Change search
Refine search result
1234 1 - 50 of 164
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    al Rawaf, Rawaf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Social-Ecological Urbanism: Lessons in Design from the Albano Resilient Campus2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Currently there is a demand for practical ways to integrate ecological insights into practices of design, which previously have lacked a substantive empirical basis. In the process of developing the Albano Resilient Campus, a transdisciplinary group of ecologists, design scholars, and architects pioneered a conceptual innovation, and a new paradigm of urban sustainability and development: Social-Ecological Urbanism.  Social-Ecological Urbanism is based on the frameworks of Ecosystem Services and Resilience thinking. This approach has created novel ideas with interesting repercussions for the international debate on sustainable urban development. From a discourse point of view, the concept of SEU can be seen as a next evolutionary step for sustainable urbanism paradigms, since it develops synergies between ecological and socio-technical systems. This case study collects ‘best practices’ that can lay a foundational platform for learning, innovation, partnership and trust building within the field of urban sustainability. It also bridges gaps in existing design approaches, such as Projective Ecologies and Design Thinking, with respect to a design methodology with its basis firmly rooted in Ecology.

  • 2.
    Alexandrov, Igor
    et al.
    Novgorod State University.
    Petrova, Ludmila
    Novgorod State Unified Museum.
    Druzhinin, Vladimir
    Kaucia, Tatyana
    8. Protecting the past of historical Veliky Novgorod2003In: Building and Re-building Sustainable Communities: Reports from the Superbs project / [ed] Lars Rydén, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2003, 1, 60-67 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Veliky Novgorod, the most ancient city in Russia with a history going back to 859, poses special urban planning and development problems. In the article the legal steps taken to protect the cultural layers in the city are described. The resulting restrictions come into conflict with the tasks of the complex planning of this part of the city, which presupposes reconstruction of the historical city environment. As an example, the work with the Nikolo-Dvirishchensky cathedral is described.

  • 3.
    Andersson-Sköld, Yvonne
    et al.
    SGI.
    Bergman, Ramona
    SGI.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Karlstads universitet.
    Persson, Erik
    Karlstads universitet.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstads universitet.
    Landslide risk management: A brief overview and example from Sweden of current situation and climate change2013In: International Journal of Disability, Community & Rehabilitation, ISSN 2095-0055, E-ISSN 2212-4209, Vol. 3, no March, 44-61 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Landslide risk is a function of the probability of the event and its consequences. Previous research has shown that preventive measures to reduce the risk are preferred over reactive measures but, especially in developing countries, rarely undertaken. A contributing factor is the lack of evidence that preventive measures pay. This study includes a brief overview of landslide risk management in general and an investigation of the present risk management situation in Sweden based on interviews in 11 municipalities complemented with interviews in Norway. The result shows that climate change has become part of the general awareness and started to be taken into account in the municipal spatial planning. Landslide susceptibility maps and databases are useful tools in the complex spatial planning. The results indicate that the application of landslide susceptibility and risk maps as previously applied for preventive measures and spatial planning in the landslide prone area Gota alv river valley have been cost effective. Improved documentation and more active communication among different stakeholders would, however, contribute to more effective landslide management.

  • 4.
    Antonson, Hans
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Mobility, actors and planning processes.
    Åkerskog, Ann
    SLU.
    Landskapsanalys och upphandling: en intervjustudie med aktörer i väg- och järnvägsplaneringen2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report builds on interviews with twelve key individuals concerning issues surrounding landscape analysis (LA) during the planning and procurement process for roads and railways. The background to the study is the long-established use of LA to support broad-scale planning and large projects such as new trunk roads and mainline rail routes.

    In its strategic plan the then Swedish Road Administration (Vägverket) decided that from 2010 onwards all public road-building projects must include a formal landscape analysis and design programme. However, there is no regulatory framework to say what should be analysed, or how the analysis should be conducted.

    There is considerable variation in the experiences and opinions of those interviewed, from which it can be concluded that project leaders at the Swedish Transport Administration (Trafikverket) adopt different styles of working depending on which geographic region or individual project they are associated with. For example, a common understanding of what ‘landscape’ might mean is largely missing, while the way that the respondents describe the landscape does not correspond to the official landscape terminology as set down in the European Landscape Convention (ELC). The term design programme presents a similar case, whereas the concept of an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is well established and goes unquestioned by the interviewees, because it is used both in legislation and in the literature.

    Another conclusion is that there is little in the way of consensus concerning LA except for a common perception that there is a lack of guidelines or assistance from the responsible authority (Trafikverket) in the form of a handbook or a dedicated chapter in the existing EIA handbooks. The importance of a handbook or similar document to the respondents is striking. There is uncertainty as to how to assure the quality of a given LA, and often a review of the EIA is regarded as sufficing for the LA as well.

    There are two schools of thought among the respondents as to when an LA should be carried out: either early in the planning process, or continuously throughout the entire planning process. In reality, though, there is a third school of thought evident in the existing planning system: that an LA is a part of the EIA, and as such should first take place during the consultation process.

  • 5.
    Berg, Per G.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    4. The city as a sustainable living system: Hågaby as a demonstration model of the conditions required for creating a sustainable living system2002In: Basic patterns of sustainability: Reports from the Superbs project / [ed] Lars Rydén and Madeleine Granvik, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2002, 1, 24-33 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Living systems in general and urban structures in particular finda large number of ways to make themselves sustainable. In thischapter the five properties for sustainability applied to the modelneighbourhood Hågaby is described, and discussed as a generaltheory for sustainability of urban environments.

  • 6.
    Berg, Per G.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    5. Demonstrating sustainability in human habitats: Six resources and 50 aspects of sustainability in Hågaby settlement2002In: Basic patterns of sustainability: Reports from the Superbs project / [ed] Lars Rydén and Madeleine Granvik, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2002, 1, 34-38 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Methods to demonstrate resources for sustainability in the modelarea Hågaby are described. Physical, economic, organisational,human and cultural resources are studied using a mix of quantitativeand qualitative assessments.

  • 7.
    Berg, Per G.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    6. Developing sustainability in Hågaby village2002In: Basic patterns of sustainability: Reports from the Superbs project / [ed] Lars Rydén and Madeleine Granvik, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2002, 1, 39-56 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The results of the first four years of development (1996-2000) ofthe model project Hågaby are reported. Data include quantitativeanalysis of a series of practical projects such as solar energy,wastewater treatment, household composting, as well as socialand economic aspects of a sustainable community life.

  • 8.
    Berg, Per G
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Rydén, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    11. Urbanisation and Urban-Rural Cooperation2012In: Rural Development and Land Use / [ed] Lars Rydén and Ingrid Karlsson, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, 141-154 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Bergkvist, Tomas
    Södertörn University College, School of Life Sciences.
    Kommunalt naturskydd som en del av markanvändningsplaneringen: en fallstudie av olika synsätt i samband med upphävande av naturreservat2007Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In metropolitan areas where the exploitation pressure increases, also the importance to point out nature areas grows, both for the sake of outdoor life and for biodiversity conservation. Since nature conservancy and spatial planning constitute two different parts of the municipalities land use control, a case study has been carried out in two municipalities in the Stockholm region, Huddinge and Järfälla. Both these municipalities have protected about one third of their land and today there are plans to repeal parts of the reserves to enable exploitation. This thesis shows – from the theoretical concept of sustainable development – officials, politicians and non-governmental organizations perspectives on questions concerning land use together with the work with nature reserves and repeals. The study focuses on how different basic attitudes and paradigms emphasizes different aspects of sustainable development and how this in turn affects the work to repeal nature reserves. Interviews with stakeholders in the municipalities and documents concerning land use and nature reserves demonstrates that there is distinct differences between the planning-paradigm, based on spatial planning, and the environmental-paradigm, based on nature conservation. From the planning-paradigm it is considered that nature reserves had to big impact on the munici­pality's land use and that valuable nature more frequently should be protected by the Swedish planning and building act. From the environmental-paradigms view the nature conservancy is – and should also in the future be – an important tool in the long-term prevention to stop valuable nature from being exploited. The thesis also stresses the importance to in the work with repeals take all effects that this kind of decision can lead to into account – not just in the repealed area but also for the future work with nature reserves on the whole.

  • 10.
    Bertilsson, Linnea
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences.
    Översvämningsrisker inom fysisk planering: Fallstudie Karlstad2007Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the essay was to study how flooding risks affects the physical planning generally, and also to do a case study regarding flooding risks in Karlstad and how these affect the municipality vision of growth: “Karlstad 100 000”. The study has mainly been made through literature studies and scrutinises of various investigations and development plans.

    During recent years Sweden has been struck by several, both severe and minor, floods of areas related to seas and watercourses, which has resulted in serious environmental consequences, economic loss and severe damage to infrastructure and other societal functions. And now, climate change is expected to make the problems even worse. The vulnerability of society regarding floods is dependent on how severe the change is going to be, but also on how much consideration is taken to risks in the shaping of physical planning. Many of the problems revealed during earlier high flows could have been solved if the unburden capacity of the watercourse had been better and if buildings and other infrastructure had been planned in consideration of high flows and flooding risks.

