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  • 1.
    Abdlbari, Abdulbari
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Product registration in e-commerce for small and medium companies (SMEs): Usability aspects2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    People these days are able to buy almost anything online. With a continuously increased E-commerce, small and medium sized companies (SMEs) feel obligated to enter the competitive E-commerce market. Moreover, for small companies with little or no experience in e-commerce it could become overwhelming to get a web-shop up and running. One important tasks in managing a web-shop is to register products into the system. This must be easy and efficient. The focus of this thesis is to answer the question "How can user-centered design principles improve productregistration, particularly in the SME context?". At the start of this study, surveys and interviews were conducted, which showed that product registration is very time consuming at the moment. User tests were conducted to measure the efficiency and the general usability of a system maintaining over 100 active web-shops. Based on the results of the first iteration of the user test conducted, design changes were proposed and implemented. A second iteration of the user test showed improved efficiency and substantially less errors. The most important new design elements were related to navigation, workflow and adjustment of input fields to the data sources. Thus it has been shown that the threshold for SME web-shops to go online can be lowered by a systematic application of user-centered design of the user interface.

  • 2.
    Agadagba, Efeoghene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    The Social Network of Changing Your Mind: 2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    We  are increasingly turn to social media for our news consumption two related media phenomenon that influence media consumption are the “Echo chamber” and “Filter Bubble”. Echo chamber this the phenomenon that we tend to have conversation only with those that has the same likeminded as we do while Filter bubble is created by Social media and information retrieval technology that tends to priorities showing us things it already know we like.

    The aim of this thesis is to suggest design solution for social media that may counter the effect of “Echo chamber” and “Filter Bubble”. The precise method used on this thesis is play centric design method and both intermediate and final evaluations were done through qualitative evaluation.

    At the end a design solution of Viewlette game were presented. It can be concluded that the suggested design solution may have the tendency to counter the effect of Filter bubble and Echo chamber on social networking site by enabling people that has conflicting points of view to still listen to each other and understand an argument from different perspective.

  • 3.
    Agaeus, Catharina
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Sociala kognitiva arbetsmiljöproblem (SKAMP) inom datorstött samarbete2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Delar av dagens samhälle fortsätter att datoriseras och nya möjligheter för interaktion med datoriserade produkter som stödjer social interaktion introduceras i ökad takt. Själva grunden för hur organisationer ser ut förändras och pekar mot ett allt mer distribuerat sätt där människor kan interagera med varandra utan att vara på samma plats, vid samma tidpunkt. Samtidigt visar forskning att det finns brister i användbarhet hos gruppverktyg. Kognitiva arbetsmiljöproblem (KAMP) kan uppstå när användbarhet brister men har hittills främst studerats ur ett enanvändarperspektiv. Syftet med den här rapporten är att identifiera samt klassificera socio-kognitiva arbetsmiljöproblem (SKAMP) inom datorstött samarbete för att bidra med kunskap som i förlängningen kan leda till en tydligare förståelse kring SKAMP. En arbetsplatsstudie utfördes där distribuerad kognition användes som analysverktyg. Studien genomfördes på en avdelning inom en organisation där förutsättningarna för att finna SKAMP ansågs som gynnsamma. Genom att anta ett distribuerat synsätt där observationer av avbrott och ”mismatches” i informationsflödet beaktats samt hur kognitiva processer implementeras i en grupp mynnade det analyserade materialet ut i fem kategorier av SKAMP: Problem med informationskoordinering, ”Bristande kommunikation”, ”gemensam lägesbildsaknas”, ”Brister i medierad kommunikation”, ”Otillräcklig kontroll och överblick”och ”Oklar holistisk helhetsmodell”. Dessa skall ses som komplement till de redan idag identifierade KAMP.

  • 4. Agardh, Johannes
    et al.
    Johansson, Martin
    Pettersson, Mårten
    Designing Future Interaction with Today's Technology1999Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Information Technology has an increasing part of our lives. In this thesis we will discuss how technology can relate to humans and human activity. We take our standing point in concepts like Calm Technology and Tacit Interaction and examine how these visions and concepts can be used in the process of designing an artifact for a real work practice. We have done work-place studies of truck-drivers and traffic leaders regarding how they find their way to the right addresses and design a truck navigation system that aims to suit the truck drivers work practice.

  • 5.
    Ahlberg, Petter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    IKT-användning i undervisningen i ämnet Idrott och hälsa2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 6.
    Akmanlar, Elif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Creating personas from online discussion logs: Case study: Bitcoin users2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Personas are useful design tools that are used for improving the quality of the design and they can be created with the help of various user research methods. However, it is hard for designers to reach out the relevant group of users. Also, it is time and effort consuming to set the interviews & observations with the users and pull the precise information from the gathered data.

    Moreover, users can recall a limited amount of their memories when they are asked unless they are keeping a diary. This study aims to suggest an alternative user research method by figuring out if the online discussions are capable of supplying the necessary information which will be the basis for the Persona. As a result, a set of procedural steps are designed for analyzing the online discussion content and it is implemented to a case where the community is trying to develop the Bitcoin technology and its usage.

    It appeared that discussion logs are such a rich source of information which covers the necessary input for Personas. Finally, Bitcoin users are segmented and five vivid Personas are created.

  • 7.
    Alklind Taylor, Anna-Sofia
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    The active instructor: Benefits and barriers to instructor-led serious gaming2015In: VS-Games 2015: 7th International Conference on Games and Virtual Worlds for Serious Applications, IEEE conference proceedings, 2015, 8-15 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While there is a wealth of studies on the subject of serious games, the same cannot be said on the issue of teaching with games, especially in game-based learning settings with adult learners. Over the years, most research in this area has been focused on the ‘active substance(s)’ of games for learning, focusing mainly on characteristics of games, but often failing to take the whole context of game-based learning into consideration, such as the role(s) of the teacher. However, the past two or three years has seen a shift in focus from merely the game as an isolated artefact, to also include more discussions on how games can successfully be integrated into an educational setting, as well as challenges as pitfalls of which instructors need to be aware. This paper aims to outline the contemporary research on instructor-led serious gaming and its implications for the design of serious gaming environments.

  • 8. Allahyari, Hiva
    et al.
    Lavesson, Niklas
    User-oriented Assessment of Classification Model Understandability2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reviews methods for evaluating and analyzing the understandability of classification models in the context of data mining. The motivation for this study is the fact that the majority of previous work has focused on increasing the accuracy of models, ignoring user-oriented properties such as comprehensibility and understandability. Approaches for analyzing the understandability of data mining models have been discussed on two different levels: one is regarding the type of the models’ presentation and the other is considering the structure of the models. In this study, we present a summary of existing assumptions regarding both approaches followed by an empirical work to examine the understandability from the user’s point of view through a survey. The results indicate that decision tree models are more understandable than rule-based models. Using the survey results regarding understandability of a number of models in conjunction with quantitative measurements of the complexity of the models, we are able to establish correlation between complexity and understandability of the models.

