheim, Norway.
    Karlsson, Anna
    Enheten för biologisk mångfald och områdesskydd, Havs och Vattenmyndigheten, Göteborg.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    Zoologi, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg.
    Magnhagen, Carin
    Fiskbiologi, Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet (SLU), Umeå.
    Rosenqvist, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development. Etologi, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway.
    Östlund Nilsson, Sara
    Nasjonalbiblioteket, Oslo, Norway.
    En beteende-ekologisk forskningsperiod på Klubbans biologiska station: Rapport från återträff med Doktorer som disputerade (1983-2001) på avhandlingar med fältarbete på Klubbans Biologiska station. I en värld av kantnålar, stubbar, spiggar och nudingar.2018Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    We had the fortune as PhD-students and scientists in Animal Ecology at Uppsala University, to spend joyful and creative field work summers at Klubban Biological Station, during the 1980-90’s. A reunion in June 2018 resulted in this report highlighting research on pipefishes, gobies, sticklebacks and nudibranchs. Our research on these animals have provided novel insights and knowledge of the process of sexual selection and paternal care. These animals have, in many aspects, now become model organisms in evolutionary behavioral ecology in marine environments. Our list of publications provides many examples of how environmental factors influence how sexual selection and mate choice operate, how predictors like potential reproductive rates, operational sex ratios work and how male parental care is prominent in influencing selection. This research, that started at Klubban, has broadened our understanding of the ecological importance of shallow marine areas. The evolutionary understanding of how males and females can behave and how adaptive traits are selected in interaction with social and an increasingly changing ambient environment is in focus in our continued scientific endeavors. We have happily compiled this report illustrating how science and scientist can stimulate each other at a wonderful place like Klubban Biological Station, with the access to amazing organisms like pipefishes, gobies, sticklebacks and nudibranchs.

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  • 30.
    Ahnlund, Hans
    Stockholm University.
    Aspects of the population dynamics of the badger (Meles meles L.)1980Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 31. Ahola, Virpi
    et al.
    Lehtonen, Rainer
    Somervuo, Panu
    Salmela, Leena
    Koskinen, Patrik
    Rastas, Pasi
    Valimaki, Niko
    Paulin, Lars
    Kvist, Jouni
    Wahlberg, Niklas
    Tanskanen, Jaakko
    Hornett, Emily A.
    Ferguson, Laura C.
    Luo, Shiqi
    Cao, Zijuan
    de Jong, Maaike A.
    Duplouy, Anne
    Smolander, Olli-Pekka
    Vogel, Heiko
    McCoy, Rajiv C.
    Qian, Kui
    Chong, Wong Swee
    Zhang, Qin
    Ahmad, Freed
    Haukka, Jani K.
    Joshi, Aruj
    Salojarvi, Jarkko
    Wheat, Christopher W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Grosse-Wilde, Ewald
    Hughes, Daniel
    Katainen, Riku
    Pitkanen, Esa
    Ylinen, Johannes
    Waterhouse, Robert M.
    Turunen, Mikko
    Vaharautio, Anna
    Ojanen, Sami P.
    Schulman, Alan H.
    Taipale, Minna
    Lawson, Daniel
    Ukkonen, Esko
    Makinen, Veli
    Goldsmith, Marian R.
    Holm, Liisa
    Auvinen, Petri
    Frilander, Mikko J.
    Hanski, Ilkka
    The Glanville fritillary genome retains an ancient karyotype and reveals selective chromosomal fusions in Lepidoptera2014In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 5, p. 4737-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have reported that chromosome synteny in Lepidoptera has been well conserved, yet the number of haploid chromosomes varies widely from 5 to 223. Here we report the genome (393 Mb) of the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia; Nymphalidae), a widely recognized model species in metapopulation biology and eco-evolutionary research, which has the putative ancestral karyotype of n = 31. Using a phylogenetic analyses of Nymphalidae and of other Lepidoptera, combined with orthologue-level comparisons of chromosomes, we conclude that the ancestral lepidopteran karyotype has been n = 31 for at least 140 My. We show that fusion chromosomes have retained the ancestral chromosome segments and very few rearrangements have occurred across the fusion sites. The same, shortest ancestral chromosomes have independently participated in fusion events in species with smaller karyotypes. The short chromosomes have higher rearrangement rate than long ones. These characteristics highlight distinctive features of the evolutionary dynamics of butterflies and moths.