    The municipalities has, in consequence of their planning monopoly, the greatest influence on the shaping of physical planning, hence a large part of the responsibility for the mitigation work is on them. But mitigating the built environment to flooding risks often collide with economic interest in the municipalities, for example building houses in close proximity to water, which denotes the risk that the necessary measures wont be taken. Unsure and contradictory information, short-term thinking in planning and an obvious tendency for urbanisation leading to an increased vulnerability for nature risks are other factors that complicates the mitigation work.

    Karlstad is one of the cities threatened by floods when the climate is changing. The close proximity to Vänern and the fact that Klarälven runs through the city makes it vulnerable to high flows. This creates a problem for the municipality regarding the work with physical planning and “Karlstad 100 000”. The municipality has based a large part of it’s marketing on the close proximity to the water and the possibility for estuaries next to water in order to attract new inhabitants to Karlstad. They argue that the state of knowledge is to uncertain, and thereby choose not to incorporate the recommendations regarding no new buildings on land threatened by floods. Instead, the municipality has chosen to investigate technical solutions to the problem, which could be considered a far more short term and also very expensive way of dealing with the problem. Thus, the short term economic profits seem to get the upper hand in the weighing between risks and economic interests.

  • 11.
    Bezlakovsky, Igor
    et al.
    City of Veliky Novgorod.
    Kuzmichev, Vladimir
    City of Veliky Novgorod.
    Ivchenko, Tatyana
    City of Veliky Novgorod.
    9. Urban planning in post-soviet Novgorod: Introducing a western legal system2003In: Building and Re-building Sustainable Communities: Reports from the Superbs project / [ed] Lars Rydén, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2003, 1, 68-78 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Development and implementation of a program for rational use of the land of the city has become first priority for ensuring self-goverment and democracy in Veliky Novgorod, and is seen as the first step towards a system of sustainable city development. The article describes how new routines and legal instruments are introduced to support local self-government and public participation in urban planning, and the development of a real estate market. A system of zooning establishes legal rules which regulate the use of land and constructions of real estate. A geographic information system (GIS) has been introduced to develop the cadaster of the city.

  • 12.
    Brandt, S. Anders
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för samhällsbyggnad.
    Geoinformatics 2004: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Geoinformatics : Geospatial Information Research : Bridging the Pacific and Atlantic. University of Gävle, Sweden, 7-9 June 20042004Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    FOREWORD

    Geoinformatics 2004, the 12th International Conference on Geoinformatics, is the premier research forum for Geospatial Information Research. It commenced in 1992 in Buffalo, and has been held every year since. Meetings have been held in North America and Asia in Beijing (1993), Calgary (1994), Hong Kong (1995), West Palm Beach (1996), Taipei (1997), Beijing (1998), Ann Arbor (1999), Monterey (2000), Bangkok (2001), Nanjing (2002), and Toronto (2003, cancelled due to the outbreak of SARS). This is the premier event organized by the University of Gävle, together with the Association of Chinese Professionals in Geographic Information Science (CPGIS-abroad).

     

    This conference is the first of the series that takes place in Europe, hence the subtitle of the conference - bridging the Pacific and Atlantic. I believe it offers an opportunity for all professionals involved in research and development of geographic information systems, global position systems and remote sensing to discuss new theories and technologies around geoinformatics research.

     

    Based on the extended abstracts and following advice from the program committee, the organizing committee selected 108 papers (involving 264 authors from 29 different countries) around 10 different themes included in the proceedings. The conference themes include some emerging research issues such as location-based services and geovisualization as well as long studied conventional issues. As a post-conference publication effort, some selected papers around special themes will go another round of review process to be published in special issues with some scientific journals.

     

    The organization of the event is rather team-oriented work. On behalf of the organizing committee, I would like to thank CPGIS, the University of Gävle, our sponsors and all those individuals involved in making it a successful event, in particular, Kickan Fahlstedt, the conference secretary who took most administrative and organizational matters into her hands; Anders Brandt who read the papers and provided useful comments to the authors; Bengt Eriksson, Stig-Göran Mårtensson, and Bengt Rystedt who are always very supportive for the event; Peter Fisher and David Maguire who share their vision on current geoinformatics research; and all the authors who contribute with their papers of high quality.

     

    Last but not least, the following colleagues or students deserve special thanks for their contributions to the organization of the conference: Gunter Göckelmann, Pia Ollert- Hallqvist, Anna Hansson, Neta Hedberg, Elisabeth Hugg, Mikael Johansson, Rebecca Jonsson, Hendrik Loch, Bengt-Olof Lundinger, Staffan Nygren, Kaj Wejander, and Wenjun Xie.

     

    Welcome to the Geoinformatics 2004, and enjoy your stay in Gävle!

     

    Bin Jiang

    Co-chair of the organizing committee

     

    ---

     

    CONTENTS - VOLUME 1

    Keynote session

    The logic of fuzzy detecting change in geographical information, p. 3

    P. Fisher

    Distributed GIS: computing in the internet age, p. 4

    D. Maguire

    Plenary session

    About egocentric geovisualisation, p. 7

    L. Meng

    Shannonian, semantic and pragmatic geoinformation, p. 15

    J. Portugali

    Spatio-temporal modelling and analysis of geolifelines, p. 22

    C. Claramunt

    Location-based service, mobile GIS and GPS

    Location-based solutions for application services, p. 25

    K.H. Kim, S.G. Hong, J.H. Park and J.H. Lee

    A test-bed simulator for GPS and GIS integrated navigation and positioning research: - bus positioning, using GPS observations, odometer readings and map matching, p. 31

    J. Li, G. Taylor, C. Brunsdon, A. Olden, D. Steup and M. Winter

    Real-time map labelling for personal navigation, p.  39

    Q. Zhang and L. Harrie

    Multi-criteria decision analysis for location based services, p.  47

    M. Raubal and C. Rinner

    Map generalization for OSMasterMap data in location based services & mobile GIS applications, p. 54

    S. Anand, J.M. Ware and G.E. Taylor

    The media and the messages of location-based services (LBS): death of distance or the revenge of geography?, p. 61

    D.Z. Sui

    Real time community mapping: evaluating two wireless technology approaches, p. 69

    Y. Lao

    Digital data collection and analysis techniques for forestry applications, p. 77

    M.G. Wing and L.D. Kellogg

    A review of research and development on intelligent transport systems in Hong Kong - a geographic information system perspective, p. 84

    W.Z. Shi and H.K. Lam

    A distributed architecture for WAP-based mobile GIS, p. 92

    Wang F., Bian F. and Hou Y.

    Efficient routing service for the open LBS services, p. 99

    S.-S. Kim and J.-H. Park

    Network perspective for spatial data distribution on wireless environments, p. 107

    E. Lee, M.-J. Kim, M. Kim and B.-T. Jang

    Precise navigation with the use of buffer zones, p. 115

    A. Banachowicz and J. Uriasz

    The implementation of presentation service using JAVA web services, p. 120

    T.-W. Heo and J.-H. Park

    An open architecture of common core component for location based service, p. 127

    J.-C. Kim, J.-H. Park and J.-H. Lee

    Open LBS solution architecture using service chaining webservices technology, p. 134

    S.-G. Hong, K.-H. Kim and J.-H. Park

    Analysis accuracy integrated position of hyperbolic system JEMIOLUSZKA and satellite navigation system GPS, p. 139

    A. Banachowicz and R. Kamiński

    Spatio-temporal modelling and databases

    A web-based multimedia framework for diffusing spatio-temporal information: application to natural hazards, p. 149

    P-A. Davoine, J. Gensel and H. Martin

    Continuous data warehouse: concepts, challenges and potentials, p. 157

    T.O. Ahmed, M. Miquel and R. Laurini

    An extended locking method for geographical database with spatial rules, p. 165

    Cheng C., Shen P., Zhang M. and Lu F.

    A hybrid approach to detect spatial-temporal outliers, p. 173

    T. Cheng and Z. Li

    A knowledge-based restricted problem solving method in GIS applications, p. 179

    Wei H., Xu Q. and Bai Y.

    Representation of moving objects along a road network, p. 187

    N. Van de Weghe, A.G. Cohn, P. Bogaert and P. De Maeyer

    A three-dimensional temporal GIS for the analysis of morphometric changes, p. 195

    M. Sriti, R. Thibaud and C. Claramunt

    Quality assessment and uncertainty handling in spatial data mining, p. 203

    B. He, T. Fang and D. Guo

    From the schema matching to the integration of updating information into user geographic databases, p. 211

    A. Braun

    Construction and specification of spatial configurations in a geographical information retrieval context, p. 219

    M. Ould Ahmed Limam and M. Gaio

    A new tetrahedral network (TEN) generation algorithm for 3-D GIS, p. 226

    Song Z., Liu Y. and Niu W.

    GIS data modeling of 17th century fortresses on Dardanelles, p. 233

    C. Guney, B. Yuksel and R.N. Celik

    The spatial data server based on open GIS standards in heterogeneous distributed environment, p. 241

    M.-J. Kim, E. Lee, B.-W. Oh and M. Kim

    Vector cellular automata based geographical entity, p. 249

    Hu S. and Li D.