  • 9.
    Allodi Westling, Mara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Linikko, Jari
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Learning technologies and special educational needs: a liiterature review of empirical research2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning technologies are used in educational settings as tools to communicate, design learning environments, and stimulate learning processes. Many of these tools are applied in the field of special educational needs.  We have identified several types of applications that have been reported in scientific international journals as technology-enhanced learning, augmentative and alternative communication, computer-assisted instruction,  interventions with computer-based games, multi-user virtual environment  (as virtual case, visualization and simulation activities), web-based inquiry learning, computer-supported collaborative learning, application software, digital literacy, learning platforms, e- learning and mobile learning. These developments in the field of learning technologies should be introduced in teacher training and in particular in special needs education training, since several of these technologies may be momentous in improving education for students with learning disabilities.  This study wants to contribute to synthesize the research in these subjects in order to disseminate knowledge and in order to stimulate to further research in this field in  teacher training. In fact, despite the rapid growth of technological applications in the Swedish schools, where many students have access to an own PC, the contents of the teacher programs are always adapted to the new, technology-enhanced educational conditions that are nowadays common in the schools. A literature review of research is valuable also to investigate which evidence that is available for the efficacy of various methods.  The literature review aim is to encourage a scientific approach on these matters, which means also a rigorous scrutiny of results. Besides the risk connected to a lack of knowledge, in fact, there is also the risk that commercial interests and marketing will influence investments in the educational sector, to a greater extent than research evidence. A comprehensive theoretical framework for the literature review has been Universal Design for Learning (Rose & Gravel, 2010, CUDE, 2012). Under this concept different didactic approaches fit that offer multiple means of representation and communication, using a variety of resources for activities and expression, and create numerous ways of engagement. ULD is based on principles that are fundamental for all learning and teaching activities. It provides the opportunity to explore a wide range of possibilities and processes related to the theme of inclusive education (inclusion) that strives for objectives of an equal education and to reduce barriers to learning. The aims are to investigate a) which  learning technologies have been developed and are reported in research; b) which theoretical models and concepts are employed in empirical studies of learning technologies and special educational needs; c) to make a mapping of the contents of the field; d) to make a synthesis of research results within a specific area e) to develop a database of research literature to identify questions and issues for future research (interventions, replication of quasi-experimental studies).

    The study has followed the recommended approach for systematic reviews (CRD, 2009, Gough, Oliver, & Thomas, 2012; Roberts & Petticrew, 2006, SBU, 2011). The searches were conducted mainly in databases that collect suitable Journals on special educational needs and learning technologies (EBSCO, Scopus) during the autumn 2012. Other databases at universities, research institutes, national and international authorities were also searched (e.g. OECD, EPPI, EIPPEE, European Agency for Special Needs Education, The Swedish National Agency for Education, Becta). The reference found was exported to an online database established in RefWorks (2012). A title- and abstract review of about 1300 references were performed according to a protocol. Required inclusion criteria concern population, educational context, special educational needs content, type of technology application, language and availability. The included references were sorted and reviewed in full text. The protocol for the full text review include: methods, subjects, type of special educational needs, relevance for the local educational context, quality. The literature review will map the existent research that is relevant for the special educational needs field and will synthesize the research conducted within a more specific area. Possible candidates are: a) serious games for numeracy, prevention of reading difficulties, training of working memory; b) virtual simulations. We expect that the results of the literature review willl be taken into account in teacher training and special educational needs training

  • 10.
    Almberg, Wah-Sui
    et al.
    Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University.
    Kjellin, Harald
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Reusing patterns for indexing and communicating knowledge and insight2011In: International Journal of Computer Information Systems and Industrial Management Applications, ISSN 2150-7988, Vol. 3, 530-538 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analogies can be used in most areas of human communication to highlight points of special interest. The creation of specific, specialised patterns, examples, or analogies for facilitating communication is resource-consuming. We therefore hypothesize that there are universal patterns that can be used and reused more economically, compared to specialised patterns, for indexing and communicating knowledge. We have conducted empirical tests with altogether 204 students, each one of whom was given 20 minutes to solve problems from six different scientific areas. The results of our tests show clearly an improvement of their problem solving skill when universal patterns were employed as cognitive aids. The average result of the test group that used universal patterns was 81 per cent higher than that of the control group.

  • 11.
    Almgren, Susanne
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Lunds universitet.
    Deltagande användare - i princip och praktik2016In: Människorna, medierna & marknaden: Medieutredningens forskningsantologi om en demokrati i förändring, Stockholm: Fritzes, 2016, 377-401 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Anderson, Karen
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Borglund, Erik AM
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Samuelsson, Göran
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Mature Public e-Services Without Mature Recordkeeping – An Impossibility?2010In: iRMA Information and Records Management Annual, ISSN 1836-3202, 71-82 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish Government has established the eGovernment Delegation agency to identify and support excellence in e-government implementation strategies. This agency has commenced working with the National Archives, to ensure that archival requirements are addressed when developing new e-services. However, the prevailing view of archives is a traditional curatorial approach, which focuses on capturing the end product once actions have been completed. In the digital environment, the prevailing archival practice frameworks are not adequate to the task of capturing the full digital context and process that is essential for a complete record. Previously, when paper records were aggregated on a physical file, the full record of processes was more likely to be captured and managed for the long term.

    Results from two empirical case studies will be used to present and illustrate the risks and problems generated by an approach where the records are not identified and captured until late in the business process. In this paper the term post hoc approach to records capture is used to describe the method whereby an attempt is made to capture records, including the necessary metadata, after they are created, without prior planning or system design. One of the Swedish eGovernment Delegation’s aims is to motivate public agencies to reach level four on Layne and Lee’s e-government maturity model, that is, full integration of interaction between agencies and citizens. However, the model does not incorporate any recordkeeping requirements in its maturity benchmarks. It is clear these kinds of e-services are so complex that late intervention by archivists will not be adequate for needed recordkeeping support and long-term preservation. So it is essential that guidance on archival preservation of integrated e-services is made available as soon as possible, particularly as current trends in government indicate that e-services will be outsourced to private providers.

