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  • 1.
    Amundin, Mats
    et al.
    Kolmården Wildlife Park.
    Hållsten, Henrik
    Filosofiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Eklund, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Karlgren, Jussi
    Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan.
    Molinder, Lars
    Carnegie Investment Bank, Swedden.
    A proposal to use distributional models to analyse dolphin vocalisation2017In: Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Vocal Interactivity in-and-between Humans, Animals and Robots, VIHAR 2017 / [ed] Angela Dassow, Ricard Marxer & Roger K. Moore, 2017, 31-32 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper gives a brief introduction to the starting points of an experimental project to study dolphin communicative behaviour using distributional semantics, with methods implemented for the large scale study of human language.

  • 2. Breed, Andrew C.
    et al.
    Breed, Martin F.
    Australian Centre for Evolutionary Biology and Biodiversity (ACEBB), and School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide.
    Meers, Joanne
    Field, Hume E.
    Evidence of endemic Hendra virus infection in flying-foxes (Pteropus conspicillatus): implications for disease risk management2011In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, e28816- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the seroepidemiology of Hendra virus in a spectacled flying-fox (Pteropus conspicillatus) population in northern Australia, near the location of an equine and associated human Hendra virus infection in late 2004. The pattern of infection in the population was investigated using a serial cross-sectional serological study over a 25-month period, with blood sampled from 521 individuals over six sampling sessions. Antibody titres to the virus were determined by virus neutralisation test. In contrast to the expected episodic infection pattern, we observed that seroprevalence gradually increased over the two years suggesting infection was endemic in the population over the study period. Our results suggested age, pregnancy and lactation were significant risk factors for a detectable neutralizing antibody response. Antibody titres were significantly higher in females than males, with the highest titres occurring in pregnant animals. Temporal variation in antibody titres suggests that herd immunity to the virus may wax and wane on a seasonal basis. These findings support an endemic infection pattern of henipaviruses in bat populations suggesting their infection dynamics may differ significantly from the acute, self limiting episodic pattern observed with related viruses (e.g. measles virus, phocine distemper virus, rinderpest virus) hence requiring a much smaller critical host population size to sustain the virus. These findings help inform predictive modelling of henipavirus infection in bat populations, and indicate that the life cycle of the reservoir species should be taken into account when developing risk management strategies for henipaviruses.

  • 3.
    Essner, Ann
    et al.
    Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Physiotherapy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Evidensia Djurkliniken Gefle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Zetterberg, Lena
    Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Physiotherapy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hellström, Karin
    Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Physiotherapy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gustås, Pia
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Husbandry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Högberg, Hans
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Sjöström, Rita
    Unit of Research Education and Development, Region Jämtland Härjedalen, Östersund, Sweden; Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Psychometric evaluation of the canine brief pain inventory in a Swedish sample of dogs with pain related to osteoarthritis2017In: Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica, ISSN 1751-0147, E-ISSN 1751-0147, Vol. 59, no 1, 44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate intervention, implement evidence-based practice and enhance the welfare of dogs with naturally occurring osteoarthritis (OA), access to valid, reliable and clinically relevant outcome measures is crucial for researchers, veterinarians and rehabilitation practitioners. The objectives of the present study were to translate and evaluate psychometric properties, in terms of internal consistency and construct validity, of the owner-reported measure canine brief pain inventory (CBPI) in a Swedish sample of dogs with pain related to OA.

    RESULTS: Twenty-one owners of clinically sound dogs and 58 owners of dogs with pain related to OA were included in this observational and cross-sectional study. After being translated according to the guidelines for patient-reported outcome measures, the CBPI was completed by the canine owners. Construct validity was assessed by confirmatory factor analysis, by repeating the principal component analysis and by assessing for differences between clinically sound dogs and dogs with pain related to OA. Internal consistency was estimated by Cronbach's α. Confirmatory factor analysis was not able to confirm the factor-structure models tested in our sample. Principal component analysis showed a two-component structure, pain severity and pain interference of function. Two components accounted for 76.8% of the total variance, suggesting an acceptable fit of a two-component structure. The ratings from the clinically sound dogs differed from OA dogs and showed significantly lower CBPI total sum. Cronbach's α was 0.94 for the total CBPI, 0.91 for the pain severity and 0.91 for the pain interference of function.

    CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that the translated version of the CBPI is valid for use in the Swedish language. The findings suggest satisfying psychometric properties in terms of high internal consistencies and ability to discriminate clinically sound dogs from OA dogs. However, based on the confirmatory factor analysis, the original factor structure in the CBPI is not ideally suited to measure pain related to OA in our sample and the hypothesis of the presented two-factor structure was rejected. Further research needs to be conducted to determine whether the original psychometric results from CBPI can be replicated across different target groups and particularly with larger sample size.

  • 4.
    Evans, Alina L.
    et al.
    Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Hedmark University College, Campus Evenstad, Elverum, Norway; Section of Arctic Veterinary Medicine, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Tromsø, Norway.
    Sahlén, Veronica
    Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.
    Stoen, Ole-Gunnar
    Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway; Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Fahlman, Åsa
    Section of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Veterinary Clinical and Diagnostic Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.
    Brunberg, Sven
    Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.
    Madslien, Knut
    Section for Wildlife Health, National Veterinary Institute, Oslo, Norway.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Örebro University Hospital. Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiology.
    Swenson, Jon E.
    Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway; Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Trondheim, Norway.
    Arnemo, Jon M.
    Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Hedmark University College, Campus Evenstad, Elverum, Norway; Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Capture, Anesthesia, and Disturbance of Free-Ranging Brown Bears (Ursus arctos) during Hibernation2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 7, e40520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We conducted thirteen immobilizations of previously collared hibernating two-to four-year-old brown bears (Ursus arctos) weighing 21-66 kg in central Sweden in winter 2010 and 2011 for comparative physiology research. Here we report, for the first time, an effective protocol for the capture and anesthesia of free-ranging brown bears during hibernation and an assessment of the disturbance the captures caused. Bears were darted in anthill, soil, or uprooted tree dens on eleven occasions, but two bears in rock dens fled and were darted outside the den. We used medetomidine at 0.02-0.06 mg/kg and zolazepam-tiletamine at 0.9-2.8 mg/kg for anesthesia. In addition, ketamine at 1.5 mg/kg was hand-injected intramuscularly in four bears and in six it was included in the dart at 1.1-3.0 mg/kg. Once anesthetized, bears were removed from the dens. In nine bears, arterial blood samples were analyzed immediately with a portable blood gas analyzer. We corrected hypoxemia in seven bears (PaO2 57-74 mmHg) with supplemental oxygen. We placed the bears back into the dens and antagonized the effect of medetomidine with atipamezole. Capturing bears in the den significantly increased the risk of den abandonment. One of twelve collared bears that were captured remained at the original den until spring, and eleven, left their dens (mean +/- standard deviation) 3.2 +/- 3.6 (range 0.5-10.5) days after capture. They used 1.9 +/- 0.9 intermediate resting sites, during 6.2 +/- 7.8 days before entering a new permanent den. The eleven new permanent dens were located 730 +/- 589 m from the original dens. We documented that it was feasible and safe to capture hibernating brown bears, although they behaved differently than black bears. When doing so, researchers should use 25% of the doses used for helicopter darting during the active period and should consider increased energetic costs associated with den abandonment.

  • 5.
    Falkenberg Hansen, Kjetil
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    The acoustics and performance of DJ scratching, Analysis and modelling2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on the analysis and modeling of scratching, in other words, the DJ (disk jockey) practice of using the turntable as a musical instrument. There has been experimental use of turntables as musical instruments since their invention, but the use is now mainly ascribed to the musical genre hip-hop and the playing style known as scratching. Scratching has developed to become a skillful instrument-playing practice with complex musical output performed by DJs. The impact on popular music culture has been significant, and for many, the DJ set-up of turntables and a mixer is now a natural instrument choice for undertaking a creative music activity. Six papers are included in this thesis, where the first three approach the acoustics and performance of scratching, and the second three approach scratch modeling and the DJ interface. Additional studies included here expand on the scope of the papers.

