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  • 1.
    Ahad, Abdul
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Nick, Peter
    Actin is bundled in activation-tagged tobacco mutants that tolerate aluminum2007In: Planta, ISSN 0032-0935, E-ISSN 1432-2048, Vol. 225, no 2, 451-468 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A panel of aluminum-tolerant (AlRes) mutants was isolated by protoplast-based T-DNA activation tagging in the tobacco cultivar SR1. The mutants fell into two phenotypic classes: a minority of the mutants were fertile and developed similarly to the wild type (type I), the majority was male-sterile and grew as semi-dwarfs (type II). These traits, along with the aluminum tolerance, were inherited in a monogenic dominant manner. Both types of mutants were characterized by excessive bundling of actin microfilaments and by a strongly increased abundance of actin, a phenotype that could be partially phenocopied in the wild type by treatment with aluminum chloride. The actin bundles could be dissociated into finer strands by addition of exogenous auxin in both types of mutants. However, actin microfilaments and leaf expansion were sensitive to blockers of actin assembly in the wild type and in the mutants of type I, whereas they were more tolerant in the mutants of type II. The mutants of type II displayed a hypertrophic development of vasculature, manifest in form of supernumerary leaf veins and extended xylem layers in stems and petioles. Whereas mutants of type I were characterized by a normal, but aluminum-tolerant polar auxin-transport, auxin-transport was strongly promoted in the mutants of type II. The phenotype of these mutants is discussed in terms of reduced endocytosis leading, concomitantly with aluminum tolerance, to changes in polar auxin transport.

  • 2. Andersson-Gunnerås, Sara
    et al.
    Mellerowicz, Ewa J
    Love, Jonathan
    Segerman, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Ohmiya, Yasunori
    Coutinho, Pedro M
    Nilsson, Peter
    Henrissat, Bernard
    Moritz, Thomas
    Sundberg, Björn
    Biosynthesis of cellulose-enriched tension wood in Populus: global analysis of transcripts and metabolites identifies biochemical and developmental regulators in secondary wall biosynthesis2006In: The Plant Journal, ISSN 0960-7412, E-ISSN 1365-313X, Vol. 45, no 2, 144-165 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stems and branches of angiosperm trees form tension wood (TW) when exposed to a gravitational stimulus. One of the main characteristics of TW, which distinguishes it from normal wood, is the formation of fibers with a thick inner gelatinous cell wall layer mainly composed of crystalline cellulose. Hence TW is enriched in cellulose, and deficient in lignin and hemicelluloses. An expressed sequence tag library made from TW-forming tissues in Populus tremula (L.) x tremuloides (Michx.) and data from transcript profiling using microarray and metabolite analysis were obtained during TW formation in Populus tremula (L.) in two growing seasons. The data were examined with the aim of identifying the genes responsible for the change in carbon (C) flow into various cell wall components, and the mechanisms important for the formation of the gelatinous cell wall layer (G-layer). A specific effort was made to identify carbohydrate-active enzymes with a putative function in cell wall biosynthesis. An increased C flux to cellulose was suggested by a higher abundance of sucrose synthase transcripts. However, genes related to the cellulose biosynthetic machinery were not generally affected, although the expression of secondary wall-specific CesA genes was modified in both directions. Other pathways for which the data suggested increased activity included lipid and glucosamine biosynthesis and the pectin degradation machinery. In addition, transcripts encoding fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins were particularly increased and found to lack true Arabidopsis orthologs. Major pathways for which the transcriptome and metabolome analysis suggested decreased activity were the pathway for C flux through guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP) sugars to mannans, the pentose phosphate pathway, lignin biosynthesis, and biosynthesis of cell wall matrix carbohydrates. Several differentially expressed auxin- and ethylene-related genes and transcription factors were also identified.

  • 3. Andreazza, N
    et al.
    Abreu, Ilka Nacif
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Sawaya, A
    Eberlin, M
    Mazzafera, P
    Production of imidazole alkaloids in cell cultures of jaborandi as affected by the medium pH2009In: Biotechnology letters, ISSN 0141-5492, E-ISSN 1573-6776, Vol. 31, no 4, 607-614 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of pH (from 4.8 to 9.8) on the production of pilosine and pilocarpine and on their partition between cell and medium was studied in two lineages (P and PP) of Pilocarpus microphyllus cell suspension cultures. Highest mass accumulation was observed at high pHs and both lineages produced pilocarpine while only lineage PP produced pilosine. Both alkaloids were released in the medium but higher accumulation occurred in the cells. The highest production of pilocarpine was at pH 8.8-9.8 in both cell lineages. Other imidazole alkaloids were also identified in both lineages. At all pHs tested, the pH in the media cultures tended to stabilize around 6 after 10-15 days of cultivation. NO(3) (-) and NH(4) (+) variation in the media might partially explain the pH stabilization.

  • 4.
    Androsiuk, P.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. University of Warmia & Mazury, Poland.
    Shimono, A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Westin, J.
    Lindgren, D.
    Fries, A.
    Wang, X. -R
    Genetic status of Norway spruce (Picea abies) breeding populations for northern Sweden2013In: Silvae Genetica, ISSN 0037-5349, Vol. 62, no 3, 127-136 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Efficient use of any breeding resources requires a good understanding of the genetic value of the founder breeding materials for predicting the gain and diversity in future generations. This study evaluates the distribution of genetic variation and level of relatedness among and within nine breeding populations of Norway spruce for Northern Sweden using nuclear microsatellite markers. A sample set of 456 individuals selected from 140 stands were genotyped with, 15 SSR loci. Over all loci each individual was identified with unique multilocus genotype. High genetic diversity (average H-e=0.820) and low population differentiation (F-ST = 0.0087) characterized this material. Although low in F-ST, the two northernmost populations were clustered as a distinct group diverged from the central populations. The population differentiation pattern corresponds well with the post glacial migration history of Norway spruce and the current gene flow and human activity in the region. The average inbreeding coefficient was 0.084 after removal loci with high frequency of null alleles. The estimated relatedness of the trees gathered in the breeding populations was very low (average kinship coefficient 0.0077) and not structured. The high genetic variation and low and not structured relatedness between individuals found in the breeding populations confirm that the Norway spruce breeding stock for northern Sweden represent valuable genetic resources for both long-term breeding and conservation programs.

  • 5.
    Arvidsson, Tommy
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Agrarian Change, Property and Resources.
    Food security now or wait for research to assess risks?: genetically modified crops and smallholder farmers in Africa2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetically modified (GM) crops are by proponents considered as a possible solution to the food and nutrition problems in developing countries. However, there are also concerns of how side effects may affect environment and human health. These will probably still remain unknown for decades. But can Africa wait 30 years for research to give a definite answer about the risks connected with biotechnology?

  • 6.
    Aspeborg, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Bhalerao, Rishikeshi
    Hertzberg, Magnus
    Johansson, Karin
    Johnsson, P.
    Karlsson, Ann
    Sandberg, Göran
    Schrader, Jarmo
    Sundberg, Björn
    Teeri, Tuula
    Trygg, Johan
    Wallbäcks, Lars
    Vegetabile material, plants and a method of producing a plant having altered lignin properties2008Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The present invention is related to a set of genes, which when modified in plants gives altered lignin properties. The invention provides DNA construct such as a vector useful in the method of the invention. Further, the invention relates to a plant cell or plant progeny of the plants and wood produced by the plants according to the invention Lower lignin levels will result in improved saccharification for bio-refining and ethanol production and improved pulp and paper. Increased lignin levels will utilise lignin properties for energy production. The genes and DNA constructs may be used for the identification of plants having altered lignin characteristics as compared to the wild-type. According to the invention genes and DNA constructs may also be used as candidate genes in marker assisted breeding.

  • 7.
    Aspeborg, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Schrader, J.
    Coutinho, P. M.
    Stam, M.
    Kallas, A.
    Djerbi, S.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Denman, S.
    Amini, B.
    Sterky, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Master, E.
    Sandberg, G.
    Mellerowicz, E.
    Sundberg, B.
    Henrissat, B.
    Teeri, Tuula T.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Carbohydrate-active enzymes involved in the secondary cell wall biogenesis in hybrid aspen2005In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 137, no 3, 983-997 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood formation is a fundamental biological process with significant economic interest. While lignin biosynthesis is currently relatively well understood, the pathways leading to the synthesis of the key structural carbohydrates in wood fibers remain obscure. We have used a functional genomics approach to identify enzymes involved in carbohydrate biosynthesis and remodeling during xylem development in the hybrid aspen Populus tremula x tremuloides. Microarrays containing cDNA clones from different tissue-specific libraries were hybridized with probes obtained from narrow tissue sections prepared by cryosectioning of the developing xylem. Bioinformatic analyses using the sensitive tools developed for carbohydrate-active enzymes allowed the identification of 25 xylem-specific glycosyltransferases belonging to the Carbohydrate-Active EnZYme families GT2, GT8, GT14, GT31, GT43, GT47, and GT61 and nine glycosidases (or transglycosidases) belonging to the Carbohydrate-Active EnZYme families GH9, GH10, GH16, GH17, GH19, GH28, GH35, and GH51. While no genes encoding either polysaccharide lyases or carbohydrate esterases were found among the secondary wall-specific genes, one putative O-acetyltransferase was identified. These wood-specific enzyme genes constitute a valuable resource for future development of engineered fibers with improved performance in different applications.