    Strategies are proposed for including recordkeeping re- quirements in e-service models. Advantageously, this can be done using existing benchmarking tools such as GARP, ISO 15489, ISO 30301 and the ICA Principles and Functional Requirements for Records In Electronic Office Environments. 

  • 13.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro University, Orebro University School of Business, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Islam, M. Sirajul
    Örebro University, Orebro University School of Business, Örebro University, Sweden.
    From one-to-one to integration of multiple toolsIn: Research in Learning Technology, ISSN 2156-7069, E-ISSN 2156-7077Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14. Andersson, Björn
    et al.
    Rouchy, Philippe
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Department of Business Administration and Social Science.
    Natural Seriousness in Learning2001Other (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Andersson, Mats
    et al.
    KTH.
    Persson, Christian
    Høgskolen i Gjøvik, Norway.
    Meeting the users’ need for knowledge:  A concept of a learning domain2005In: Allestädes närvarande kunskap: Doktorsavhandling i Medieteknik och grafisk produktion, Stockholm: KTH Datavetenskap och kommunikation , 2005, 185-200 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In everyday life, many people use the web as a resource for knowledge. In this paper we are investigating the preconditions for a web resource called learning domain. The characteristics of the web resource learning domain can contribute to a reduction of well-known problems with structuring the content in a communicative way and also to contribute to an increased trust of the presented information. In the paper the characteristics of learning domains are described and some examples of web sites with characteristics contiguous to that of a learning domain are discussed. Our conclusions are that web resources with learning domain characteristics can contribute as a knowledge support. The challenge related to learning domains is not a technological one but instead how to arrange the information in such a way that it makes sense for the users.

  • 16.
    Andersson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Teaching and Learning (UPC).
    Nordic knowledge on the web2013In: Reformation, revolution, evolution: universitetslärandet ur ett tidsperspektiv / [ed] Erik Lindenius, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2013, 173-173 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Angulo, Julio
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Centre for HumanIT. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School.
    Designing for Usable Privacy and Transparency in Digital Transactions2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    People engage with multiple online services and carry out a range of different digital transactions with these services. Registering an account, sharing content in social networks, or requesting products or services online are a few examples of such digital transactions. With every transaction, people take decisions and make disclosures of personal data. Despite the possible benefits of collecting data about a person or a group of people, massive collection and aggregation of personal data carries a series of privacy and security implications which can ultimately result in a threat to people's dignity, their finances, and many other aspects of their lives. For this reason, privacy and transparency enhancing technologies are being developed to help people protect their privacy and personal data online. However, some of these technologies are usually hard to understand, difficult to use, and get in the way of people's momentary goals.

    The objective of this thesis is to explore, and iteratively improve, the usability and user experience provided by novel privacy and transparency technologies. To this end, it compiles a series of case studies that address identified issues of usable privacy and transparency at four stages of a digital transaction, namely the information, agreement, fulfilment and after-sales stages. These studies contribute with a better understanding of the human-factors and design requirements that are necessary for creating user-friendly tools that can help people to protect their privacy and to control their personal information on the Internet.

  • 18.
    Anrin, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Det måste vara intressant!: En kvalitativ studie om fritidspedagogers villkor kring att arbeta med IKT.2016Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna uppsats har varit att undersöka villkoren för fritidspedagoger att arbeta med informations- och kommunikationsteknik (nedan förkortat IKT) på fritidshemmet med hjälp av en kvalitativ metod (intervjuer). Det teoretiska perspektiv som studien utgått ifrån är fenomenologi, och därav blev resultatet av min uppsats tre livsvärldar inom IKT som informanterna i studien konstruerade. Dessa tre livsvärldar blev motivation, förutsättningar och kunskap. De informanter som konstruerat dessa livsvärldar är 4 fritidspedagoger och 3 personer som har IKT-ansvar som en del av sina arbetsdagar. Resultatet visade att de tre kategorierna gick in i varandra, men tyngdpunkten låg ändå i kategorin motivation. Fritidspedagogers arbete med IKT är beroende av hur pass motiverade och drivna de är som pedagoger kring just fenomenet IKT. Att vissa förutsättningar saknas, som till exempel planeringstid eller kunskaper kring området, påverkar också i hur stor utsträckning pedagoger använder IKT. Slutsatsen blir därför att användandet av IKT på fritidshem beror dels på hur motiverade fritidspedagogerna är kring att söka kunskap och arbeta med IKT, dels på hur starkt motiverad ledningen på skolorna är med att arbeta med IKT. Det vill säga hur pass motiverade de olika yrkeskategorierna inom skolan är för att ge bra förutsättningar till fritidspedagoger för att kunna arbeta med IKT.

  • 19.
    Appelgren, Ester
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Från kontroll till en illusion av interaktivitet: Datajournalistik som grävande arbetsmetod2016In: Nordicom Information, ISSN 0349-5949, Vol. 38, no 2, 58-61 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Datajournalistik som grävande arbetsmetod resulterar ofta i att journalistiska vinklar visualiseras i form av mönster eller specifika samband med hjälp av digitala medieformer. Här möts två tidigare åtskilda kulturer då journalistiska arbetsmetoder kombineras med tekniska arbetsmetoder. För att skapa en berättelse får journalister förtroende att fatta beslut åt publiken, i publikens intresse, medan en ingenjör istället kan bli anklagad för att fatta paternalistiska beslut över huvudet på människor. Med utgångspunkt från aktuell nordisk datajournalistik diskuteras i denna artikel därför vad som händer när just dessa två kulturer möts, i termer av beslutsfattande åt publiken, i publikens intresse.

  • 20.
    Appelgren, Ester
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola.
    Leckner, Sara
    Malmö högskola.
    Mejtoft, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    The media consumers' conscious and unconscious choices: a key to understanding the news media consumption of tomorrow2014In: Communication électronique, cultures et identités: actes du colloque international organisé au Havre les 11, 12 et 13 juin 2014, Editions Klog , 2014, 521-528 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The digital society of today is dramatically different than that of a decade ago. During the past decades computers have gone from being clearly visible and at the center of attention to becoming an integrated and omnipresent part of our everyday lives. Today, individuals are catching up on a reality where homes, workplaces and society to a large extent consist of microprocessors that collect, analyze and present information. With regards to news and information sharing, it may seem that the users, thanks to greater ability to choose content, hold the upper hand in this process. However, since these data are constantly collected and analyzed for various purposes by companies, for example in the media industry, the users’ choices may not be as unconditional as they may think they are.Using the Swedish media market as an example, this exploratory paper discusses the interdependency between people’s choices and the market-driven choices made by the media industry in relation to news, and the impact these choices may have on media consumption and the media market.