  • 32.
    Akram, Mehwish
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology. Univ Punjab, Sch Biol Sci, Quaid E Azam Campus, Lahore 54590, Pakistan.
    Rashid, Naeem
    Univ Punjab, Sch Biol Sci, Quaid E Azam Campus, Lahore 54590, Pakistan.
    Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channels in Drosophila Regulate the Sleep/Wake Behaviour through PDF-Neurons2019In: PAKISTAN JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY, ISSN 0030-9923, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 709-715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Potassium channels are important modulators of cell function depending on the cell type of where they are expressed. They are involved in regulation of cell membrane resting potential, potassium homeostasis and control a variety of cellular functions including metabolism. In this study we determined that a regulator of Pigment dispersing factor, PDF-immunoreactive neurons in the Drosophila melanogaster adult brain, is an inwardly rectifying potassium channel, IRK1. Knocking down the potassium channels specifically on PDF expressing neurons using UAS-GAL4 RNA(1) system resulted in altered axonal projections of lateral neurons (LNv) towards the dorsal neurons (DN). Moreover, it was observed that lack of the potassium channels also caused a robust increase in sleep and reduction in the fly's active period during the day. We observed that the normal circadian control of the morning and evening anticipation is also dependant on these potassium channels. The flies deficient in IRK1 channels didn't show an evening anticipation peak. Another interesting disclosure during this study was the inability of PDF- Tri neurons to undergo programmed cell death in the absence of inwardly rectifying potassium channels. Hence, IRK1, though poorly expressed in the Drosophila central nervous system, plays an important role in the normal functioning of PDF expressing neurons. Further studies are needed to elaborate the physiological roles of Drosophila potassium channels which may lead to a better understanding of human Kir channels related to pathological conditions and diseases.

  • 33.
    Al Naggar, Yahya
    et al.
    Tanta Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Zool, Tanta 31527, Egypt; Martin Luther Univ Halle Wittenberg, Gen Zool, Inst Biol, D-06120 Halle, Germany.
    Brinkmann, Markus
    Univ Saskatchewan, Sch Environm & Sustainabil, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5C8, Canada; Univ Saskatchewan, Global Inst Water Secur, Saskatoon, SK S7N 3H5, Canada; Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan.
    Sayes, Christie M.
    Baylor Univ, Dept Environm Sci, Waco, TX 76798 USA.
    AL-Kahtani, Saad N.
    King Faisal University.
    Dar, Showket A.
    Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences andTechnology of Kashmir.
    El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences. Jiangsu University; Menoufia Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Chem, Shibin Al Kawm 32512, Egypt.
    Grünewald, Bernd
    Goethe-Universität.
    Giesy, John P.
    University of Saskatchewan; Baylor University; Michigan State University.
    Are Honey Bees at Risk from Microplastics?2021In: Toxics, E-ISSN 2305-6304, Vol. 9, no 5, article id 109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microplastics (MPs) are ubiquitous and persistent pollutants, and have been detected in a wide variety of media, from soils to aquatic systems. MPs, consisting primarily of polyethylene, polypropylene, and polyacrylamide polymers, have recently been found in 12% of samples of honey collected in Ecuador. Recently, MPs have also been identified in honey bees collected from apiaries in Copenhagen, Denmark, as well as nearby semiurban and rural areas. Given these documented exposures, assessment of their effects is critical for understanding the risks of MP exposure to honey bees. Exposure to polystyrene (PS)-MPs decreased diversity of the honey bee gut microbiota, followed by changes in gene expression related to oxidative damage, detoxification, and immunity. As a result, the aim of this perspective was to investigate whether wide-spread prevalence of MPs might have unintended negative effects on health and fitness of honey bees, as well as to draw the scientific community's attention to the possible risks of MPs to the fitness of honey bees. Several research questions must be answered before MPs can be considered a potential threat to bees.

