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  • 1. Andersson, Anders
    et al.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Piccolo, John
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Comparing mail-in, interview and tournament catch rates for a recreational salmonid fisheryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract
  • 2. Andersson, Anders
    et al.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Su, Zhenming
    Andersson, Magnus
    Piccolo, John
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Estimating effort and catch of a recreational trolling fishery in one of Europe’s largest lakesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract
  • 3. Backstrom, Tobias
    et al.
    Heynen, Martina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Brannas, Eva
    Nilsson, Jan
    Winberg, Svante
    Magnhagen, Carin
    Anaesthesia and handling stress effects on pigmentation and monoamines in Arctic charr2017In: Environmental Biology of Fishes, ISSN 0378-1909, E-ISSN 1573-5133, Vol. 100, no 5, 471-480 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress responsiveness differs between individuals and is often categorized into different stress coping styles. Using these stress coping styles for selection in fish farming could be beneficial, since stress is one main factor affecting welfare. In Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) carotenoid pigmentation is associated with stress responsiveness and stress coping styles. Thus this could be an important tool to use for selection of stress resilient charr. However, anaesthetics seem to affect carotenoid pigmentation, and it would be better if the method for selection could be implemented during normal maintenance, which usually includes anaesthetics. Therefore, this study investigated how the use of anaesthetics affected carotenoid pigmentation, i.e. number of spots, over time compared to no-anaesthetic treatment. Additionally, the stress indicators monoamines and glucocorticoids were investigated. The results indicate that the anaesthetic MS-222 affects number of spots on the right side. This anaesthetic also increased dopaminergic activity in the telencephalon. Both brain dopaminergic and serotonergic activity was associated with spottiness. Further, behaviour during anaesthetization was associated with spots on the left side, but not the right side. Repetition of the same treatment seemed to affect spot numbers on the right side. In conclusion, this study shows that inducing stress in charr affects the carotenoid spots. Thus, it is possible to use anaesthetics when evaluating spottiness although careful planning is needed.

  • 4.
    Bignert, Anders
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bäcklin, Britt-Marie
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Helander, Björn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Roos, Anna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    9. Contaminants and Health of Aquatic Wildlife2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, 73-85 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Brawn, Jeffrey D.
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,.
    3. Maintaining and Restoring Avian Habitat in Agricultural Landscapes2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, 39-41 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6. Dankel, Dorothy
    et al.
    Haraldsson, Gunnar
    Heldbo, Jesper
    Hoydal, Kjartan
    Lassen, Hans
    Siegstad, Helle
    Schou, Mogens
    Sverdrup-Jensen, Sten
    Waldo, Staffan
    Ørebech, Peter
    Allocation of Fishing Rights in the NEA: Discussion paper2015Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This discussion paper aims to initiate an informed debate in the Nordic countries and elsewhere on how to allocate the trans-boundary fish stocks in the North East Atlantic in the future and how to resolve possible allocation conflicts. The paper maps the current legal framework and international fisheries agreements in the North East Atlantic Ocean which forms the basis for allocation agreements. It considers the relevance of the biological status of the fish stocks and the economic situation of the coastal states in the area for the allocation of fishing rights and further proposes a dynamic allocation methodology and a decision making process including the handling of allocation conflicts. The paper is compiled by an inter-disciplinary Nordic group of fisheries experts.

  • 7.
    Drury O'Neill, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Small-Scale Fisheries Governance: Broadening Perspectives on Markets, Relationships and Benefits in Seafood Trade2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This licentiate adresses the relative ambiguity surounding benefit flows from small-scale fisheries seafood trade with a specific focus on how they may be impacted by market and social stuctures. Small-scale fishery governenace has previously taken a narrowly approach to sustainability. Focused on managing fishing activities, economic-led market interventions and overlooking the embededness of the fishers within a broader social structure. Also failing to address fisheries as interlinked social-ecological systems where feedbacks between the two can impact future sustainability. The larger PhD project takes a step towards combining these two out-of-focus areas by taking a systems perspective, through a Value Chain approach, to fisheries governance, associated market influences and the consequent benefit flows from marine ecosystem services. This licentiate begins by unpacking dynamics within the social realm that may impact benefit flows and ultimately resource extraction decisions, potentially contributing to feedbacks from the marine ecosystem. Research uses mixed-methods and is case-orientated with sites across two tropical marine small-scale fisheries in Zanzibar and the Philippines. Results present two market environments with distinct structures, conduct, reciprocity systems and notably, gender roles. However both systems experience economic transactions underlain by broader social relations and binds. These various features manifest themselves in different, yet often unexpected, ways through income equalities, distributions and reciprocal networks of fishers and trading actors. Once a broadened and diversified view of the SSF trading environment is appropriated, it is clear that benefit flows are impacted by various contextual features (e.g. gender, transaction forms and buyer types). Governance-related research or interventions should incorporate undervalued local attributes such as cultural characteristics, social relationships and market participation as they play a role in who benefits from seafood trade. Thus If governance is to be improved for sustainably increasing food and livelihood security it is necessary to unpack these benefit flow mechanisms and, in particular, the local social dynamics that mediate fishers’ everyday interplay with the marine ecosystem. Future steps include the aim to identify potential social-ecological feedbacks between the disentangled market environments and the local marine ecosystems as a result of interactions in SSF trade. 