  • 21.
    Appelgren, Ester
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola.
    Sara, Leckner
    Malmö högskola.
    Mejtoft, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Mediekonsumentens medvetna och omedvetna val: en nyckel till morgondagens mediekonsumtion2014In: Medie-Sverige: statistik och analys. 2014 / [ed] Ulla Carlsson & Ulrika Facht, Göteborg: Nordicom, 2014, 29-37 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22. Appelquist, Joakim
    et al.
    Ekelin, Annelie
    Jila, Florian
    Hallqvist, Klas
    SMILE Revisited2003Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    SMILE Revisited beskriver utvecklingen, införandet och avvecklingen av ett system för mobilt stöd för hemtjänsten. Systemet analyseras dels ur ett ekonomiskt perspektiv, dels ur ett arbetsvetenskapligt perspektiv.

  • 23. Arkenson, Caroline
    et al.
    Chou, Y. -Y
    Huang, C. -Y
    Lee, Y. -C
    Tag and seek a location-based game in tainan city2014In: CHI PLAY 2014 - Proceedings of the 2014 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, 315-318 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tag and Seek is a location-based game which leads a traveler through Tainan City in Taiwan. The traveler's task is to find Harry's friends who are hiding at different sites in the city. Once at the site, the traveler has to scan a Near Field Communication (NFC) tag placed on a board looking like Harry's friend. When the NFC tag is scanned the lost friend is found, information about the site is presented and instructions to the next site will be available. The game lets the traveler experience culture, gain knowledge about sites in the city and meet local citizens - without the traveler having to plan the trip ahead. By implementing NFC technology as check points the interaction with the game differs from regular tourist guides and the threat of privacy which comes with location-based services is greatly lowered as the traveler is not being tracked by GPS. From our user evaluation we found that both the interface and interaction with the boards could use some improvements to increase the usability.

  • 24.
    Artman, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    House, David
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Hulten, Magnus
    Linköpings universitet.
    Designed by Engineers: An analysis of interactionaries with engineering students2015In: Designs for Learning, ISSN 1654-7608, Vol. 7, no 2, 28-56 p., 10.2478/dfl-2014-0062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to describe and analyze learning taking place in a collaborative design exercise involving engineering students. The students perform a time-constrained, open-ended, complex interaction design task, an “interactionary”. A multimodal learning perspective is used. We have performed detailed analyses of video recordings of the engineering students, including classifying aspects of interaction. Our results show that the engineering students carry out and articulate their design work using a technology-centred approach and focus more on the function of their designs than on aspects of interaction. The engineering students mainly make use of ephemeral communication strategies (gestures and speech) rather than sketching in physical materials. We conclude that the interactionary may be an educational format that can help engineering students learn the messiness of design work. We further identify several constraints to the engineering students’ design learning and propose useful interventions that a teacher could make during an interactionary. We especially emphasize interventions that help engineering students retain aspects of human-centered design throughout the design process. This study partially replicates a previous study which involved interaction design students.

  • 25.
    Artman, Henrik
    et al.
    Operativa institutionen, Försvarshögskolan, Department of Operational Studies, Swedish National Defence College.
    Persson, Mats
    Operativa institutionen, Försvarshögskolan, Department of Operational Studies, Swedish National Defence College.
    Old Practices – New Technology: Observation of how established practices meet new technology2000In: Designing Cooperative Systems: The Use of Theories and Models- Proc. of the 5th Int. Conf. on the Design of Coop. Syst. (COOP’2000) / [ed] Dieng-Kuntz, R., Giboin, A., Karsenty, L., De Michelis, G., Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2000, Vol. 58, 35-49 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most technology for command and control units is developed from top-down visions and models of an ideal team and technology fit. Such models seldom pay attention to social and historical practises. In Sweden there is a futuristic command and control post under development. The system is intended for civilian and military handling of crises. In spring 1999, a training session was carried out in an elaborated virtual environment. The session was video recorded. In this paper we present and discuss our observations from this session. We have especially focused on the team organisation and use of technology from a bottom-up perspective. As we suspected we found a clash between old practices and what new technology affords. We describe our observations and discuss them in connection to how the system is coupled to external units. One main conclusion is that the team members seem to be more coupled to their subordinate units than to the command and control team.

  • 26.
    Artman, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Tholander, Jakob
    Klas, Karlgren
    Rollen hos representationer och agerande inom interaktionsdesign2014In: Resultatdialog, Vetenskapsrådet , 2014, , 8 p.156-163 p.Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Arvola, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karsvall, Arvid
    Södertörns Högskola, Institutionen för kommunikation, medier och IT, Medieteknik.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholms universitet, Mobile Life.
    Values and qualities in interaction design meetings2011In: The Endless End: The 9th International European Academy of Design Conference. Porto, Portugal, May 4-7, 2011., 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How are values and qualities expressed in interaction design? Previous research into this topic has largely been conceptual. How interaction designers and clients actually reason has only been touched upon in empirical studies. The research question for this paper is how interaction designers, as a collective and in an unfolding design process, concretize values and qualities in meetings with clients. By way of video recordings, we have analyzed two interaction design workshops. The analysis indicated that values were concretized top-down, from general conceptions and the design brief given, while also explored bottom-up. Several kinds of communicative means (e.g. talk, gestures, whiteboards, post-it notes) were used to animate values and design visions. Mixing a top-down and bottom-up approach allowed the designers to be both prescriptive and sensitive the uniqueness of the design situation. Thedifferences in communicative means did not really matter for how values and qualities weremade concrete. What mattered was that people really started talking with each other.

  • 28.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Social Media as Informal Public Spheres2012In: Creating and applying socially, ethically and professionally acceptable ICT systems: Current challenges and what is next? / [ed] Diane Whitehouse, 2012, 3- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Do social media generate social capital beyond borders between the real and virtual spaces? If so, how do social media function in forming and maintaining social capital? From the beginning of 2011, a huge number of people have seen political turmoil stimulated by use of social media and felt the inner stirrings of people’s cooperative networks via social media. Thus, some people strongly stressed that social media has a great power to change authoritarian regimes from the global political issues perspective. On the other hand, we recognized how social media worked effectively from the local issues perspective, for example in the case of the massive disaster in Japan. Existing media such as TV and newspapers didn’t work well, the Japanese got and exchanged information through social media and in fact some victims were rescued based on information via social media. Both cases, political changes and massive disasters, show information transaction process has been supported by thin trust, generalized reciprocity and loosely tied people’s network, regardless of geographical borders or real/virtual spaces. And some users opened their opinions about governments’ policies or their discontent with the government through social media and discuss with others online. Through this discussing process, it seems that social media plays an important role in fostering a social network leading to social capital. This study reconsiders characteristics of social capital and its role in improving people’s lives through social media. It also examines how social media affects social capital processes, by giving a few examples of using social media under critical social situations.