  • 8.
    Atikuzzaman, Mohammad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sanz, Libia
    Instituto de Biomedicina de Valencia, CSIC, Valencia, Spain.
    Pla, Davinia
    Instituto de Biomedicina de Valencia, CSIC, Valencia, Spain.
    Alvarez-Rodriguez, Manuel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rubér, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wright, Dominic
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Calvete, Juan J.
    Instituto de Biomedicina de Valencia, CSIC, Valencia, Spain.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Selection for higher fertility reflects in the seminal fluid proteome of modern domestic chicken2017In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part D: Genomics and Proteomics, ISSN 1744-117X, E-ISSN 1878-0407, Vol. 21, 27-40 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The high egg-laying capacity of the modern domestic chicken (i.e. White Leghorn, WL) has arisen from the low egg-laying ancestor Red Junglefowl (RJF) via continuous trait selection and breeding. To investigate whether this long-term selection impacted the seminal fluid (SF)-proteome, 2DE electrophoresis-based proteomic analyses and immunoassays were conducted to map SF-proteins/cytokines in RJF, WL and a 9th generation Advanced Intercross Line (AIL) of RJF/WL-L13, including individual SF (n = 4, from each RJF, WL and AIL groups) and pools of the SF from 15 males of each group, analyzed by 2DE to determine their degree of intra-group (AIL, WL, and RJF) variability using Principal Component Analysis (PCA); respectively an inter-breed comparative analysis of intergroup fold change of specific SF protein spots intensity between breeds. The PCA clearly highlighted a clear intra-group similarity among individual roosters as well as a clear inter-group variability (e.g. between RJF, WL and AIL) validating the use of pools to minimize confounding individual variation. Protein expression varied considerably for processes related to sperm motility, nutrition, transport and survival in the female, including signaling towards immunomodulation. The major conserved SF-proteins were serum albumin and ovotransferrin. Aspartate aminotransferase, annexin A5, arginosuccinate synthase, glutathione S-transferase 2 and l-lactate dehydrogenase-A were RJF-specific. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase appeared specific to the WL-SF while angiotensin-converting enzyme, γ-enolase, coagulation factor IX, fibrinogen α-chain, hemoglobin subunit α-D, lysozyme C, phosphoglycerate kinase, Src-substrate protein p85, tubulins and thioredoxin were AIL-specific. The RJF-SF contained fewer immune system process proteins and lower amounts of the anti-inflammatory/immunomodulatory TGF-β2 compared to WL and AIL, which had low levels- or lacked pro-inflammatory CXCL10 compared to RJF. The seminal fluid proteome differs between ancestor and modern chicken, with a clear enrichment of proteins and peptides related to immune-modulation for sperm survival in the female and fertility.

    The full text will be freely available from 2017-11-03 13:41
  • 9.
    Auffret, Alistair G
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Meineri, Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Bruun, Hans Henrik
    Ejrnaes, Rasmus
    Graae, Bente J
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ontogenetic niche shifts in three Vaccinium species on a sub-alpine mountain side2010In: Plant Ecology & Diversity, ISSN 1755-0874, Vol. 3, no 2, 131-139 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Climate warming in arctic and alpine regions is expected to result in the altitudinal migration of plant species, but current predictions neglect differences between species' regeneration niche and established niche.

    Aims: To examine potential recruitment of Vaccinium myrtillus, V. uliginosum and V. vitis-idaea on a mountain slope in northern Sweden in relation to current adult occurrence.

    Methods: We combined a seed-sowing experiment in seven community types with adult occurrence observations and species distribution mapping. Results: Emergence of V. myrtillus and V. vitis-idaea seedlings was significantly related to community type, while V. uliginosum was indifferent, but exhibited the highest average emergence. Adult occurrence was related to community, and ontogenetic niche shifts were observed for all three study species. V. myrtillus was shown to have the highest potential recruitment in habitats at altitudes above its current populations.

    Conclusions: The potential for migration exists, but incongruence between regenerative and established niches presents a challenge for colonisers, as well as for plant migration modelling.

  • 10.
    Barajas-Lopez, Juan de Dios
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Kremnev, Dmitry
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Shaikhali, Jehad
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Pinas-Fernandez, Aurora
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Strand, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    PAPP5 is involved in the tetrapyrrole mediated plastid signalling during chloroplast development2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 3, e60305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The initiation of chloroplast development in the light is dependent on nuclear encoded components. The nuclear genes encoding key components in the photosynthetic machinery are regulated by signals originating in the plastids. These plastid signals play an essential role in the regulation of photosynthesis associated nuclear genes (PhANGs) when proplastids develop into chloroplasts. One of the plastid signals is linked to the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and accumulation of the intermediates the Mg-ProtoIX and its methyl ester Mg-ProtoIX-ME. Phytochrome-Associated Protein Phosphatase 5 (PAPP5) was isolated in a previous study as a putative Mg-ProtoIX interacting protein. In order to elucidate if there is a biological link between PAPP5 and the tetrapyrrole mediated signal we generated double mutants between the Arabidopsis papp5 and the crd mutants. The crd mutant over-accumulates Mg-ProtoIX and Mg-ProtoIX-ME and the tetrapyrrole accumulation triggers retrograde signalling. The crd mutant exhibits repression of PhANG expression, altered chloroplast morphology and a pale phenotype. However, in the papp5crd double mutant, the crd phenotype is restored and papp5crd accumulated wild type levels of chlorophyll, developed proper chloroplasts and showed normal induction of PhANG expression in response to light. Tetrapyrrole feeding experiments showed that PAPP5 is required to respond correctly to accumulation of tetrapyrroles in the cell and that PAPP5 is most likely a component in the plastid signalling pathway down stream of the tetrapyrrole Mg-ProtoIX/Mg-ProtoIX-ME. Inhibition of phosphatase activity phenocopied the papp5crd phenotype in the crd single mutant demonstrating that PAPP5 phosphatase activity is essential to mediate the retrograde signal and to suppress PhANG expression in the crd mutant. Thus, our results suggest that PAPP5 receives an inbalance in the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis through the accumulation of Mg-ProtoIX and acts as a negative regulator of PhANG expression during chloroplast biogenesis and development.

  • 11.
    Bautista, Rocí­o
    et al.
    University of Malaga.
    Villalobos, David, P.
    University of Malaga.
    Diaz-Moreno, Sara M
    University of Malaga.
    Cantón, Francisco, R.
    University of Malaga.
    Cánovas, Francisco, M.
    University of Malaga.
    Gonzalo Claros, M.
    University of Malaga.
    Toward a Pinus pinaster bacterial artificial chromosome library2007In: Annals of Forest Science, ISSN 1286-4560, E-ISSN 1297-966X, Vol. 64, no 8, 855-864 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conifers are of great economic and ecological importance, but little is known concerning their genomic organization. This study is an attempt to obtain high-quality high-molecular-weight DNA from Pinus pinaster cotyledons and the construction of a pine BAC library. The preparation incorporates modifications like low centrifugation speeds, increase of EDTA concentration for plug maintenance, use of DNase inhibitors to reduce DNA degradation, use of polyvinylpyrrolidone and ascorbate to avoid secondary metabolites, and a brief electrophoresis of the plugs prior to their use. A total of 72 192 clones with an average insert size of 107 kb, which represents an equivalent of 11X pine haploid genomes, were obtained. The proportions of clones lacking inserts or containing chloroplast DNA are both approximately 1.6%. The library was screened with cDNA probes for seven genes, and two clones containing Fd-GOGAT sequences were found, one of them seemingly functional. Ongoing projects aimed at constructing a pinebacterial artificial chromosome library may benefit from the methods described here.

  • 12. Benson, Samuel L
    et al.
    Maheswaran, Pratheesh
    Ware, Maxwell A
    Hunter, C Neil
    Horton, Peter
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Ruban, Alexander V
    Johnson, Matthew P
    An intact light harvesting complex I antenna system is required for complete state transitions in Arabidopsis2015In: Nature plants, ISSN 2055-026X, Vol. 1, no 12, 15176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Efficient photosynthesis depends on maintaining balance between the rate of light-driven electron transport occurring in photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII), located in the chloroplast thylakoid membranes. Balance is achieved through a process of 'state transitions' that increases energy transfer towards PSI when PSII is overexcited (state II), and towards PSII when PSI is overexcited (state I). This is achieved through redox control of the phosphorylation state of light-harvesting antenna complex II (LHCII). PSI is served by both LHCII and four light-harvesting antenna complex I (LHCI) subunits, Lhca1, 2, 3 and 4. Here we demonstrate that despite unchanged levels of LHCII phosphorylation, absence of specific Lhca subunits reduces state transitions in Arabidopsis. The severest phenotype-observed in a mutant lacking Lhca4 (Delta Lhca4)-displayed a 69% reduction compared with the wild type. Yet, surprisingly, the amounts of the PSI-LHCI-LHCII supercomplex isolated by blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) from digitonin-solubilized thylakoids were similar in the wild type and Delta Lhca mutants. Fluorescence excitation spectroscopy revealed that in the wild type this PSI-LHCI-LHCII supercomplex is supplemented by energy transfer from additional LHCII trimers in state II, whose binding is sensitive to digitonin, and which are absent in Delta Lhca4. The grana margins of the thylakoid membrane were found to be the primary site of interaction between this 'extra' LHCII and the PSI-LHCI-LHCII supercomplex in state II. The results suggest that the LHCI complexes mediate energetic interactions between LHCII and PSI in the intact membrane.

  • 13.
    Bergqvist, AS
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Sweden.
    Yokoo, M
    Tohoku University , Japan; .
    Bage, R
    Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Sweden.
    Sato, E
    Tohoku University, Japan; .
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Sweden.
    Detection of the hyaluronan receptor CD44 in the bovine oviductal epithelium2005In: Journal of reproduction and development, ISSN 0916-8818, E-ISSN 1348-4400, Vol. 51, no 4, 445-453 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hyaluronan is involved in fundamental reproductive events such as sperm storage in the female reproductive tract, fertilization, and early embryo development, these functions are presumably mediated by its major cell surface receptor, CD44. The present study was conducted to investigate the presence and localization of CD44 in the bovine oviductal epithelium, using immunohistochemical and Western blot methods on tissue sections and epithelial cell extracts collected from the uterotubal junction (UTJ), isthmus, and ampulla of animals in the oestrus or luteal phase of the oestrous cycle. While positive immunolabelling for CD44 was found on the ad-luminal surface and supra-nuclear region of epithelial cells in all tubal segments investigated, in the UTJ, there were epithelial cells in which the entire cytoplasm positively stained. We found no differences in terms of CD44-positive staining between the different stages of the oestrous cycle. Presence of CD44 was detected by Western blotting in the tubal epithelium as a single band at 200 kDa. Although it appeared in all tubal segments, the expression of CD44 protein was more accentuated in the sperm reservoir (UTJ) than in the other segments. This is the first time CD44 has been detected in the epithelium of the tubal sperm reservoir in cattle, suggesting a pathway for the action of hyaluronan in this segment.

