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  • 1. Aavik, Einari
    et al.
    Lumivuori, Henri
    Leppänen, Olli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Wirth, Thomas
    Hakkinen, Sanna-Kaisa
    Braesen, Jan-Hinrich
    Beschorner, Ulrich
    Zeller, Thomas
    Braspenning, Maarten
    van Criekinge, Wim
    Makinen, Kimmo
    Yla-Herttuala, Seppo
    Global DNA methylation analysis of human atherosclerotic plaques reveals extensive genomic hypomethylation and reactivation at imprinted locus 14q32 involving induction of a miRNA cluster2015In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, no 16, 993-U23 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Genetics can explain just above 10% of the observed heritability in cardiovascular diseases. Epigenetics is about to provide some further explanations, but the information needed for that is in the accumulation phase. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis has revealed thousands of genes, which are epigenetically differentially regulated in atherosclerotic plaques. Our results point to an additional level of complexity that needs to be integrated into the aetiology of atherogenesis.We conducted a genome-wide analysis to identify differentially methylated genes in atherosclerotic lesions. Methods DNA methylation at promoters, exons and introns was identified by massive parallel sequencing. Gene expression was analysed by microarrays, qPCR, immunohistochemistry and western blots. Results Globally, hypomethylation of chromosomal DNA predominates in atherosclerotic plaques and two-thirds of genes showing over 2.5-fold differential in DNA methylation are up-regulated in comparison to healthy mammary arteries. The imprinted chromatin locus 14q32 was identified for the first time as an extensively hypomethylated area in atherosclerosis with highly induced expression of miR127, -136, -410, -431, -432, -433 and capillary formation-associated gene RTL1. The top 100 list of hypomethylated promoters exhibited over 1000-fold enrichment for miRNAs, many of which mapped to locus 14q32. Unexpectedly, also gene body hypermethylation was found to correlate with stimulated mRNA expression. Conclusion Significant changes in genomic methylation were identified in atherosclerotic lesions. The most prominent gene cluster activated via hypomethylation was detected at imprinted chromosomal locus 14q32 with several clustered miRNAs that were up-regulated. These results suggest that epigenetic changes are involved in atherogenesis and may offer new potential therapeutic targets for vascular diseases.

  • 2. Abbott, A. L.
    et al.
    Adelman, M. A.
    Alexandrov, A. V.
    Barnett, H. J. M.
    Beard, J.
    Bell, P.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Blacker, D.
    Buckley, C. J.
    Cambria, R. P.
    Comerota, A. J.
    Connolly, E. S., Jr.
    Davies, A. H.
    Eckstein, H. H.
    Faruqi, R.
    Fraedrich, G.
    Gloviczki, P.
    Hankey, G. J.
    Harbaugh, R. E.
    Heldenberg, E.
    Kittner, S. J.
    Kleinig, T. J.
    Mikhailidis, D. P.
    Moore, W. S.
    Naylor, R.
    Nicolaides, A.
    Paraskevas, K. I.
    Pelz, D. M.
    Prichard, J. W.
    Purdie, G.
    Ricco, J. B.
    Riles, T.
    Rothwell, P.
    Sandercock, P.
    Sillesen, H.
    Spence, J. D.
    Spinelli, F.
    Tan, A.
    Thapar, A.
    Veith, F. J.
    Zhou, W.
    Why the United States Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Should not Extend Reimbursement Indications for Carotid Artery Angioplasty/Stenting2012In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, ISSN 1078-5884, E-ISSN 1532-2165, Vol. 43, no 3, 247-251 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Abbott, Anne L.
    et al.
    Adelman, Mark A.
    Alexandrov, Andrei V.
    Barnett, Henry J. M.
    Beard, Jonathan
    Bell, Peter
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Blacker, David
    Buckley, Clifford J.
    Cambria, Richard P.
    Comerota, Anthony J.
    Connolly, E. Sander
    Davies, Alun H.
    Eckstein, Hans-Henning
    Faruqi, Rishad
    Fraedrich, Gustav
    Gloviczki, Peter
    Hankey, Graeme J.
    Harbaugh, Robert E.
    Heldenberg, Eitan
    Kittner, Steven J.
    Kleinig, Timothy J.
    Mikhailidis, Dimitri P.
    Moore, Wesley S.
    Naylor, Ross
    Nicolaides, Andrew
    Paraskevas, Kosmas I.
    Pelz, David M.
    Prichard, James W.
    Purdie, Grant
    Ricco, Jean-Baptiste
    Riles, Thomas
    Rothwell, Peter
    Sandercock, Peter
    Sillesen, Henrik
    Spence, J. David
    Spinelli, Francesco
    Tan, Aaron
    Thapar, Ankur
    Veith, Frank J.
    Zhou, Wei
    Why the United States Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services should not extend reimbursement indications for carotid artery angioplasty/stenting2012In: VASCULAR, ISSN 1708-5381, Vol. 20, no 1, 1-7 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4. Abdon, NJ
    et al.
    Herlitz, J
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Andrersson, B
    Peripartumcardiomyopathi an often mised diagnosis2013In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 110, no 23-24, 1152-1154 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Peripartumkardiomyopati är en sällsynt form av hjärtsvikt. Diagnostiska kriterier är nytillkommen hjärtsvikt från sen graviditet och upp till fem månader efter förlossning, avsaknad av annan förklaring till hjärtsvikt och nedsatt systolisk vänsterkammarfunktion Orsaken till tillståndet tros vara omvandling av prolaktin till en kardiotoxisk variant. Terapin är den etablerade, men ACE-hämmare och ARB får inte ges till ammande mödrar. Hjärttransplantation har tillgripits. Maligna hjärtarytmier har krävt behandling med implanterbar defibrillator och pacemaker. Hämning av produktionen av prolaktin med bromokriptin har gett goda resultat i en liten studie. Resultaten har inte bekräftats.

  • 5.
    Abedpour Dehkordi, Adel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Nayeri, H.
    Naderi, G. A.
    Dinani, N. Jafari
    Boshtam, M.
    Interleukin-6 reduces paraoxonase-1 activity in a dose-dependent manner: evidence for a potential novel lipoprotein-based modulatory mechanism2016In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 252, E113-E114 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The anti-oxidant/anti-inflammatory nature of HDL is mainly associated with paraoxonase-1 (PON1). Previous studies have revealed an inverse correlation between Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and PON1 expression. The current study investigates the effect of IL-6 on serum PON1 activity in vitro, given the potential structural capability of PON1 to host multiple ligands. Methods: PON1 activity was measured spectrophotometrically (234 nm) using paraoxon substrate in the presence of concentrations of IL-6 than control samples. A sequence alignment using the FASTA sequence was manually conducted to identify possible homologies between PON1 and the IL-6-binding protein. Statistical analysis was conducted using GraphPad Prism v5.0. Results: PON1 enzyme activity decreased by 15%, 26% (P<0.05) and 55% (P<0.001) in the presence of 4, 10 and 20 pg/ml of IL-6, respectively. in comparison with the controls. Student t. test was used as statistical method (p<0.05: statistically significant). There are potential homologies between PON1 active sites and know IL-6-binding residues. Conclusions: This study shows that IL-6 directly reduce the PON1 activity in a dose-dependent manner. This observation supports some studies indicating inverse correlation between PON1 and IL-6. However, as opposed to the gene-mediated approach, this study suggest that IL-6 may act directly through specific binding to PON1 (biochemical modulation). X ray crystallography can further scrutinize the present finding.

  • 6.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Editorial Material: Not all probiotic strains prevent necrotising enterocolitis in premature infants in LANCET, vol 387, issue 10019, pp 624-6252016In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 387, no 10019, 624-625 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 7. Achouiti, A.
    et al.
    Vogl, T.
    Urban, Constantin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Hommes, T. J.
    van Zoelen, M. A.
    Florquin, S.
    Roth, J.
    van 't Veer, C.
    de Vos, A. F.
    van der Poll, T.
    Myeloid related protein (mrp) 8/14 contributes to an antibacterial host response against klebsiella (k.) pneumoniae2012In: Shock, ISSN 1073-2322, E-ISSN 1540-0514, Vol. 37, no S1, 56-56 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Acosta, S.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Vasc Ctr, Malmo, Sweden..
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Wanhainen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Negative-pressure wound therapy for prevention and treatment of surgical-site infections after vascular surgery2017In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 104, no 2, E75-E84 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundIndications for negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in vascular surgical patients are expanding. The aim of this review was to outline the evidence for NPWT on open and closed wounds. MethodsA PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane Library search from 2007 to June 2016 was performed combining the medical subject headings terms wound infection', abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)', fasciotomy', vascular surgery' and NPWT' or VAC'. ResultsNPWT of open infected groin wounds was associated with shorter duration of wound healing by 47 days, and was more cost-effective than alginate dressings in one RCT. In one RCT and six observational studies, NPWT-related major bleeding and graft preservation rates were 0-10 and 83-100 per cent respectively. One retrospective comparative study showed greater wound size reduction per day, fewer dressing changes, quicker wound closure and shorter hospital stay with NPWT compared with gauze dressings for lower leg fasciotomy. NPWT and mesh-mediated fascial traction after AAA repair and open abdomen was associated with high primary fascial closure rates (96-100 per cent) and low risk of graft infection (0-7 per cent). One retrospective comparative study showed a significant reduction in surgical-site infection, from 30 per cent with standard wound care to 6 per cent with closed incisional NPWT. ConclusionNPWT has a central role in open and infected wounds after vascular surgery; the results of prophylactic care of closed incisions are promising.