    For the acoustics and performance studies, DJs were recorded playing both demonstrations of standard performance techniques, and expressive performances on sensor-equipped instruments. Analysis of the data revealed that there are both differences and commonalities in playing strategies between musicians, and between expressive intentions. One characteristic feature of scratching is the range of standard playing techniques, but in performances it seems DJs vary the combination of playing techniques more than the rendering of these techniques. The third study describes some of the acoustic parameters of typical scratch improvisations and looks at which musical parameters are typically used for expressive performances. Extracted acoustic and performance parameters from the data show the functional ranges within which DJs normally play.

    Unlike traditional musical instruments, the equipment used for scratching was not intended to be used for creating music. The interface studies focus on traditional as well as new interfaces for DJs, where parameter mappings between input gestures and output signal are described. Standard performance techniques have been modeled in software called Skipproof, based on results from the first papers. Skipproof was used for testing other types of controllers than turntables, where complex DJ gestures could be manipulated using simplified control actions, enabling even non-experts to play expressively within the stylistic boundaries of DJ scratching. The last paper describes an experiment of using an existing hardware platform, the Reactable, to help designing and prototyping the interaction between different sound models and instrument interfaces, including scratching and Skipproof.

    In addition to the included papers, studies were conducted of expressivity, description of the emotional contents of scratching, DJ playing activities, and the coupling between playing techniques and sample. The physical affordances of the turntable, mixer and samples, as well as genre conventions of hip-hop, are assumed to explain some of the findings that distinguish scratching from other instrumental sounds or practices.

  • 6.
    Foyer, Pernilla
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Military Studies. Linköpings universitet, Biologi.
    Svedberg, Anna-Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Biologi.
    Nilsson, Emma
    Linköpings universitet, Biologi.
    Wilsson, Erik
    Swedish Armed Forces Dog Training Unit, Märsta, Sweden.
    Olsen Faresjö, Åshild
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin.
    Jensen, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Biologi.
    Behavior and cortisol responses of dogs evaluated in a standardized temperament test for military working dogs2016In: Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, ISSN 1558-7878, E-ISSN 1878-7517, Vol. 11, 7-12 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Military and police working dogs are often exposed to stressful or threatening events, and an improper response, e.g., fear, may implicate both reduced working efficiency and welfare. Therefore, identifying individuals that display a favorable response to potentially threatening situations is of great interest. In the present study, we investigated behavior responses of 85 prospective military working dogs in 4 subtests in a standardized temperament test used to select working dogs for the Swedish Armed Forces. Our goal was to evaluate behavioral responses in specific subtests and cortisol responses of candidate dogs. After dogs were rated as approved or nonapproved based on the test leader’s assessment of the full test result, we independently analyzed video recordings of 4 subtests. In addition, for 37 dogs, we analyzed pretest and posttest salivary cortisol levels. Dogs which were approved by the test leader for further training scored higher in the video recordings on emotionality and, in particular, fear-related behavior during a subset of the test and had higher levels of cortisol both before and after the test, than nonapproved dogs. Although this may actually reflect the desired traits, it could also indicate a bias in the selection procedure, which may pose limitations on the attempts to recruit the most suitable working dogs.

  • 7.
    Foyer, Pernilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Department of Military Studies, Military-Technology Division, Swedish Defence University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svedberg, Anna-Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nilsson, Emma
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wilsson, Erik
    Swedish Armed Forces Dog Training Unit, Märsta, Sweden.
    Olsen Faresjö, Åshild
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jensen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Behavior and cortisol responses of dogs evaluated in a standardized temperament test for military working dogs2016In: Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, ISSN 1558-7878, E-ISSN 1878-7517, Vol. 11, 7-12 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Military and police working dogs are often exposed to stressful or threatening events, and an improper response, e.g., fear, may implicate both reduced working efficiency and welfare. Therefore, identifying individuals that display a favorable response to potentially threatening situations is of great interest. In the present study, we investigated behavior responses of 85 prospective military working dogs in 4 subtests in a standardized temperament test used to select working dogs for the Swedish Armed Forces. Our goal was to evaluate behavioral responses in specific subtests and cortisol responses of candidate dogs. After dogs were rated as approved or nonapproved based on the test leader’s assessment of the full test result, we independently analyzed video recordings of 4 subtests. In addition, for 37 dogs, we analyzed pretest and posttest salivary cortisol levels. Dogs which were approved by the test leader for further training scored higher in the video recordings on emotionality and, in particular, fear-related behavior during a subset of the test and had higher levels of cortisol both before and after the test, than nonapproved dogs. Although this may actually reflect the desired traits, it could also indicate a bias in the selection procedure, which may pose limitations on the attempts to recruit the most suitable working dogs.