  • 14.
    Biswas, M. K.
    et al.
    Huazhong Agricultural University, China.
    Ahmed, M. B.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Mondal, M. A. A.
    University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Razvy, M. A.
    Huazhong Agricultural University, China.
    Hoque, A.
    University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Islam, R.
    University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Hossaina, M.
    University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Mandal, Abul
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    In exploitation of genetic diversity in potato breeding2010In: Agronomski Glasnik (Agronomy Journal), ISSN 1848-8900, Vol. 72, no 4-5, 261-276 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With a view to select divergent parents genetic diversity was estimated among twenty genotypes. Thirty F1 progenies developed by line-tester mating were studied from seedling generation to first clonal generation for five important agronomic traits. Cluster analysis reveals that the parents could be grouped into seven different clusters. Cluster means showed wide range of variation for several traits among singles as well as multi genotypic clusters. Considering diversity pattern, parents should select from cluster I, III, IV, and V for the improvement of potato. Analysis of variance revealed that all most all the sources of variation were highly significant for all the studied traits in both generations. Parents Challisha, Lalpakri, Patnai, Chamak, Sadagoti, TPS-67 and TPS-364 were found to be good general combiners for tuber yield and yield contribution traits due to their gca effects. The sca effects showed that out of 30 hybrids 12 were found to have specific combining ability for tuber yield and those hybrids also exhibited considerable heterosis for tuber yield and yield contributing traits.

  • 15. Bitocchi, Elena
    et al.
    Rau, Domenico
    Benazzo, Andrea
    Bellucci, Elisa
    Goretti, Daniela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Biagetti, Eleonora
    Panziera, Alex
    Laido, Giovanni
    Rodriguez, Monica
    Gioia, Tania
    Attene, Giovanna
    McClean, Phillip
    Lee, Rian K.
    Jackson, Scott A.
    Bertorelle, Giorgio
    Papa, Roberto
    High Level of Nonsynonymous Changes in Common Bean Suggests That Selection under Domestication Increased Functional Diversity at Target Traits2017In: Frontiers in Plant Science, ISSN 1664-462X, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 7, 2005Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crop species have been deeply affected by the domestication process, and there have been many efforts to identify selection signatures at the genome level. This knowledge will help geneticists to better understand the evolution of organisms, and at the same time, help breeders to implement successful breeding strategies. Here, we focused on domestication in the Mesoamerican gene pool of Phaseolus vulgaris by sequencing 49 gene fragments from a sample of 45 P. vulgaris wild and domesticated accessions, and as controls, two accessions each of the closely related species Phaseolus coccineus and Phaseolus dumosus. An excess of nonsynonymous mutations within the domesticated germplasm was found. Our data suggest that the cost of domestication alone cannot explain fully this finding. Indeed, the significantly higher frequency of polymorphisms in the coding regions observed only in the domesticated plants (compared to noncoding regions), the fact that these mutations were mostly nonsynonymous and appear to be recently derived mutations, and the investigations into the functions of their relative genes (responses to biotic and abiotic stresses), support a scenario that involves new functional mutations selected for adaptation during domestication. Moreover, consistent with this hypothesis, selection analysis and the possibility to compare data obtained for the same genes in different studies of varying sizes, data types, and methodologies allowed us to identify four genes that were strongly selected during domestication. Each selection candidate is involved in plant resistance/tolerance to abiotic stresses, such as heat, drought, and salinity. Overall, our study suggests that domestication acted to increase functional diversity at target loci, which probably controlled traits related to expansion and adaptation to new agro-ecological growing conditions.

  • 16.
    Boutté, Yohann
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Frescatada-Rosa, Márcia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Men, Shuzhen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Chow, Cheung-Ming
    Ebine, Kazuo
    Gustavsson, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Johansson, Lenore
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Ueda, Takashi
    Moore, Ian
    Jürgens, Gerd
    Grebe, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Endocytosis restricts Arabidopsis KNOLLE syntaxin to the cell division plane during late cytokinesis2010In: EMBO Journal, ISSN 0261-4189, E-ISSN 1460-2075, Vol. 29, no 3, 546-58 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cytokinesis represents the final stage of eukaryotic cell division during which the cytoplasm becomes partitioned between daughter cells. The process differs to some extent between animal and plant cells, but proteins of the syntaxin family mediate membrane fusion in the plane of cell division in diverse organisms. How syntaxin localization is kept in check remains elusive. Here, we report that localization of the Arabidopsis KNOLLE syntaxin in the plane of cell division is maintained by sterol-dependent endocytosis involving a clathrin- and DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN1A-dependent mechanism. On genetic or pharmacological interference with endocytosis, KNOLLE mis-localizes to lateral plasma membranes after cell-plate fusion. Fluorescence-loss-in-photo-bleaching and fluorescence-recovery-after-photo-bleaching experiments reveal lateral diffusion of GFP-KNOLLE from the plane of division to lateral membranes. In an endocytosis-defective sterol biosynthesis mutant displaying lateral KNOLLE diffusion, KNOLLE secretory trafficking remains unaffected. Thus, restriction of lateral diffusion by endocytosis may serve to maintain specificity of syntaxin localization during late cytokinesis.

  • 17.
    Canales, Javier
    et al.
    University of Malaga.
    Ávila, Concepción
    University of Malaga.
    Cantón, Francisco
    University of Malaga.
    Pacheco-Villalobos, David
    University of Malaga.
    Díaz-Moreno, Sara
    University of Malaga.
    Ariza, David
    University of Cordoba.
    Molina-Rueda, Juan
    University of Malaga.
    Navarro-Cerrillo, Rafael
    University of Cordoba.
    Claros, M.
    University of Malaga.
    Cánovas, Francisco
    University of Malaga.
    Gene expression profiling in the stem of young maritime pine trees: detection of ammonium stress-responsive genes in the apex2011In: Trees, ISSN 0931-1890, E-ISSN 1432-2285, Vol. 26, no 2, 609-619 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The shoots of young conifer trees represent an interesting model to study the development and growth of conifers from meristematic cells in the shoot apex to differentiated tissues at the shoot base. In this work, microarray analysis was used to monitor contrasting patterns of gene expression between the apex and the base ofmaritime pine shoots. A group of differentially expressed genes were selected and validated by examining their relative expression levels in different sections along thestem, from the top to the bottom. After validation of the microarray data, additional geneexpression analyses were also performed in the shoots of young maritime pine treesexposed to different levels of ammonium nutrition. Our results show that the apex ofmaritime pine trees is extremely sensitive to conditions of ammonium excess or deficiency, as revealed by the observed changes in the expression of stress-responsivegenes. This new knowledge may be used to precocious detection of early symptoms of nitrogen nutritional stresses, thereby increasing survival and growth rates of young treesin managed forests. 

  • 18.
    Cañas, Rafael A
    et al.
    University of Malaga.
    Villalobos, David P
    University of Malaga.
    Díaz-Moreno, Sara
    University of Malaga.
    Cánovas, Francisco M
    University of Malaga.
    Cantón, Francisco R
    University of Malaga.
    Molecular and functional analyses support a role of Ornithine-{delta}-aminotransferase in the provision of glutamate for glutamine biosynthesis during pine germination2008In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 148, no 1, 77-88 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the molecular characterization and functional analysis of a gene (PsdeltaOAT) from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) encoding Orn-delta-aminotransferase (delta-OAT; EC 2.6.1.13), an enzyme of arginine metabolism. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative N-terminal signal peptide for mitochondrial targeting. The polypeptide is similar to other delta-OATs from plants, yeast, and mammals and encoded by a single-copy gene in pine. PsdeltaOAT encodes a functional delta-OAT as determined by expression of the recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and analysis of the active enzyme. The expression of PsdeltaOAT was undetectable in the embryo, but highly induced at early stages of germination and seedling development in all different organs. Transcript levels decreased in later developmental stages, although an increase was observed in lignified stems of 90-d-old plants. An increase of delta-OAT activity was observed in germinating embryos and seedlings and appears to mirror the observed alterations in PsdeltaOAT transcript levels. Similar expression patterns were also observed for genes encoding arginase and isocitrate dehydrogenase. Transcripts of PsdeltaOAT and the arginase gene were found widely distributed in different cell types of pine organs. Consistent with these results a metabolic pathway is proposed for the nitrogen flow from the megagametophyte to the developing seedling, which is also supported by the relative abundance of free amino acids in embryos and seedlings. Taken together, our data support that delta-OAT plays an important role in this process providing glutamate for glutamine biosynthesis during early pine growth.

  • 19.
    Chen, Yang-Er
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. College of Life Sciences, Sichuan Agricultural University, Ya'an, China.
    Yuan, Shu
    Schröder, Wolfgang P.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Comparison of methods for extracting thylakoid membranes of Arabidopsis plants2016In: Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, ISSN 0031-9317, E-ISSN 1399-3054, Vol. 156, no 1, 3-12 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robust and reproducible methods for extracting thylakoid membranes are required for the analysis of photosynthetic processes in higher plants such as Arabidopsis. Here, we compare three methods for thylakoid extraction using two different buffers. Method I involves homogenizing the plant material witha metal/glass blender; method II involves manually grinding the plant materialin ice-cold grinding buffer with a mortar and method III entails snap-freezing followed by manual grinding with a mortar, after which the frozen powder is thawed in isolation buffer. Thylakoid membrane samples extracted using each method were analyzed with respect to protein and chlorophyll content, yields relative to starting material, oxygen-evolving activity, protein complex content and phosphorylation. We also examined how the use of fresh and frozen thylakoid material affected the extracts’ contents of protein complexes. The use of different extraction buffers did not significantly alter the protein contentof the extracts in any case. Method I yielded thylakoid membranes with the highest purity and oxygen-evolving activity. Method III used low amounts of starting material and was capable of capturing rapid phosphorylation changes in the sample at the cost of higher levels of contamination. Method II yielded thylakoid membrane extracts with properties intermediate between those obtained with the other two methods. Finally, frozen and freshly isolated thylakoid membranes performed identically in blue native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis experiments conducted in order to separate multimeric protein supracomplexes.