  • 9.
    Acosta, S.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Vasc Ctr, Dept Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden..
    Wanhainen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Temporary Abdominal Closure After Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Systematic Review of Contemporary Observational Studies2016In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, ISSN 1078-5884, E-ISSN 1532-2165, Vol. 51, no 3, 371-378 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this paper was to review the literature on temporary abdominal closure (TAC) after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. Methods: This was a systematic review of observational studies. A PubMed, EM BASE and Cochrane search from 2007 to July 2015 was performed combining the Medical Subject Headings "aortic aneurysm" and "temporary abdominal closure", "delayed abdominal closure", "open abdomen", "abdominal compartment syndrome", "negative pressure wound therapy", or "vacuum assisted wound closure". Results: Seven original studies were found. The methods used for TAC were the vacuum pack system with (n = 1) or without (n = 2) mesh bridge, vacuum assisted wound closure (VAWC; n = 1) and the VAWC with mesh mediated fascial traction (VACM; n = 3). The number of patients included varied from four to 30. Three studies were exclusively after open repair, one after endovascular aneurysm repair, and three were mixed series. The frequency of ruptured AAA varied from 60% to 100%. The primary fascia] closure rate varied from 79% to 100%. The median time to closure of the open abdomen was 10.5 and 17 days in two prospective studies with a fascia] closure rate of 100% and 96%, respectively; the inclusion criterion was an anticipated open abdomen therapy time >= 5 days using the VACM method. The graft infection rate was 0% in three studies. No patient with longterm open abdomen therapy with the VACM in the three studies was left with a planned ventral hernia. The in hospital survival rate varied from 46% to 80%. Conclusions: A high fascial closure rate without planned ventral hernia is possible to achieve with VACM, even after long-term open abdomen therapy. There are, however, few publications reporting specific results of open abdomen treatment after AAA repair, and there is a need for randomized controlled trials to determine the most efficient and safe TAC method during open abdomen treatment after AAA repair.

  • 10.
    Acosta, Stefan
    et al.
    Vascular Center, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Torbjörn
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Current status on plasma biomarkers for acute mesenteric ischemia2012In: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis, ISSN 0929-5305, E-ISSN 1573-742X, Vol. 33, no 4, 355-361 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical diagnosis of acute mesenteric ischemia is difficult. The aim of this review is to provide current status on the search for an accurate plasma biomarker for acute mesenteric ischemia. A search using the medical subject heading terms marker and mesenteric ischemia or intestinal ischemia or superior mesenteric artery occlusion or mesenteric venous thrombosis in the Medline and Embase databases from 1980 to 2011. Studies without a control group or a control group consisted of healthy individuals (human studies), or studies on intestinal reperfusion were excluded. Twenty animal and twelve human studies were identified. In human studies, the studied series of patients had a control group that had a need of laparotomy (n = 2), suspected acute mesenteric ischemia (n = 7), acute abdomen (n = 2) or systemic inflammatory response syndrome (n = 1). D: -dimer has been found to be the most consistent highly sensitive early marker, but specificity was low. The follow-up study on α-glutathione S-transferase yielded inferior sensitivity and accuracy than the preliminary study, clearly questioning the value of this marker. Intestinal fatty acid binding globulin (I-FABP) and D: -lactate are both interesting markers, but the results were conflicting. Different cut-off levels have been used in the studies on I-FABP. The encouraging preliminary result of cobalt-albumin and urinary FABP as an accurate marker needs to be addressed in other study populations. The early clinical and laboratory diagnosis of intestinal ischemia remains a challenge. None of the proposed plasma-derived tests for acute mesenteric ischemia has as yet entered routine clinical practice. The proposed biomarkers need to be evaluated in a prospective clinical research project in patients with acute abdomen.

  • 11. Acosta, Stefan
    et al.
    Nilsson, Torbjörn K
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, Örebro University Hospital.
    Current status on plasma biomarkers for acute mesenteric ischemia2012In: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis, ISSN 0929-5305, E-ISSN 1573-742X, Vol. 33, no 4, 355-361 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical diagnosis of acute mesenteric ischemia is difficult. The aim of this review is to provide current status on the search for an accurate plasma biomarker for acute mesenteric ischemia. A search using the medical subject heading terms marker and mesenteric ischemia or intestinal ischemia or superior mesenteric artery occlusion or mesenteric venous thrombosis in the Medline and Embase databases from 1980 to 2011. Studies without a control group or a control group consisted of healthy individuals (human studies), or studies on intestinal reperfusion were excluded. Twenty animal and twelve human studies were identified. In human studies, the studied series of patients had a control group that had a need of laparotomy (n = 2), suspected acute mesenteric ischemia (n = 7), acute abdomen (n = 2) or systemic inflammatory response syndrome (n = 1). D: -dimer has been found to be the most consistent highly sensitive early marker, but specificity was low. The follow-up study on α-glutathione S-transferase yielded inferior sensitivity and accuracy than the preliminary study, clearly questioning the value of this marker. Intestinal fatty acid binding globulin (I-FABP) and D: -lactate are both interesting markers, but the results were conflicting. Different cut-off levels have been used in the studies on I-FABP. The encouraging preliminary result of cobalt-albumin and urinary FABP as an accurate marker needs to be addressed in other study populations. The early clinical and laboratory diagnosis of intestinal ischemia remains a challenge. None of the proposed plasma-derived tests for acute mesenteric ischemia has as yet entered routine clinical practice. The proposed biomarkers need to be evaluated in a prospective clinical research project in patients with acute abdomen.

  • 12.
    Aerts, Marc
    et al.
    Interuniversity Institute for Biostatistics and Statistical Bioinformatics.
    Minalu, Girma
    Interuniversity Institute for Biostatistics and Statistical Bioinformatics.
    Bösner, Stefan
    Department of General Practice and Family Medicine, Philipps University Marburg, Germany..
    Buntinx, Frank
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven, Belgium; Department of General Practice, Maastricht University, The Netherlands..
    Burnand, Bernard
    Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland..
    Haasenritter, Jörg
    Department of General Practice and Family Medicine, Philipps University Marburg, Germany..
    Herzig, Lilli
    Institute of Family Medicine, University of Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Knottnerus, J André
    Department of General Practice, Maastricht University, The Netherlands..
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Norrköping.
    Renier, Walter
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven, Belgium.
    Sox, Carol
    Department of Community and Family Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, USA..
    Sox, Harold
    Department of Community and Family Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH , USA; Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, Washington, USA..
    Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert
    Department of General Practice and Family Medicine, Philipps University Marburg, Germany..
    Pooled individual patient data from five countries were used to derive a clinical prediction rule for coronary artery disease in primary care.2017In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, ISSN 0895-4356, E-ISSN 1878-5921, Vol. 81, 120-128 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To construct a clinical prediction rule for coronary artery disease (CAD) presenting with chest pain in primary care.

    STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Meta-Analysis using 3,099 patients from five studies. To identify candidate predictors, we used random forest trees, multiple imputation of missing values, and logistic regression within individual studies. To generate a prediction rule on the pooled data, we applied a regression model that took account of the differing standard data sets collected by the five studies.

    RESULTS: The most parsimonious rule included six equally weighted predictors: age ≥55 (males) or ≥65 (females) (+1); attending physician suspected a serious diagnosis (+1); history of CAD (+1); pain brought on by exertion (+1); pain feels like "pressure" (+1); pain reproducible by palpation (-1). CAD was considered absent if the prediction score is <2. The area under the ROC curve was 0.84. We applied this rule to a study setting with a CAD prevalence of 13.2% using a prediction score cutoff of <2 (i.e., -1, 0, or +1). When the score was <2, the probability of CAD was 2.1% (95% CI: 1.1-3.9%); when the score was ≥ 2, it was 43.0% (95% CI: 35.8-50.4%).

    CONCLUSIONS: Clinical prediction rules are a key strategy for individualizing care. Large data sets based on electronic health records from diverse sites create opportunities for improving their internal and external validity. Our patient-level meta-analysis from five primary care sites should improve external validity. Our strategy for addressing site-to-site systematic variation in missing data should improve internal validity. Using principles derived from decision theory, we also discuss the problem of setting the cutoff prediction score for taking action.