  • 8.
    Gizejewski, Z
    et al.
    Institute of Animal Breeding and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Olsztyn, Poland.
    Söderquist, L
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Developmental Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Genital and sperm characteristics of wild, free rangingred deer stags (Cervus elaphus L) hunted in different regions of Poland2010In: Wildlife Biology in Practice, ISSN 1646-1509, E-ISSN 1646-2742, Vol. 6, no 2, 81-94 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an attempt to establish reference values for sperm morphology in wild red deer, genital tracts were collected from thirty-six 3-11 years old free-ranging, wild red deer stags (Cervus elaphus L) shot down during 3 consecutive mating seasons (1996-1998) at three different environmental regions of Poland, defining two major ecotypes: (i) highland (outer eastern Carpathian range, Bieszczady mountains) and, (ii) lowland (Mazuria and Pomerania) and studied within 4.5h-49h after death for testis (T), epididymides (E) and vesicular gland (VG) variables. Spermatozoa collected from the E-cauda were examined for motility and morphology (light and electron microscopy levels). Both T size and weight and VS-weight differed with age (P<0.05-0.01) while habitat influenced T size and weight (P<0.01) a well as sperm motility (P<0.05). Neither sperm numbers nor morphology showed significant differences, mostly owing to

    the large variation recorded among stags (range 1-72%). Domain-grouped sperm morphological deviations were <5%, the mean total proportion of abnormal spermatozoa ranging 7.2-17.5%. Although variation was present, the values ought to be used as reference for spermiogrammes.

  • 9.
    Hultling, C
    et al.
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rosenlund, B
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Levi, Richard
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fridström, M
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjöblom, P
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hillensjö, T
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Assisted ejaculation and in-vitro fertilization in the treatment of infertile spinal cord-injured men: the role of intracytoplasmic sperm injection.1997In: Human Reproduction, ISSN 0268-1161, E-ISSN 1460-2350, Vol. 12, no 3, 499-502 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the present longitudinal descriptive study was to extend previous observations on the benefit of in-vitro fertilization (IVF) in cases of anejaculatory infertility due to spinal cord injuries (SCI) and to report results achieved by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). The study was performed in a national referral unit for SCI, Spinalis SCI Research Unit, the Karolinska Institute. The patient material consisted of couples with SCI men seeking treatment for their infertility. The inclusion criteria were: stable relationship, motile spermatozoa in a diagnostic sample and no female contraindications. Spermatozoa were retrieved through electroejaculation or vibratory stimulation. If the sperm quality was judged to be sufficient, standard IVF was performed. ICSI was employed if the semen quality was extremely poor. We have treated 25 couples in 52 cycles, leading to 81 ovum retrievals and 47 embryo transfers. Total sperm counts were very variable (0.01-978 x 10(6)). Before the introduction of ICSI the fertilization rate was 30%. ICSI increased the fertilization rate to 88%. There was no association between the pregnancy rate and the sperm count, level of injury or fertilization technique. A total of 16 clinical pregnancies was established, leading to 11 deliveries. This gives a cumulative pregnancy rate per couple of 56%.

  • 10.
    Landgren, Emilia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET).
    Wallman, Sabina
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET).
    Hästavmaskningsmedels påverkan på miljö och välfärd2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Healthy, natural pastures is very valuable for biodiversity in the form of both plants and animals. An efficient use of pastures helps to preserve biodiversity, but grazing animals needs to be de-wormed to keep them healthy and to prevent harmful parasites spread on the pasture. The awareness about the environmental impact of the frequent use of deworming agents is low among the public. Some people are unaware that the absorption in horses of anthelmintics is incomplete, which make the circumstances about enviromental effect important to investigate further. The scientific evidence in this area is limited and more studies and trials are needed to deepen the knowledge about the effects of anthelmintics in the environment. Our report includes a compilation of studies conducted on anthelmintics and equine parasites, as well as an experiment which was conducted at the University of Halmstad biogaslaboratory April 2014. Anthelmintics have been shown to have negative impact on the manure ecosystem and especially against manure living fauna. Deworming routines has changed over the years as the equine industry has developed. Nevertheless, there’s still a lack of concrete approach to deworming.