  • 20. Chow, Wah Soon
    et al.
    Lee, Hae-Youn
    He, Jie
    Hendrickson, Luke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Research School of Biological Sciences, Australian National University, GPO Box 475, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia.
    Hong, Young-Nam
    Matsubara, Shizue
    Photoinactivation of photosystem II in leaves2005In: Photosynthesis Research, ISSN 0166-8595, E-ISSN 1573-5079, Vol. 84, no 1-3, 35-41 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photoinactivation of Photosystem II (PS II), the light-induced loss of ability to evolve oxygen, inevitably occurs under any light environment in nature, counteracted by repair. Under certain conditions, the extent of photoinactivation of PS II depends on the photon exposure (light dosage, x), rather than the irradiance or duration of illumination per se, thus obeying the law of reciprocity of irradiance and duration of illumination, namely, that equal photon exposure produces an equal effect. If the probability of photoinactivation (p) of PS II is directly proportional to an increment in photon exposure (p = kDeltax, where k is the probability per unit photon exposure), it can be deduced that the number of active PS II complexes decreases exponentially as a function of photon exposure: N = Noexp(-kx). Further, since a photon exposure is usually achieved by varying the illumination time (t) at constant irradiance (I), N = Noexp(-kI t), i.e., N decreases exponentially with time, with a rate coefficient of photoinactivation kI, where the product kI is obviously directly proportional to I. Given that N = Noexp(-kx), the quantum yield of photoinactivation of PS II can be defined as -dN/dx = kN, which varies with the number of active PS II complexes remaining. Typically, the quantum yield of photoinactivation of PS II is ca. 0.1micromol PS II per mol photons at low photon exposure when repair is inhibited. That is, when about 10(7) photons have been received by leaf tissue, one PS II complex is inactivated. Some species such as grapevine have a much lower quantum yield of photoinactivation of PS II, even at a chilling temperature. Examination of the longer-term time course of photoinactivation of PS II in capsicum leaves reveals that the decrease in N deviates from a single-exponential decay when the majority of the PS II complexes are inactivated in the absence of repair. This can be attributed to the formation of strong quenchers in severely-photoinactivated PS II complexes, able to dissipate excitation energy efficiently and to protect the remaining active neighbours against damage by light.

  • 21. Cifuentes, Carolina
    et al.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Emons, Anne Mie C.
    Biosynthesis of Callose and Cellulose by Detergent Extracts of Tobacco Cell Membranes and Quantification of the Polymers Synthesized in vitro2010In: J INTEGR PLANT BIOL, ISSN 1672-9072, Vol. 52, no 2, 221-233 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The conditions that favor the in vitro synthesis of cellulose from tobacco BY-2 cell extracts were determined. The procedure leading to the highest yield of cellulose consisted of incubating digitonin extracts of membranes from 11-day-old tobacco BY-2 cells in the presence of 1 mM UDP-glucose, 8 mM Ca2+ and 8 mM Mg2+. Under these conditions, up to nearly 40% of the polysaccharides synthesized in vitro corresponded to cellulose, the other polymer synthesized being callose. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed the occurrence of two types of structures in the synthetic reactions. The first type consisted of small aggregates with a diameter between 3 and 5 nm that associated to form fibrillar strings of a maximum length of 400 nm. These structures were sensitive to the acetic/nitric acid treatment of Updegraff and corresponded to callose. The second type of structures was resistant to the Updegraff reagent and corresponded to straight cellulose microfibrils of 2-3 nm in diameter and 200 nm to up to 5 mu m in length. In vitro reactions performed on electron microscopy grids indicated that the minimal rate of microfibril elongation in vitro is 120 nm/min. Measurements of retardance by liquid crystal polarization microscopy as a function of time showed that small groups of microfibrils increased in retardance by up to 0.047 nm/min per pixel, confirming the formation of organized structures.

  • 22.
    Clergeot, Pierre-Henri
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Rivetti, Claudia
    Stockholm University.
    Hamiduzzaman, M. Md.
    Stockholm University.
    Ekengren, Sophia
    Stockholm University.
    The corky root rot pathogen, Pyrenochaeta lycopersici manipulates tomato roots with molecules secreted early during their interaction2012In: Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica - Section B, ISSN 0906-4710, E-ISSN 1651-1913, Vol. 62, no 4, 300-310 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corky root rot is a ubiquitous soil-borne disease of tomato caused by the pathogen Pyrenochaeta lycopersici. This filamentous fungus is found on the roots of many crops and can persist in the soil up to 15 years as microsclerotia. High prevalence of corky root rot can be partly explained by the endurance and the broad host range of P. lycopersici, but how this fungus can gain access to host roots is still poorly understood, as its competitive saprophytic ability is very low. We have combined microscopy and reporter gene techniques to investigate the tomato-P. lycopersici interaction in vitro, and discovered the pathogen secretes molecules that change the direction of root growth and induce cell necrosis specifically in the apical part of the root of tomato ( apex, elongation zone and beginning of the root hair zone). Moreover, we found that the fungus preferentially infects immature root cells that are sensitive to these secreted fungal molecules, whereas infection is blocked in mature and insensitive parts of the root. Our study sheds light on novel and important features of the biology of this pathogen, which could contribute to its fitness in the rhizosphere.

  • 23. Collen, Pi Nyvall
    et al.
    Collen, Jonas
    Reis, Marcelo da Silva
    Pedersen, Marianne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
    Setubal, Joao C.
    Varani, Alessandro M.
    Colepicolo, Pio
    Oliveira, Mariana C.
    Analysis of expressed sequence tags from the agarophyte Gracilaria tenuistipitata (Rhodophyta)2012In: Journal of Applied Phycology, ISSN 0921-8971, E-ISSN 1573-5176, Vol. 24, no 4, 641-647 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A total of 3,631 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were established from two size-selected cDNA libraries made from the tetrasporophytic phase of the agarophytic red alga Gracilaria tenuistipitata. The average sizes of the inserts in the two libraries were 1,600 bp and 600 bp, with an average length of the edited sequences of 850 bp. Clustering gave 2,387 assembled sequences with a redundancy of 53%. Of the ESTs, 65% had significant matches to sequences deposited in public databases, 11% to proteins without known function, and 35% were novel. The most represented ESTs were a Na/K-transporting ATPase, a hedgehog-like protein, a glycine dehydrogenase and an actin. Most of the identified genes were involved in primary metabolism and housekeeping. The largest functional group was thus genes involved in metabolism with 14% of the ESTs; other large functional categories included energy, transcription, and protein synthesis and destination. The codon usage was examined using a subset of the data, and the codon bias was found to be limited with all codon combinations used.

  • 24. Crutsinger, G M
    et al.
    Sanders, N J
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Abreu, Ilka Nacif
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Wardle, D A
    Ecosystem retrogression leads to increased insect abundance and herbivory across an island chronosequence2008In: Functional Ecology, ISSN 0269-8463, E-ISSN 1365-2435, Vol. 22, no 5, 816-823 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    1. Ecosystem retrogression, the decline-phase of ecosystem development, occurs during the long-term absence of catastrophic disturbance. It usually involves increased nutrient limitation over time, and leads to reductions in primary productivity, decomposition, and nutrient cycling.

    2. As a consequence, retrogression can alter the quality and abundance of host plants as food resources, but little is known about how these changes influence herbivore densities and foliage consumption.

    3. In this study, we used a 5000-year-old chronosequence of forested islands in northern Sweden on which retrogression occurs in the absence of lightning-induced wildfire. We asked whether retrogression affected the abundance and herbivory of a dominant herbivorous weevil (Deporaus betulae) and the quality and productivity of a dominant host-tree, mountain birch (Betula pubescens).

    4. Betula pubescens trees on retrogressed islands were less productive and produced smaller, tougher leaves that were lower in nutrients and higher in secondary metabolites than did those trees on earlier-successional islands.

    5. Despite the lower density and what ecologists might perceive as poorer quality of host plants, we observed several-fold higher weevil abundance and damage on retrogressed islands. This suggests that weevils might prefer the poorer quality leaves with higher secondary metabolites that occur on nutrient stressed host trees.

    6. Our results show that ecosystem retrogression increases susceptibility of B. pubescens trees to attack by herbivorous weevils.

    7. Our study provides evidence that ecosystem retrogression and associated shifts in the quantity and quality of available resources can operate as an important driver of abundance of a dominant insect herbivore.

  • 25.
    da Fonseca, Rute R.
    et al.
    Univ Copenhagen, Ctr GeoGenet, DK-1350 Copenhagen, Denmark.;Univ Copenhagen, Bioinformat Ctr, DK-2200 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Smith, Bruce D.
    Smithsonian Inst, Natl Museum Nat Hist, Dept Anthropol, Program Human Ecol & Archaeobiol, Washington, DC 20560 USA..
    Wales, Nathan
    Univ Copenhagen, Ctr GeoGenet, DK-1350 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Cappellini, Enrico
    Univ Copenhagen, Ctr GeoGenet, DK-1350 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Skoglund, Pontus
    Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Dept Genet, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Fumagalli, Matteo
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Integrat Biol, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Samaniego, Jose Alfredo
    Univ Copenhagen, Ctr GeoGenet, DK-1350 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Caroe, Christian
    Univ Copenhagen, Ctr GeoGenet, DK-1350 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Avila-Arcos, Mara C.
    Univ Copenhagen, Ctr GeoGenet, DK-1350 Copenhagen, Denmark.;Stanford Univ, Dept Genet, Sch Med, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Hufnagel, David E.
    Iowa State Univ, Dept Ecol Evolut & Organismal Biol, Ames, IA 50011 USA..
    Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand
    Univ Copenhagen, Ctr GeoGenet, DK-1350 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Vieira, Filipe Garrett
    Univ Copenhagen, Ctr GeoGenet, DK-1350 Copenhagen, Denmark.;Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Integrat Biol, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Arriaza, Bernardo
    Univ Tarapaca, Inst Alta Invest, Arica 15101, Chile..
    Willerslev, Eske
    Univ Copenhagen, Ctr GeoGenet, DK-1350 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Nielsen, Rasmus
    Univ Copenhagen, Ctr GeoGenet, DK-1350 Copenhagen, Denmark.;Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Integrat Biol & Stat, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Hufford, Matthew B.
    Iowa State Univ, Dept Ecol Evolut & Organismal Biol, Ames, IA 50011 USA..
    Albrechtsen, Anders
    Univ Copenhagen, Bioinformat Ctr, DK-2200 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey
    Univ Calif Davis, Dept Plant Sci, Ctr Populat Biol, Davis, CA 95616 USA.;Univ Calif Davis, Genome Ctr, Davis, CA 95616 USA..
    Gilbert, M. Thomas P.
    Univ Copenhagen, Ctr GeoGenet, DK-1350 Copenhagen, Denmark.;Curtin Univ, Trace & Environm DNA Lab, Dept Environm & Agr, Perth, WA 6102, Australia..
    The origin and evolution of maize in the Southwestern United States2015In: Nature Plants, ISSN 2055-026X, Vol. 1, no 1, UNSP 14003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The origin of maize (Zea mays mays) in the US Southwest remains contentious, with conflicting archaeological data supporting either coastal(1-4) or highland(5,6) routes of diffusion of maize into the United States. Furthermore, the genetics of adaptation to the new environmental and cultural context of the Southwest is largely uncharacterized(7). To address these issues, we compared nuclear DNA from 32 archaeological maize samples spanning 6,000 years of evolution to modern landraces. We found that the initial diffusion of maize into the Southwest about 4,000 years ago is likely to have occurred along a highland route, followed by gene flow from a lowland coastal maize beginning at least 2,000 years ago. Our population genetic analysis also enabled us to differentiate selection during domestication for adaptation to the climatic and cultural environment of the Southwest, identifying adaptation loci relevant to drought tolerance and sugar content.