    A method for testing low-value spatial clustering, p. 257

    G. Lin and T. Zhang

    Research on Petri Net based spatiotemporal data model, p. 265

    Yin Z. and Li L.

    Advances in earth observation technologies

    Lossless inter-array predictive coding for subpixel-shifted satellite images based on texture analysis, p. 275

    Gao S., Zhang X.J. and Sun W.D.

    Visualizing distributions from multi-return lidar data to understand forest structure, p. 283

    D. Kao, M. Kramer, A. Love, J. Dungan and A. Pang

    3D scanning and photogrammetry for heritage recording: a comparison, p. 291

    W. Boehler and A. Marbs

    On modelling and visualisation of high resolution virtual environments using LIDAR data, p. 299

    S. Ahlberg, U. Söderman, M. Elmqvist and Å. Persson

    The utilization of GPR data in GIS, p.  307

    Chen B.Z., Hu Z.Q. and Li W.D.

    APIAS - Airborne photos and images attainment system, p. 311

    J.C.C. Gonçalves Junior, E.C. Piovesan, G.C. Silveira and E.A. Silva

    Geovisualisation

    Representation of geographic terrain surface using global indexing, p. 321

    J. Kolar

    Geo-visualization support for multidimensional clustering, p. 329

    G. Andrienko and N. Andrienko

    Annotated observations as knowledge construction elements in visual data analysis, p. 336

    I. Denisovich

    3D geovisualization as a communication and analysis tool in fluvial geomorphology, p. 339

    S.A. Brandt and B. Jiang

    A study on algorithms of a 3D visualization dynamic modification system based on TIN, p. 347

    P. Yang, H. Lin, S.J. Mao and D. Shen

    A multi-user mobile system to visualize environmental processes, p. 355

    J. Danado, E. Dias, T. Romão, N. Correia, A. Trabuco, C. Santos, J. Serpa, M. Costa and A. Câmara

    Interacting with 17th century fortresses on Dardanelles through web-based geo-visualization, p. 363

    C. Guney and R.N. Celik

    Visualization of landscape data in digital maps by exclusive use of XML-based languages, p. 370

    K. Neumann, P. Ahlbrecht, S. Eckstein, B. Mathiak and A. Kupfer

    Embedding digital rights in geovisualizations, p. 375

    J. Döllner

    Experimental research on web-based 3D terrain visualization - using Java3D and Microsoft.Net, p. 383

    Wang Y., Tan H. and Liu J.

    The principles of designing CIS - cartographic information system, p. 389

    Zheng S. and Chen Y.

    A network common data form (NetCDF) utility for efficient environmental data processing and visualization, p. 397

    J. Liu, J.M. Chen, D.T. Price, and S. Liu

    Design and implementation of high precision map symbol library based on GDI+, p. 405

    Wu X., Du Q., Cai Z. and Xu Z.

    User-centered 3D geovisualisation, p. 412

    A. Nielsen

    Studying groundwater resource by volume visualization technology, p. 417

    Zhu G., Xu Z., Wu X. and Yan H.

    Cognition theory-based research on adaptive user interface for GEO-visualization system, p. 424

    Ling Y., Chen Y. and Wang Y.

     

    CONTENTS - VOLUME 2

    GIS in urban planning and modelling

    Spatial patterns of urban growth in Nepal: a GIS-assisted analysis, p. 435

    M. Adhikari, B.A. Portnov and M. Schwartz

    What's planning (support system design)?, p. 443

    M. Campagna and G. Deplano

    GIS and remote sensing for urban planning: a case of Festac town, Lagos, Nigeria, p. 451

    M.J. Fasona and A.S. Omojola

    Geographical information systems on the web for public participation in planning, p. 459

    O. Gudes, E. Stern and T. Svoray

    Study on China National Park planning supported by spatial information technology, p. 464

    Dang A., Liu X., Yang R. and Zhuang Y.

    Uncertainty and data quality

    Uncertainty evaluation of military terrain analysis results by simulation and visualization, p. 473

    P. Horttanainen and K.Virrantaus

    Defuzzification operators for geographical data of nominal scale, p. 481

    T. Hatzichristos and J. Potamias

    Fuzzy model and Kriging for imprecise soil polygon boundaries, p. 489

    R. Sunila, E. Laine and O. Kremenova

    Fuzzy description of fuzzy direction relations and their similarities, p. 496

    Du S., Wang Q. and Yang Y.

    A new approach for modeling uncertainty in remote sensing change detection process, p. 503

    A. Alimohammadi, H.R. Rabiei and P.Z. Firouzabadi

    GIS in environmental management and decision making

    Mapping landslide susceptibility in the Three Gorges area, China using GIS, expert systems and fuzzy logic, p. 511

    A-X. Zhu, R. Wang, J. Qiao, Y. Chen, Q. Cai and C. Zhou

    A 3D GIS for managing building rehabilitation process, p. 518

    F. Ramos, D. Siret and M. Musy

    Spatial-temporal carbon sequestration under land USE and land cover change, p. 525

    S. Liu, J. Liu and T.R. Loveland

    GIS based analysis of store closure: a case study of an Office Depot store in Cincinnati, p. 533

    Y. Xu and L. Liu

    Branch bank closures in Sydney: a geographical perspective and analysis, p. 541

    L. Zhao, B. Garner and B. Parolin

    Integration of multidisciplinary knowledge and modelling techniques for a river-SDSS, p. 549

    J. Möltgen and G. Schmidt

    Applications of GIS and RS for land use dynamics monitoring in the rim zone of North China, p. 557

    Z. Qin, B. Xu, J. Liu and W. Zhang

    A methodology for siting a water harvesting reservoir, p. 565

    W.M. Jabre and F.A. Awar

    Landscape indices for comparison of spatial forest patterns in different geographical regions, p. 573

    E.M. De Clercq and R.R. De Wulf

    GIS in spatial management on a local level of administration in Poland, p. 578

    P. Fogel and J. Fiszczuk-Wiktorowicz

    Development of spatial GIS database for monitoring on dynamic state of grassland productivity, p. 585

    and animal loading balance in Northern China

    B. Xu, X. Xin, Z. Qin, H. Liu, Z. Chen, G. Yang, W. Wu, Q. Zhou and X. Wu

    Remote sensing coupled to a database of catchments and coastal zones, p. 593

    S.G. Halldórsdóttir and H. Þorbergsson

    Regionalization of N2O measurements for the North China Plain, p. 599

    G. Bareth and M. Kogge

    Application of RS and GIS in ecological environmental dynamic monitoring and management information system, p. 607

    Liao K.

    Geospatial cancer analysis for the state of Santa Catarina, brazil - environmental parameters considered, p. 615

    C.E. Hübner and F.H. Oliveira

    Information extraction from remote sensing data

    Object-based updating of land-use maps of urban areas using satellite remote sensing, p. 623

    R.J. Dekker

    Multiscale object-specific analysis: scale problems and multiscale solutions, p. 631

    O. Hall, G.J. Hay and D.J. Marceau

    A greedy point algorithm derived by Gabor filter bank for IKONOS satellite image segmentation, p. 639

    N. Nezamoddini-Kachouie and J. Alirezaie

    A modeling-based threshold approach to derive change/no change information over vegetation area, p. 647

    Y. Hu, S.M. de Jong and R. Sluiter

    A neural network approach for information extraction from remotely sensed data, p. 655

    J. Liu, G. Shao, H. Zhu and S. Liu

    New stereo matching and 3D view generation algorithms using aerial stereo images, p. 663

    J.-C. Kim and J.-H. Park

    Comparison of remote sensing based analysis of crop diseases by using high resolution multispectral and hyperspectral data - case study: Rhizoctonia solani in sugar beet -, p. 670

    R. Laudien, G. Bareth and R. Doluschitz

    A comparison of land-use classification with sampled IKONOS and TM imagery, p. 677

    Tang Z. and Zhu L.

    Quality study of ASTER data geometry by digitize contour lines in ILWIS, p. 683

    A. Partovi, K. Grabmaier and J. Hendrikse

    A new algorithm for map projection reverse transformation in GIS, p. 691

    Teng J., Huang W. and Sun M.

    Exploitation of geospatial techniques for studying the snow and water runoff parameters, p. 699

    A.S. Almas, M. Azam, M.J. Butt and S. Amer

    Land cover mapping of Khulna City applying remote sensing technique, p. 707

    M. Billah and G.A. Rahman

    Integration of ground sampling with satellite imaging through GIS database to monitor rangeland productivity for grazing in north China, p.  715

    Z. Qin, B. Xu, W. Li, W. Zhang and J. Liu

    Forestry inventory and information systems in developing countries: constraints and benefits, p. 723

    S.M. Malaza, P.G. Abbot and S. Mabena

    Multi-scale representation and generalisation

    Building a multi-granularity based spatial database, p. 733

    Cheng C. and Lu F.