  • 8.
    Eriksson, Max
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Ericsson, Göran
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Umeå.
    Direct experience and attitude change towards bears and wolves2015In: Wildlife Biology, ISSN 0909-6396, E-ISSN 1903-220X, Vol. 21, no 3, 131-137 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding how changes in the sizes of large carnivore populations affect the attitudes of the public is vital in order to mitigate social conflicts over large carnivore management issues. Using data from two Swedish postal surveys in 2004 and 2009, we examined the probable social effects of a continued increase in the Swedish populations of bear and wolf by comparing levels of direct experience of bears and wolves with public attitudes towards these animals. We report an increase in direct experience of bears and wolves, lower levels of acceptance of the existence of these animals, and a lower degree of support for the policy goals of both species in 2009 compared to 2004. We also find that these changes are more prominent in areas with local carnivore populations than in other areas of Sweden. Our results imply that attitudes towards bears and wolves are likely to become more negative as populations continue to grow. The uneven distributions of the carnivore populations are likely to generate more frequent social conflicts in the future as they could cause an increase in the attitudinal divide between those members of the Swedish public who have had direct experiences of carnivores and those who have not.

  • 9.
    Estes, Kelly
    Illinois Natural History Survey University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
    4. Terrestrial Invasive Species of the Great Lakes Region2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, 42-46 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Fitzgerald, Guy
    University of Montreal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, CAN.
    15. Effects and Remediation of Oil Spills on Wild Birds: The St. Lawrence Estuary and Gulf Experience2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, 122-127 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Fitzsimons, John D.
    et al.
    Great Lakes Laboratory for Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Burlington, Canada.
    Wolgamood, Martha
    Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Mattawan, MI, USA.
    Madenjian, Charles P.
    United States Geological Survey, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
    Bunnell, David B.
    United States Geological Survey, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
    20. Thiamine Deficiency in Aquatic Food Chains: The Cumulative Result of Ecosystem Disruption by Clupeids?2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, 167-180 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Gillespie, Thomas
    Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    24. Habitat Fragmentation and Species Barriers2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, 199-200 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Hellström, Anders
    et al.
    National Veterinary Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Chukalova, Natalia
    AtlantNiro, Kaliningrad, Russia.
    Rodjuk, Galina
    AtlantNiro, Kaliningrad, Russia.
    Ekman, Elisabet
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Norrgren, Leif
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    8. Aquaculture and Fish Health2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, 63-72 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Jägerbrand, Annika
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Environment.
    Antonson, Hans
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Mobility, actors and planning processes.
    Driving behaviour responses to a moose encounter, automatic speed camera, wildlife warning sign and radio message determined in a factorial simulator study2016In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 86, 229-238 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a driving simulator study, driving behaviour responses (speed and deceleration) to encountering a moose, automatic speed camera, wildlife warning sign and radio message, with or without a wildlife fence and in dense forest or open landscape, were analysed. The study consisted of a factorial experiment that examined responses to factors singly and in combination over 9-km road stretches driven eight times by 25 participants (10 men, 15 women). The aims were to: determine the most effective animal–vehicle collision (AVC) countermeasures in reducing vehicle speed and test whether these are more effective in combination for reducing vehicle speed; identify the most effective countermeasures on encountering moose; and determine whether the driving responses to AVC countermeasures are affected by the presence of wildlife fences and landscape characteristics. The AVC countermeasures that proved most effective in reducing vehicle speed were a wildlife warning sign and radio message, while automatic speed cameras had a speed-increasing effect. There were no statistically significant interactions between different countermeasures and moose encounters. However, there was a tendency for a stronger speed-reducing effect from the radio message warning and from a combination of a radio message and wildlife warning sign in velocity profiles covering longer driving distances than the statistical tests. Encountering a moose during the drive had the overall strongest speed-reducing effect and gave the strongest deceleration, indicating that moose decoys or moose artwork might be useful as speed-reducing countermeasures. Furthermore, drivers reduced speed earlier on encountering a moose in open landscape and had lower velocity when driving past it. The presence of a wildlife fence on encountering the moose resulted in smaller deceleration.