  • 26.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science, Örebro University, Grythyttan, Sweden.
    Tham, WilhelmÖrebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science, Örebro University, Grythyttan, Sweden.
    Nordic PFGE meeting January 27–28, 2000, Uppsala, Sweden2000Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Decker, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    UDP-sugar metabolizing pyrophosphorylases in plants: formation of precursors for essential glycosylation-reactions2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    UDP-sugar metabolizing pyrophosphorylases provide the primary mechanism for de novo synthesis of UDP-sugars, which can then be used for myriads of glycosyltranferase reactions, producing cell wall carbohydrates, sucrose, glycoproteins and glycolipids, as well as many other glycosylated compounds. The pyrophosphorylases can be divided into three families: UDP-Glc pyrophosphorylase (UGPase), UDP-sugar pyrophosphorylase (USPase) and UDP-N-acety lglucosamine pyrophosphorylase (UAGPase), which can be discriminated both by differences in accepted substrate range and amino acid sequences.

    This thesis focuses both on experimental examination (and re-examination) of some enzymatic/ biochemical properties of selected members of the UGPases and USPases and UAGPase families and on the design and implementation of a strategy to study in vivo roles of these pyrophosphorylases using specific inhibitors. In the first part, substrate specificities of members of the Arabidopsis UGPase, USPase and UAGPase families were comprehensively surveyed and kinetically analyzed, with barley UGPase also further studied with regard to itspH dependency, regulation by oligomerization, etc. Whereas all the enzymes preferentially used UTP as nucleotide donor, they differed in their specificity for sugar-1-P. UGPases had high activity with D-Glc-1-P, but could also react with Frc-1-P, whereas USPase reacted with arange of sugar-1-phosphates, including D-Glc-1-P, D-Gal-1-P, D-GalA-1-P, β-L-Ara-1-P and α-D-Fuc-1-P. In contrast, UAGPase2 reacted only with D-GlcNAc-1-P, D-GalNAc-1-P and, to some extent, with D-Glc-1-P. A structure activity relationship was established to connect enzyme activity, the examined sugar-1-phosphates and the three pyrophosphorylases. The UGPase/USPase/UAGPase active sites were subsequently compared in an attempt to identify amino acids which may contribute to the experimentally determined differences in substrate specificities.

    The second part of the thesis deals with identification and characterization of inhibitors of the pyrophosphorylases and with studies on in vivo effects of those inhibitors in Arabidopsis-based systems. A novel luminescence-based high-throughput assay system was designed, which allowed for quantitative measurement of UGPase and USPase activities, down to a pmol per min level. The assay was then used to screen a chemical library (which contained 17,500 potential inhibitors) to identify several compounds affecting UGPase and USPase. Hit-optimization on one of the compounds revealed even stronger inhibitors of UGPase and USPase which also strongly inhibited Arabidopsis pollen germination, by disturbing UDP-sugar metabolism. The inhibitors may represent useful tools to study in vivo roles of the pyrophosphorylases, as a complement to previous genetics-based studies.

    The thesis also includes two review papers on mechanisms of synthesis of NDP-sugars. The first review covered the characterization of USPase from both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, whereas the second review was a comprehensive survey of NDP-sugar producing enzymes (not only UDP-sugar producing and not only pyrophosphorylases). All these enzymes were discussed with respect to their substrate specificities and structural features (if known) and their proposed in vivo functions.

  • 28.
    Decker, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Öberg, Christopher
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Kleczkowski, Leszek A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Identification and characterization of inhibitors of UDP-glucose and UDP-sugar pyrophosphorylases for in vivo studiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    UDP-sugars serve as ultimate precursors in hundreds of glycosylation reactions (e.g. for protein and lipidglycosylation, synthesis of sucrose, cell wall polysaccharides, etc.), underlying an important role of UDP-sugar-producing enzymes in cellular metabolism. However, genetic studies on mechanisms of UDP-sugarformation were frequently hampered by reproductive impairment of the resulting mutants, making it difficult to assess anin vivorole of a given enzyme. Here, a chemical library containing 17 500 compounds wasseparately screened against purified UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase) and UDP-sugar pyrophosphorylase (USPase), both enzymes representing the primary mechanisms of UDP-sugar formation. Several compounds have been identified which, at 50lM, exerted at least 50% inhibition of the pyrophosphorylaseactivity. In all cases, both UGPase and USPase activities were inhibited, probably reflecting common structural features of active sites of these enzymes. One of these compounds (cmp #6), a salicylamide derivative, was found as effective inhibitor of Arabidopsis pollen germination and Arabidopsis cell culture growth. Hit optimization on cmp #6 yielded two analogs (cmp #6D and cmp #6D2), which acted as uncompetitive inhibitors against both UGPase and USPase, and were strong inhibitors in the pollen test, with apparent inhibition constants of less than 1lM. Their effects on pollen germination were relieved by addition of UDP-glucose and UDP-galactose, suggesting that the inhibitors targeted UDP-sugar formation. The results suggest that cmp #6 and its analogs may represent useful tools to study in vivo roles of the pyrophosphorylases, helping to overcome the limitations of genetic approaches.

  • 29.
    Dinca, Vlad
    et al.
    Univ Guelph, Biodivers Inst Ontario, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada..
    Backstrom, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Dapporto, Leonardo
    Oxford Brookes Univ, Dept Biol & Med Sci, Oxford OX3 0BP, England..
    Friberg, Magne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Garcia-Barros, Enrique
    Univ Autonoma Madrid, Dept Biol, Madrid 28049, Spain..
    Hebert, Paul D. N.
    Univ Guelph, Biodivers Inst Ontario, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada..
    Hernandez-Roldan, Juan
    Univ Autonoma Madrid, Dept Biol, Madrid 28049, Spain..
    Hornett, Emily
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Zool, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, England..
    Lukhtanov, Vladimir
    Russian Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Dept Karyosystemat, St Petersburg 199034, Russia..
    Marec, Frantisek
    Univ South Bohemia, Fac Sci, Ceske Budejovice 37005, Czech Republic..
    DNA barcodes highlight unique research models in European butterflies2015In: Genome, ISSN 0831-2796, E-ISSN 1480-3321, Vol. 58, no 5, 212-212 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Dobrenel, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Institut Jean-Pierre Bourgin, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, AgroParisTech, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Université Paris-Saclay, Versailles, France; Université Paris-Sud–Université Paris-Saclay, Orsay, France.
    Mancera-Martinez, Eder
    Forzani, Celine
    Azzopardi, Marianne
    Davanture, Marlene
    Moreau, Manon
    Schepetilnikov, Mikhail
    Chicher, Johana
    Langella, Olivier
    Zivy, Michel
    Robaglia, Christophe
    Ryabova, Lyubov A.
    Hanson, Johannes
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Meyer, Christian
    The Arabidopsis TOR Kinase Specifically Regulates the Expression of Nuclear Genes Coding for Plastidic Ribosomal Proteins and the Phosphorylation of the Cytosolic Ribosomal Protein S62016In: Frontiers in Plant Science, ISSN 1664-462X, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 7, 1611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein translation is an energy consuming process that has to be fine-tuned at both the cell and organism levels to match the availability of resources. The target of rapamycin kinase (TOR) is a key regulator of a large range of biological processes in response to environmental cues. In this study, we have investigated the effects of TOR inactivation on the expression and regulation of Arabidopsis ribosomal proteins at different levels of analysis, namely from transcriptomic to phosphoproteomic. TOR inactivation resulted in a coordinated down-regulation of the transcription and translation of nuclear-encoded mRNAs coding for plastidic ribosomal proteins, which could explain the chlorotic phenotype of the TOR silenced plants. We have identified in the 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) of this set of genes a conserved sequence related to the 5' terminal oligopyrimidine motif, which is known to confer translational regulation by the TOR kinase in other eukaryotes. Furthermore, the phosphoproteomic analysis of the ribosomal fraction following TOR inactivation revealed a lower phosphorylation of the conserved Ser240 residue in the C-terminal region of the 40S ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6). These results were confirmed by Western blot analysis using an antibody that specifically recognizes phosphorylated Ser240 in RPS6. Finally, this antibody was used to follow TOR activity in plants. Our results thus uncover a multi-level regulation of plant ribosomal genes and proteins by the TOR kinase.

  • 31.
    Du, Xueyu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Gellerstedt, Göran
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Li, Jiebing
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Universal fractionation of lignin-carbohydrate complexes (LCCs) from lignocellulosic biomass: an example using spruce wood2013In: The Plant Journal, ISSN 0960-7412, E-ISSN 1365-313X, Vol. 74, no 2, 328-338 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is of both theoretical and practical importance to develop a universally applicable approach for the fractionation and sensitive lignin characterization of lignin-carbohydrate complexes (LCCs) from all types of lignocellulosic biomass, both natively and after various types of processing. In the present study, a previously reported fractionation approach that is applicable for eucalyptus (hardwood) and flax (non-wood) was further improved by introducing an additional step of barium hydroxide precipitation to isolate the mannan-enriched LCC (glucomannan-lignin, GML), in order to suit softwood species as well. Spruce wood was used as the softwood sample. As indicated by the recovery yield and composition analysis, all of the lignin was recovered in three LCC fractions: a glucan-enriched fraction (glucan-lignin, GL), a mannan-enriched fraction (GML) and a xylan-enriched fraction (xylan-lignin, XL). All of the LCCs had high molecular masses and were insoluble or barely soluble in a dioxane/water solution. Carbohydrate and lignin signals were observed in H-1 NMR, C-13 CP-MAS NMR and normal- or high-sensitivity 2D HSQC NMR analyses. The carbohydrate and lignin constituents in each LCC fraction are therefore believed to be chemically bonded rather than physically mixed with one another. The three LCC fractions were found to be distinctly different from each other in terms of their lignin structures, as revealed by highly sensitive analyses by thioacidolysis-GC, thioacidolysis-SEC and pyrolysis-GC.