    Automated generalisation in a multiple representation database, p. 741

    M. Dunkars

    Data update across multi-scale databases, p. 749

    H.-K. Kang, J.-W. Moon and K.-J. Li

    Modelling urban road networks integrating multiple representations of complex road and junction structures, p. 757

    N.N. Ulugtekin, A.O. Dogru and R.C. Thomson

    Streaming of compressed multi-resolution geographic vector data, p. 765

    J. Persson

    Metadata and spatial data infrastructure

    A hierarchical framework to aid the entry of metadata, p. 775

    J.-H. Hong, Y.-H. Chen and H.-P. Liao

    Building a taxonomy of GI knowledge - using Bloom's taxonomy to evaluate non-professional users' understanding of GI, p. 783

    M. Arleth

    Opportunities and challenges for SDI development in developing countries - a case study of, p. 789

    Uganda

    M. Musinguzi, G. Bax and S.S. Tickodri-Togboa

    SDI and network-based GIS for disaster management, p. 797

    A. Mansourian, A. Rajabifard and M.J.V. Zoej

    Discovering structure in geographical metadata, p. 805

    I. Podolak and U. Demšar

    Map interface valid coverage analysis based on XML metadata, p. 812

    H.-P. Liao and J.-H. Hong

    A cadastral domain model, p. 820

    J.M. Paasch

  • 13.
    Byerley, Andrew
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    'The Frightened Land: Land,Landscape and Politics in South Africa in the twentieth Century': Book Review2009In: Urban Studies, Vol. 46, no 1, 235-238 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Ek, Clara
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Spatial Planning.
    Lisa, Hjelm
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Spatial Planning.
    Den gröna staden2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    SAMMANFATTNING

    Detta kandidatarbete behandlar grönska i staden och dess komplexitet. Arbetet ser till vad svensk forskning säger om grönska i staden samt hur Boverket, Plan- och bygglagen och Miljöbalken förhåller sig till detta. Vidare redogör arbetet för hur Malmö inom planering behandlar grönska i staden och hur detta förhåller sig till forskning i ämnet.

    Studien utgår från ett analytiskt ramverk som bygger på forskning kring grönskans betydelse för en stad utifrån en svensk kontext. Därför har enbart svensk forskning använts i arbetet. Vid genomgång av forskningen var begreppen tillgång, tillgänglighet, kvalitet samt hälsa, förtätning, klimat och barn återkommande och utgör en viktig del av grönskan i en stad. Forskningen resulterade på så sätt i begrepp som sedan låg till grund för en innehållsanalys på plandokument från Malmö.

    Både Malmö, forskning samt svensk lagstiftning och rekommendationer lyfter hur stadens gröna områden besitter många olika funktioner för livet i en stad. Grönområden i en stad beskrivs bland annat besitta en social funktion som mötesplats och används för rekreation, lek och upplevelser samt är av betydelse för människors hälsa och välmående. Vidare är stadens grönområden av betydelse för ekologiska funktioner, för ett rikt djur- och växtliv samt av betydelse för närklimatet och för en god luftkvalitet. Exploatering och förtätning utgör ett hot mot grönskan i en stad då grönområden kan komma att ses som markreserv. Genom riktlinjer och detaljplaneläggning kan den fysiska planeringen bidra till att bevara och utveckla stadens grönska, vilket sker med lagstöd i Plan- och bygglagen. Det är vid fysisk planering viktigt att se till ett grönområdens kortsiktiga och långsiktiga värde för en stad, då ett grönområdes värde kan öka över tid om det förvaltats väl.

    Nyckelord: Grönstruktur & Fysisk planering. 

  • 15.
    Ekane, Bellewang Nelson
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Socio-economic impact of Prunus africana management in the Mount Cameroon region: A case study of the Bokwoango community2006Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 points / 30 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In most developing countries, forest resources are a major source of livelihood for forest dwellers. Forests provide fuel wood, farm products, meat, timber and plants of high medicinal value, including Prunus africana. The collection of medicinal plants is also an important source of cash income for some forest communities, and widely relied on to cure illnesses (Poffenberger, 1993). Because of this, the poor forest dwellers in particular are forced to exert pressure on their surrounding environment to make ends meet. Indiscriminate exploitation of forest resources has cost some forest dwellers dearly as they are now experiencing marked reduction of wildlife, forest cover, soil fertility and most importantly water supply, which is a key to life. Prunus africana has a very high economic and medicinal value locally as well as internationally. The exploitation of this species is a very profitable activity in most parts of Africa where it occurs, including the Mount Cameroon region. In recent years, most youths and young men in the Mount Cameroon region have seemingly become less interested in their usual income generating activities (farming, hunting, etc.) because of reduced productivity and have taken up Prunus harvesting as their major source of income. Increase in demand for this species by the French pharmaceutical company (Plantecam), weak institutional capacity to control exploitation, uncontrolled access into the forest, scramble for diminished stock by legal and illegal exploiters, destruction of wild stock by unsustainable practices, and insufficient regeneration of the species in the past have almost driven this species to extinction in certain parts of Cameroon and made it severely threatened in others. Prunus africana is presently threatened with extinction in the entire Mount Cameroon region. In response to this, the Mount Cameroon Project (MCP) and the Ministry of Environment and Forests (MINEF) helped some communities (Bokwoango and Mapanja) in the Mount Cameroon region to form Prunus africana harvesters’ unions with the aim of preserving the resource and improving the socio-economic benefits. The principal aim of the Bokwoango Prunus africana harvesters’ union is to ensure sustainable exploitation of Prunus africana while saving money for important development projects for individual members, their families and the entire community. This piece of work highlights the different facets of Prunus africana management in Cameroon in general and the Bokwoango community in particular. The study examines the socio-economic impact of Prunus africana management in the Bokwoango community and shows specifically the management role played by the Bokwoango Prunus africana harvesters’ union to reduce the rate of exploitation of Prunus africana and also to ensure benefit sharing of the earnings from sales of Prunus bark. It at the same time brings out the constraints encountered by harvesters as well as the opportunities that can make the union become more viable to the socio-economic development of the Bokwoango community. Results of this study show that for the short period that the Bokwoango Prunus africana harvesters’ union has existed, the socio-economic changes in this community are encouraging if one compares the present situation with that before the formation of the union. Most importantly, there has been increased awareness on the great need to conserve not only the threatened Prunus africana species but also other threatened plant and animal species in the region through sustainable hunting, harvesting and regeneration. Some proposals are made for efficient natural resource management and improvements on livelihood through alternative income generating activities. The study ends with recommendations for policy and institutional reforms as well as suggestions for further research in sustainable management of Prunus africana.

  • 16.
    Eriksson, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology (INK).
    Skogslandskapets sammansättning - en ekologisk tillämpning av en 1800-talskarta2007In: Kartlagt land: Kartan som källa till de arella näringarnas geografi och historia / [ed] Ulf Jansson, Stockholm: Kungliga Skogs- och Lantbruksakademin , 2007, 193-204 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Eriksson, Sofia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology (INK).
    Hammer, Monica
    Institutionen för livsvetenskaper, Södertörns högskola.
    The challenge of combining timber production and biodiversity conservation for long-term ecosystem functioning - A case study of Swedish boreal forestry2006In: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, Vol. 237, no 1-3, 208-217 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this case study of Swedish boreal forestry, we analyze the implementation in practical management of a sustainable forest management that includes the continued capacity of ecosystems to also provide non-timber services. In the Swedish national forest policy, the equal goals of timber production and biodiversity conservation have increased the responsibility of landowners and managers to modify practical management. We compiled written information from three larger FSC-certified forestry companies combined with semi-structured interviews with forest management personnel at regional offices to map what data and information the companies collect and use. We examined to what extent obtainable information from the forest companies captures composition, structure, and function of boreal ecosystems at patch, stand and landscape scale. This was done using 47 indicators compiled from literature and grouped into five categories based on nationally identified deficiencies in the managed boreal forest compared to unmanaged forest. We found that the recording of data describing different aspects of the forest ecosystem were separated in two largely uncoordinated systems, Ecological Landscape Plans and stand registers. While there is a need for conservation-oriented data across scales, collected statistics was largely production-oriented and related to the stand scale. We also identified information gaps regarding different ecosystem structures and their spatial distribution such as dead wood and habitat networks. The knowledge base available to future management decisions also seems to lack information on connectivity in the landscape, habitat at smaller spatial scales and the effectiveness of reserved areas. To reach the ecological goals of sustainable forest management, there is a need to further coordinate existing data and information but also to fill gaps in particular regarding cross-scale information.