    The full text will be freely available from 2017-10-20 12:39
  • 13.
    Ageno, Walter
    et al.
    University of Insubria, Italy.
    Buller, Harry R.
    Academic Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Falanga, Anna
    Hospital Papa Giovanni XXIII, Italy; Hospital Papa Giovanni XXIII, Italy.
    Hacke, Werner
    Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Hendriks, Jeroen
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Lobban, Trudie
    Arrhythmia Alliance and AF Assoc, England.
    Merino, Jose
    University of La Paz, Spain.
    Milojevic, Ivan S.
    Gen Hospital Cuprija, Serbia.
    Moya, Francisco
    Vithas Xanit Int Hospital, Spain.
    Bart van der Worp, H.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Randall, Gary
    SAFE, England.
    Tsioufis, Konstantinos
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Verhamme, Peter
    University of Leuven, Belgium.
    John Camm, A.
    St Georges University of London, England; Imperial Coll, England.
    Managing reversal of direct oral anticoagulants in emergency situations Anticoagulation Education Task Force White Paper2016In: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, Vol. 116, no 6, 1003-1010 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anticoagulation is the cornerstone of prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the mechanisms by which anticoagulants confer therapeutic benefit also increase the risk of bleeding. As such, reversal strategies are critical. Until recently, the direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban lacked a specific reversal agent. This report is based on findings from the Anticoagulation Education Task Force, which brought together patient groups and professionals representing different medical specialties with an interest in patient safety and expertise in AF, VTE, stroke, anticoagulation, and reversal agents, to discuss the current status of anticoagulation reversal and fundamental changes in management of bleeding associated with DOACs occasioned by the approval of idarucizumab, a specific reversal agent for dabigatran, as well as recent clinical data on specific reversal agents for factor Xa inhibitors. Recommendations are given for when there is a definite need for a reversal agent (e.g. in cases of life-threatening bleeding, bleeding into a closed space or organ, persistent bleeding despite local haemostatic measures, and need for urgent interventions and/or interventions that carry a high risk for bleeding), when reversal agents may be helpful, and when a reversal agent is generally not needed. Key stakeholders who require 24-7/around-the-clock access to these agents vary among hospitals; however, from a practical perspective the emergency department is recommended as an appropriate location for these agents. Clearly, the advent of new agents requires standardised protocols for treating bleeding on an institutional level.

  • 14. Agewall, Stefan
    et al.
    Rydén, Lars
    Perk, Joep
    Rosengren, Annika
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Skellefteå Research Unit.
    Hellénius, Mai-Lis
    Ros, Inger
    Efterlyses: politik mot hjärtinfarkt2013In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 110, no 13-14, 664- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Agvall, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County.
    Paulsson, Thomas
    Global Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Belgium.
    Foldevi, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Resource use and cost implications of implementing a heart failure program for patients with systolic heart failure in Swedish primary health care2014In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 176, 731-738 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Heart failure (HF) is a common but serious condition which involves a significant economic burden on the health care economy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate cost and quality of life (QoL) implications of implementing a HF management program (HFMP) in primary health care (PHC).

    Methods and results: This was a prospective randomized open-label study including 160 patientswith a diagnosis of HF from five PHC centers in south-eastern Sweden. Patients randomized to the intervention group received information about HF from HF nurses and from a validated computer-based awareness program. HF nurses and physicians followed the patients intensely in order to optimize HF treatment according to current guidelines. The patients in the control group were followed by their regular general practitioner (GP) and received standard treatment according to local management routines. No significant changes were observed in NYHA class and quality-adjusted life years (QALY), implying that functional class and QoL were preserved. However, costs for hospital care (HC) and PHC were reduced by EUR 2167, or 33%. The total cost was EUR 4471 in the intervention group and EUR 6638 in the control group.

    Conclusions: Introducing HFMP in Swedish PHC in patients with HF entails a significant reduction in resource utilization and costs, and maintains QoL. Based on these results, a broader implementation of HFMP in PHC may be recommended. However, results should be confirmed with extended follow-up to verify  long-term effects.

  • 16.
    Ahlander, Britt-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Heart: Image quality, measurement accuracy and patient experience2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Non-invasive diagnostic imaging of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) is frequently carried out with cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) or myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (MPS). CMR is the gold standard for the evaluation of scar after myocardial infarction and MPS the clinical gold standard for ischemia. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is at times difficult for patients and may induce anxiety while patient experience of MPS is largely unknown.

    Aims: To evaluate image quality in CMR with respect to the sequences employed, the influence of atrial fibrillation, myocardial perfusion and the impact of patient information. Further, to study patient experience in relation to MRI with the goal of improving the care of these patients.

    Method: Four study designs have been used. In paper I, experimental cross-over, paper (II) experimental controlled clinical trial, paper (III) psychometric crosssectional study and paper (IV) prospective intervention study. A total of 475 patients ≥ 18 years with primarily cardiac problems (I-IV) except for those referred for MRI of the spine (III) were included in the four studies.

    Result: In patients (n=20) with atrial fibrillation, a single shot steady state free precession (SS-SSFP) sequence showed significantly better image quality than the standard segmented inversion recovery fast gradient echo (IR-FGRE) sequence (I). In first-pass perfusion imaging the gradient echo-echo planar imaging sequence (GREEPI) (n=30) had lower signal-to-noise and contrast–to-noise ratios than the steady state free precession sequence (SSFP) (n=30) but displayed a higher correlation with the MPS results, evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively (II). The MRIAnxiety Questionnaire (MRI-AQ) was validated on patients, referred for MRI of either the spine (n=193) or the heart (n=54). The final instrument had 15 items divided in two factors regarding Anxiety and Relaxation. The instrument was found to have satisfactory psychometric properties (III). Patients who prior CMR viewed an information video scored significantly (lower) better in the factor Relaxation, than those who received standard information. Patients who underwent MPS scored lower on both factors, Anxiety and Relaxation. The extra video information had no effect on CMR image quality (IV).

    Conclusion: Single shot imaging in atrial fibrillation produced images with less artefact than a segmented sequence. In first-pass perfusion imaging, the sequence GRE-EPI was superior to SSFP. A questionnaire depicting anxiety during MRI showed that video information prior to imaging helped patients relax but did not result in an improvement in image quality.

  • 17.
    Ahlander, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Department of Radiology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Maret, Eva
    Department of Radiology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Starck, Sven-Åke
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Department of Oncology, Hospital Physics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Engvall, Jan
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    An echo-planar imaging sequence is superior to a steady-state free precession sequence for visual as well as quantitative assessment of cardiac magnetic resonance stress perfusion2017In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 37, no 1, 52-61 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To assess myocardial perfusion, steady-state free precession cardiac magnetic resonance (SSFP, CMR) was compared with gradient-echo–echo-planar imaging (GRE-EPI) using myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) as reference.

    Methods: Cardiac magnetic resonance perfusion was recorded in 30 patients with SSFP and in another 30 patients with GRE-EPI. Timing and extent of inflow delay to the myocardium was visually assessed. Signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios were calculated. Myocardial scar was visualized with a phase-sensitive inversion recovery sequence (PSIR). All scar positive segments were considered pathologic. In MPS, stress and rest images were used as in clinical reporting. The CMR contrast wash-in slope was calculated and compared with the stress score from the MPS examination. CMR scar, CMR perfusion and MPS were assessed separately by one expert for each method who was blinded to other aspects of the study.

    Results: Visual assessment of CMR had a sensitivity for the detection of an abnormal MPS at 78% (SSFP) versus 91% (GRE-EPI) and a specificity of 58% (SSFP) versus 84% (GRE-EPI). Kappa statistics for SSFP and MPS was 0·29, for GRE-EPI and MPS 0·72. The ANOVA of CMR perfusion slopes for all segments versus MPS score (four levels based on MPS) had correlation r = 0·64 (SSFP) and r = 0·96 (GRE-EPI). SNR was for normal segments 35·63 ± 11·80 (SSFP) and 17·98 ± 8·31 (GRE-EPI), while CNR was 28·79 ± 10·43 (SSFP) and 13·06 ± 7·61 (GRE-EPI).

    Conclusion: GRE-EPI displayed higher agreement with the MPS results than SSFP despite significantly lower signal intensity, SNR and CNR.