  • 29.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    New form of social ties through communicating in social media (Sosharu media ga tukuru atarashii kizuna no katachi)2012In: Information and Management  64th Conferenceedings Spring / [ed] Japan Society for Information and Management, 2012, 141-144 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Social media as a tool for change2011In: The social impact of social computing / [ed] A. Bisset et al., Sheffield, UK: Sheffield Hallam University , 2011, 44-50 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Social Media Supporting Democratic Dialogue2013In: Ambiguous Technologies: Philosophical Issues, Practical Solutions, Human Nature, Lisbon: Autónoma University , 2013, 36-43 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term of “social media” appears in newspapers and magazines everyday and the huge number of people use social media actively in daily life. Nowadays, in the highly Information and Communication Technology (ICT) developed country Japan, Japanese people enroll in social media and evolve a new way of communicating with others based on the “virtual” social distance between them. Among social media, Twitter has been focusing on its strong power as the tool for political change recent years. While Twitter has of-expressed problems as well as the “traditional” social media, it is characterized by the limited number of characters, strong propagation and optional reciprocity. Those characteristics stimulate people’s communication online and bring about opportunities for social interaction and democratic dialogue. On the other hand, in the deluge of information, we need to nurture skills to utilize critical and rational way of thinking through dialogue not only between others also between themselves internally. This study explores characteristics of social media and differences between “traditional” social media and Twitter, and how the difference affects people’s information behavior in Japan.

  • 32.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Rethinking ICT's contribution to sustainability and education2012In: New technologies, education for sustainable development and critical pedagogy / [ed] Vassilios Makrakis and Nelly Kostoulas-Makrakis, Rethymnon, Greece: ICTeESD, University of Crete , 2012, 232-235 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The open education system based on Information and communication technology (ICT) can provide great opportunities for people to learn regardless of resident area, language, gender, age and so on. Currently people use it actively and build up new social networks as learning communities or study groups on the Internet. Shared knowledge and the process of sharing knowledge established through online communication are considered as key elements in the context of strengthen the individual and the country. In other words, creating the open education platform and content plays a role of designing a culture and society. However, it is not easy to realize the ideal concept of “open education” because people have many differences in language, culture, political system, ideology, thought, deployment of ICT et cetera. In order to create the open education system, which has a high degree of usability and effectiveness, we need to closely examine social roles and difficulties of the ICT-based education system in designing sustainable societies. And also the ICT-based educational system is established through the continuous human-computer interaction. Therefore, all participants get involved with developing the open education and each of them assumes a responsibility for making the open educational contents more abundant.

  • 33.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Regulation of potentially harmful contents on minors2012In: Equity, integrity and beauty in information law and ethics / [ed] Maria Botti, Kerkyra, Greece: Ionian Academy , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In democratic societies, freedom of expression is the indispensable right and duty of citizens. Although there are a few exceptions, it is generally considered that governments should not intervene and regulate this right. Both in digital and analog environments, sexual and violent descriptions are usually regulated by self-censorship of participants. However, trying to protect minors from potentially harmful contents by controlling and regulating them is very difficult. The definition of what is “potentially harmful contents on minors” varies depending on the values and on the culture of each social group. Moreover, along with the rapid spread of mobile phones and smartphones, it becomes more difficult for parents and teachers to control children’s access to harmful contents; something that might have been easier regarding the use of personal computers. Access to the Internet provides huge opportunities not only of visiting websites but also of participating in online communication such as Social Networking Service (SNS). An incredible surge of SNS evokes some issues in considering juvenile access to SNS, categorized roughly into three types. One is the very old and new problem in accessing the Internet, which is how to shield minors from harmful contents. Second is how to block inappropriate contact with a pedophile. Third is cyber bullying. SNS is a very new medium and its market and technology are evolving drastically and are constantly changing. Thus the agent of taking the lead in making and enforcing rules or self-regulation is still absent. Additionally, SNS services utilize the function of social graph actively, and third parties can provide contents and applications using open API. In response to these situations, European Commission implemented Safer Social Networking Principle for the EU, and United States released the guideline for SNS users and worked on SNS companies and users to promote voluntary efforts for using SNS properly. In Japan, mobile contents companies built the Content Evaluation and Monitoring Association (EMA) as a voluntary reviewing entity. However those measures don’t include any severe legal penalty. Those remain self-regulation relying on voluntary activities of private sectors. On the other hand, self-regulation itself is regulated by laws, social norms, market conditions and technological architectures. In this paper we discuss the conditions of regulation and self-regulation, and we explore some ideas about what would be the best way to regulate SNS.

  • 34.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Social movement and social media2012In: Critique, democracy and philosophy in 21st century information society: Towards critical theories of social media / [ed] Christian Fuchs, 2012, 76-77 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do social media affect the process of building a democratic society? Information and communication technology (ICT) made it possible for people to communicate beyond national borders and other obstacles. Social media in particular play an important role in creating a place where people communicate with each other, for example Facebook, MySpace, YouTube and so on. In other words, under these circumstances, social media function as the third place in addition to home and workplaces, which contributes not only to unite people in commu- nities but also to the resolution of various problems and crises. Therefore, the third place nurtures relationships and mutual trust under internet access conditions, and it is open for free discussions, and becomes a ground for democracy.

    In face-to-face communication, participants’ behavior is affected by social context cues, and users let their behavior adjust to particular communication manners. However, in online communicati- on, it is more difficult for participants to understand static and dynamic cues surrounding other participants compared to face-to-face communication. Because, in many cases, whereas social media makes it possible for users to communicate with others easily regardless of physical dis- tance, national boundaries and time difference, it limits the number of characters and the amount of data that they can post and use. However, participation in online communication, especially in social media, is seen as the key element in the recent trend toward democratization. In fact, millions of users send and receive a huge amount of information via social media in order to cultivate a relationship with others and strengthen mutual exchange beyond borders. Generally it is recognized that social media advance participation through exchanging information with minimal social context cues.