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  • 34.
    Al Naggar, Yahya
    et al.
    Martin Luther Univ Halle Wittenberg, Inst Biol, Gen Zool, Hoher Weg 8, D-06120 Halle, Germany.;Tanta Univ, Fac Sci, Zool Dept, Tanta 31527, Egypt..
    Sayes, Christie M.
    Baylor Univ, Dept Environm Sci, Waco, TX 76706 USA..
    Collom, Clancy
    Baylor Univ, Dept Environm Sci, Waco, TX 76706 USA..
    Ayorinde, Taiwo
    Baylor Univ, Dept Environm Sci, Waco, TX 76706 USA..
    Qi, Suzhen
    Chinese Acad Agr Sci, Inst Apicultural Res, Beijing 100093, Peoples R China..
    El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences. Menoufia Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Chem, Shibin Al Kawm 32512, Egypt.
    Paxton, Robert J.
    Martin Luther Univ Halle Wittenberg, Inst Biol, Gen Zool, Hoher Weg 8, D-06120 Halle, Germany..
    Wang, Kai
    Chinese Acad Agr Sci, Inst Apicultural Res, Beijing 100093, Peoples R China..
    Chronic Exposure to Polystyrene Microplastic Fragments Has No Effect on Honey Bee Survival, but Reduces Feeding Rate and Body Weight2023In: Toxics, E-ISSN 2305-6304, Vol. 11, no 2, article id 100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microplastics (MPs), in the form of fragments and fibers, were recently found in honey samples collected in Ecuador as well as in honey bees collected from Denmark and China. However, little is known about how MPs impact bee health. To fill this knowledge gap, we investigated the potential toxicity of irregularly shaped polystyrene (PS)-MP fragments on honey bee health. In the first experiment of its kind with honey bees, we chronically exposed bees with a well-established gut microbiome to small (27 ± 17 µm) or large (93 ± 25 µm) PS-MP fragments at varying concentrations (1, 10, 100 µg mL−1) for 14 days. Bee mortality, food consumption, and body weight were all studied. We found that chronic exposure to PS-MP fragments has no effect on honey bee survival, but reduced the feeding rate and body weight, particularly at 10 µg PS-MP fragments per mL, which may have long-term consequences for honey bee health. The findings of this study could assist in the risk assessment of MPs on pollinator health.

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  • 35.
    Alatalo, Rauno V
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology.
    Lundberg, Arne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology.
    Sundberg, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology.
    Can Female Preference Explain Sexual Dichromatism In The Pied Flycatcher, Ficedula-Hypoleuca1990In: Animal Behaviour, ISSN 0003-3472, E-ISSN 1095-8282, Vol. 39, p. 244-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How important female choice is for the evolution of male secondary sexual characteristics is controversial. Two field and one laboratory experiment, using the pied flycatcher, were performed to test the female choice aspect of sexual selection. In addition, non-manipulative data from 5 years are presented. The observational data suggest a slight preference for dark males by females but in field experiments in which males had territories at random sites (i.e. they did not choose a territory) or the colour of concurrently arriving males was altered, there was no preference for darker ones. Similarly, oestradiol-treated females did not prefer black or brown males in the laboratory. Thus, there is little support for the idea that female choice has been an important mechanism in the evolution of sexual dichromatism in the pied flycatcher.

  • 36.
    Aleksija, Neijmane
    et al.
    Statens Veterinärmedicinska Anstalt.
    Jasmine, Stavenow
    Statens Veterinärmedicinska Anstalt.
    Roos, Anna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Kallunki-Nyström, Jonas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Hälsa, sjukdomar och dödsorsaker hos marina däggdjur 2020: Resultat från obduktion och provtagning av marina däggdjur som undersökts på SVA2021Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 37. Alexander, Jodi L.
    et al.
    Oliphant, Andrew
    Wilcockson, David C.
    Brendler-Spaeth, Timothy
    Dircksen, Heinrich
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Functional Morphology.
    Webster, Simon G.
    Pigment dispersing factors and their cognate receptors in a crustacean model, with new insights into distinct neurons and their functions2020In: Frontiers in Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-4548, E-ISSN 1662-453X, Vol. 14, article id 595648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pigment dispersing factors (PDFs, or PDHs in crustaceans) form a structurally related group of neuropeptides found throughout the Ecdysozoa and were first discovered as pigmentary effector hormones in crustaceans. In insects PDFs fulfill crucial neuromodulatory roles, most notably as output regulators of the circadian system, underscoring their central position in physiological and behavioral organization of arthropods. Intriguingly, decapod crustaceans express multiple isoforms of PDH originating from separate genes, yet their differential functions are still to be determined. Here, we functionally define two PDH receptors in the crab Carcinus maenas and show them to be selectively activated by four PDH isoforms: PDHR 43673 was activated by PDH-1 and PDH-2 at low nanomolar doses whilst PDHR 41189 was activated by PDH-3 and an extended 20 residue e-PDH. Detailed examination of the anatomical distribution of all four peptides and their cognate receptors indicate that they likely perform different functions as secreted hormones and/or neuromodulators, with PDH-1 and its receptor 43,673 implicated in an authentic hormonal axis. PDH-2, PDH-3, and e-PDH were limited to non-neurohemal interneuronal sites in the CNS; PDHR 41189 was largely restricted to the nervous system suggesting a neuromodulatory function. Notably PDH-3 and e-PDH were without chromatophore dispersing activity. This is the first report which functionally defines a PDHR in an endocrine system in a crustacean and to indicate this and other putative roles of this physiologically pivotal peptide group in these organisms. Thus, our findings present opportunities to further examine the endocrine and circadian machinery in this important arthropod phylum.