  • 18.
    Ahlin, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Wilhelminen Hospital, Austria.
    Arfvidsson, John
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Wilhelminen Hospital, Austria.
    Vargas, Kris G.
    Wilhelminen Hospital, Austria.
    Stojkovic, Stefan
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria; Ludwig Boltzmann Cluster Cardiovasc Research, Austria.
    Huber, Kurt
    Wilhelminen Hospital, Austria; Ludwig Boltzmann Cluster Cardiovasc Research, Austria; Sigmund Freud University, Austria.
    Wojta, Johann
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria; Ludwig Boltzmann Cluster Cardiovasc Research, Austria; Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    MicroRNAs as circulating biomarkers in acute coronary syndromes: A review2016In: Vascular pharmacology, ISSN 1537-1891, E-ISSN 1879-3649, Vol. 81, 15-21 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) and its complications remain the most common cause of death worldwide. Cardiac troponins (cTn) are standard biomarkers used today for diagnosis and risk stratification of myocardial infarction (MI). Increasing efforts are made to develop additional, new biomarkers for more effective and safe rule-in and rule-out of MI patients at the emergency department. During the past decade, microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as new, potential diagnostic biomarkers in several diseases, including MI. In this review, we aimed to summarize some of the prominent studies in the field, and discuss the potential value of miRNAs in the diagnosis of MI. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 19.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    eComment. Postoperative atrial fibrillation: a robust human model of atrial fibrillation genesis?2013In: Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1569-9293, E-ISSN 1569-9285, Vol. 17, no 4, 614-5 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Orebro University Hospital. Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Exploration of Theoretical Ganglionated Plexi Ablation Technique in Atrial Fibrillation Surgery COMMENTARY2014In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 0003-4975, E-ISSN 1552-6259, Vol. 98, no 5, 1604-1605 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Orebro University Hospital. Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg.
    Postoperative atrial fibrillation and stroke-is it time to act?2014In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 48, no 2, 69-70 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Orebro University Hospital. Thoraxkliniken.
    Ahlbåge, Anders
    Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jidéus, Lena
    Akademiska universitetssjukhuset, Uppsala, sweden.
    Berglin, Eva
    Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Kirurgisk behandling av förmaksflimmer i samband med hjärtkirurgi: Konsensusrapport fran Sveriges arytmiansvariga hjärtkirurger2012In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 109, no 5, 214-217 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Thoraxkliniken, Universitetssjukhuset, Örebro, Sweden.
    Albåge, Anders
    Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jidéus, Lena
    Akademiska universitetssjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Berglin, Eva
    Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Kirurgisk behandling av förmaksflimmer i samband med hjärtkirurgi [Surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation in connection with cardiac surgery]: konsensusrapport från Sveriges arytmiansvariga hjärtkirurger [ Consensus report from Swedish cardiac surgeons responsible for arrhythmia]2012In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 109, no 5, 214-217 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Förmaksflimmer är vanligt och förekommer hos 6–10 procent av de patienter som ska genomgå kranskärlsoperation eller klaffkirurgi. Kirurgisk ablation av förmaksflimmer i samband med kranskärlsoperation eller klaffkirurgi bör erbjudas alla symtomatiska och utvalda asymtomatiska patienter. Cox-maze III (labyrintoperation) är den metod som gett bäst resultat vad avser frihet från förmaksflimmer 1 år efter ingreppet.

    Under senare år har flera nya metoder utvecklats för att åstadkomma elektriskt isolerande lesioner i hjärtats förmak. Dessa är tekniskt enklare och mindre invasiva. De är dock behäftade med sämre resultat än den ursprungliga Cox-maze III-operationen. Arytmiansvariga kirurger på landets samtliga hjärtkirurgiska kliniker har nått samstämmighet om hur förmaksflimmer bör behandlas i samband med annan hjärtkirurgi. Denna konsensus, vilken presenteras här, betonar vikten av att vid kirurgisk ablation följa lesionsmönstret i Cox-maze III och helst behandla både höger och vänster förmak för bästa långtidsresultat

  • 24.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Anesthesiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Örebro University, Orebro University School of Business, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Statistics and Epidemiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fengsrud, Espen
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Englund, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Patients with postoperative atrial fibrillation have a doubled cardiovascular mortality2009In: Scandinavian cardiovascular journal : SCJ, ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 43, no 5, 330-336 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the impact of postoperative AF on late mortality and cause of death in CABG patients.

    DESIGN: All CABG patients without preoperative AF surgically treated between January 1, 1997 and June 30, 2000 were included (N = 1419). Altogether, 419 patients (29.5%) developed postoperative AF. After a median follow-up of 8.0 years, survival data were obtained, causes of death were compared and Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to determine predictors of late mortality.

    RESULTS: The total mortality was 140 deaths/419 patients (33.4%) in postoperative AF patients and 191 deaths/1 000 patients (19.1%) in patients without AF. Death due to cerebral ischemia (2.6% vs. 0.5%), myocardial infarction (7.4% vs. 3.0%), sudden death (2.6% vs. 0.9%), and heart failure (6.7% vs. 2.7%) was more common among postoperative AF patients. Postoperative AF was an age-independent risk indicator for late mortality with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.56 (95% confidence interval 1.23-1.98).

    CONCLUSIONS: Postoperative AF is an age-independent risk factor for late mortality in CABG patients, explained by an increased risk of cardiovascular death.

  • 25.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Orebro University Hospital. Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg.
    Fengsrud, Espen
    Örebro Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Örebro, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Birger
    Orebro University Hospital. Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg.
    Positioning of the ablation catheter in total endoscopic ablation2014In: Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1569-9293, E-ISSN 1569-9285, Vol. 18, no 1, 125-127 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Minimally invasive ablation of atrial fibrillation is an option in patients not suitable for or refractory to catheter ablation. Total endoscopic ablation can be performed via a monolateral approach, whereby a left atrial box lesion is created. If the ablation is introduced from the right side, the positioning of the ablation catheter on the partly hidden left pulmonary veins is of vital importance. Using thoracoscopy in combination with multiplane transoesophageal echocardiography, the anatomical position of the ablation catheter can be established. Our experience in over 60 procedures has confirmed this to be a safe technique of total endoscopic ablation.

  • 26.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Anesthesiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fengsrud, Espen
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Department of Statistics and Epidemiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Englund, Anders
    Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing aortocoronary bypass surgery carries an eightfold risk of future atrial fibrillation and a doubled cardiovascular mortality.2010In: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 37, no 6, 1353-1359 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: This article presents a study of postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) and its long-term effects on mortality and heart rhythm.

    METHODS: The study cohort consisted of 571 patients with no history of AF who underwent primary aortocoronary bypass surgery from 1999 to 2000. Postoperative AF occurred in 165/571 patients (28.9%). After a median follow-up of 6 years, questionnaires were obtained from 91.6% of surviving patients and an electrocardiogram (ECG) from 88.6% of all patients. Data from hospitalisations due to arrhythmia or stroke during follow-up were analysed. The causes of death were obtained for deceased patients.

    RESULTS: In postoperative AF patients, 25.4% had atrial fibrillation at follow-up compared with 3.6% of patients with no AF at surgery (p<0.001). An episode of postoperative AF was the strongest independent risk factor for development of late AF, with an adjusted risk ratio of 8.31 (95% confidence interval (CI) 4.20-16.43). Mortality was 29.7% (49 deaths/165 patients) in the AF group and 14.8% (60 deaths/406 patients) in the non-AF group (p<0.001). Death due to cerebral ischaemia was more common in the postoperative AF group (4.2% vs 0.2%, p<0.001), as was death due to myocardial infarction (6.7% vs 3.0%, p=0.041). Postoperative AF was an age-independent risk factor for late mortality, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.57 (95% CI 1.05-2.34).

    CONCLUSIONS: Postoperative AF patients have an eightfold increased risk of developing AF in the future, and a doubled long-term cardiovascular mortality.

  • 27.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Orebro University Hospital. Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg.
    Sandin, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, Örebro, Sweden.
    Souza, Domingos S. R.
    Orebro University Hospital. Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg.
    Annular abscess leading to free wall rupture2014In: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 45, no 2, E39-E39 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Ahmadi, Zainab
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Respiratory Medicine & Allergology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sundh, Josefin
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Bornefalk-Hermansson, Anna
    Department of Statistics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ekström, Magnus
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Respiratory Medicine & Allergology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Long-Term Oxygen Therapy 24 vs 15 h/day and Mortality in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 9, e0163293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) ≥ 15 h/day improves survival in hypoxemic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). LTOT 24 h/day is often recommended but may pose an unnecessary burden with no clear survival benefit compared with LTOT 15 h/day. The aim was to test the hypothesis that LTOT 24 h/day decreases all-cause, respiratory, and cardiovascular mortality compared to LTOT 15 h/day in hypoxemic COPD. This was a prospective, observational, population-based study of COPD patients starting LTOT between October 1, 2005 and June 30, 2009 in Sweden. Overall and cause-specific mortality was analyzed using Cox and Fine-Gray regression, controlling for age, sex, prescribed oxygen dose, PaO2 (air), PaCO2 (air), Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1), WHO performance status, body mass index, comorbidity, and oral glucocorticoids. A total of 2,249 included patients were included with a median follow-up of 1.1 years (interquartile range, 0.6-2.1). 1,129 (50%) patients died and no patient was lost to follow-up. Higher LTOT duration analyzed as a continuous variable was not associated with any change in mortality rate (hazard ratio [HR] 1.00; (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98 to 1.02) per 1 h/day increase above 15 h/day. LTOT exactly 24 h/day was prescribed in 539 (24%) patients and LTOT 15-16 h/day in 1,231 (55%) patients. Mortality was similar between the groups for all-cause, respiratory and cardiovascular mortality. In hypoxemic COPD, LTOT 24 h/day was not associated with a survival benefit compared with treatment 15-16 h/day. A design for a registry-based randomized trial (R-RCT) is proposed.