    However, communication through social media has some problems. Firstly, exchanged informa- tion via social media minimizes social context cues under severe restricted or censored internet access conditions; because simplified messages can be more understandable and impressive for other users in communicating. Therefore information tends to be extreme, and it could evoke a risk of group polarization. Secondly, in social media, information receivers gather fragmented information in borderless cyberspace, for any purpose. Following this they try to transform infor- mation into something they can understand, something closer to their own experience, or they try to perceive the feelings and experience of the senders of information. Through this process, users develop a sense of solidarity and share expectations and norms, which bring them together as one community. Therefore, social norms have a considerable influence on users in particular communities and advance self-stereotyping among them as solidarity and social identity are en- hanced. This situation carries the social risk of exclusion of others. Some people call Middle-east political change “Facebook revolution” or “twitter revolution” on the internet. Is this naming really pertinent? Indeed, social media has played an important role as “hub for information” and as the third place in political change. Still, social media has to contribute to the development of skills for dialog in order to achieve a really democratic society. 

  • 35.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    The paradoxical nature of privacy2012In: Privacy in the social networked world / [ed] Andrew A. Adams, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Privacy appears to be a very important issue today when ICT permeates more and more aspects of our life. Mainly this is understood as a risk of breaking the privacy of persons, and possibly the privacy of groups, organizations, corporations and states. It is therefore interesting to investigate the main definitions of privacy, try to grasp its nature and to discern its features, and to discuss the possible ways of suitable and needed activities.

     

    There are essentially two types if definitions. One is focused on the protection of information and on the rules that govern openness and protection. Moor (1997), defines privacy like “the expression of a core value, viz., the value of security” or “sometimes used to designate a situation in which people are protected from intrusion or observation by natural or physical circumstances.... In addition to natural privacy there is normative privacy. A normatively private situation is a situation protected by ethical, legal, or conventional norms.” A similar definition is given by Edmund Byrne (1998): Privacy as a “zone of inaccessibility”.

     

    A different approach to the definition of privacy is focused on the control of information, and the main example of this kind of definition is given by Charles Fried (1968): “Privacy is not simply an absence of information about us in the minds of others, rather it is the control we have over information about ourselves”. In the same wavelength we find the definition given by Quinn (2011): “Privacy is a social arrangement that allows individuals to have some level of control over who is able to gain access to their physical selves and their personal information”.

     

    Which of the two lines of definitions is more accurate and fruitful, regarding its power to guide our activities toward the achievement of desired goals? If we make an effort to describe the nature of privacy we can easily and rather fast come to the conclusion that privacy is not only something that has to be protected. Although this is important, underlined by both lines of definitions, it seems that privacy sometimes has to be diminished or invaded in order to satisfy important interests and values. One is to create a bond to another person, group or organization. To achieve this one has to give access to private information, or even to give up part or all limitations toward this special person or organization. It is a matter of trust between each other. The other situation, which is the most common one, is that a person, group or organization, which we may call a separate entity, has always another important interest added to the interest of protecting its own privacy: To break, diminish or invade the privacy of any other entity that is a prospective or actual partner in any sense. It is very important for any entity to acquire access to the information about any other entity that is of some interest.

     

    If we now go back to the definitions of privacy, and look upon them through the glasses of our observations of its nature we may have good arguments to maintain that a definition focused on the control of information is more plausible. Given the controversial nature of privacy (protect it and break it at the same time) and the clashes arising constantly between all entities in a social interaction, the focus cannot be on normative solutions which if they work are always limited to a certain situation, but on the ways skills, methods and tools we use to create, revise and apply policies, guidelines, rules and principles to manage the issues of privacy.

     

    References

    Byrne, E. F. (1998). “Privacy”. Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics, 3, 649-659.

    Fried, C. (1968). “Privacy: A moral analysis”. Yale Law Journal, 77, 475-493.

    Moor, J. (1997). “Towards a theory of privacy in the information age”. Computer and Society, 27, 27-32.

    Quinn, M. J. (2011). Ethics for the Information Age. Boston: Pearson.

  • 36.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Do social media generate social capital?2012In: ICT, society and human beings / [ed] Gunilla Bradley, Diane Whitehouse and Angela Lin, Lisbon: IADIS Press , 2012, 133-136 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Do social media generate social capital beyond borders between the real and virtual spaces? If so, how do social media function in forming and maintaining social capital? This study is triggered by those simple questions. From the beginning of 2011, a huge number of people have seen political turmoil stimulated by use of social media and felt the inner stirrings of people’s cooperative network via social media. Thus, some people strongly stressed that social media has a great power to change authoritarian regimes from the global political issues perspective. On the other hand, we recognized how social media worked effectively from the local issues perspective, for example in the case of the massive disaster in Japan. Under the critical situation, where existing traditional media like phones, TV, radio and newspapers didn’t work, the Japanese got and exchanged information through social media and in fact some victims were rescued based on information via social media. Both cases, political changes and massive disasters, show information transaction process has been supported by thin trust, generalized reciprocity and loosely tied people’s network, regardless of geographical borders or real/virtual spaces. Therefore it seems that social media plays an important role in fostering a social network leading to social capital. This paper reconsiders characteristics of social capital and its role in improving people’s lives through social media. It also examines how social media influences social capital by giving a few examples of social media and social issues, more specifically, the political turmoil in Tunisia and big earthquake disasters in Japan.

  • 37.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    ICT supported crisis communication and dialog2013In: The possibilities of ethical ICT, Kolding: University of Southern Denmark , 2013, 37-41 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how people use social media under serious social conditions, and how social media affects people’s behavior after a disaster based on the case of the March 2011 disaster in Japan. In this critical situation, where existing traditional media like phones, television, radio and newspapers did not work well, the Japanese exchanged and received information through social media. In fact some victims were rescued based on information via social media. Corresponding to people’s need, social media provided various services to support people immediately after the disaster. Therefore it seems that social media plays an important role in fostering a social network leading to horizontal communication, critical thinking, dialog; supporting social capital. This study reconsiders characteristics of social capital and its role in improving people’s lives and supporting democratic communication as well as the difficulties in people bonding together through social media.

  • 38.
    Ask, Andreas
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Hedström, Karin
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Taking initial steps towards enterprise architecture in local government2011In: Electronic government and the information systems perspective / [ed] Kim Normann Andersen, Enrico Francesconi, Åke Grönlund, Tom M. van Engers, Berlin: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, 26-40 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to increase the understanding of immature use of Enterprise Architectures (EAs). In this paper we present results from an eGovernment initiative in a Swedish local government. This longitudinal case study illustrates the problems of taking initial steps of moving towards an EA during the development and implementation an eGovernment initiative. Through an analysis of goal achievements, we develop a better understanding of the challenges of using EA frameworks for local eGovernment-projects. Our results show that the immature use of the EA framework resulted in parts of the organization deviating from plan where individual members began to implement individual solutions, instead of basing decisions on the overall architecture. This impaired project’s possibility to develop towards an EA in an efficient way.