  • 18.
    Eriksson, Sofia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology (INK).
    Lönn, Mikael
    Institutionen för livsvetenskaper, Södertörns högskola.
    Historical perspepctives on landscape representation and forest composition in Woodland Key Habitats compared to formally protected forest in boreal SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Habitats of Swedish conservation interests are in general small and fragmented following the extensive and intensive forest management history. This study covering 71 000 ha of boreal Sweden investigates how history influences present-day distribution and composition of forests identified as high conservation value habitats and how they are protected. We also investigated if the habitat criteria used to describe reservations differed between reservation types and if habitat criteria were associated with the size of Woodland Key Habitats. The results show strong effects from historical ownership and historical forest type on the probability of an area being set aside as formally protected or as voluntary protected Woodland Key Habitats. We also found that both formal reservations and Woodland Key Habitats primarily cover coniferous forest in the age interval 70-110 years but not the presumably most valuable oldest coniferous category >110 or deciduous forests, which are as common in reservations as in other areas. Old deciduous forests (>110 years) are significantly more rare in formal reservations compared to the forest matrix. When viewed in a context of fragmentation and edge effects the results underline the importance of evaluating reserved areas and Woodland Key Habitats in a wider temporal and larger spatial perspective to optimize conservation management efforts. Maximal representation and biodiversity can be better achieved if new reservations are chosen to represent different ownership and forest history, and if they are selected in a landscape context related to present reservations and the present surrounding production forest.

  • 19.
    Eriksson, Sofia
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science. Stockholms universitet.
    Lönn, Mikael
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology.
    Historical perspepctives on landscape representation and forest composition in Woodland Key Habitats compared to formally protected forest in boreal SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Habitats of Swedish conservation interests are in general small and fragmented following the extensive and intensive forest management history. This study covering 71 000 ha of boreal Sweden investigates how history influences present-day distribution and composition of forests identified as high conservation value habitats and how they are protected. We also investigated if the habitat criteria used to describe reservations differed between reservation types and if habitat criteria were associated with the size of Woodland Key Habitats. The results show strong effects from historical ownership and historical forest type on the probability of an area being set aside as formally protected or as voluntary protected Woodland Key Habitats. We also found that both formal reservations and Woodland Key Habitats primarily cover coniferous forest in the age interval 70-110 years but not the presumably most valuable oldest coniferous category >110 or deciduous forests, which are as common in reservations as in other areas. Old deciduous forests (>110 years) are significantly more rare in formal reservations compared to the forest matrix. When viewed in a context of fragmentation and edge effects the results underline the importance of evaluating reserved areas and Woodland Key Habitats in a wider temporal and larger spatial perspective to optimize conservation management efforts. Maximal representation and biodiversity can be better achieved if new reservations are chosen to represent different ownership and forest history, and if they are selected in a landscape context related to present reservations and the present surrounding production forest.

  • 20.
    Eriksson, Sofia
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Miljövetenskap.
    Lönn, Mikael
    Södertörns högskola, Biologi.
    Historical perspepctives on landscape representation and forest composition in Woodland Key Habitats compared to formally protected forest in boreal SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Habitats of Swedish conservation interests are in general small and fragmented following the extensive and intensive forest management history. This study covering 71 000 ha of boreal Sweden investigates how history influences present-day distribution and composition of forests identified as high conservation value habitats and how they are protected. We also investigated if the habitat criteria used to describe reservations differed between reservation types and if habitat criteria were associated with the size of Woodland Key Habitats. The results show strong effects from historical ownership and historical forest type on the probability of an area being set aside as formally protected or as voluntary protected Woodland Key Habitats. We also found that both formal reservations and Woodland Key Habitats primarily cover coniferous forest in the age interval 70-110 years but not the presumably most valuable oldest coniferous category >110 or deciduous forests, which are as common in reservations as in other areas. Old deciduous forests (>110 years) are significantly more rare in formal reservations compared to the forest matrix. When viewed in a context of fragmentation and edge effects the results underline the importance of evaluating reserved areas and Woodland Key Habitats in a wider temporal and larger spatial perspective to optimize conservation management efforts. Maximal representation and biodiversity can be better achieved if new reservations are chosen to represent different ownership and forest history, and if they are selected in a landscape context related to present reservations and the present surrounding production forest.

  • 21.
    Eriksson, Sofia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology (INK).
    Lönn, Mikael
    Institutionen för livsvetenskaper, Södertörns högskola.
    Interactions between historical forest composition and ownership affect present composition of older forest in boreal SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we reconstruct forest composition during the 1860s for a 71000 ha area in southern boreal Sweden. The aim is to show how historical ownership and associated anthropogenic disturbances act as a source of heterogeneity in the present-day distribution and composition of coniferous and deciduous forest within the commercial production forest. We use older (>110 years) and mature (70-110 years) forest as response variables in generalized linear models with a binominal error distribution. The explanatory variables include size of zone, historical type of ownership zone (village, company, and farm), amount of forest, and forest type. We focus in particular on investigating effects from interacting explanatory variables. The significant statistical associations in the study indicate that patterns of deciduous and coniferous older patches differ, and that deciduous patches differ in relation to age interval. The oldest deciduous patches, for example, are today more likely on areas that had deciduous cover also in the past and stood on forestland managed by farmers, but less likely on the same habitat managed by companies. We show that there are strong effects on present forest composition from historical ownership and forest composition. We argue that by including local data on past ownership combined with knowledge on use patterns management could be better adapted to local landscape dynamics compared to the application of overly generalized patterns or models of boreal dynamics that excludes interactions with management.

  • 22.
    Eriksson, Sofia
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science. Stockholms universitet.
    Lönn, Mikael
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology.
    Interactions between historical forest composition and ownership affect present composition of older forest in boreal SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we reconstruct forest composition during the 1860s for a 71000 ha area in southern boreal Sweden. The aim is to show how historical ownership and associated anthropogenic disturbances act as a source of heterogeneity in the present-day distribution and composition of coniferous and deciduous forest within the commercial production forest. We use older (>110 years) and mature (70-110 years) forest as response variables in generalized linear models with a binominal error distribution. The explanatory variables include size of zone, historical type of ownership zone (village, company, and farm), amount of forest, and forest type. We focus in particular on investigating effects from interacting explanatory variables. The significant statistical associations in the study indicate that patterns of deciduous and coniferous older patches differ, and that deciduous patches differ in relation to age interval. The oldest deciduous patches, for example, are today more likely on areas that had deciduous cover also in the past and stood on forestland managed by farmers, but less likely on the same habitat managed by companies. We show that there are strong effects on present forest composition from historical ownership and forest composition. We argue that by including local data on past ownership combined with knowledge on use patterns management could be better adapted to local landscape dynamics compared to the application of overly generalized patterns or models of boreal dynamics that excludes interactions with management.

  • 23.
    Eriksson, Sofia
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Miljövetenskap.
    Lönn, Mikael
    Södertörns högskola, Biologi.
    Interactions between historical forest composition and ownership affect present composition of older forest in boreal SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we reconstruct forest composition during the 1860s for a 71000 ha area in southern boreal Sweden. The aim is to show how historical ownership and associated anthropogenic disturbances act as a source of heterogeneity in the present-day distribution and composition of coniferous and deciduous forest within the commercial production forest. We use older (>110 years) and mature (70-110 years) forest as response variables in generalized linear models with a binominal error distribution. The explanatory variables include size of zone, historical type of ownership zone (village, company, and farm), amount of forest, and forest type. We focus in particular on investigating effects from interacting explanatory variables. The significant statistical associations in the study indicate that patterns of deciduous and coniferous older patches differ, and that deciduous patches differ in relation to age interval. The oldest deciduous patches, for example, are today more likely on areas that had deciduous cover also in the past and stood on forestland managed by farmers, but less likely on the same habitat managed by companies. We show that there are strong effects on present forest composition from historical ownership and forest composition. We argue that by including local data on past ownership combined with knowledge on use patterns management could be better adapted to local landscape dynamics compared to the application of overly generalized patterns or models of boreal dynamics that excludes interactions with management.

  • 24.
    Eriksson, Sofia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology (INK).
    Skånes, Helle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology (INK).
    Addressing semantics and historical data heterogeneities in cross-temporal landscape change analyses2010In: Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, ISSN 0167-8809, E-ISSN 1873-2305, Vol. 139, no 139, 516-521 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The process of recreating historical land cover dynamics, needed to understand trends and transient states in ecosystems, includes difficulties such as the sensitivity of applied spatial analyses to heterogeneities in historical material. This paper compares the handling of quantitatively dominating categories in two matrix analyses of land cover change within a Swedish boreal landscape (1725–1859). The focus is on how inconsistencies between historical maps can be handled without violating the inherent semantic potential. The study shows that analyses of land cover support different indications of change depending on the treatment of dominating categories. The type of landscape and research questions in focus should therefore be part of choosing matrix method and classification scheme. The observed patterns need to be evaluated against drivers of change and semantic plasticity in classification schemes to separate ecological change from semantic confusion. This paper recommends aggregated classification schemes with maintained original relationships between categories in comprehensive analyses. However, no pathway is persistent over time and categories should be allowed to disappear and new to appear. Analysis of historical dynamics with extended transition matrixes is recommended to account for the dynamics of small categories in relation to dominating categories within a landscape.