  • 29.
    Ahmed, K.
    et al.
    School of Health and Medical Science, Clinical Medicine, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hurtig-Wennlöf, Anita
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Association between objectively measured physical activity and sub-clinical atherosclerosis in young adults2010In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 31, no Suppl 1, 388-388 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Ahn, Henrik Casimir
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Baranowski, Jacek
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Dahlin, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Transvenous Implantation of a Stent Valve in Patients With Degenerated Mitral Prostheses and Native Mitral Stenosis2016In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 0003-4975, E-ISSN 1552-6259, Vol. 101, no 6, 2279-2284 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to report the use of a transvenous transseptal approach using a stent valve in patients with degenerated biological mitral valve prostheses, regurgitation after mitral repair, and native mitral stenosis.

    METHODS: Ten patients (median age, 74 years; range, 20-89 years; 5 men and 5 women) with degenerated mitral bioprosthetic valves (n = 7), failed mitral repair (n = 1), or calcified native stenotic valves (n = 2) underwent transvenous implantation of a stent valve.

    RESULTS: The procedure was initially successful in all patients. Predilation was performed for balloon sizing only in the 2 patients with native mitral stenosis. The stent valve was deployed during 1 period of rapid pacing. A guidewire, as a loop from the right femoral vein and through the left ventricular apex, facilitated a good angle and secure positioning of the stent valve. An ultrasonographically guided puncture of the apex was carried out in 6 patients, and in the other 4 we performed a minithoracotomy before apical puncture. All valves were implanted in a good position with improved function and without significant paravalvular leakage (PVL). There were no periprocedural deaths. The 30-day survival was 80% (8 of 10 patients), and 60% (6 of 10) of patients were still alive a median time of 290 days after the procedure.

    CONCLUSIONS: Transvenous transseptal implantation of a stent valve was performed in 10 patients with mitral valve disease, with good early functional results. These high-risk patients must be carefully selected by a multidisciplinary team because the procedure carries a high mortality.

  • 31.
    Ahn, Henrik Casimir
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Baranowski, Jacek
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Can predilatation in transcatheter aortic valve implantation be omitted? - a prospective randomized study2016In: Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery, ISSN 1749-8090, E-ISSN 1749-8090, Vol. 11, no 124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The use of a balloon expandable stent valve includes balloon predilatation of the aortic stenosis before valve deployment. The aim of the study was to see whether or not balloon predilatation is necessary in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVI). Methods: Sixty consecutive TAVI patients were randomized to the standard procedure or to a protocol where balloon predilatation was omitted. Results: There were no significant differences between the groups regarding early hemodynamic results or complication rates. Conclusions: TAVI can be performed safely without balloon predilatation and with the same early results as achieved with the standard procedure including balloon predilatation. The reduction in the number of pacing periods required may be beneficial for the patient.

  • 32.
    Alabas, O. A.
    et al.
    Univ Leeds, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England..
    Rutherford, M.
    Univ Leicester, Leicester, Leics, England..
    Hall, M.
    Univ Leeds, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England..
    Szummer, K.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med H7, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Gale, C. P.
    Univ Leeds, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England..
    Jernberg, T.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med H7, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lower long term relative survival and higher excess mortality in women and in elderly after acute myocardial infarction: a national cohort study using 180,368 cases from the SWEDEHEART registry2016In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 37, no Suppl. 1, 1385-1385 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Anton
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Stat Konsultgrp, Sweden.
    Savendahl, Lars
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Niklasson, Aimon
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bang, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlgren, Jovanna
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Kriström, Berit
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Norgren, Svante
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Pehrsson, Nils-Gunnar
    Stat Konsultgrp, Sweden.
    Oden, Anders
    Stat Konsultgrp, Sweden; Chalmers, Sweden.
    Mortality Is Not Increased in Recombinant Human Growth Hormone-treated Patients When Adjusting for Birth Characteristics2016In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 101, no 5, 2149-2159 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate whether reported high mortality in childhood recombinant human GH (rhGH)-treated patients was related to birth-characteristics and/or rhGH treatment. Design and Setting: We sought to develop a mortality model of the Swedish general population born between 1973 and 2010, using continuous-hazard functions adjusting for birth characteristics, sex, age intervals, and calendar year to estimate standardized mortality ratio (SMR) and to apply this model to assess expected deaths in Swedish rhGH-treated patients with idiopathic isolated GH deficiency (IGHD), idiopathic short stature (155) or born small for gestational age (SGA). Participants:The general population: Swedish Medical Birth Register (1973-2010: 1 880 668 males; 1 781 131 females) and Cause of Death Register (1985-2010). Intervention Population: Three thousand eight hundred forty-seven patients starting rhGH treatment between 1985 and 2010 and followed in the National GH Register and/or in rhGH trials diagnosed with IGHD (n = 1890), ISS (n = 975), or SGA (n=982). Main Outcome Measures: Death. Results: Using conventional models adjusting for age, sex, and calendar-year, the SMR was 1.43 (95% confidence interval, 0.89-2.19), P = .14, observed/expected deaths 21/14.68. The rhGH population differed (P amp;lt; .001) from the general population regarding birth weight, birth length, and congenital malformations. Application of an Advanced Model: When applying the developed mortality model of the general population, the ratio of observed/expected deaths in rhGH-treated patients was 21/21.99; SMR = 0.955 (0.591-1.456)P = .95. Model Comparison: Expected number of deaths were 14.68 (14.35-14.96) using the conventional model, and 21.99 (21.24-22.81) using the advanced model, P amp;lt; .001, which had at all ages a higher gradient of risk per SD of the model, 24% (range, 18-42%; P amp;lt; .001). Conclusions: Compared with the general Swedish population, the ratio of observed/expected deaths (21/21.99) was not increased in childhood rhGH-treated IGHD, ISS, and SGA patients when applying an advanced sex-specific mortality model adjusting for birth characteristics.

  • 34.
    Albåge, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Thoracic Surgery.
    Jideus, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Thoracic Surgery.
    Liden, Hans
    Schersten, Henrik
    The Berglin apical stitch: a simple technique to straighten things out in atrial fibrillation surgery2014In: Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1569-9293, E-ISSN 1569-9285, Vol. 19, no 4, 685-686 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Cox-Maze IV procedure, or in endocardial left atrial ablation, correct positioning of the surgical ablation probe within the left atrium might be difficult due to bulging or folds in the posterior left atrial wall. The Berglin apical stitch is a simple trick of the trade to create a smooth surface in the posterior left atrium that facilitates performing a safe transmural lesion and, consequently, may increase antiarrhythmic efficiency.

  • 35.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Research Department, Innlandet Hospital Trust and Hedmark University College, Norway.
    Johansson, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Less increase of copeptin and MR-proADM due to intervention with selenium and coenzyme Q10 combined: Results from a 4-year prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial among elderly Swedish citizens.2015In: Biofactors, ISSN 0951-6433, E-ISSN 1872-8081, Vol. 41, no 6, 443-452 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intervention with selenium and coenzyme Q10 have recently been found to reduce mortality and increase cardiac function. The mechanisms behind these effects are unclear. As selenium and coenzyme Q10 is involved in the anti-oxidative defence, the present study aimed to evaluate effects of selenium and coenzyme Q10 on copeptin and adrenomedullin as oxidative stress biomarkers. Therefore 437 elderly individuals were included and given intervention for 4 years. Clinical examination and blood samples were undertaken at start and after 18 and 48 months. Evaluations of copeptin and MR-proADM changes were performed using repeated measures of variance. Cardiovascular mortality was evaluated using a 10-year-period of follow-up, and presented in Kaplan-Meier plots. A significant increase in copeptin level could be seen in the placebo group during the intervention period (from 9.4 pmol/L to 15.3 pmol/L), compared to the active treatment group. The difference between the groups was confirmed in the repeated measurement of variance analyses (P = 0.031) with less copeptin increase in the active treatment group. Furthermore, active treatment appeared to protect against cardiovascular death both in those with high and with low copeptin levels at inclusion. Less increase of MR-proADM could also be seen during the intervention in the active treatment group compared to controls (P=0.026). Both in those having an MR-proADM level above or below median level, significantly less cardiovascular mortality could be seen in the active treatment group (P=0.0001, and P=0.04 respectively). In conclusion supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 during four years resulted in less concentration of both copeptin and MR-proADM. A cardioprotective effect of the supplementation was registered, irrespective of the initial levels of these biomarkers, and this protection was recognized also after 10 years of observation. © 2015 BioFactors, 41(6):443-452, 2015.