  • 32. Edger, Patrick P.
    et al.
    Heidel-Fischer, Hanna M.
    Bekaert, Michael
    Rota, Jadranka
    Gloeckner, Gernot
    Platts, Adrian E.
    Heckel, David G.
    Der, Joshua P.
    Wafula, Eric K.
    Tang, Michelle
    Hofberger, Johannes A.
    Smithson, Ann
    Hall, Jocelyn C.
    Blanchette, Matthieu
    Bureau, Thomas E.
    Wright, Stephen I.
    dePamphilis, Claude W.
    Schranz, M. Eric
    Barker, Michael S.
    Conant, Gavin C.
    Wahlberg, Niklas
    Vogel, Heiko
    Pires, J. Chris
    Wheat, Christopher W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    The butterfly plant arms-race escalated by gene and genome duplications2015In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 112, no 27, 8362-8366 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coevolutionary interactions are thought to have spurred the evolution of key innovations and driven the diversification of much of life on Earth. However, the genetic and evolutionary basis of the innovations that facilitate such interactions remains poorly understood. We examined the coevolutionary interactions between plants (Brassicales) and butterflies (Pieridae), and uncovered evidence for an escalating evolutionary arms-race. Although gradual changes in trait complexity appear to have been facilitated by allelic turnover, key innovations are associated with gene and genome duplications. Furthermore, we show that the origins of both chemical defenses and of molecular counter adaptations were associated with shifts in diversification rates during the arms-race. These findings provide an important connection between the origins of biodiversity, coevolution, and the role of gene and genome duplications as a substrate for novel traits.

  • 33.
    Erik, Edlund
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Regulatory Control of Autumn Senescence in Populus tremula2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Autumn senescence is a visually spectacular phenomenon in which trees prepare for the oncoming winter. The mechanism for regulation of autumn senescence in trees has been very hard to pinpoint. In this thesis the main focus is to investigate how autumn senescence is regulated in aspens (Populus tremula).

    Previous work has established that autumn senescence in aspens is under daylight control, in this thesis the metabolic status and the effect on autumn senescence was investigated. The metabolic status was altered by girdling which leads to accumulation of photosynthates in the canopy. This resulted in an earlier onset of senescence but also the speed of senescence was changed. At the onset of senescence the girdled trees also accumulated or retained anthocyanins.

    The nitrogen status of aspens during autumn senescence was also investigated, we found that high doses of fertilization could significantly delay the onset of senescence. The effects of various nitrogen forms was investigated by delivering organic and inorganic nitrogen through a precision fertilization delivery system that could inject solutes directly into the xylem of the mature aspens. The study showed that addition of nitrate delayed senescence, addition of arginine did not have any effect on the autumn senescence in aspens, and furthermore the nitrate altered the trees leaf metabolism that was more profound in high dosages of supplied nitrate. 

    Cytokinins are plant hormones believed to delay or block senescence, studies have suggested that the decrease of cytokinins and/or cytokinin signalling may precede senescence in some plants. To investigate how cytokinin regulates autumn senescence in aspens we profiled 34 cytokinin types in a free growing mature aspen. The study begun before autumn senescence was initiated and ended with the shedding of the leaves, and spanned three consecutive years. The study showed that the individual cytokinin profiles varied significantly between the years, this despite that senescence was initiated at the same time each year. Senescence was furthermore not connected to the depletion of either active or total cytokinins levels. The gene pattern of genes known to be associated with cytokinin was also studied, but no gene expression pattern that the profile generated could explain the onset of senescence. These results suggest that the depletion of cytokinins is unlikely to explain the tightly regulated onset of autumn leaf senescence in aspen.

  • 34.
    Fagerlind, Magnus
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Stålhammar, Hans
    VikingGenetics, Skara.
    Olsson, Björn
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Klinga-Levan, Karin
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Expression of miRNAs in Bull Spermatozoa Correlates with Fertility Rates2015In: Reproduction in domestic animals (1990), ISSN 0936-6768, E-ISSN 1439-0531, Vol. 50, no 4, 587-594 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Fallahshahroudi, Amir
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Domestication Effects on the Stress Response in Chickens: Genetics, Physiology, and Behaviour2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Animal domestication, the process where animals become adapted to living in proximity to humans, is associated with the alteration of multiple traits, including decreased fearfulness and stress response. With an estimated population of 50 billion, the domesticated chicken is the most populous avian species in the world. Hundreds of chicken breeds have been developed for meat and egg production, hobby or research purposes. Multidirectional selection and the relaxation of natural selection in captivity have created immense phenotypic diversity amongst domesticates in a relatively short evolutionary time. The extensive phenotypic diversity, existence of the wild ancestor, and feasibility of intercrossing various breeds makes the chicken a suitable model animal for deciphering genetic determinants of complex traits such as stress response. We used chicken domestication as a model to gain insights about the mechanisms that regulate stress response in an avian species. We studied behavioural and physiological stress response in the ancestral Red Junglefowl and one of its domesticated progenies, White Leghorn. An advanced intercross between the aforementioned breeds was later used to map genetic loci underlying modification of stress response. The general pattern of the stress response in chickens was comparable with that reported in mammals, however we identified distinctive differences in the stress modulatory pathways in chickens. We showed that changes in the expression levels of several stress modulatory genes in the brain, the pituitary and the adrenal glands underlie the observed modified stress response in domesticated chickens. Using quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping, several QTL underlying stress induced corticosterone, aldosterone and baseline dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels were detected. As a next step, we combined QTL mapping with gene expression (eQTL) mapping and narrowed two QTL down to the putative causal genes, SERPINA10 and PDE1C. Both of these genes were differentially expressed in the adrenal glands of White Leghorn and the Red Junglefowl, had overlapping eQTL with hormonal QTL, and their expression levels in the adrenal glands were correlated with plasma levels of corticosterone and al-dosterone. These two genes thus serve as strong candidates for further functional investigation concerning modification of the stress response during domestication. This dissertation increase the knowledge about genetics and physiology of the stress response in an avian species and its modification during domestication. Our findings expand the basic knowledge about the stress response in chicken, which can potentially be used to improve welfare through appropriate genetic selection.

  • 36. Felten, Judith
    et al.
    Kohler, Annegret
    Morin, Emmanuelle
    Bhalerao, Rishikesh P
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Palme, Klaus
    Martin, Francis
    Ditengou, Franck A
    Legue, Valerie
    The ectomycorrhizal fungus laccaria bicolor stimulates lateral root formation in poplar and arabidopsis through auxin transport and signaling2009In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 151, no 4, 1991-2005 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The early phase of the interaction between tree roots and ectomycorrhizal fungi, prior to symbiosis establishment, is accompanied by a stimulation of lateral root (LR) development. We aimed to identify gene networks that regulate LR development during the early signal exchanges between poplar (Populus tremula x Populus alba) and the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor with a focus on auxin transport and signaling pathways. Our data demonstrated that increased LR development in poplar and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) interacting with L. bicolor is not dependent on the ability of the plant to form ectomycorrhizae. LR stimulation paralleled an increase in auxin accumulation at root apices. Blocking plant polar auxin transport with 1-naphthylphthalamic acid inhibited LR development and auxin accumulation. An oligoarray-based transcript profile of poplar roots exposed to molecules released by L. bicolor revealed the differential expression of 2,945 genes, including several components of polar auxin transport (PtaPIN and PtaAUX genes), auxin conjugation (PtaGH3 genes), and auxin signaling (PtaIAA genes). Transcripts of PtaPIN9, the homolog of Arabidopsis AtPIN2, and several PtaIAAs accumulated specifically during the early interaction phase. Expression of these rapidly induced genes was repressed by 1-naphthylphthalamic acid. Accordingly, LR stimulation upon contact with L. bicolor in Arabidopsis transgenic plants defective in homologs of these genes was decreased or absent. Furthermore, in Arabidopsis pin2, the root apical auxin increase during contact with the fungus was modified. We propose a model in which fungus-induced auxin accumulation at the root apex stimulates LR formation through a mechanism involving PtaPIN9-dependent auxin redistribution together with PtaIAA-based auxin signaling.

  • 37.
    Fernández-Pozo, Noé
    et al.
    University of Malaga.
    Canales, Javier
    University of Malaga.
    Guerrero-Fernández, Darío
    University of Malaga.
    Villalobos, David P
    University of Malaga.
    Díaz-Moreno, Sara M
    University of Malaga.
    Bautista, Rocío
    University of Malaga.
    Flores-Monterroso, Arantxa
    University of Malaga.
    Guevara, M Ángeles
    CIFOR-UNIA.
    Perdiguero, Pedro
    Universidad Politecnica de Madrid.
    Collada, Carmen
    Universidad Politecnica de Madrid.
    Cervera, M Teresa
    Universidad Politecnica de Madrid.
    Soto, Alvaro
    Universidad Politecnica de Madrid.
    Ordás, Ricardo
    University of Oviedo.
    Cantón, Francisco R
    University of Malaga.
    Avila, Concepción
    University of Malaga.
    Cánovas, Francisco M
    University of Malaga.
    Claros, M Gonzalo
    University of Malaga.
    EuroPineDB: a high-coverage web database for maritime pine transcriptome2011In: BMC Genomics, ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 12, 366- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Pinus pinaster is an economically and ecologically important species that is becoming a woody gymnosperm model. Its enormous genome size makes whole-genome sequencing approaches are hard to apply. Therefore, the expressed portion of the genome has to be characterised and the results and annotations have to be stored in dedicated databases.

    DESCRIPTION: EuroPineDB is the largest sequence collection available for a single pine species, Pinus pinaster (maritime pine), since it comprises 951 641 raw sequence reads obtained from non-normalised cDNA libraries and high-throughput sequencing from adult (xylem, phloem, roots, stem, needles, cones, strobili) and embryonic (germinated embryos, buds, callus) maritime pine tissues. Using open-source tools, sequences were optimally pre-processed, assembled, and extensively annotated (GO, EC and KEGG terms, descriptions, SNPs, SSRs, ORFs and InterPro codes). As a result, a 10.5× P. pinaster genome was covered and assembled in 55 322 UniGenes. A total of 32 919 (59.5%) of P. pinaster UniGenes were annotated with at least one description, revealing at least 18 466 different genes. The complete database, which is designed to be scalable, maintainable, and expandable, is freely available at: http://www.scbi.uma.es/pindb/. It can be retrieved by gene libraries, pine species, annotations, UniGenes and microarrays (i.e., the sequences are distributed in two-colour microarrays; this is the only conifer database that provides this information) and will be periodically updated. Small assemblies can be viewed using a dedicated visualisation tool that connects them with SNPs. Any sequence or annotation set shown on-screen can be downloaded. Retrieval mechanisms for sequences and gene annotations are provided.