  • 39.
    Augustsson, Jens
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Holm, Alexis
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Framtidens konsumtion av digitala tjänster: En studie kring bruk av digitala tjänster på mobila enheter, baserat på ett Smart City-perspektiv.2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to find out how mobile user habits can provide a basis for applications and services based on a Smart City perspective, this by using two scientific methods, interviews and user diaries. The study will also analyze and develop the method for further studies in this subject. The cell phone has in recent years evolved into a unit where the original phone functions and features have become secondary. Even though its main purpose is still to communicate with others, it’s now done primarily through other types of services. Today the development goes from a use of digital services where each unit has a specific purpose, to a practise where they work together and share a common purpose. As a result of the fact that our use and our habits of these devices are changing, the nature of the services provided by these devices are also changing. Due to this, there is an ongoing evolution towards, and a demand for, new services that can take advantage of new technologies to dissolve the border between the digital and the physical reality. Which, from a Smart City perspective, could have great potential in several areas of social and organizational development.

    One can also se that the way we consume digital services is changing. We have gone from having a device centerd focus, were every unit has a specific purpose to a serviced centerd focus, were the units work as a collaborative ecosystem. These units share a collective pupose, to act as a window towards the internet.

  • 40.
    Axell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Boström, Johan
    Linnaeus University, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Växjö, Sweden.
    Preschoolers’ Conceptions of Technological Artefacts and Gender in Picture Books2016In: PATT-32 Proceedings Technology Education for 21st Century Skills / [ed] J. de Vries, Arien Bekker-Holtland and Gerald van Dijk, ITEEA , 2016, 57-64 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Picture books are a frequent element of daily preschool activities (Damber, Nilsson & Ohlsson, 2013; Simonsson, 2004; SOU 2006:75). They are important pedagogical tools that can help children acquire an understanding of the everyday technology they come in contact with, as well as the human application of technology (Axell, 2015; Axell & Boström, 2015). These are skills that are emphasised in the Swedish preschool curriculum. In the curriculum it is also stated that the preschool should counteract traditional gender patterns and gender roles (Skolverket, 2010). However, an investigation of a selection of picture books aimed at preschool children shows that the books content is somewhat problematic. Many of the picture books provide a focus on the function of separate artefacts without any sort of context or explanation of their implications in a societal context. There also tends to be an emphasis on traditional masculine-coded technology in the books. Building and making and working with machines is depicted as a male activity. The male stereotype is essentially connected with different kinds of vehicles like cars, airplanes, motorbikes, tractors etc. (Axell & Boström, 2015; See also Holbrok, 2008). Based on these previous findings, the aim of this pilot study was to obtain an initial concept about how children’s literature may influence preschool children’s view on technological artefacts. The study was conducted through semi-structured interviews with four five-year-olds, two girls and two boys. Through a thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2006) three overarching themes were identified: The relationship between design and function, anthropomorphic animals as users of artefacts, and gender and artefacts. Some of the key findings were that the 5-year-olds did not know what “technology” is, but had good knowledge about tools. Additionally, they did not genderise any of the artefacts included in the study.

  • 41.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Designing for Transformative Play2017In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, ISSN 1073-0516, E-ISSN 1557-7325, Vol. 24, no 3, 18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous studies have foregrounded how play is only partially shaped by the artifacts that their designers design. The play activity can change the structures framing it, turning players into co-designers through the mere act of playing. This article contributes to our understanding of how we can design for play taking into account that play has this transformative power. We describe four ways that players can engage with framing structures, which we classify in terms of whether players conform to explore, transgress, or (re)create them. Through the examples of three case studies, we illustrate how this model has been useful in design: as an analytical tool for deconstructing player behavior, to articulate design goals and support specific design choices, and for shaping the design process.

  • 42.
    Badampudi, Deepika
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Fricker, Samuel
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Moreno, Ana
    Perspectives on Productivity and Delays in Large-Scale Agile Projects2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many large and distributed companies run agile projects in development environments that are inconsistent with the original agile ideas. Problems that result from these inconsistencies can affect the productivity of development projects and the timeliness of releases. To be effective in such contexts, the agile ideas need to be adapted. We take an inductive approach for reaching this aim by basing the design of the development process on observations of how context, practices, challenges, and impacts interact. This paper reports the results of an interview study of five agile development projects in an environment that was unfavorable for agile principles. Grounded theory was used to identify the challenges of these projects and how these challenges affected productivity and delays according to the involved project roles. Productivity and delay-influencing factors were discovered that related to requirements creation and use, collaboration, knowledge management, and the application domain. The practitioners’ explanations about the factors' impacts are, on one hand, a rich empirical source for avoiding and mitigating productivity and delay problems and, on the other hand, a good starting point for further research on flexible large-scale development.

  • 43.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Teaching and Learning Language, Literature and Media.
    Messina Dahlberg, Giulia
    School of Health and Education, Skövde University, Sweden.
    Winther, Ylva
    Karlstad Municipality, Nyed Primary School, Sweden.
    Disabling and Enabling Technologies for Learning in Higher Education for All: Issues and Challenges for Whom?2016In: Informatics, ISSN 2227-9709, Vol. 3, no 4, 21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Integration, inclusion, and equity constitute fundamental dimensions of democracy in post-World War II societies and their institutions. The study presented here reports upon the ways in which individuals and institutions both use and account for the roles that technologies, including ICT, play in disabling and enabling access for learning in higher education for all. Technological innovations during the 20th and 21st centuries, including ICT, have been heralded as holding significant promise for revolutionizing issues of access in societal institutions like schools, healthcare services, etc. (at least in the global North). Taking a socially oriented perspective, the study presented in this paper focuses on an ethnographically framed analysis of two datasets that critically explores the role that technologies, including ICT, play in higher education for individuals who are “differently abled” and who constitute a variation on a continuum of capabilities. Functionality as a dimension of everyday life in higher education in the 21st century is explored through the analysis of (i) case studies of two “differently abled” students in Sweden and (ii) current support services at universities in Sweden. The findings make visible the work that institutions and their members do through analyses of the organization of time and space and the use of technologies in institutional settings against the backdrop of individuals’ accountings and life trajectories. This study also highlights the relevance of multi-scale data analyses for revisiting the ways in which identity positions become framed or understood within higher education.