  • 36.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Alexander, Jan
    Norwegian Institute Public Heatlh, Norway; Norwegian University of Life Science NMBU, Norway.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Innlandet Hospital Trust, Norway; Hedmark University of Coll, Norway.
    Supplementation with Selenium and Coenzyme Q10 Reduces Cardiovascular Mortality in Elderly with Low Selenium Status. A Secondary Analysis of a Randomised Clinical Trial2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 7, e0157541Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Selenium is needed by all living cells in order to ensure the optimal function of several enzyme systems. However, the selenium content in the soil in Europe is generally low. Previous reports indicate that a dietary supplement of selenium could reduce cardiovascular disease but mainly in populations in low selenium areas. The objective of this secondary analysis of a previous randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial from our group was to determine whether the effects on cardiovascular mortality of supplementation with a fixed dose of selenium and coenzyme Q10 combined during a four-year intervention were dependent on the basal level of selenium. Methods In 668 healthy elderly individuals from a municipality in Sweden, serum selenium concentration was measured. Of these, 219 individuals received daily supplementation with selenium (200 mu g Se as selenized yeast) and coenzyme Q10 (200 mg) combined for four years. The remaining participants (n = 449) received either placebo (n = 222) or no treatment (n = 227). All cardiovascular mortality was registered. No participant was lost during a median follow-up of 5.2 years. Based on death certificates and autopsy results, all mortality was registered. Findings The mean serum selenium concentration among participants at baseline was low, 67.1 mu g/L. Based on the distribution of selenium concentration at baseline, the supplemented group was divided into three groups; amp;lt;65 mu g/L, 65-85 mu g/L, and amp;gt;85 mu g/L (45 and 90 percentiles) and the remaining participants were distributed accordingly. Among the non-treated participants, lower cardiovascular mortality was found in the high selenium group as compared with the low selenium group (13.0% vs. 24.1%; P = 0.04). In the group with the lowest selenium basal concentration, those receiving placebo or no supplementation had a mortality of 24.1%, while mortality was 12.1% in the group receiving the active substance, which was an absolute risk reduction of 12%. In the middle selenium concentration group a mortality of 14.0% in the non-treated group, and 6.0% in the actively treated group could be demonstrated; thus, there was an absolute risk reduction of 8.0%. In the group with a serum concentration of amp;gt;85 mu g/L, a cardiovascular mortality of 17.5% in the non-treated group, and 13.0% in the actively treated group was observed. No significant risk reduction by supplementation could thus be found in this group. Conclusions In this evaluation of healthy elderly Swedish municipality members, two important results could be reported. Firstly, a low mean serum selenium concentration, 67 mu g/L, was found among the participants, and the cardiovascular mortality was higher in the subgroup with the lower selenium concentrations amp;lt; 65 mu g/L in comparison with those having a selenium concentration amp;gt; 85 mu g/L. Secondly, supplementation was cardio-protective in those with a low selenium concentration, amp;lt;= 85 at inclusion. In those with serum seleniumamp;gt; 85 mu g/L and no apparent deficiency, there was no effect of supplementation. This is a small study, but it presents interesting data, and more research on the impact of lower selenium intake than recommended is therefore warranted.

  • 37.
    Alenius Dahlqvist, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Karlsson, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Hörnsten, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Rydberg, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Handheld ECG in analysis of arrhythmia and heart rate variability in children with Fontan circulation2014In: Journal of Electrocardiology, ISSN 0022-0736, E-ISSN 1532-8430, Vol. 47, no 3, 374-382 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Our aim was to evaluate the intermittent use of a handheld ECG system for detecting silent arrhythmias and cardiac autonomic dysfunction in children with univentricular hearts. Methods: Twenty-seven patients performed intermittent ECG recordings with handheld devices during a 14-day period. A manual arrhythmia analysis was performed. We analyzed heart rate variability (HRV) using scatter plots of all interbeat intervals (Poincare plots) from the total observation period. Reference values of HRV indices were determined from Holter-ECGs in 41 healthy children. Results: One asymptomatic patient had frequent ventricular extra systoles. Another patient had episodes with supraventricular tachycardia (with concomitant palpitations). Seven patients showed reduced HRV. Conclusions: Asymptomatic arrhythmia was detected in one patient. The proposed method for pooling of intermittent recordings from handheld or similar devices may be used for detection of arrhythmias as well as for cardiac autonomic dysfunction.

  • 38.
    Alexander, J.
    et al.
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA..
    Andersson, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lopes, R. D.
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA..
    Hijazi, Ziad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Cardiol, Uppsala, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Uppsala Clin Res Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hohnloser, S. H.
    Goethe Univ Frankfurt, Div Cardiac Electrophysiol, D-60054 Frankfurt, Germany..
    Ezekowitz, J.
    Univ Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada..
    Halvorsen, S.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Oslo, Norway..
    Hanna, M.
    Bristol Myers Squibb Co, Princeton, NJ USA..
    Granger, C. B.
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA..
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Stroke and bleeding outcomes with apixaban versus warfarin in patients with high creatinine, low body weight or high age receiving standard dose apixaban for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation2015In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, no Suppl. 1, 345-345 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39. Alexander, John H
    et al.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lopes, Renato D
    Hijazi, Ziad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Hohnloser, Stefan H
    Ezekowitz, Justin A
    Halvorsen, Sigrun
    Hanna, Michael
    Commerford, Patrick
    Ruzyllo, Witold
    Huber, Kurt
    Al-Khatib, Sana M
    Granger, Christopher B
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Apixaban 5 mg Twice Daily and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation and Advanced Age, Low Body Weight, or High Creatinine: A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial2016In: JAMA cardiology, ISSN 2380-6591, Vol. 1, no 6, 673-681 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE: In the Apixaban for Reduction of Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Complications in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) trial, the standard dose of apixaban was 5 mg twice daily; patients with at least 2 dose-reduction criteria-80 years or older, weight 60 kg or less, and creatinine level 1.5 mg/dL or higher-received a reduced dose of apixaban of 2.5 mg twice daily. Little is known about patients with 1 dose-reduction criterion who received the 5 mg twice daily dose of apixaban.

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of 1 dose-reduction criterion and whether the effects of the 5 mg twice daily dose of apixaban on stroke or systemic embolism and bleeding varied among patients with 1 or no dose-reduction criteria.

    DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Among 18 201 patients in the ARISTOTLE trial, 17 322 were included in this analysis. Annualized event rates of stroke or systemic embolism and major bleeding and hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs were evaluated. Interactions between the effects of apixaban vs warfarin and the presence of 1 or no dose-reduction criteria were assessed. The first patient was enrolled in the ARISTOTLE trial on December 19, 2006, and follow-up was completed on January 30, 2011. Data were analyzed from January 2015 to May 30, 2016.

    MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Analysis of major bleeding included events during study drug treatment. Analysis of stroke or systemic embolism was based on intention to treat.

    RESULTS: Of the patients with 1 or no dose-reduction criteria assigned to receive the 5 mg twice daily dose of apixaban or warfarin, 3966 had 1 dose-reduction criterion; these patients had higher rates of stroke or systemic embolism (HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.20-1.81) and major bleeding (HR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.62-2.20) compared with those with no dose-reduction criteria (n = 13 356). The benefit of the 5 mg twice daily dose of apixaban (n = 8665) compared with warfarin (n = 8657) on stroke or systemic embolism in patients with 1 dose-reduction criterion (HR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.66-1.32) and no dose-reduction criterion (HR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.62-0.97) were similar (P for interaction = .36). Similarly, the benefit of 5 mg twice daily dose of apixaban compared with warfarin on major bleeding in patients with 1 dose-reduction criterion (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.53-0.87) and no dose-reduction criterion (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.60-0.86) were similar (P for interaction = .71). Similar patterns were seen for each dose-reduction criterion and across the spectrum of age, body weight, creatinine level, and creatinine clearance.

    CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Patients with atrial fibrillation and isolated advanced age, low body weight, or renal dysfunction have a higher risk of stroke or systemic embolism and major bleeding but show consistent benefits with the 5 mg twice daily dose of apixaban vs warfarin compared with patients without these characteristics. The 5 mg twice daily dose of apixaban is safe, efficacious, and appropriate for patients with only 1 dose-reduction criterion.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00412984.