  • 25.
    Erixon, Hanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Borgström, S.
    Andersson, E.
    Challenging dichotomies: exploring resilience as an integrative and operative conceptual framework for large-scale urban green structures2013In: Planning Theory & Practice, ISSN 1464-9357, E-ISSN 1470-000X, Vol. 14, no 3, 349-372 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban planners and urban planning as a field face a major challenge in balancing urban development interests against the need to safeguard socially equitable and ecologically functional green space. This need is still commonly seen through a modernist lens, whereby large-scale green areas are viewed as an antithesis to the city, creating a polarised landscape seemingly free from cross-scale social and ecological interactions. This study reports on a transdisciplinary work process that aimed to challenge this polarisation by exploring more integrative and operative planning approaches to large-scale urban green structures, using the concept of resilience, both as a theoretical umbrella and in relation to a case study in Stockholm, Sweden. The exploration took the form of a series of workshops in which professionals from the fields of planning, urban design, ecology, landscape architecture, and environmental history, as well as city-wide and regional planning, took part. Throughout the process, tentative designs served as "touchstones", bringing questions from a theoretical level to a hands-on, specific, local context. This paper identifies three ways that resilience science can be useful in the planning and management of large urban green structures. Firstly, resilience can introduce complexity and thus make visible synergies and "win-win" situations within planning. Secondly, in highlighting change, resilience can offer alternatives to present conservationist perspectives on green space planning and thus offer constructive ways out of planning-related deadlocks. Thirdly, resilience can be advantageously combined with the concept of "legibility" in clarifying common goals and thus helping to build a constituency which will sustain large-scale green structures over time.

  • 26. Erixon, Hanna
    et al.
    Borgström, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Andersson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Challenging dichotomies - exploring resilience as an integrative and operative conceptual framework for large-scale urban green structures2013In: Planning Theory & Practice, ISSN 1464-9357, E-ISSN 1470-000X, Vol. 14, no 3, 349-372 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Balancing interests of urban growth and development against the need to safeguard socially equitable and ecologically functional green space is a core urban planning issue. These urban needs are still commonly seen through a modernist lens where green areas are viewed as an antithesis to the city, creating a polarized landscape seemingly free from cross-scale social and ecological interactions.

    This study aims to challenge this polarisation by using the concept of resilience both as a theoretical umbrella and applied to a case study. More operative and integrative planning approaches to large-scale urban green structures are here explored and discussed. The study reports on a trans-disciplinary work process designed by the authors as a sequence of workshops attended by ecologists, urban planners, architects, landscape architects and environmental historians and outreach meetings set in comprehensive planning and policy contexts. The explorations took the form of design experiments based in a suburban stretch of Stockholm (Sweden) which served as a basis for the discussions. This approach aimed to bring questions from a theoretical and general level and to discuss these in relation to a specific, local context in order to explore key points of conflict and possible alternatives.

    Three recurring themes upholding dichotomist views on the urban landscape were identified: 1) large size and scale mismatches, 2) problems of artificial borders; and 3) static views of urban nature leading to a lack of interest in future potential. The resilience concept was useful for highlighting options and opening up for innovation and change, but at the same time it was identified as in need of complementary approaches to identify goals and to bring people on board. Through our design experiments, we show how synergies and social-ecological resilience can encourage creative solutions rather than polarizing positions. Drawing on recent practice-based discourse on large parks, we suggest the adoption of legibility, i.e. to work with people's perceptions and understanding of their surroundings through design, within the resilience framework. There is a clear need to further explore how such approaches can complement the resilience concept in social-ecological systems governance.

  • 27.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Barthel, Stephan
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Andersson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Borgström, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Scale-Crossing Brokers and Network Governance of Urban Ecosystem Services: The Case of Stockholm2010In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 15, no 4, 28- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban ecosystem services are crucial for human well-being and the livability of cities. A central challenge for sustaining ecosystem services lies in addressing scale mismatches between ecological processes on one hand, and social processes of governance on the other. This article synthesizes a set of case studies from urban green areas in Stockholm, Sweden—allotment gardens, urban parks, cemeteries and protected areas—and discusses how governmental agencies and civil society groups engaged in urban green area management can be linked through social networks so as to better match spatial scales of ecosystem processes. The article develops a framework that combines ecological scales with social network structure, with the latter being taken as the patterns of interaction between actor groups. Based on this framework, the article (1) assesses current ecosystem governance, and (2) develops a theoretical understanding of how social network structure influences ecosystem governance and how certain actors can work as agents to promote beneficial network structures. The main results show that the mesoscale of what is conceptualized as city scale green networks (i.e., functionally interconnected local green areas) is not addressed by any actor in Stockholm, and that the management practices of civil society groups engaged in local ecosystem management play a crucial but neglected role in upholding ecosystem services. The article proposes an alternative network structure and discusses the role of midscale managers (for improving ecological functioning) and scale-crossing brokers (engaged in practices to connect actors across ecological scales). Dilemmas, strategies, and practices for establishing this governance system are discussed.

  • 28.
    Evasdotter, Liselott
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Biology Education Centre.
    Restoration of a Rich Fen by Top Soil Removal: Temporal and Spatial Responses among Vascular Plants, Bryophytes and Land Snails during 15 years2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Rich fens are calcareous and nutrient poor wetlands with a rich flora of orchids, sedges and mosses. As many as one hundred plant species are rich fen specialists. Many wetlands have been drained historically, and transformed to agricultural land or production forests. Today rich fens cover only 2-3% of the total mire area in Sweden. Rich fen is a rare and valuable habitat also from a European perspective and is protected in the Natura 2000-network. To increase and maintain the biodiversity and ecosystem services rich fens can offer, it is important to increase the rich fen area by restoration and management. Rich fen restoration can be carried out in different ways. In this report the restoration method of top soil removal is investigated. The method has never been tested before in Sweden and therefore it is important to evaluate the suitability of the method for further conservation work.

     

    Before restoration, the study area had been drained, used as arable land and pasture, and finally become abandoned and overgrown by tall eutrophic herbaceous vegetation. An excavator dug away the layer of nutrient rich top soil and then the site was left for spontaneous development. Adjacent to the restored area, there is a small remnant of rich fen. Monitoring of the restored area was performed during the first five years after the restoration. I repeated the monitoring after ten years, and analyzed the long-term succession of plants and snails, in comparison with the status in the reference fen.

     

    The vegetation in the restored parts is approaching the one in the reference fen. For example, the number of rich fen specialists has increased steadily. However, the colonization of bryophytes is slow. They cover at most 20 % in the restored parts, while 80 % in the reference fen, possibly because of dispersal limitation and the fact that the restored area is drier than the reference fen. More species of herbs can be found in the restored parts than in the reference fen. Another difference is the high cover of bare soil in the restored areas, compared to none in the reference fen. Some trees and bushes are growing in the area, primarily birch (Betula pubescens) and different species of Salix. The land snails have successfully colonized the restored areas. After two years the same number of species was found in the restored area, as in the reference fen. The total number of species found in the restored areas was 26, compared to 29 in the reference fen, among them three rare rich fen indicator species.

     

    The results show how the restored site has developed from bare mineral soil to a rich fen site, approaching the species composition of the reference fen. Several species of rich fen specialists among vascular plants, bryophytes and land snails have established in the restored areas. The small rich fen close to the restored area functions as a source from where plants and animals can spread. Overall the restoration shows very positive results, going from bare soil to rich fen vegetation in only ten years.

  • 29.
    Farzin, Maziar
    Södertörn University College, School of Life Sciences.
    Det svenska områdesskyddet: Ett samspel mellan diskurs och institutioner2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden has had laws protecting nature for about a hundred years. In this paper the views of nature and the values that serve as a rationale for protective measures are analyzed as results of a social process characterized by the dialectic relationship between institutions and discourse. Critical discourse analysis (CDA) is used to study this relationship and the discursive practices used by institutions, which reproduce or reshape views of nature that define the relationship between society and nature. Institutional design contributes to shaping discourse in the field of nature protection, while being originally shaped by discourse. In Sweden, the national park is an institution that reproduces a view of nature as the wild and untamed opposite of society, and the natural reserves reproduce a view of nature as holder of a multi-faceted set of values intertwined with society. However, the most recently formed national park, the marine national park of the Koster sea includes resource values that threaten the hegemony of arcadian discourse within the institution and indicates social change.

  • 30.
    Folkesson, Malin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology (INK).
    Towards a Sustainable Fisheries Management: How to address uncertainty in order to achieve a sustainable development of regional fisheries management2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Fisheries management is not only about managing the resource fish, but also includes managing the social system. Aquatic ecosystems and the social system are both complex and change continuously. It is important to address what types of uncertainty the combination of both systems, complex socio-ecological systems leads to, their consequences and how these should be dealt with. Successful or unsuccessful management outcomes are difficult to address whether or not they are due to management efforts or natural changes. In addition, uncertainties often lead to a short-term management, since lack of knowledge makes it difficult to act in a long-term perspective. This thesis conceptualizes how to address different types of uncertainty prevalent in fisheries management, with focus on natural process uncertainty, measurement and estimation uncertainty, decision and implementation uncertainty, and institutional and regime uncertainty.  This was done by analyzing how three theoretical approaches, namely co-management, adaptive management and adaptive co-management address these uncertainties. In order to highlight how different types of uncertainty have been dealt with in practice, a case study on the fishery management in Lake Vättern has been made.

    A comparison between the literature study and this thesis’ case study shows that hypothesis-testing, cooperation, communication and transparency are corresponding factors on how to deal with uncertainties in fisheries management and that institutional and regime uncertainty is inadequately addressed in Sweden.