  • 11.
    Lerner, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Centre for Applied Ethics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Transeminarium om eutanasi för människa och av djur2010In: Svensk Veterinärtidning, ISSN 0346-2250, Vol. 62, no 10, 23-25 p.Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Norman Haldén, Anna
    et al.
    Institutionen för biomedicin och veterinär folkhälsovetenskap, Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet.
    Arnoldsson, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Haglund, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Mattsson, A.
    Institutionen för biomedicin och veterinär folkhälsovetenskap; Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet.
    Ullerås, E.
    Institutionen för biomedicin och veterinär folkhälsovetenskap, Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet.
    Sturve, J.
    Zoologiska institutionen, Göteborgs universitet.
    Norrgren, Leif
    Institutionen för biomedicin och veterinär folkhälsovetenskap, Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet.
    Retention and maternal transfer of brominated dioxins in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and effects on reproduction, aryl hydrocarbon receptor-regulated genes, and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity2011In: Aquatic Toxicology, ISSN 0166-445X, E-ISSN 1879-1514, Vol. 102, no 3-4, 150-161 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brominated dioxins have recently been detected in Baltic Sea biota. Due to their similarities to the highly toxic chlorinated dioxins, concern has been raised about their potential biological effects. The present study investigated retention and effects of brominated dioxins in adult zebrafish, as well as maternal transfer and effects on offspring. We exposed adult zebrafish for nine weeks via feed to 2,3,7,8-tetrabromodibenzo-p-dioxin (TBDD) or to a mixture of brominated dioxins (Baltic Sea mixture), which was designed to reflect relative concentrations found in Baltic Sea biota. We studied spawning success, gonad morphology, hepatic vitellogenin gene expression, and offspring early life-stage development to investigate effects on zebrafish reproduction. Hepatic ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity and hepatic expression of a number of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)-regulated genes were studied to investigate if the brominated dioxins can activate gene transcription through the AHR pathway in zebrafish. In addition, glutathione reductase activity and expression of genes involved in adaptive responses to intracellular stress were studied to investigate potential stress effects of brominated dioxins. After nine weeks of exposure, all brominated dioxins spiked to the feed were detected in female fish and transferred to eggs. Exposure to the Baltic Sea mixture and TBDD clearly induced AHR-regulated genes and EROD activity. Exposure to TBDD reduced spawning success, altered ovarian morphology and reduced hepatic vitellogenin gene expression, which implies that TBDD has a similar effect pattern as the chlorinated analogue. Overall, our results show that dietary exposure to sublethal concentrations of brominated dioxins may impair reproductive physiology in fish and induce AHR-regulated genes. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 13.
    Olsson, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Education in Arts and Professions. Yrkeskunnande och lärande.
    OM FRISKVÅRDSPEDAGOGIK I ARBETSLIVET.: EN O/RÄTTVIS BETRAKTELSE.1993Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I fokus för detta arbete står friskvård inom arbetslivet som pedagogisk praktik med hälsoprofilsbedömning, en metod för undersökning och påverkan av människors hälsostatus och hälsovanor, som konkret exempel. En bakgrund till detta är framväxten av insatser för folkhälsa och den ökade betoning av friskvård inom arbetslivet som skett inom såväl privat som offentlig sektor. Friskvård handlar om människors levnadsvanor när det gäller kost, motion, stress, alkohol, tobak m.m.

    Hälsoprofilsbedömning och friskvårdspedagogik inom arbetslivet ses här ur två olika perspektiv. Ur det ena perspektivet behandlas verksamheten på dess egna villkor - som en metod att inom ramen för arbetslivet få till stånd ner hälsosamma livsstilar genom kontrakt mellan självständiga parter. Det andra perspektivet kan ses som kritiskt granskande. Här ifrågasätts premissema för hälsoprofilsbedömningen utifrån begrepp som makt och disciplinering. En inspirationskälla har därvid bland annat Michel Foucaults arbeten varit. Som empiriskt material för analysen används två avhandlingar som presenterar hälsoprofilbedömningen som metod.

    Ur dessa båda perspektiv erhålles två olika betraktelser om hälsoprofilsbedömning och friskvårdspedagogik inom arbetslivet - en rättvis och en orättvis. På basis av en kritisk pragmatisk ansats diskuteras möjligheten till ett samtal baserad på relationen mellan de båda betrakelserna.

  • 14.
    Redmalm, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Djur i bur även i hyllade djurparker2012In: Djurens Rätt, ISSN 0345-2409, no 1, 36-37 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Roca, J.
    et al.
    University of Murcia, Spain.
    Parrilla, I.
    University of Murcia, Spain.
    Gil, M. A.
    University of Murcia, Spain.
    Cuello, C.
    University of Murcia, Spain.
    Martinez, E. A.
    University of Murcia, Spain.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Non-viable sperm in the ejaculate: Lethal escorts for Contemporary viable sperm2016In: Animal Reproduction Science, ISSN 0378-4320, E-ISSN 1873-2232, Vol. 169, 24-31 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-viable sperm ("dead sperm") are present invariable numbers in mammalian ejaculates and their number increase substantially when semen is stored, particularly cryopreserved. This review comparatively highlights, with experimental data in porcine, the role-played by non-viable sperm in the outcome of semen used in assisted reproductive technologies. As well, the review discusses our current understanding of their origin and the pathways involved when their large numbers negative influence the functional lifespan of contemporary viable sperm to eventually cause irreversible dysfunction that reduces their fertility potential and their ability to develop healthy embryos. Finally, it highlights procedures currently available to mitigate these harmful effects. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 16.
    Skoglund, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Following the mevalonate pathway to bone heal alley2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The mevalonate pathway is an important biosynthetic pathway, found in all cells of virtually all known pro- as well as eukaryotic organisms. This thesis is an investigation into the use of two drugs, originally developed for different applications, but both affecting the mevalonate pathway, in to models of fracture repair.

    Using two different rodent models of fracture repair, a commonly used cholesterol lowering drug (statin) and two drugs used to treat osteoporosis (bisphosphonate) were applied both systemically as well as locally in order to enhance fracture repair.

    Papers I and II investigate the potential of simvastatin to improve the healing of femoral fractures in mice. Papers III and IV explore the use of two bisphosphonates to improve early fixation of stainless steel screws into rat bone.

    The statin simvastatin lead to an increased strength of the healing cellus. The application of bisphosphonates increased early screw fixation.

    It seems clear that both drugs have uses in orthopaedic applications. One interesting avenue of further research would be to combine the two classes of drugs and see if we can get the benefits while at the same time diminishing the drawbacks.

  • 17.
    Spoerry, Christian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Seele, Jana
    Valentin-Weigand, Peter
    Baums, Christoph G.
    von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Identification and Characterization of IgdE, a Novel IgG-degrading Protease of Streptococcus suis with Unique Specificity for Porcine IgG.2016In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 291, no 15, 7915-7925 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Streptococcus suis is a major endemic pathogen of pigs causing meningitis, arthritis, and other diseases. Zoonotic S. suis infections are emerging in humans causing similar pathologies as well as severe conditions such as toxic shock-like syndrome. Recently, we discovered an IdeS family protease of S. suis that exclusively cleaves porcine IgM and represents the first virulence factor described, linking S. suis to pigs as their natural host. Here we report the identification and characterization of a novel, unrelated protease of S. suis that exclusively targets porcine IgG. This enzyme, designated IgdE for immunoglobulin G-degrading enzyme of S. suis, is a cysteine protease distinct from previous characterized streptococcal immunoglobulin degrading proteases of the IdeS family and mediates efficient cleavage of the hinge region of porcine IgG with a high degree of specificity. The findings that all S. suis strains investigated possess the IgG proteolytic activity and that piglet serum samples contain specific antibodies against IgdE strongly indicate that the protease is expressed in vivo during infection and represents a novel and putative important bacterial virulence/colonization determinant, and a thus potential therapeutic target.

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