  • 38.
    Alfredsson, Jessica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    INNOVATIVE TOOL-MODIFICATIONS AND TOOL SELECTIVITY IN NEW CALEDONIAN CROWS (CORVUS MONEDULOIDES)2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Tool-use and tool-manufacture are thought to require high cognitive skills and have been considered as an exclusive attribute to primates. Recent observations of New Caledonian crows (NCCs) challenge this assumption. In this study 13 NCCs were tested with two different tool production tasks. The NCC either had to straighten a hook or bend a stick to retrieve food from two different kinds of tree trunks. The result showed that 3/5 birds bent sticks and used them to retrieve food and 1/5 birds straightened hooks to retrieve food. The birds managed to solve both tasks but not the birds in the control group. This indicates that NCC's tool making is a flexible innovative act and not just an innate predisposition to bend flexible material. This finding is interesting given that recent studies on human children show that below 8 years of age children fail in similar innovative tool making tasks.

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  • 39. Ali El Hadi Mohamed, Rania
    et al.
    Abdelgadir, Deena M.
    Bashab, Hind M.
    Al-Shuraym, Laila A.
    Sfouq Aleanizy, Fadilah
    Alqahtani, Fulwah Y.
    Ahmed Al-Keridis, Lamya
    Mohamed, Nahla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Princess Nourah Bint Abdurrahman University.
    First record of West Nile Virus detection inside wild mosquitoes in Khartoum capital of Sudan using PCR2020In: Saudi Journal of Biological Sciences, ISSN 1319-562X, Vol. 27, no 12, p. 3359-3364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to explore the presence of West Nile Virus (WNV) inside four species of mosquitoes: Culex univittatus (Theobald), Culex quinquefasciatus (Say) Aedes vittatus (Bigot) and Aedes vexans (Meigen). Adult wild mosquitoes were collected from different sites: Soba West, Hellat Kuku, Shambat, and Khartoum North Central Live Stock Market (KCLM). Surveys were carried out at Khartoum State during two phases: pre to the rainy season and post to the rainy season. Mosquito specimens were identified using classical keys then preserved at −80 °C freezer for two weeks till the virus examination using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were carried out. WNV has been detected inside the three species of mosquitoes: A. vexans, C. univittatus, and C. quinquefasciatus. The species were collected from Hellat Kuku, (Shambat and Hellat Kuku), and (Shambat and KCLM) respectively. Two species of mosquitoes were positive for the virus: C. quinquefasciatus and C. univittatus. Positive results for the virus during the first phase of the study; males of C. quinquefasciatus and C. univittatus collected during the second phase of the study were also tested for the existence of the virus and they were positive. For our knowledge this study represents first record of WNV inside wild mosquitoes in Sudan. PCR technique provided reliable information because specific primer-probe sets were used for the detection of the virus. Extra studies are required to incriminate these species of mosquitoes as potential vectors of WNV.

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  • 40. ALIPANAH, HELEN
    et al.
    ASSELBERGS, JAN
    MALM, TOBIAS
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    SLAMKA, FRANTIŠEK
    Taxonomic study of the subfamily Pyraustinae (Lepidoptera: Crambidae)in Iran2023In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 5289, no 1, p. 1-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sixty-seven species of the subfamily Pyraustinae from 17 genera and two tribes are listed. Anania verbascalis verbascalis ([Denis & Schiffermüller], 1949) is considered as a senior synonym of A. verbascalis parvalis (Osthelder, 1935) syn. n.; Pyrausta virginalis Duponchel, 1832 as a senior synonym of P. perkeo Amsel, 1970 syn. n.; and P. ferrealis (Hampson, 1900) as a senior synonym of P. euergestalis Amsel, 1954 syn. n. Thirteen species, namely Anania coronata (Hufnagel, 1767), A. murcialis (Ragonot, 1895), A. terrealis (Treitschke, 1829), Pyrausta ferrealis (Hampson, 1900), P. armeniaca Slamka, 2013, P. zeitunalis Caradja, 1916, P. cingulata (Linnaeus, 1758), P. delicatalis Caradja, 1916, P. tatarica Kemal et al., 2020, Loxostege sedakowialis (Eversmann, 1852), L. wagneri Zerny in Wagner, 1929, L. mucosalis (Herrich-Schäffer, 1848) and L. peltaloides (Rebel in Wagner, 1932), are newly reported from Iran. Additionally, a redescription of the male of P. delicatalis and the female of L. sedakowialis, as well as description of the hitherto unknown female of P. delicatalis are presented. The intraspecific variations of the species if present are discussed and additional new diagnostic characters to separate the closely related species are presented. Data on the geographical distribution of the Iranian species of this subfamily are provided.

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  • 41.
    Alipanah, Helen
    et al.
    Iranian Research Institute of Plant Protection (IRIPP).
    Malm, Tobias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Asselbergs, Jan
    A new species of Sitochroa Hübner, 1825 (Lepidoptera, Crambidae, Pyraustinae) from Iran, with taxonomic notes on the genus2020In: Nota lepidopterologica, ISSN 0342-7536, Vol. 43, p. 61-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sitochroa urmiensis sp. nov. is described based on a single male collected in West Azarbaijan Province, Iran. Sitochroa palealis (Denis & Schiffermüller, 1775) is considered as a senior synonym of Loxostege farsalis Amsel, 1950 syn. nov. Loxostege malekalis Amsel, 1950 is transferred to the genus Sitochroa Hübner, as S. malekalis (Amsel, 1950) comb. nov. And the hitherto unknown female of S. malekalis is described and illustrated.

  • 42.
    Allander, Klas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology.
    Sundberg, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology.
    Temporal variation and reliability of blood parasite levels in captive Yellowhammer males Emberiza citrinella1997In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 325-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The temporal variation of blood parasites in captive Yellowhammer males was studied in order to investigate possible costs of parasites. Birds were caught in the wild in early April and kept in aviaries during the study period. Blood samples were taken, body mass measured, and moult was scored twelve times for the same individuals from April to October. Blood parasites were detectable in smears during the whole study period with an intensity peak coinciding with breeding in the wild. Young birds had more parasites and a consistently higher body mass than older birds. There was no relationship between parasite intensity and mass in older birds but possibly one in young birds. Parasites did not seem to affect moult in either age class. Repeatability of parasite counts of smears from the same individual was very high and smears are therefore a reliable method for estimating parasite intensity. We conclude that blood parasites are probably most severe during, but occur in their hosts long after, the breeding season. Possible costs of parasites outside the breeding season require further study.

  • 43. Allen, Derek
    et al.
    Bateman, Mark
    Department of Geography, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
    Buckland, Paul C.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Hartmann, Dan
    Department of Geography, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
    Coope, Russell
    Department of Geological Sciences, Birmingham University, Birmingham, UK.
    Stratigraphy, dates and insect faunas from the Lateglacial site at Barmston, East Yorkshire2023In: The Naturalist, ISSN 0028-0771, Vol. 148, p. 81-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Late Quaternary deposits on the Yorkshire coast southwards from Sewerby Cliff in Bridlington Bay to Dimlington north of Spurn Point (Figs. 1a-1c, p82) have been the subject of stratigraphic and palaeontological research for well over a century (Bateman et al., 2011; Catt, 2007 and references therein, Evans et al., 1995). The region contains the type-site for the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in Britain at Dimlington (Rose, 1985) and extensive outcrops of at least three glacial diamicts, locally the Basement, Skipsea and Withernsea Tills, indicating the dynamic nature of the North Sea ice lobe during the final stages of the British and Irish Icesheet (BIIS). Work by Bateman et al. (2015) indicates that the Skipsea and Withernsea Tills represent icesheets that were present across Holderness for less than 6 ka between 20.9 and 15.1 ka BP before retreating north and east. However, the deglaciation remains insufficiently constrained, with a hiatus between the preserved glacial deposits and the earliest Lateglacial sequences at Gransmoor and Roos Bog (Walker et al., 1993; Beckett, 1981). Organic sediments directly overlying glacial till have been examined at Barmston which provide additional evidence of Lateglacial environments and climate in Holderness. This paper presents fossil insect and chronological evidence from coastal exposures from which climatic reconstructions can be made.

  • 44.
    Alm Bergvall, Ulrika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Svensson, Lisa
    Kjellander, Petter
    Vigilance adjustments in relation to long- and short term risk in wild fallow deer (Dama dama)2016In: Behavioural Processes, ISSN 0376-6357, E-ISSN 1872-8308, Vol. 128, p. 58-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The risk allocation hypothesis predicts that vigilance should be adjusted to the temporal variation in risk. We test this hypothesis in wild fallow deer exposed to short term (disturbance) and long term (presence of a fawn after parturition) changes in risk. We recorded the proportion, frequency and type of vigilance and size of used area before and after parturition, in GPS-collared wild female fallow deer. Vigilance was divided in two main groups: non-grazing vigilance and grazing vigilance. The latter group was divided into grazing vigilance while chewing and a grazing vigilance when chewing was interrupted. By recording external disturbance in form of passing cars, we were able to investigate if this altered the amount, and type of vigilance. We found that females increased the proportion and frequency of grazing vigilance stop chewing after parturition. The grazing vigilance chewing was unaffected, but non-grazing vigilance decreased. Disturbance increased the proportion grazing vigilance stop chewing to the same extent before and after parturition. We found a clear decrease in female home range size after parturition as a possible behavioural adjustment. The increase in grazing vigilance stop chewing after parturition is a rarely described but expected cost of reproduction.

  • 45.
    Almbro, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Ethology.
    Kullberg, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Ethology.
    Impaired escape flight ability in butterflies due to low flight muscle ratio prior to hibernation2008In: Journal of Experimental Biology, ISSN 0022-0949, E-ISSN 1477-9145, Vol. 211, no 1, p. 24-28Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Almbro, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Kullberg, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Weight Loading and Reproductive Status Affect the Flight Performance of Pieris napi Butterflies2012In: Journal of insect behavior, ISSN 0892-7553, E-ISSN 1572-8889, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 441-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Weight-induced mobility reductions can have dramatic fitness consequences and winged animals are especially sensitive to the trade-off between mass and locomotion. Data on how natural weight fluctuations influence a flying insect's ability to take off are scarce. We therefore quantified take-off flight ability in Pieris napi butterflies in relation to reproductive status. Take-off flight ability (velocity and take-off angle) under suboptimal temperature conditions was recorded with a 3D-tracking camera system and was predicted to decrease with relatively larger weight loads. Our results show that relatively larger weight loads generally reduce flight speed in male butterflies and lower take-off angles in females. However, despite having a lower wing loading, mated male butterflies flew slower than unmated males. Our study suggests that retention of weight loads associated with reproduction impairs insect flight performance.

  • 47. Alstrom, Per
    et al.
    Rasmussen, Pamela C.
    Sangster, George
    Dalvi, Shashank
    Round, Philip D.
    Zhang, Ruiying
    Yao, Cheng-Te
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Le Manh, Hung
    Lei, Fumin
    Olsson, Urban
    Multiple species within the Striated Prinia Prinia crinigera-Brown Prinia P. polychroa complex revealed through an integrative taxonomic approach2019In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, p. 1-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We re-evaluated the taxonomy of the Striated Prinia Prinia crinigera-Brown Prinia P. polychroa complex using molecular, morphological and vocal analyses. The extensive seasonal, sexual, age-related, geographical and taxon-specific variation in this complex has never before been adequately studied. As no previous genetic or vocal analyses have focused on this group, misinterpretation of taxonomic signals from limited conventional morphological study alone was likely. Using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, we found that P. crinigera sensu lato (s.l.) comprises two non-sister groups of taxa (Himalayan crinigera and Chinese striata groups) that differ substantially morphologically and vocally and that are broadly sympatric in Yunnan Province, China. Prinia polychroa cooki (Myanmar) and P. p. rocki (southern Vietnam) are each morphologically, vocally and genetically distinct. Thai, Cambodian and Laotian populations formerly ascribed to P. p. cooki are morphologically and vocally most similar to and most closely related to Javan P. p. polychroa, and require a new name, proposed here. Prinia p. bangsi of Yunnan is part of the crinigera group rather than of P. polychroa, and hence there is no evidence for sympatry between P. polychroa s.l. and P. crinigera s.l., nor of the occurrence of P. polychroa in mainland China or Taiwan. We recommend the recognition of five species in the complex, with the following suggestions for new English names: Himalayan Prinia P. crinigera sensu stricto (s.s.; with subspecies striatula, crinigera, yunnanensis and bangsi); Chinese Prinia P. striata (subspecies catharia, parumstriata and striata); Burmese Prinia P. cooki (monotypic); Annam Prinia P. rocki (monotypic) and Deignan’s Prinia P. polychroa s.s. (subspecies Javan polychroa and the new Southeast Asian taxon). This study underlines the importance of using multiple datasets for the elucidation of diversity of cryptic bird species and their evolutionary history and biogeography.

  • 48. Alström, Per
    et al.
    Cibois, Alice
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Fuchs, Jerome
    The worldwide expansion of ‘higher’ passerines, and some ancient, relictual lineages2020In: The Largest Avian Radiation: The Evolution of Perching Birds, or the Order Passeriformes / [ed] Fjeldså, J., Christidis, L., Ericson, P.G.P., Barcelona: Lynx Edicions , 2020Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Swedish Species Informat Ctr, Box 7007, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.;Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China..
    Cibois, Alice
    Nat Hist Museum Geneva, Dept Mammal & Ornithol, CP 6434, CH-1211 Geneva 6, Switzerland..
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Bioinformat & Genet, POB 50007, SE-10405 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zuccon, Dario
    UMS MNHN CNRS 2700 Outils & Methodes Systemat Int, CP 51,57 Rue Cuvier, F-75231 Paris 05, France.;Sorbonne Univ, Museum Natl Hist Nat, UMR7205,EPHE, Inst Systemat,Evolut,Biodiversite,CNRS,MNHN,UPMC, CP 51,57 Rue Cuvier, F-75231 Paris 05, France..
    Gelang, Magnus
    Gothenburg Nat Hist Museum, Box 7283, S-40235 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Fjeldsa, Jon
    Nat Hist Museum Denmark, Zool Museum, Ctr Macroecol Evolut & Climate, Univ Pk 15, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Andersen, Michael
    Univ New Mexico, Dept Biol, Albuquerque, NM 87131 USA.;Univ New Mexico, Museum Southwestern Biol, Albuquerque, NM 87131 USA..
    Moyle, Robert
    Univ Kansas, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, Lawrence, KS 66045 USA.;Univ Kansas, Biodivers Inst, Lawrence, KS 66045 USA..
    Pasquet, Eric
    UMS MNHN CNRS 2700 Outils & Methodes Systemat Int, CP 51,57 Rue Cuvier, F-75231 Paris 05, France.;Sorbonne Univ, Museum Natl Hist Nat, UMR7205,EPHE, Inst Systemat,Evolut,Biodiversite,CNRS,MNHN,UPMC, CP 51,57 Rue Cuvier, F-75231 Paris 05, France..
    Olsson, Urban
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci Systemat & Biodivers, Box 463, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Comprehensive molecular phylogeny of the grassbirds and allies (Locustellidae) reveals extensive non-monophyly of traditional genera, and a proposal for a new classification2018In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 127, p. 367-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The widespread Old World avian family Locustellidae ('grassbirds and allies') comprises 62 extant species in 11 genera. In the present study, we used one mitochondrial and, for most species, four nuclear loci to infer the phylogeny of this family. We analysed 59 species, including the five previously unsampled genera plus two genera that had not before been analysed in a densely sampled dataset. This study revealed extensive disagreement with current taxonomy; the genera Bradypterus, Locustella, Megalurus, Megalurulus and Schoenicola were all found to be non-monophyletic. Non-monophyly was particularly pronounced for Megalurus, which was widely scattered across the tree. Three of the five monotypic genera (Amphilais, Buettikoferella and Malia) were nested within other genera; one monotypic genus (Chaetornis) formed a Glade with one of the two species of Schoenicola; whereas the position of the fifth monotypic genus (Elaphrornis) was unresolved. Robsonius was confirmed as sister to the other genera. We propose a phylogenetically informed revision of genus-level taxonomy, including one new generic name. Finally, we highlight several non-monophyletic species complexes and deep intra-species divergences that point to conflict in taxonomy and suggest an underestimation of current species diversity in this group.

  • 50.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    de Juana, Eduardo
    Donald, Paul F.
    Suárez, Francisco
    Mediterranean Short-toed Lark (Alaudala rufescens)2023Other (Other academic)
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