  • 44. Bai, Guohua
    A Sustainable Information System for e-home Services2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    E-home related home-services (including homecare and home healthcare) in China is urgently needed. The population of aged people over 80 is increasing 5% every year in China, and to year 2050, one fourth of whole population or 0.4 billions people in China are aged staying at home. Meanwhile the government cannot afford with a national elderly care system like most western countries as Sweden. This is because China has had one-child/one-family policy since 1970’s, and this radical policy has made China step in aged society very quickly within only 20 years, while the same process took 40-80 years in western countries. Even worse, China becomes aged society when the country is still poor and under developing with GDP per capita less than 1000$, comparing to western countries with 5000 – 10000 $ when they became aged society. E-home provides China with a unique, and maybe the most effective solution to the problem. By applying effective IT&C at home, elder people are facilitated to manage their own daily life. If needed, they can always call help from their collective service centre that is located in their resident area and the collective service centre can provide with both homecare (cleaning, shopping, reparation, baby care etc.) and home healthcare (legitimate medical care). Elder people can be also monitored (if wished by all partners) both at home and out door by bearing sensors that can send singles directly to related care providers (including their children and relatives if wished). E-home will greatly increase the security of elder people, release great worry from both their children and elder people themselves, and can be afford by most people. However, e-home is more than just a technical problem, and it needs a systemic way and social-psychological study how to design e-home system. In the end, e-home system must provide with needed services to residents. I will introduce IMIS project ´Integrated Mobile Information System for Home Healthcare’ financed by Swedish Agency for Innovative Systems (VINNOVA). This project will continue to 2006, and one of the outputs will be a sustainable software platform which is based on a systemic study of social psychological factors involved in the home healthcare. I will provide with some Swedish experiences and the so called ‘Scandinavia Approach’ in conducting such complex system to my colleagues in China, and I hope the IMIS project will be also developed in China based up on some feasibility and desirability studies with some Chinese colleagues.

  • 45.
    Bai, Guohua
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Activity System Theory Approach to Healthcare Information System2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthcare information system is a very complex system and has to be approached from systematic perspectives. This paper presents an Activity System Theory (ATS) approach by integrating system thinking and social psychology. First part of the paper, the activity system theory is presented, especially a recursive model of human activity system is introduced. A project ‘Integrated Mobile Information System for Diabetic Healthcare (IMIS)’ is then used to demonstrate a practical application of the Activity System Theory especially in constructing healthcare information system. Our conclusion is that the activity system model can provide the service system designers with a comprehensive and integrated framework for designing healthcare information system in specific, and for designing various kinds of service systems in general.

  • 46. Bakardjieva, Maria
    et al.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Skoric, Marko
    Digital Citizenship and Activism: Questions of Power and Participation Online2012In: JeDEM eJournal of eDemocracy, ISSN 2075-9517, Vol. 4, no 1, i-iv p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47. Bakardjieva, Maria
    et al.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Skoric, Marko
    Digital Citizenship and Activism: Questions of Power and Participation Online2012In: eJournal of eDemocracy & Open Government, ISSN 2075-9517, Vol. 4, no 1, i-iv p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The eJournal of eDemocracy and Open Government (JeDEM) is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal (ISSN: 2075-9517) published twice a year. It addresses theory and practice in the areas of eDemocracy and Open Government as well as eGovernment, eParticipation, and eSociety. JeDEM publishes ongoing and completed research, case studies and project descriptions that are selected after a rigorous blind review by experts in the field.

  • 48. Barbabella, Francesco
    Family carers: Technology-based support services2015Book (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    et al.
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Schmidt, Andrea
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Chiatti, Carlos
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    A theoretical framework for assessing the impact of ICT-based interventions for carers2012In: Gerontechnology, ISSN 1569-1101, E-ISSN 1569-111X, Vol. 11, no 2, 393-393 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Initiatives using information and communication technologies (ICTs) as support for carers of dependent older people are reported since the early 1990s, mainly in form of phone services, computer networks, and video respite. Although the role of ICTs in home care gained increasing relevance in the last decades – for instance in the areas of social integration, care coordination and ambient assisted living (AAL) – few attempts have been made to systematically understand the potentialities of such technologies, overcoming single technology or intervention domains. In this respect, the issues of terminology ambiguity and lack of comparability represented major barriers, so that most of evaluation studies in this area led to mixed and/or inconclusive results. Drawing on the findings of the CARICT-project, this paper discusses the development of a theoretical and conceptual framework to assess the impact ofI CT-based interventions for carers. Method Literature review and a mapping exercise of 52 ICT-based initiatives for carers in 8 countries. Results & Discussion We will provide the results of a mapping exercise of 52 case studies, showing the diversity of existing good practices across Europe and carrying out a review of available impact assessment of these initiatives from a social ecological perspective (at micro-, meso- and macro-level). Subsewquently, we will discuss a theoretical and conceptual framework that is built on the basis of available evidence, leading toa proper classification of ICT-based interventions in relation to types of interactions between actors they support: an attempt is made to group the solutions in coherent and comprehensive classes, with related implications for impact assessments and comparative analysis. Main classes include: alarms, home automation, auto-communication, meta-services, information and training, cognitive stimulations and mental exercises, support group sessions, individual care and support services, and social participation tools. Finally, recommendations for future research in the field are formulated with regard to the assessment and comparability of these services, as well as to the testing and development of new solutions.

  • 50.
    Beckhusen, Benedict
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Mobile Apps and the ultimate addiction to the Smartphone: A comprehensive study on the consequences of society’s mobile needs2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The smartphone is omnipresent and is cherished and held close by people. It allows for constant connection within a digitally connected society, as well as for many other purposes such as leisure activity or informational purpose. Within the Information Systems studies deeper investigation is required as to what impact this “taken – for – granted” mobile access to information and mobile apps has for individuals and society and if a “technological addiction”can be developed when using the smartphone for everything during the day on such a constant basis.

    The aim of this study was to understand the role of the smartphone in society and to shed light on this unclear relationship between the constant use of a smartphone and its development towards an addictive quality. To reach a conclusion, in depth – interviews were conducted with participants about their relationship to the smartphone and their smartphone use based on questions derived from literature on mobile communication technologies and the types of digital addictions existing.

    The results are that the smartphone is a device that seamlessly integrates into our daily lives in that we unconsciously use it as a tool to make our daily tasks more manageable, and enjoyable. It also supports us in getting better organized, to be in constant touch with family and friends remotely, and to be more mobile which is a useful ability in today’s mobility driven society.

    Smartphones have been found to inhabit a relatively low potential to addiction. Traits of voluntary behaviour, habitual behaviour, and mandatory behaviour of smartphone use have been found. All of these behaviours are not considered a true addiction. In the end, it seems that the increase of smartphone use is mainly due to the way we communicate nowadays digitally,and the shift in how we relate to our social peers using digital means.

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