    CONCLUSIONS: The EuroPineDB with its integrated information can be used to reveal new knowledge, offers an easy-to-use collection of information to directly support experimental work (including microarray hybridisation), and provides deeper knowledge on the maritime pine transcriptome.

  • 38.
    Fountain, Toby
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology. Univ Helsinki, Dept Biosci, Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Sheffield, Dept Anim & Plant Sci, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Ravinet, Mark
    Natl Inst Genet, Ecol Genet Div, Mishima, Shizuoka, Japan..
    Naylor, Richard
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Anim & Plant Sci, Sheffield S10 2TN, S Yorkshire, England..
    Reinhardt, Klaus
    Tech Univ Dresden, Appl Zool, Dept Biol, D-01069 Dresden, Germany..
    Butlin, Roger K.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Marine Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Sheffield, Dept Anim & Plant Sci, Sheffield S10 2TN, S Yorkshire, England..
    A Linkage Map and QTL Analysis for Pyrethroid Resistance in the Bed Bug Cimex lectularius2016In: G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics, ISSN 2160-1836, E-ISSN 2160-1836, Vol. 6, no 12, 4059-4066 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid evolution of insecticide resistance remains one of the biggest challenges in the control of medically and economically important pests. Insects have evolved a diverse range of mechanisms to reduce the efficacy of the commonly used classes of insecticides, and finding the genetic basis of resistance is a major aid to management. In a previously unstudied population, we performed an F-2 resistance mapping cross for the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius, for which insecticide resistance is increasingly widespread. Using 334 SNP markers obtained through RAD-sequencing, we constructed the first linkage map for the species, consisting of 14 putative linkage groups (LG), with a length of 407 cM and an average marker spacing of 1.3 cM. The linkage map was used to reassemble the recently published reference genome, facilitating refinement and validation of the current genome assembly. We detected a major QTL on LG12 associated with insecticide resistance, occurring in close proximity (1.2 Mb) to a carboxylesterase encoding candidate gene for pyrethroid resistance. This provides another example of this candidate gene playing a major role in determining survival in a bed bug population following pesticide resistance evolution. The recent availability of the bed bug genome, complete with a full list of potential candidate genes related to insecticide resistance, in addition to the linkage map generated here, provides an excellent resource for future research on the development and spread of insecticide resistance in this resurging pest species.

  • 39.
    Foyer, Pernilla
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies. Linköpings universitet, Biologi.
    Svedberg, Anna-Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Biologi.
    Nilsson, Emma
    Linköpings universitet, Biologi.
    Wilsson, Erik
    Swedish Armed Forces Dog Training Unit, Märsta, Sweden.
    Olsen Faresjö, Åshild
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin.
    Jensen, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Biologi.
    Behavior and cortisol responses of dogs evaluated in a standardized temperament test for military working dogs2016In: Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, ISSN 1558-7878, E-ISSN 1878-7517, Vol. 11, 7-12 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Military and police working dogs are often exposed to stressful or threatening events, and an improper response, e.g., fear, may implicate both reduced working efficiency and welfare. Therefore, identifying individuals that display a favorable response to potentially threatening situations is of great interest. In the present study, we investigated behavior responses of 85 prospective military working dogs in 4 subtests in a standardized temperament test used to select working dogs for the Swedish Armed Forces. Our goal was to evaluate behavioral responses in specific subtests and cortisol responses of candidate dogs. After dogs were rated as approved or nonapproved based on the test leader’s assessment of the full test result, we independently analyzed video recordings of 4 subtests. In addition, for 37 dogs, we analyzed pretest and posttest salivary cortisol levels. Dogs which were approved by the test leader for further training scored higher in the video recordings on emotionality and, in particular, fear-related behavior during a subset of the test and had higher levels of cortisol both before and after the test, than nonapproved dogs. Although this may actually reflect the desired traits, it could also indicate a bias in the selection procedure, which may pose limitations on the attempts to recruit the most suitable working dogs.

  • 40.
    Foyer, Pernilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Department of Military Studies, Military-Technology Division, Swedish Defence University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svedberg, Anna-Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nilsson, Emma
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wilsson, Erik
    Swedish Armed Forces Dog Training Unit, Märsta, Sweden.
    Olsen Faresjö, Åshild
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jensen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Behavior and cortisol responses of dogs evaluated in a standardized temperament test for military working dogs2016In: Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, ISSN 1558-7878, E-ISSN 1878-7517, Vol. 11, 7-12 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Military and police working dogs are often exposed to stressful or threatening events, and an improper response, e.g., fear, may implicate both reduced working efficiency and welfare. Therefore, identifying individuals that display a favorable response to potentially threatening situations is of great interest. In the present study, we investigated behavior responses of 85 prospective military working dogs in 4 subtests in a standardized temperament test used to select working dogs for the Swedish Armed Forces. Our goal was to evaluate behavioral responses in specific subtests and cortisol responses of candidate dogs. After dogs were rated as approved or nonapproved based on the test leader’s assessment of the full test result, we independently analyzed video recordings of 4 subtests. In addition, for 37 dogs, we analyzed pretest and posttest salivary cortisol levels. Dogs which were approved by the test leader for further training scored higher in the video recordings on emotionality and, in particular, fear-related behavior during a subset of the test and had higher levels of cortisol both before and after the test, than nonapproved dogs. Although this may actually reflect the desired traits, it could also indicate a bias in the selection procedure, which may pose limitations on the attempts to recruit the most suitable working dogs.

  • 41. Gauslaa, Yngvar
    et al.
    Palmqvist, Kristin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Solhaug, Knut Asbjørn
    Hilmo, Olga
    Holien, Håkon
    Nybakken, Line
    Ohlson, Mikael
    Size-dependent growth of two old-growth associated macrolichen species2009In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 181, no 3, 683-692 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relationships between thallus size and growth variables were analysed for the foliose Lobaria pulmonaria and the pendulous Usnea longissima with the aim of elucidating their morphogenesis and the factors determining thallus area (A) versus biomass (dry weight (DW) gain. Size and growth data originated from a factorial transplantation experiment that included three boreal climate zones (Atlantic, suboceanic and continental), each with three successional forest stands (clear-cut, young and old). When A was replaced by the estimated photobiont layer area in an area-DW scatterplot including all thalli (n = 1080), the two separate species clusters merged into one, suggesting similar allocation patterns between photobionts and mycobionts across growth forms. During transplantation, stand-specific water availability boosted area gain in foliose transplants, consistent with a positive role of water in fungal expansion. In pendulous lichens, A gain greatly exceeded DW gain, particularly in small transplants. The A gain in U. longissima increased with increasing DW:A ratio, consistent with a reallocation of carbon, presumably mobilized from the dense central chord. Pendulous lichens with cylindrical photobiont layers harvest light from all sides. Rapid and flexible three-dimensional A gain allows the colonization of spaces between canopy branches to utilize temporary windows of light in a growing canopy. Foliose lichens with a two-dimensional photobiont layer have more coupled A and DW gains.

  • 42.
    Gavrilets, Sergey
    et al.
    Departments of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Mathematics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville,USA.
    Arnqvist, Göran
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, University of Umeå, Sweden.
    Friberg, Urban
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, University of Umeå, Sweden.
    The evolution of female mate choice by sexual conflict2001In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B, ISSN 0080-4649, Vol. 268, no 1466, 531-539 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although empirical evidence has shown that many male traits have evolved via sexual selection by female mate choice, our understanding of the adaptive value of female mating preferences is still very incomplete. It has recently been suggested that female mate choice may result from females evolving resistance rather than attraction to males, but this has been disputed. Here, we develop a quantitative genetic model showing that sexual conflict over mating indeed results in the joint evolution of costly female mate choice and exaggerated male traits under a wide range of circumstances. In contrast to traditional explanations of costly female mate choice, which rely on indirect genetic benefits, our model shows that mate choice can be generated as a side–effect of females evolving to reduce the direct costs of mating.

  • 43. Geisler-Lee, J.
    et al.
    Geisler, M.
    Coutinho, P. M.
    Segerman, B.
    Nishikubo, N.
    Takahashi, J.
    Aspeborg, H.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Djerbi, S.
    Master, E.
    Andersson-Gunneras, S.
    Sundberg, B.
    Karpinski, S.
    Teeri, Tuula T.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Kleczkowski, L. A.
    Henrissat, B.
    Mellerowicz, E. J.
    Poplar carbohydrate-active enzymes. Gene identification and expression analyses2006In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 140, no 3, 946-962 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over 1,600 genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) in the Populus trichocarpa (Torr.&Gray) genome were identified based on sequence homology, annotated, and grouped into families of glycosyltransferases, glycoside hydrolases, carbohydrate esterases, polysaccharide lyases, and expansins. Poplar ( Populus spp.) had approximately 1.6 times more CAZyme genes than Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana). Whereas most families were proportionally increased, xylan and pectin-related families were underrepresented and the GT1 family of secondary metabolite-glycosylating enzymes was overrepresented in poplar. CAZyme gene expression in poplar was analyzed using a collection of 100,000 expressed sequence tags from 17 different tissues and compared to microarray data for poplar and Arabidopsis. Expression of genes involved in pectin and hemicellulose metabolism was detected in all tissues, indicating a constant maintenance of transcripts encoding enzymes remodeling the cell wall matrix. The most abundant transcripts encoded sucrose synthases that were specifically expressed in wood-forming tissues along with cellulose synthase and homologs of KORRIGAN and ELP1. Woody tissues were the richest source of various other CAZyme transcripts, demonstrating the importance of this group of enzymes for xylogenesis. In contrast, there was little expression of genes related to starch metabolism during wood formation, consistent with the preferential flux of carbon to cell wall biosynthesis. Seasonally dormant meristems of poplar showed a high prevalence of transcripts related to starch metabolism and surprisingly retained transcripts of some cell wall synthesis enzymes. The data showed profound changes in CAZyme transcriptomes in different poplar tissues and pointed to some key differences in CAZyme genes and their regulation between herbaceous and woody plants.