  • 31.
    Freitas, Flavio L. M.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Brazilian land use policies and the development of ecosystem services2017Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Concerns related to global environmental changes due to land use changes have been driving international communities towards more sustainable land use systems. Brazil is a country of global strategic importance in this matter considering that it is the nation with the largest extension of preserved tropical native vegetation, recognised for its ecosystem services and high and unique biodiversity. Expansion of forestry and agriculture is taking place rapidly in Brazil, partly over degraded pastureland, but also over native vegetation. Regulating policies to govern and limit this expansion is crucial to ensure the preservation of the ecosystems services provided by native vegetation.  This thesis aims at improving the understanding of the potential impacts of prevailing public and private policies in the conservation of nature in Brazil. For this end, the Land Use Policy Assessment (LUPA) model was employed to evaluate potential pathways of implementation of the land use policies. Paper 1 evaluated the effects of current private and public command and control regulations in the protection of above-ground carbon stocks, identifying the most relevant stakeholders holding carbon stocks. The findings suggest that about 10% of carbon stocks are unprotected, where other policy instruments based on the market will be mostly required. Paper 2 performed an assessment of the mechanism for offsetting the legal deficit of native vegetation among landholders, evaluating the different offsetting implementation practices and their impacts on nature protection and socio-economic development. The results indicate that the offsetting mechanism may have little or no additional effects on protection of native vegetation and its ecosystem services because most of the offsetting is likely to take place where native vegetation is already protected by current legislations. However, it is viable to maximise environmental and socio-economic returns from the offsetting mechanism.

  • 32.
    Freitas, Flavio L. M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Englund, Oskar
    Chalmers University, Energy and Environment.
    Sparovek, Gerd
    University of São Paulo, Soil Dep..
    Berndes, Göran
    Chalmers University, Energy and Environment.
    Guidotti, Vinicius
    d Institute of Agricultural and Forest Management and Certification – Imaflora.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Who owns the Brazilian carbon?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Gallardo Fernández, Gloria L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, För teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten gemensamma enheter, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development.
    From Seascapes of Extinction to Seascapes of Confidence: Territorial Use Rights in Fisheries in Chile: El Quisco and Puerto Oscuro2008Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Chile, the indiscriminate harvest for export of the edible shellfish, Concholepas concholepas or false abalone, propelled by a neo-liberal market economy during the 1970s, almost led to the extinction of the species, thereby threatening the dependant small-scale artisan fishers’ survival as well as the ecosystem. To reverse this, fishers’ organizations in Chile have adopted the state created regulatory measure, Management and Exploitation Areas for Benthic Resources (MEABR; locally known as Management Areas -- MAs). Replacing the former unsuccessful fishing regulatory measurements, the MEABR regime empowers the fishers with exclusive territorial use rights (TURF) to manage the species, often under commons institutions, thus creating new seascapes of confidence. However, as is often the case with new solutions, emergent problems are posed that threaten to undermine the reform. With the new regulated extraction measure and geographical expansion of this novel labour and production alternative, fishers experience a transition from ‘nomadic’ to sedentary fishing leading to a transformation of their lifestyle and skills. If MAs become permanent, fishing in rural areas may lead to tensions as the fishers settle on coastal lands without entitlement, or are hindered from developing their own fisheries infrastructure. The legal system does not seem to fully foresee the consequences of the reform, and prevailing power relations and private property rights work to disadvantage the fishers. Using a participatory approach for the first research location of El Quisco (Valparaíso Region), and interviews with key informants for the second research location of Puerto Oscuro (Coquimbo Region), fishers’ views of the Chilean TURF were evaluated. How fishers perceive this experience should be central for the success or failure of the MAs as a viable alternative to the earlier conditions of open access. While the assessment of El Quisco deals more with the performance of the MA, Puerto Oscuro is used to portray the seascapes of conflict that have emerged as ownership of the coastal land is contested. The study shows that while the reform has brought better incomes from the benthic resources, the overall economic importance of the MAs for the fishers is reduced relative to the incomes coming from fishing activities realized outside the MAs. Experiences in both cases have been otherwise positive in terms of the recuperation of the species, ecological concerns and strengthening fishers’ so-called soft assets. Nevertheless, many problems remain, among them the problem of access to the sea border and those related to ambiguous land rights to support coastal settlement and fishing infrastructure development.

  • 34.
    Gallardo Fernández, Gloria L.
    Uppsala universitet.
    From Seascapes of Extinction to Seascapes of Confidence: Territorial Use Rights in Fisheries in Chile: El Quisco and Puerto Oscuro2008Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Chile, the indiscriminate harvest for export of the edible shellfish, Concholepas concholepas or false abalone, propelled by a neo-liberal market economy during the 1970s, almost led to the extinction of the species, thereby threatening the dependant small-scale artisan fishers’ survival as well as the ecosystem. To reverse this, fishers’ organizations in Chile have adopted the state created regulatory measure, Management and Exploitation Areas for Benthic Resources (MEABR; locally known as Management Areas -- MAs). Replacing the former unsuccessful fishing regulatory measurements, the MEABR regime empowers the fishers with exclusive territorial use rights (TURF) to manage the species, often under commons institutions, thus creating new seascapes of confidence. However, as is often the case with new solutions, emergent problems are posed that threaten to undermine the reform. With the new regulated extraction measure and geographical expansion of this novel labour and production alternative, fishers experience a transition from ‘nomadic’ to sedentary fishing leading to a transformation of their lifestyle and skills. If MAs become permanent, fishing in rural areas may lead to tensions as the fishers settle on coastal lands without entitlement, or are hindered from developing their own fisheries infrastructure. The legal system does not seem to fully foresee the consequences of the reform, and prevailing power relations and private property rights work to disadvantage the fishers. Using a participatory approach for the first research location of El Quisco (Valparaíso Region), and interviews with key informants for the second research location of Puerto Oscuro (Coquimbo Region), fishers’ views of the Chilean TURF were evaluated. How fishers perceive this experience should be central for the success or failure of the MAs as a viable alternative to the earlier conditions of open access. While the assessment of El Quisco deals more with the performance of the MA, Puerto Oscuro is used to portray the seascapes of conflict that have emerged as ownership of the coastal land is contested. The study shows that while the reform has brought better incomes from the benthic resources, the overall economic importance of the MAs for the fishers is reduced relative to the incomes coming from fishing activities realized outside the MAs. Experiences in both cases have been otherwise positive in terms of the recuperation of the species, ecological concerns and strengthening fishers’ so-called soft assets. Nevertheless, many problems remain, among them the problem of access to the sea border and those related to ambiguous land rights to support coastal settlement and fishing infrastructure development.

  • 35.
    Gercans, Visvaldis
    et al.
    City of Livani.
    Ubelis, Arnolds
    University of Latvia.
    3. Efforts to create a sustainable economic development in Livani2003In: Public Participation and Democracy: Reports from the Superbs project / [ed] Lars Rydén, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2003, 1, 21-27 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In this second study the economic resources of Livani, a town of 11,000 in south-western Latvia, is discussed and examined. A detailed account of the resources in industrial production, agriculture, forestry and the service sector is given. The larger industries in the town all collapsed after 1991. Today three of these slowly regain production but on a much lower level. The former glass factory, which has started a high tech production of optical fibres mostly for export to the west, seems the most successful. Agriculture and forestry are traditional sectors in the nearest region and is a base for production and much selfsufficiency. The service sector is slowly growing. The economy is analysed in terms of sustainable development.

  • 36.
    Gilljam, David
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Metapopulation persistence of insects living in hollow oaks: effects of adding oaks in  the surrounding landscape2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The oak district of Östergötland is one of the largest oak forests left in Europe and it harbours many threatened species dependent on old hollow trees. In this study, the saproxylic beetle Osmoderma eremita living in hollow oaks was used as a model species and parameterised for a metapopulation model (the incidence function model) at the level of individual trees. The aim was to set up a number of conservation management scenarios, where new oaks were added to increase the quality of the matrix and then simulate the resulting metapopulation occupancy, using three levels of dispersal. A real data set of hollow oaks was used as the base for modeling. Oaks were added to cells in a lattice covering the study landscape, where cell size, cell position and numbers of oaks per hectare were varied. The results show that a larger area of added oaks and a greater number of oaks per hectare will give a higher increase in total occupancy, no matter the dispersal, but the second smallest cell size used (3.4 km2 ) will give the highest response per effort for medium and high dispersal abilities, and smaller cells with greater number of oaks per area can be more effective. The spatial position of the increase in occupancy differs depending on dispersal ability of the focal species and should be considered in conservation management work. For unoccupied cells, the effort required to get the cell occupied will be smaller for cells having a greater number of oaks.