  • 15.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Environment.
    Kollisioner och olyckor med rådjur i Sverige under 10 år (2003–2012): variation i tid, geografi och kostnader2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal for this project was to create a 10-year overview of the number of deer collisions in Sweden and accidents variation in time, geography and cost, both in terms of property damage and personal injuries. Accident statistics were gathered from NVR (National Wildlife Accident Council, data on collisions), Strada (fatalities and injuries in Swedish Traffic Accident Data Acquisition) and Ofelia (collisions at railway). The results show that the number of deer collisions has increased over the 10-year period and that the increase has been much greater in the northernmost counties and Gotland. The number of deer collisions is higher during the early summer (May–June) and winter (October–December), whereas the number of fatalities and injury accidents is highest during the summer. The number of deer collisions varies during the day, but most accidents occur in the morning and evening for both property damage and personal injury accidents. For fatalities in accidents with roe deer, there are more than twice as many compared to the officially reported numbers, and the number of serious injuries is 177% higher than the official records. It is likely that the official statistics are also underestimating the number of fatalities and injuries from wildlife accidents caused by moose, deer and wild boar. This study shows that the total cost of roe deer collisions and accidents in 2012 exceeds 1 billion SEK, of which approximately 70% account for the cost of property damage.

  • 16.
    Lampman, Richard
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
    23. Emerging Vector-borne Diseases of Public Health in Europe and North America2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic Universit Press , 2012, 2, 191-198 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Larsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Serrano Gonzalez, Ignacio
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Eriksson, Lars-Ove
    Effects of muscle lipid concentration on wild and hatchery brown trout (Salmo trutta) smolt migration2012In: Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, ISSN 0706-652X, E-ISSN 1205-7533, Vol. 69, no 1, 1-12 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Annually, hatchery programs are releasing millions of salmonid smolts into the Baltic Sea. Recent estimations indicate a decline in smolt sea survival, questioning the ecological and socioeconomic values of these programs. Concurrently, hatchery smolts have increased in lipid concentration. Salmonids display partial migration, and it is suggested that the ratio of migrants/residents is affected by individual smolt energetic status. To test whether the increased energetic status of hatchery smolts could explain the noted decrease in survival, we released wild trout smolts, conventional hatchery smolts, and hatchery smolts of low energetic status into a Baltic Sea river. Using telemetry, we obtained data on the number of successful migrants, their swimming speed, and diel migratory behaviour. A much lower proportion of conventional smolts (30%) successfully migrated to the coast. No difference was found between wild (74%) and hatchery smolts of low energetic status (64%). Furthermore, conventional smolts migrated slower and showed no diel migratory pattern. The results are of high relevance for hatchery programs producing partially migrating fish.

  • 18.
    Levengood, Jeffrey M.
    et al.
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
    Martineau, Daniel
    University of Montreal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, Canada.
    11. Geological, Hydrological and Anthropogenic Features2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, 97-100 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Magnusson, Ulf
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    21. Overview of Infectious Diseases and the Wildlife-Livestock Interface2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, 183-185 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Martineau, Daniel
    University of Montreal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, Canada.
    19. Fisheries of the St Lawrence River, Estuary and Gulf2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, 163-166 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Martineau, Daniel
    University of Montreal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, CAN.
    17. Contaminants and Health of Beluga Whales of the Saint Lawrence Estuary2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, 139-148 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Miller, Philip S.
    et al.
    International Union for Conservation of Nature, Apple Valley, MN, USA.
    Citino, Scott
    White Oak Conservation Center, Yulee, FL, US.
    2. Facilitating Recovery of Threatened and Endangered Species2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, 29-38 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Mörner, Torsten
    et al.
    National Veterinary Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Beasley, Val
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
    22. Monitoring for Diseases in Wildlife Populations2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, 186-190 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Sandstrom, Camilla
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Johansson, Maria
    Sjolander-Lindqvist-, Annelie
    The management of large carnivores in Sweden: challenges and opportunities2015In: Wildlife Biology, ISSN 0909-6396, E-ISSN 1903-220X, Vol. 21, no 3, 120-121 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Sandström, Camilla
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Wennberg DiGasper, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Öhman, Karin
    Department of Forest Resource Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Conflict resolution through ecosystem-based management: the case of Swedish moose management2013In: International Journal of the Commons, ISSN 1875-0281, E-ISSN 1875-0281, Vol. 7, no 2, 549-570 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish moose (Alces alces) management has over the years transformed from a situation similar to what Hardin (1968) defined as a tragedy of the commons – i.e. where open access and unrestricted demands lead to over-exploitation – into a situation characterized by an abundance of moose. While high numbers of moose are preferred by hunters, they damage forests through grazing, causing conflicts between hunters and forest owners. In an attempt to resolve these disputes, the Swedish government is introducing a new local ecosystem-based management system. This paper analyzes this shift from managing a single resource to the broader perspective of ecosystem management and discusses to what extent it will contribute to conflict resolution. The results suggest that some of the problems highlighted may be solved through the implementation of an ecosystem management system. However, several challenges remain to be tackled, such as how to establish robust partnerships between forest owners and hunters for managing moose on land with a fragmented property rights structure. This can lead to different and conflicting objectives and, consequently, difficulties in reaching collective action.