  • 40.
    Alexander, Karen P.
    et al.
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA.;Duke Univ, Durham, NC 27710 USA..
    Weisz, Giora
    Shaare Zedek Med Ctr, Jerusalem, Israel.;Cardiovasc Res Fdn, New York, NY USA..
    Prather, Kristi
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA.;Duke Univ, Durham, NC 27710 USA..
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Mark, Daniel B.
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA.;Duke Univ, Durham, NC 27710 USA..
    Anstrom, Kevin J.
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA.;Duke Univ, Durham, NC 27710 USA..
    Davidson-Ray, Linda
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA.;Duke Univ, Durham, NC 27710 USA..
    Witkowski, Adam
    Inst Cardiol, Dept Intervent Cardiol & Angiol, Warsaw, Poland..
    Mulkay, Angel J.
    Holy Name Med Ctr, Hackensack, NJ USA..
    Osmukhina, Anna
    Gilead Sci Inc, Foster City, CA 94404 USA..
    Farzaneh-Far, Ramin
    Gilead Sci Inc, Foster City, CA 94404 USA..
    Ben-Yehuda, Ori
    Cardiovasc Res Fdn, New York, NY USA.;Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, New York Presbyterian Hosp, New York, NY 10027 USA..
    Stone, Gregg W.
    Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, New York Presbyterian Hosp, New York, NY 10027 USA..
    Ohman, E. Magnus
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA.;Duke Univ, Durham, NC 27710 USA..
    Effects of Ranolazine on Angina and Quality of Life After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention With Incomplete Revascularization Results From the Ranolazine for Incomplete Vessel Revascularization (RIVER-PCI) Trial2016In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 133, no 1, 39-47 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Angina often persists or returns in populations following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We hypothesized that ranolazine would be effective in reducing angina and improving quality of life (QOL) in incomplete revascularization (ICR) post-PCI patients. Methods and Results In RIVER-PCI, 2604 patients with a history of chronic angina who had ICR post-PCI were randomized 1:1 to oral ranolazine versus placebo; QOL analyses included 2389 randomized subjects. Angina and QOL questionnaires were collected at baseline and months 1, 6, and 12. Ranolazine patients were more likely than placebo to discontinue study drug by month 6 (20.4% versus 14.1%, P<0.001) and 12 (27.2% versus 21.3%, P<0.001). Following qualifying index PCI, the primary QOL outcome (Seattle Angina Questionnaire [SAQ] angina frequency score) improved markedly, but similarly, in the ranolazine and placebo groups, respectively, from baseline (67.324.5 versus 69.724.0, P=0.01) to month 1 (86.6 +/- 18.1 versus 85.8 +/- 18.5, P=0.27) and month 12 (88.4 +/- 17.8 versus 88.5 +/- 17.8, P=0.94). SAQ angina frequency repeated measures did not differ in adjusted analysis between groups post baseline (mean difference 1.0; 95% CI -0.2, 2.2; P=0.11). Improvement in SAQ angina frequency was observed with ranolazine at month 6 among diabetics (mean difference 3.3; 95% CI 0.6, 6.1; P=0.02) and those with more angina (baseline SAQ angina frequency 60; mean difference 3.4; 95% CI 0.6, 6.2; P=0.02), but was not maintained at month 12. Conclusions Despite ICR following PCI, there was no incremental benefit in angina or QOL measures by adding ranolazine in this angiographically-identified population. These measures markedly improved within 1 month of PCI and persisted up to 1 year in both treatment arms. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01442038.

  • 41.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Management and Outcome in Non ST-Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes: Similarities and Differences Between Women nad Men2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Non ST-elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes are the most frequent manifestations of acute ischemic heart disease. Gender differences in treatment intensity, including differences in level of care, have been reported. Also differences in benefit from certain treatments, especially invasive treatment, have been discussed. Finally, difference in outcome between men and women, have been proposed. Results have been inconsistent, partly depending on if and how adjustment for differences in background characteristics has been made. The aims of the studies in this thesis were to assess differences between the genders in baseline characteristics, level of care, medical treatment and non-invasive and invasive cardiac procedures. The aims were also to determine gender differences in short and long-term mortality, including impact of level of care, and to determine differences between the genders in benefit from an invasive strategy, with special reference to benefit in women.

    Method: We used prospectively collected data from the RIKS-HIA registry in two studies (Paper I and IV). In one study we merged data from patients admitted to general wards in the south-east region of Sweden (The AKUT registry), with data from patients admitted to CCU´s (RIKS-HIA) at participating hospitals during the same time (Paper II). We also randomly assigned women to a routine invasive or a selective invasive treatment strategy, and performed a meta-analysis, to determine gender differences in benefit from a routine invasive strategy (Paper III).

    Results: Women were older than men and more likely to have a history of diabetes and hypertension, while men were more likely to have a history of myocardial infarction and revascularisation. Women were also more likely to have normal coronary arteries on the angiogram. After adjustment for baseline differences there were only minor, and directionally inconsistent, differences between women and men in pharmacological treatment. Men were more often referred for coronary angiography, even after adjustment. While CABG-rate was lower in women, after adjustment PCI-rate was similar or even higher compared to men. After adjustment for differences in age, longterm outcome was better in women. In our small but randomised trial there was no benefit from a routine invasive strategy in women. A meta-analysis indicated interaction between gender and treatment strategy, with lack of benefit in women, in contrast to in men. However, our large observational study indicated no gender difference with an invasive strategy. Moreover, benefit was similar in women and men with invasive treatment.

    Conclusion: There are substantial differences between women and men in baseline characteristics that affect management and outcome more than gender per se. After adjustment women have better long-term outcome than men. There appear to be a difference in benefit from a routine invasive strategy between the genders, with less benefit in women, but in routine clinical management there was no difference between women and men managed with an invasive strategy.

  • 42. Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Clayton, Tim
    Damman, Peter
    Fox, Keith A. A.
    Fredriksson, Mats
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    de Winter, Robbert J.
    Swahn, Eva
    Impact of an invasive strategy on 5 years outcome in men and women with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes2014In: American Heart Journal, ISSN 0002-8703, E-ISSN 1097-6744, Vol. 168, no 4, 522-529 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background A routine invasive (RI) strategy in non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE ACS) has been associated with better outcome compared with a selective invasive (SI) strategy in men, but results in women have yielded disparate results. The aim of this study was to assess gender differences in long-term outcome with an SI compared with an RI strategy in NSTE ACS. Methods Individual patient data were obtained from the FRISC II trial, ICTUS trial, and RITA 3 trial for a collaborative meta-analysis. Results Men treated with an RI strategy had significantly lower rate of the primary outcome 5-year cardiovascular (CV) death/myocardial infarction (MI) compared with men treated with an SI strategy (15.6% vs 19.8%, P = .001); risk-adjusted hazards ratio (HR) 0.73 (95% CI 0.63-0.86). In contrast, there was little impact of an RI compared with an SI strategy on the primary outcome among women (16.5% vs 15.1%, P = .324); risk-adjusted HR 1.13 (95% CI 0.89-1.43), interaction P = .01. For the individual components of the primary outcome, a similar pattern was seen with lower rate of MI (adjusted HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.57-0.83) and CV death (adjusted HR 0.71, 95% CI 0.56-0.89) in men but without obvious difference in women in MI (adjusted HR 1.13, 95% CI 0.85-1.50) or CV death (adjusted HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.68-1.39). Conclusions In this meta-analysis comparing an SI and RI strategy, benefit from an RI strategy during long-term follow-up was confirmed in men. Conversely, in women, there was no evidence of benefit.

  • 43.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas L
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin M
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Logander, Elisabeth
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Large early variation of residual platelet reactivity in Acute Coronary Syndrome patients treated with clopidogrel: Results from Assessing Platelet Activity in Coronary Heart Disease (APACHE).2015In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 136, no 2, 335-340 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: There is a large inter-individual variation in response to clopidogrel treatment and previous studies have indicated higher risk of thrombotic events in patients with high residual platelet reactivity (HRPR), but the optimal time-point for testing is not established. The aim of this study was to investigate the optimal time-point for aggregometry testing and the risk of major adverse cardiac events associated with HRPR.

    METHOD AND RESULTS: We included 125 patients with ACS (73 with STEMI, and 71 received abciximab). The prevalence of HRPR varied substantially over time. The rate of HRPR in patients treated and not treated with abciximab were 43% vs 67% (p=0.01) before, 2% vs 23% (p=0.001) 6-8h after, 8% vs 9% (p=0.749) 3days after, and 23% vs 12% (p=0.138) 7-9 days after loading dose of clopidogrel. We found HRPR in 18% of the patients but only four ischemic events during 6months follow-up, with no significant difference between HRPR patients compared to the rest of the population. There were 3 TIMI major bleedings, all of which occurred in the low residual platelet reactivity (LRPR) group.

    CONCLUSION: There is a large variation in platelet reactivity over time, also depending on adjunctive therapy, which has a large impact on optimal time-point for assessment. We found HRPR in almost 1 in 5 patients, but very few MACE, and not significantly higher in HRPR patients. In a contemporary ACS population, with low risk for stent thrombosis, the predictive value of HRPR for ischemic events will probably be low.

  • 44. Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Lindbäck, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Swahn, Eva
    Similar outcome with an invasive strategy in men and women with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes: From the Swedish Web-System for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-Based Care in Heart Disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART)2011In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 32, no 24, 3128-3136 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To assess gender differences in outcome with an early invasive or non-invasive strategy in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE ACS).

    Methods and results

    We included 46 455 patients [14 819 women (32%) and 31 636 men (68%)] from the SWEDEHEART register, with NSTE ACS, between 2000 and 2006, and followed them for 1 year. In the non-invasive strategy arm, the relative risk (RR) of death was (women vs. men) 1.02 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.94-1.11] and in the invasive strategy arm 1.12 (95% CI, 0.96-1.29). After adjustment for baseline differences between the genders, with propensity score and discharge medication, there was a similar trend towards better outcome among women in both the early non-invasive cohort [RR 0.90 (95% CI, 0.82-0.99)] and the early invasive cohort [RR 0.90 (95% CI, 0.76-1.06)], although it did not reach statistical significance in the early invasive cohort. Results were similar with the combined endpoint death/myocardial infarction. An early invasive treatment was associated with a marked, and similar, mortality reduction in women [RR 0.46 (95% CI, 0.38-0.55)] and men [RR 0.45 (95% CI, 0.40-0.52)], without interaction with gender.