  • 44. Gerttula, S.
    et al.
    Zinkgraf, M.
    Muday, G. K.
    Lewis, D. R.
    Ibatullin, Farid M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. National Research Center Kurchatov Institute, Russian Federation.
    Brumer, Harry
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Hart, F.
    Mansfield, S. D.
    Filkov, V.
    Groover, A.
    Transcriptional and hormonal regulation of gravitropism of woody stems in populus2015In: The Plant Cell, ISSN 1040-4651, E-ISSN 1532-298X, Vol. 27, no 10, 2800-2813 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Angiosperm trees reorient their woody stems by asymmetrically producing a specialized xylem tissue, tension wood, which exerts a strong contractile force resulting in negative gravitropism of the stem. Here, we show, in Populus trees, that initial gravity perception and response occurs in specialized cells through sedimentation of starch-filled amyloplasts and relocalization of the auxin transport protein, PIN3. Gibberellic acid treatment stimulates the rate of tension wood formation and gravibending and enhances tissue-specific expression of an auxin-responsive reporter. Gravibending, maturation of contractile fibers, and gibberellic acid (GA) stimulation of tension wood formation are all sensitive to transcript levels of the Class I KNOX homeodomain transcription factor-encoding gene ARBORKNOX2 (ARK2). We generated genome-wide transcriptomes for trees in which gene expression was perturbed by gravistimulation, GA treatment, and modulation of ARK2 expression. These data were employed in computational analyses to model the transcriptional networks underlying wood formation, including identification and dissection of gene coexpression modules associated with wood phenotypes, GA response, and ARK2 binding to genes within modules. We propose a model for gravitropism in the woody stem in which the peripheral location of PIN3-expressing cells relative to the cambium results in auxin transport toward the cambium in the top of the stem, triggering tension wood formation, while transport away from the cambium in the bottom of the stem triggers opposite wood formation.

  • 45. Granado-Yela, C
    et al.
    García-Verdugo, C
    Carrillo, K
    Rubio DE Casas, R
    Kleczkowski, Leszek A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Balaguer, L
    Temporal matching among diurnal photosynthetic patterns within the crown of the evergreen sclerophyll Olea europaea L2011In: Plant, Cell and Environment, ISSN 0140-7791, E-ISSN 1365-3040, Vol. 34, no 5, 800-810 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trees are modular organisms that adjust their within-crown morphology and physiology in response to within-crown light gradients. However, whether within-plant variation represents a strategy for optimizing light absorption has not been formally tested. We investigated the arrangement of the photosynthetic surface throughout one day and its effects on the photosynthetic process, at the most exposed and most sheltered crown layers of a wild olive tree (Olea europaea L.). Similar measurements were made for cuttings taken from this individual and grown in a greenhouse at contrasted irradiance-levels (100 and 20% full sunlight). Diurnal variations in light interception, carbon fixation and carbohydrate accumulation in sun leaves were negatively correlated with those in shade leaves under field conditions when light intensity was not limiting. Despite genetic identity, these complementary patterns were not found in plants grown in the greenhouse. The temporal disparity among crown positions derived from specialization of the photosynthetic behaviour at different functional and spatial scales: architectural structure (crown level) and carbon budget (leaf level). Our results suggest that the profitability of producing a new module may not only respond to construction costs or light availability, but also rely on its spatio-temporal integration within the productive processes at the whole-crown level.

  • 46. Greger, M.
    et al.
    Bergqvist, C.
    Sandhi, Arifin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Landberg, T.
    Influence of silicon on arsenic uptake and toxicity in lettuce2015In: Journal of Applied Botany and Food Quality / Angewandte Botanik, ISSN 1613-9216, E-ISSN 1439-040X, Vol. 88, 234-240 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lettuce grown in soil is found to contain high concentrations of arsenic (As). This paper investigates the uptake and speciation of As in lettuce as well as the influence of silicon (Si) on As uptake, since Si may decrease it. Lettuce plants were cultivated in nutrient solution containing arsenite or arsenate with or without silicate. The uptake and distribution of As between roots and shoots, As accu-mulation in cell walls, As speciation, and toxic effects on growth were analysed. Results indicate that arsenite was more toxic to lettuce than was arsenate. Silicate decreased arsenate toxicity but had little effect on arsenite toxicity. In contrast, Si decreased arsenite uptake more than arsenate uptake. The concentration of arsenate was higher than that of arsenite in the plants independent of the As species added. When arsenate was added, the As concentration in shoots was half of that in the roots and this distribution did not change with Si addition. When arsenite was added, approximately 10% of As was found in the shoots and 90% in the roots; this pattern changed in the presence of Si, and As became evenly distributed in the plant. In both roots and shoots, approximately 40% of the As was found in the cell wall fraction; when arsenite was added, the presence of Si increased this fraction to 47%, but only in the shoots. The extraction efficiency when analysing the As species was lower in shoots than in roots, especially in the presence of arsenite and Si. The opposite was found for As concentration in pellets after extraction. This indicated variation in the binding strength of arsenite and arsenate between roots and shoots and between Si-and non-Si-treated plants.

  • 47. Guerriero, Gea
    et al.
    Hausman, Jean-Francois
    Ezcurra, Ines
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Industrial Biotechnology.
    WD4O-Repeat Proteins in Plant Cell Wall Formation: Current Evidence and Research Prospects2015In: Frontiers in Plant Science, ISSN 1664-462X, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 6, 1112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The metabolic complexity of living organisms relies on supramolecular protein structures which ensure vital processes, such as signal transduction, transcription, translation and cell wall synthesis. In eukaryotes WD40-repeat (WDR) proteins often function as molecular "hubs" mediating supramolecular interactions. WDR proteins may display a variety of interacting partners and participate in the assembly of complexes involved in distinct cellular functions. In plants, the formation of lignocellulosic biomass involves extensive synthesis of cell wall polysaccharides, a process that requires the assembly of large transmembrane enzyme complexes, intensive vesicle trafficking, interactions with the cytoskeleton, and coordinated gene expression. Because of their function as supramolecular hubs, WDR proteins could participate in each or any of these steps, although to date only few WDR proteins have been linked to the cell wall by experimental evidence. Nevertheless, several potential cell wall-related WDR proteins were recently identified using in silico approaches, such as analyses of co-expression, interactome and conserved gene neighborhood. Notably, some WDR genes are frequently genomic neighbors of genes coding for GT2-family polysaccharide synthases in eukaryotes, and this WDR-GT2 collinear microsynteny is detected in diverse taxa. In angiosperms, two WDR genes are collinear to cellulose synthase genes, CesAs, whereas in ascomycetous fungi several WDR genes are adjacent to chitin synthase genes, chs. In this Perspective we summarize and discuss experimental and in silico studies on the possible involvement of WDR proteins in plant cell wall formation. The prospects of biotechnological engineering for enhanced biomass production are discussed.

  • 48. Hall, Hardy C.
    et al.
    Fakhrzadeh, Azadeh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Luengo Hendriks, Cris L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Fischer, Urs
    Precision automation of cell type classification and sub-cellular fluorescence quantification from laser scanning confocal images2016In: Frontiers in Plant Science, ISSN 1664-462X, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 7, 119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While novel whole-plant phenotyping technologies have been successfully implemented into functional genomics and breeding programs, the potential of automated phenotyping with cellular resolution is largely unexploited. Laser scanning confocal microscopy has the potential to close this gap by providing spatially highly resolved images containing anatomic as well as chemical information on a subcellular basis. However, in the absence of automated methods, the assessment of the spatial patterns and abundance of fluorescent markers with subcellular resolution is still largely qualitative and time-consuming. Recent advances in image acquisition and analysis, coupled with improvements in microprocessor performance, have brought such automated methods within reach, so that information from thousands of cells per image for hundreds of images may be derived in an experimentally convenient time-frame. Here, we present a MATLAB-based analytical pipeline to (1) segment radial plant organs into individual cells, (2) classify cells into cell type categories based upon Random Forest classification, (3) divide each cell into sub-regions, and (4) quantify fluorescence intensity to a subcellular degree of precision for a separate fluorescence channel. In this research advance, we demonstrate the precision of this analytical process for the relatively complex tissues of Arabidopsis hypocotyls at various stages of development. High speed and robustness make our approach suitable for phenotyping of large collections of stem-like material and other tissue types.

  • 49.
    Halvarsson, Linnéa
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences.
    Ätbara perenner: Ätbara perenner ur aspekterna; Ätbara perenner kontra ätbara annueller, ätbara perenner i förhållandet till klimatet i odlingszon 5samt ätbara perenner i förhållande till odlingsmetoder motsvarande den i en skogsträdgård.2012Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 50.
    Hansson, Charlotta
    et al.
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Schön, Karin
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kalbina, Irina
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Strid, Åke
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Andersson, Sören
    Orebro University Hospital. Univ Orebro, Sch Sci & Technol, Orebro Life Sci Ctr, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden; Department of Laboratory Medicine; .
    Bokarewa, Maria I.
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Researc h, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lycke, Nils Y.
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Feeding transgenic plants that express a tolerogenic fusion protein effectively protects against arthritis2016In: Plant Biotechnology Journal, ISSN 1467-7644, E-ISSN 1467-7652, Vol. 14, no 4, 1106-1115 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although much explored, oral tolerance for treatment of autoimmune diseases still awaits the establishment of novel and effective vectors. We investigated if the tolerogenic CTA1(R7K)-COL-DD fusion protein can be expressed in edible plants and in this way induce oral tolerance and protect against arthritis. The fusion protein was recombinantly expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana plants, which were fed to H-2q restricted DBA/1 mice to assess the preventive effect on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The treatment resulted in fewer mice exhibiting disease and arthritis scores were significantly reduced. Immune suppression was evident in treated mice and serum biomarkers for inflammation as well as anti-collagen IgG responses were reduced. In spleen draining and lymph nodes, CD4+ T cell responses were reduced. Concomitant with a reduced effector T cell activity with lower IFNg, IL-13 and IL-17A production we observed an increase in IL-10 production to recall antigen stimulation in vitro, suggesting reduced Th1, Th2 and Th17 activity subsequent to upregulated IL-10 and regulatory T cell (Treg) functions. The present study shows that edible plants expressing a tolerogen were effective at stimulating CD4 T cell tolerance and in protecting against CIA disease. Our study conveys optimism as to the potential of using edible plants for oral treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

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