  • 26.
    Söderquist, Pär
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Large-scale releases of native species: the mallard as a predictive model system2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Human alteration of natural systems, and its consequences are of great concern and the impact on global ecosystems is one of the biggest threats that biodiversity stands before. Translocations of invasive species, as well as intraspecific contingents with non-native genotypes, whether they are deliberate or unintentional, are one such alteration and its consequences are continuously being assessed. The mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) is the most numerous and widespread duck in the world and a flagship in wetland conservation. It is also an important game species which is heavily restocked for hunting purposes, especially in Europe where over three million ducklings are released every year. Because of its hunted status, its abundance, and the number of released individuals, it can serve as a model species to study effects of releases, both for conservation and restocking for hunting, on wild populations. In this thesis the status of the mallard was assessed in the Nordic countries and the effects of releases on the wild populations were studied by mining historical ringing data, comparing morphology of present-day wild, farmed, and historical mallards, and analyzing phylogeography of wild and farmed mallards in Europe. The status of the mallard population in the Nordic countries are generally good, however, a joint effort of European countries is needed to monitor and manage the population. A significant difference between wild and farmed mallards concerning longevity, migration, bill morphology and genetic structure was also found, together with signs of cryptic introgression of farmed genotypes in the wild population with potential fitness reduction as a result. The effect is however limited by that only a fraction of released farmed mallards reach the breeding season due to low survival. A natural captive environment is crucial to keep individuals wild-like with high survival rates after release. However, with an introgression of potentially maladapted farmed genotypes leading to a reduction in fitness, a low survival of released mallards would favor the wild population. A legislative change regarding obligation to report numbers, provenance, and release sites of farmed mallard should be considered, together with practical solutions of ringing and genetic monitoring of released mallards.

  • 27.
    Söderquist, Pär
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Utsatta änder – så går det för dem2014In: Svensk jakt, ISSN 0039-6583, Vol. 152, no 12, 72-73 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Weseloh, D.V. Chip
    Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    14. Contaminants in Colonial Waterbirds of the North American Great Lakes, 1955-20072012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, 116-121 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Ziegler, F.
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Hornborg, S.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Valentinsson, D.
    Skontorp Hognes, E.
    Søvik, G.
    Ritzau Eigaard, O.
    Same stock, different management: Quantifying the sustainability of three shrimp fisheries in the Skagerrak from a product perspective2016In: ICES Journal of Marine Science, ISSN 1054-3139, E-ISSN 1095-9289, Vol. 73, no 7, 1806-1814 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The northern shrimp (Pandalus borealis L.) stock in the Skagerrak is shared by Sweden, Norway, and Denmark. Although the fishery is regulated by an annual agreement between the EU and Norway, there are also national regulations as well as differences in fleet composition and shrimp markets. In early 2014, the World Wildlife Fund gave all Skagerrak shrimp a red light in their seafood consumer guide, which led to an extensive debate, especially in Sweden, about the sustainability of this fishery. The aim of this study was to quantify a set of indicators that together give a broad picture of the sustainability of the three fisheries to provide an objective basis for a discussion on needed measures. The different indicators concerned environmental, economic or social aspects of sustainability and were quantified per tonne of shrimp landed by each country in 2012. The Danish fishery was most efficient in terms of environmental and economic indicators, while the Swedish fishery provided most employment per tonne of shrimp landed. Fuel use in all fisheries was high, also when compared with other shrimp fisheries. Interesting patterns emerged, with smaller vessels being more fuel efficient than larger ones in Sweden and Norway, with the opposite trend in Denmark. The study also demonstrated major data gaps and differences between the countries in how data are collected and made available. Various improvement options in the areas data collection and publication, allocation of quotas and enforcement of regulations resulted. Product-oriented studies could be useful to follow-up performance of fisheries over time and to identify how to best utilize the Skagerrak shrimp stock. This could involve evaluating novel solutions in terms of technology and management, based on current and future scenarios aiming to maximize societal benefits generated from this limited resource, at minimized environmental impacts. © 2016 International Council for the Exploration of the Sea 2016. All rights reserved.

  • 30.
    Zwiernik, Matthew
    et al.
    Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA.
    Vermeulen, Frouke
    Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA.
    Bursian, Steven
    Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA.
    16. Contaminants in Semi-aquatic Wildlife: Lessons from the Laurentian Great Lakes2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 2, 128-138 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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