    Conclusion

    In this large cohort of patients with NSTE ACS, reflecting real-life management, women and men had similar and better outcome associated with an invasive strategy.

  • 45.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Duke Clin Research Institute, NC USA.
    Neely, Benjamin
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC USA.
    Neely, Megan L.
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC USA.
    Bhatt, Deepak L.
    Brigham and Womens Hospital, MA 02115 USA; Harvard Medical Sch, MA USA.
    Goodman, Shaun G.
    St Michaels Hospital, Canada; University of Alberta, Canada; University of Alberta, Canada.
    Tricoci, Pierluigi
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC USA; Duke University, NC 27706 USA.
    Mahaffey, Kenneth W.
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Cornel, Jan H.
    Medical Centre Alkmaar, Netherlands.
    White, Harvey D.
    Auckland City Hospital, New Zealand.
    Fox, Keith A. A.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Prabhakaran, Dorairaj
    Centre Chron Disease Control and Public Health Fdn India, India.
    Winters, Kenneth J.
    Eli Lilly and Co, IN 46285 USA.
    Armstrong, Paul W.
    University of Alberta, Canada; University of Alberta, Canada.
    Magnus Ohman, E.
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC USA; Duke University, NC 27706 USA.
    Roe, Matthew T.
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC USA; Duke University, NC 27706 USA.
    Predicting the risk of bleeding during dual antiplatelet therapy after acute coronary syndromes2017In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 103, no 15, 1168-1176 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with aspirin + a P2Y12 inhibitor is recommended for at least 12 months for patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), with shorter durations considered for patients with increased bleeding risk. However, there are no decision support tools available to predict an individual patients bleeding risk during DAPT treatment in the post-ACS setting. Methods To develop a longitudinal bleeding risk prediction model, we analysed 9240 patients with unstable angina/non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) from the Targeted Platelet Inhibition to Clarify the Optimal Strategy to Medically Manage Acute Coronary Syndromes (TRILOGY ACS) trial, who were managed without revascularisation and treated with DAPT for a median of 14.8 months. Results We identified 10 significant baseline predictors of non-coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG)-related Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Arteries (GUSTO) severe/life-threatening/moderate bleeding: age, sex, weight, NSTEMI (vs unstable angina), angiography performed before randomisation, prior peptic ulcer disease, creatinine, systolic blood pressure, haemoglobin and treatment with beta-blocker. The five significant baseline predictors of Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) major or minor bleeding included age, sex, angiography performed before randomisation, creatinine and haemoglobin. The models showed good predictive accuracy with Therneaus C-indices: 0.78 (SE=0.024) for the GUSTO model and 0.67 (SE=0.023) for the TIMI model. Internal validation with bootstrapping gave similar C-indices of 0.77 and 0.65, respectively. External validation demonstrated an attenuated C-index for the GUSTO model (0.69) but not the TIMI model (0.68). Conclusions Longitudinal bleeding risks during treatment with DAPT in patients with ACS can be reliably predicted using selected baseline characteristics. The TRILOGY ACS bleeding models can inform riskbenefit considerations regarding the duration of DAPT following ACS.

  • 46.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Roe, Matthew T
    Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, NC.
    Balancing the risks and benefits of long-term antiplatelet therapies for cardiovascular disease: clinical, research, and regulatory implications.2015In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 4, no 3, e001897Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47. Ali, Ashfaq
    et al.
    Varga, Tibor V.
    Stojkovic, Ivana A.
    Schulz, Christina-Alexandra
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Barroso, Ines
    Poveda, Alaitz
    Renström, Frida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Orho-Melander, Marju
    Franks, Paul W.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
    Do Genetic Factors Modify the Relationship Between Obesity and Hypertriglyceridemia?: Findings From the GLACIER and the MDC Studies2016In: Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics, ISSN 1942-325X, E-ISSN 1942-3268, Vol. 9, no 2, 162-171 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Obesity is a major risk factor for dyslipidemia, but this relationship is highly variable. Recently published data from 2 Danish cohorts suggest that genetic factors may underlie some of this variability.

    Methods and Results We tested whether established triglyceride-associated loci modify the relationship of body mass index (BMI) and triglyceride concentrations in 2 Swedish cohorts (the Gene-Lifestyle Interactions and Complex Traits Involved in Elevated Disease Risk [GLACIER Study; N=4312] and the Malmo Diet and Cancer Study [N=5352]). The genetic loci were amalgamated into a weighted genetic risk score (WGRS(TG)) by summing the triglyceride-elevating alleles (weighted by their established marginal effects) for all loci. Both BMI and the WGRS(TG) were strongly associated with triglyceride concentrations in GLACIER, with each additional BMI unit (kg/m(2)) associated with 2.8% (P=8.4x10(-84)) higher triglyceride concentration and each additional WGRS(TG) unit with 2% (P=7.6x10(-48)) higher triglyceride concentration. Each unit of the WGRS(TG) was associated with 1.5% higher triglyceride concentrations in normal weight and 2.4% higher concentrations in overweight/obese participants (P-interaction=0.056). Meta-analyses of results from the Swedish cohorts yielded a statistically significant WGRS(TG)xBMI interaction effect (P-interaction=6.0x10(-4)), which was strengthened by including data from the Danish cohorts (P-interaction=6.5x10(-7)). In the meta-analysis of the Swedish cohorts, nominal evidence of a 3-way interaction (WGRS(TG)xBMIxsex) was observed (P-interaction=0.03), where the WGRS(TG)xBMI interaction was only statistically significant in females. Using protein-protein interaction network analyses, we identified molecular interactions and pathways elucidating the metabolic relationships between BMI and triglyceride-associated loci.

    Conclusions Our findings provide evidence that body fatness accentuates the effects of genetic susceptibility variants in hypertriglyceridemia, effects that are most evident in females.

  • 48.
    Almroth, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Atrial fibrillation: inflammatory and pharmacological studies2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Almroth, Henrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Höglund, Niklas
    Boman, Kurt
    Englund, Anders
    Jensen, Steen
    Kjellman, Björn
    Tornvall, Per
    Rosenqvist, Mårten
    Atorvastatin and persistent atrial fibrillation following cardioversion: a randomized placebo-controlled multicentre study2009In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 30, no 7, 827-833 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To evaluate the effect of atorvastatin in achieving stable sinus rhythm (SR) 30 days after electrical cardioversion (CV) in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). METHODS AND RESULTS: The study included 234 patients. The patients were randomized to treatment with atorvastatin 80 mg daily (n = 118) or placebo (n = 116) in a prospective, double-blinded fashion. Treatment was initiated 14 days before CV and was continued 30 days after CV. The two groups were well-balanced with respect to baseline characteristics. Mean age was 65 +/- 10 years, 76% of the patients were male and 4% had ischaemic heart disease. Study medication was well-tolerated in all patients but one. Before primary endpoint 12 patients were excluded. In the atorvastatin group 99 patients (89%) converted to SR at electrical CV compared with 95 (86%) in the placebo group (P = 0.42). An intention-to-treat analysis with the available data, by randomization group, showed that 57 (51%) in the atorvastatin group and 47 (42%) in the placebo group were in SR 30 days after CV (OR 1.44, 95%CI 0.85-2.44, P = 0.18). CONCLUSION: Atorvastatin was not statistically superior to placebo with regards to maintaining SR 30 days after CV in patients with persistent AF.

  • 50. Almroth, Henrik
    et al.
    Höglund, Niklas
    Department of Cardiology, Heart Centre, University Hospital, S-901 85 Umeå, Sweden.
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Englund, Anders
    Jensen, Steen
    Department of Cardiology, Heart Centre, University Hospital, S-901 85 Umeå, Sweden.
    Kjellman, Björn
    Tornvall, Per
    Rosenqvist, Mårten
    Atorvastatin and persistent atrial fibrillation following cardioversion: a randomized placebo-controlled multicentre study2009In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 30, no 7, 827-833 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To evaluate the effect of atorvastatin in achieving stable sinus rhythm (SR) 30 days after electrical cardioversion (CV) in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). METHODS AND RESULTS: The study included 234 patients. The patients were randomized to treatment with atorvastatin 80 mg daily (n = 118) or placebo (n = 116) in a prospective, double-blinded fashion. Treatment was initiated 14 days before CV and was continued 30 days after CV. The two groups were well-balanced with respect to baseline characteristics. Mean age was 65 +/- 10 years, 76% of the patients were male and 4% had ischaemic heart disease. Study medication was well-tolerated in all patients but one. Before primary endpoint 12 patients were excluded. In the atorvastatin group 99 patients (89%) converted to SR at electrical CV compared with 95 (86%) in the placebo group (P = 0.42). An intention-to-treat analysis with the available data, by randomization group, showed that 57 (51%) in the atorvastatin group and 47 (42%) in the placebo group were in SR 30 days after CV (OR 1.44, 95%CI 0.85-2.44, P = 0.18). CONCLUSION: Atorvastatin was not statistically superior to placebo with regards to maintaining SR 30 days after CV in patients with persistent AF.

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