  • 37. Gonzalez, Eduardo
    et al.
    Felipe-Lucia, Maria R.
    Bourgeois, Berenger
    Boz, Bruno
    Nilsson, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Palmer, Grant
    Sher, Anna A.
    Integrative conservation of riparian zones2017In: Biological Conservation, ISSN 0006-3207, E-ISSN 1873-2917, Vol. 211, 20-29 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Riparian zones are the interface between aquatic and terrestrial systems along inland watercourses. They have a disproportionate ecological role in the landscape considering their narrow extent, which makes them a good example of small natural features (sensu Hunter, 2017-in this issue). Characteristically, riparian zones increase species richness in the landscape and provide key services to society, such as soil fertility, water purification, and recreation. Despite the recognized importance of riparian zones for ecological, economic and social reasons, and the vast amount of scientific literature exploring measures for their conservation, current management is still failing at enabling a proper ecological functioning of these areas. The best practices for conservation of riparian zones have mostly focused on manipulating biotic and physical components (e.g. renaturalizing flow regimes, improving channel mobility, and controlling invasions of exotic ecosystem engineer species). However, these strategies face important technical, socio-economic, and legal constraints that require a more integrative approach for effective conservation. In this paper we summarize the main problems affecting riparian zones and their current management challenges. Following Hunter et al. (2017-in this issue), we review novel approaches to conservation of riparian zones, complementary to manipulating processes that reflect contemporary management and policy. These include (1) investing in environmental education for both local people and technical staff, (2) guaranteeing qualitative and long term inventories and monitoring, (3) establishing legislation and solutions to protect riparian zones, (4) framing economic activities in riparian zones under sustainable management, and (5) planning restoration of riparian zones at multiple and hierarchical spatio-temporal scales.

  • 38.
    Granvik, Madeleine
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    1. A strong municipality: On the local economic and planning competence in Uppsala and other Swedish municipalities2002In: Basic patterns of sustainability: Reports from the Superbs project / [ed] Lars Rydén and Madeleine Granvik, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2002, 1, 4-8 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Uppsala is described as an example of the typical Nordic strongmunicipality. This includes an extensive self-government andlocal democracy with self-taxation and a planning monopoly. Itis argued that a strong local community is good for approachingsustainability. Madeleine Granvik is a geographer and researchstudent at the Dept of Landscape Planning at the Swedish AgriculturalUniversity. She has worked with development of democracyand environmental awareness in cities in Sweden and Russia.

  • 39.
    Granvik, Madeleine
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Forsberg, Mia
    City of Uppsala.
    3. Urban growth and longterm planning: Strategies and vision for the city of Uppsala – public participation in long term planning2002In: Basic patterns of sustainability: Reports from the Superbs project / [ed] Lars Rydén and Madeleine Granvik, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2002, 1, 17-23 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable development is addressed as a new challenge instrategic planning. The Strategies and vision for Uppsala City2012 is one example of a strategic planning document. Thearticle describes the work with the plan, public participation andits main features.

  • 40.
    Granvik, Madeleine
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences .
    Wlodarczyk, Dorota
    Gdansk Technical University.
    Rydén, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    3. Building a sustainable neighbourhood: Kronsberg2003In: Building and Re-building Sustainable Communities: Reports from the Superbs project / [ed] Lars Rydén, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2003, 1, 26-34 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Eleven recently built neighbourhoods applying principles of sustainability in all its aspects – environmental, economic and social – are described with a more detailed description of Kronsberg outside Hannover, Germany. Kronsberg with 15,000 inhabitants and working places for 2,000, consists of 10% single-family homes and 90% multi-storey buildings. Considerable obligations were made in all phases of the project to secure a high quality of life and to use natural resources sparingly.

  • 41. Green, Tom L.
    et al.
    Kronenberg, Jakub
    Andersson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Gomez-Baggethun, Erik
    Insurance Value of Green Infrastructure in and Around Cities2016In: Ecosystems (New York. Print), ISSN 1432-9840, E-ISSN 1435-0629, Vol. 19, no 6, 1051-1063 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The combination of climate change and urbanization projected to occur until 2050 poses new challenges for land-use planning, not least in terms of reducing urban vulnerability to hazards from projected increases in the frequency and intensity of climate extremes. Interest in investments in green infrastructure (interconnected systems of parks, wetlands, gardens and other green spaces), as well as in restoration of urban ecosystems as part of such adaptation strategies, is growing worldwide. Previous research has highlighted the insurance value of ecosystems in securing the supply of ecosystem services in the face of disturbance and change, yet this literature neglects urban areas even though urban populations are often highly vulnerable. We revisit the insurance value literature to examine the applicability of the concept in urban contexts, illustrating it with two case studies: watersheds providing drinking water for residents of Vancouver, Canada; and private gardens ensuring connectedness between other parts of urban green infrastructure in London, UK. Our research supports the notion that investments in green infrastructure can enhance insurance value, reducing vulnerability and the costs of adaptation to climate change and other environmental change. Although we recommend that urban authorities consider the insurance value of ecosystems in their decision-making matrix, we advise caution in relying upon monetary evaluations of insurance value. We conclude by identifying actions and management strategies oriented to maintain or enhance the insurance value of urban ecosystems. Ecosystems that are themselves resilient to external disturbances are better able to provide insurance for broader social-ecological systems.

  • 42.
    Grönholm, Björn
    Åbo Akademi University.
    1. Implementing Local Agenda 21 in the Baltic Sea region: The case of Turku and southwest Finland2003In: Public Participation and Democracy: Reports from the Superbs project / [ed] Lars Rydén, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2003, 1, 4-14 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction and implementation of Local Agenda 21 (LA21) in municipalities in Finland, Sweden, Norway and Denmark is reviewed. In Sweden all municipalities have a LA21, in Finland many and in Norway almost none, but here many environmental projects serve the same purpose as LA21. The importance of the participatory and informative – democracy building – character of LA21 is underlined with many examples from Turku and Southwest Finland.

  • 43.
    Göransson, Emma
    University College of Arts, Crafts and Design, Institutionen för Konst (K).
    Att skriva en plats2015In: Platsens poetik: ett konstnärligt forskningsprojekt om gröna platser och tillhörighet / [ed] Emma Göransson, Stockholm: ArkDes, Arkitektur- och designcentrum , 2015, 12-19 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Göransson, Emma
    University College of Arts, Crafts and Design, Institutionen för Konst (K).
    Gröna platser och tillhörighet2015In: Platsens poetik: ett konstnärligt forskningsprojekt om gröna platser och tillhörighet / [ed] Emma Göransson, Stockholm: ArkDes, Arkitektur- och designcentrum , 2015, 30-41 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Göransson, Emma
    University College of Arts, Crafts and Design, Institutionen för Konst (K).
    Konstnärlig forskning, ekologi och kulturhistoria2015In: Platsens poetik: ett konstnärligt forskningsprojekt om gröna platser och tillhörighet / [ed] Emma Göransson, Stockholm: ArkDes, Arkitektur- och designcentrum , 2015, 20-31 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Göransson, Emma
    University College of Arts, Crafts and Design, Institutionen för Konst (K).
    Kulturhistoria och ekokonst2015In: Platsens poetik: ett konstnärligt forskningsprojekt om gröna platser och tillhörighet / [ed] Emma Göransson, Stockholm: ArkDes, Arkitektur- och designcentrum , 2015, 88--93 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Göransson, Emma
    University College of Arts, Crafts and Design, Institutionen för Konst (K).
    Platsens poetik: ett konstnärligt forskningsprojekt om gröna platser och tillhörighet2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Göransson, Emma
    University College of Arts, Crafts and Design, Institutionen för Konst (K).
    Projektet platsens poetik: process2015In: Platsens poetik: ett konstnärligt forskningsprojekt om gröna platser och tillhörighet / [ed] Emma Göransson, Stockholm: ArkDes, Arkitektur- och designcentrum , 2015, 70-77 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Göransson, Emma
    University College of Arts, Crafts and Design, Institutionen för Konst (K).
    Utställningen Platsens poetik2015In: Platsens poetik: ett konstnärligt forskningsprojekt om gröna platser och tillhörighet / [ed] Emma Göransson, Stockholm: ArkDes, Arkitektur- och designcentrum , 2015, 116-124 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Haas, Tigran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Lundström, Mats
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Urban Design In Sweden2012In: Urban Design Practice: An International Review / [ed] Sebastian Loew, London: RIBA - Royal Institute of British Architects Publishing , 2012, 96-112 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban Design Practice gives a fascinating account of the state of urban design practice across the world today. Packed with invaluable local knowledge from on-the-spot contributors, its global scope offers an armoury of background facts and figures to professionals interested in exporting their skills internationally. Along the way it reveals how urban design is practiced, identifies a multitude of key concerns and refines our understanding of what urban design (so often a nebulous concept) means.

    Aimed broadly at practitioners – masterplanners, architects, landscape architects, planners, civil engineers – and students and academics of these disciplines, twenty chapters analyse a different country’s urban design context. Fully illustrated and structured in a similar way, each chapter features a case study, general background economic statistics, and a handy ‘quick guide’ to the types of work available, the underlying legislation and tips for securing work. 

    Features chapters of the following countries: 

    Argentina, Australia, Brazil, China, the Czech Republic, Dubai, Egypt, England, France, Germany, India, Italy, Morocco, Netherlands, New Zealand, South Africa, Spain, Sweden and the USA.

1234 1 - 50 of 164
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf