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  • 1.
    Aasa, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Granath, Fredrik
    Törnqvist, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Cancer risk estimation of glycidol based on rodent carcinogenicity studies, a multiplicative risk model and in vivo dosimetry2019In: Food and Chemical Toxicology, ISSN 0278-6915, E-ISSN 1873-6351, Vol. 128, p. 54-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we evaluate a multiplicative (relative) risk model for improved cancer risk estimation of genotoxic compounds. According to this model, cancer risk is proportional to the background tumor incidence and to the internal dose of the genotoxic compound. Furthermore, the relative risk coefficient per internal dose is considered to be approximately the same across tumor sites, sex, and species. In the present study, we demonstrate that the relative risk model is valid for cancer risk estimation of glycidol, a common food contaminant. Published tumor data from glycidol carcinogenicity studies in mice and rats were evaluated in combination with internal dose estimates from hemoglobin adduct measurements in blood from mice and rats treated with glycidol in short-term studies. A good agreement between predicted and observed tumor incidence in responding sites was demonstrated in the animals, supporting a relative risk coefficient that is independent of tumor site, sex, and species. There was no significant difference between the risk coefficients for mice (5.1% per mMh) and rats (5.4% per mMh) when considering internal doses of glycidol. Altogether, this mechanism-based risk model gives a reliable risk coefficient, which then was extrapolated to humans considering internal dose, and background cancer incidence.

  • 2.
    Abbas, Hassan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Huzeirovic, Melisa
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    En jämförelse mellan två sjukdomsgrupper med PET/CT som undersökningsmetod: Beräkning av den totala effektiva dosen från PET- och CT-undersökning2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Lung cancer and malignant melanoma are diseases investigated by the dual-modality positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). There are radiation risks with the examination that can appear as stochastic effects such as cancer. The aim of this study was to compare the radiation doses between the lung cancer group (suspected or verified) and the malignant melanoma group by calculating the total effective radiation dose and to declare the risk with the PET/CT examination. Material and method: The material contained parameters regarding the examination and the sample contained 20 patients from the two groups. The method was retrospective with a quantitative approach. Results: There was a significant difference (p <0,001) between these two groups, were the lung cancer group received 11,95 milliSievert (mSv) and the malignant melanoma group 6,03 mSv and the percentage risk for lethal cancer increased by 0,06% and 0,03%, respectively. Conclusions: The lung cancer group received twice as much effective dose than the malignant melanoma group. However, the effective dose is so low that the risk increase of the lethal cancer is marginal, and the benefit of the examination outweighs the risks.

  • 3. Abbas, Sascha
    et al.
    Linseisen, Jakob
    Rohrmann, Sabine
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    Peeters, Petra H
    Engel, Pierre
    Brustad, Magritt
    Lund, Eiliv
    Skeie, Guri
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Overvad, Kim
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Boeing, Heiner
    Buijsse, Brian
    Adarakis, George
    Ouranos, Vassilis
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Masala, Giovanna
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Buckland, Genevieve
    Suárez, Marcial Vicente Argüelles
    Sánchez, Maria-José
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Amiano, Pilar
    Manjer, Jonas
    Wirfält, Elisabet
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B
    van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nick
    Key, Timothy J
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Gallo, Valentina
    Norat, Teresa
    Wark, Petra A
    Riboli, Elio
    Dietary intake of vitamin D and calcium and breast cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition2013In: Nutrition and Cancer, ISSN 0163-5581, E-ISSN 1532-7914, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 178-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies assessing the effects of vitamin D or calcium intake on breast cancer risk have been inconclusive. Furthermore, few studies have evaluated them jointly. This study is the largest so far examining the association of dietary vitamin D and calcium intake with breast cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. During a mean follow-up of 8.8 yr, 7760 incident invasive breast cancer cases were identified among 319,985 women. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for pre- and postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Comparing the highest with the lowest quintile of vitamin D intake, HR and 95% CI were 1.07 (0.87-1.32) and 1.02 (0.90-1.16) for pre- and postmenopausal women, respectively. The corresponding HR and 95% CIs for calcium intake were 0.98 (0.80-1.19) and 0.90 (0.79-1.02), respectively. For calcium intake in postmenopausal women, the test for trend was borderline statistically significant (P(trend) = 0.05). There was no significant interaction between vitamin D and calcium intake and cancer risk (P(interaction) = 0.57 and 0.22 in pre- and postmenopausal women, respectively). In this large prospective cohort, we found no evidence for an association between dietary vitamin D or calcium intake and breast cancer risk.

  • 4.
    Abdulla, Maysaa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Laszlo, Sofia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Triumf, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Hedström, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Berglund, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Novum, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    A population-based study of cellular markers in R-CHOP treated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients2016In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 55, no 9-10, p. 1126-1131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To determine the prognostic significance of co-expression of MYC, BCL-2 and BCL-6 proteins in combination with other biomarkers and clinical characteristics within a population-based cohort of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients uniformly treated with R-CHOP.

    Patients and methods: The immunohistochemical (IHC) expression of CD10, BCL-2, BCL-6, MUM1, MYC, CD5, CD30, Ki-67 and p53 was evaluated in a retrospective, population-based study comprising 188 DLBCL patients treated with R-CHOP and diagnosed in Sweden between 2002 and 2012.

    Results: Patients had a median age at diagnosis of 64 years (26-85 years) with a male:female ratio of 1.4:1. Approximately half (52%) of the patients presented with an International Prognostic Index (IPI) age adjusted (IPIaa)2. Median follow-up time was 51 months (range 0.4-158) and the five-year lymphoma-specific survival (LSS) was 76%, five-year overall survival (OS) was 65% and five-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 61%. A high Ki-67 value was found in 59% of patients, while p53 overexpression was detected in 12% of patients and MYC, BCL-2 and BCL-6 expression were detected in 42%, 55% and 74% of patients, respectively. IPIaa2 (p=0.002), Ki-6770% (p=0.04) and p53 overexpression50% (p=0.02) were associated with inferior LSS and OS. Co-expression of both MYC (>40%) and BCL-2 (>70%) proteins was detected in 27% of patients and correlated with a significantly inferior LSS (p=0.0002), OS (p=0.009) and PFS (p=0.03). In addition, triple expression of MYC, BCL-2 and BCL-6, also correlated with a significantly inferior LSS (p=0.02).

    Conclusion: Concurrent expression of MYC and BCL-2 proteins, as detected by IHC, was strongly associated with an inferior survival in DLBCL patients treated with R-CHOP. Other markers affecting survival were triple expression of MYC, BCL-2 and BCL-6, IPIaa, high Ki-67 and p53 overexpression.

  • 5.
    Abdulla, Maysaa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Laszlo, Sofia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Triumf, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hedström, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Berglund, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Core needle biopsies for the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma - a great concern for research2017In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 106-109Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Abrahamsson, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Capodanno, Alessandra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rzepecka, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Downregulation of tumor suppressive microRNAs in vivo in dense breast tissue of postmenopausal women2017In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 8, no 54, p. 92134-92142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women with dense breast tissue on mammography are at higher risk of developing breast cancer but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. De-regulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) has been associated with the onset of breast cancer. miRNAs in the extracellular space participate in the regulation of the local tissue microenvironment. Here, we recruited 39 healthy postmenopausal women attending their mammography-screen that were assessed having extreme dense or entirely fatty breasts (nondense). Microdialysis was performed in breast tissue and a reference catheter was inserted in abdominal subcutaneous fat for local sampling of extracellular compounds. Three miRNAs, associated with tumor suppression, miR-193b, miR-365a, and miR-452 were significantly down-regulated in dense breast tissue compared with nondense breast tissue. In addition, miR-452 exhibited significant negative correlations with several pro-inflammatory cytokines in vivo, which was confirmed in vitro by overexpression of miR-452 in breast cancer cells. No differences were found of miR-21, -29a, -30c, 146a, -148a, -203, or -451 in breast tissue and no miRs were different in plasma. Extracellular miRNAs may be among factors that should be included in studies of novel prevention strategies for breast cancer.

  • 7.
    Abrahamsson, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rzepecka, Anna
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Increased nutrient availability in dense breast tissue of postmenopausal women in vivo2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 42733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer. Nutrient availability in the tissue microenvironment determines cellular events and may play a role in breast carcinogenesis. High mammographic density is an independent risk factor for breast cancer. Whether nutrient availability differs in normal breast tissues with various densities is unknown. Therefore we investigated whether breast tissues with various densities exhibited differences in nutrient availability. Healthy postmenopausal women from the regular mammographic screening program who had either predominantly fatty breast tissue (nondense), n = 18, or extremely dense breast tissue (dense), n = 20, were included. Microdialysis was performed for the in vivo sampling of amino acids (AAs), analyzed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectroscopy, glucose, lactate and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in breast tissues and, as a control, in abdominal subcutaneous (s.c.) fat. We found that dense breast tissue exhibited significantly increased levels of 20 proteinogenic AAs and that 18 of these AAs correlated significantly with VEGF. No differences were found in the s.c. fat, except for one AA, suggesting tissue-specific alterations in the breast. Glucose and lactate were unaltered. Our findings provide novel insights into the biology of dense breast tissue that may be explored for breast cancer prevention strategies.

  • 8.
    Abrahamsson, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rzepecka, Anna
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lundberg, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Dense breast tissue in postmenopausal women is associated with a pro-inflammatory microenvironment in vivo2016In: Oncoimmunology, ISSN 2162-4011, E-ISSN 2162-402X, Vol. 5, no 10, article id e1229723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inflammation is one of the hallmarks of carcinogenesis. High mammographic density has been associated with increased risk of breast cancer but the mechanisms behind are poorly understood. We evaluated whether breasts with different mammographic densities exhibited differences in the inflammatory microenvironment.Postmenopausal women attending the mammography-screening program were assessed having extreme dense, n = 20, or entirely fatty breasts (nondense), n = 19, on their regular mammograms. Thereafter, the women were invited for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), microdialysis for the collection of extracellular molecules in situ and a core tissue biopsy for research purposes. On the MRI, lean tissue fraction (LTF) was calculated for a continuous measurement of breast density. LTF confirmed the selection from the mammograms and gave a continuous measurement of breast density. Microdialysis revealed significantly increased extracellular in vivo levels of IL-6, IL-8, vascular endothelial growth factor, and CCL5 in dense breast tissue as compared with nondense breasts. Moreover, the ratio IL-1Ra/IL-1 was decreased in dense breasts. No differences were found in levels of IL-1, IL-1Ra, CCL2, leptin, adiponectin, or leptin:adiponectin ratio between the two breast tissue types. Significant positive correlations between LTF and the pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as between the cytokines were detected. Stainings of the core biopsies exhibited increased levels of immune cells in dense breast tissue.Our data show that dense breast tissue in postmenopausal women is associated with a pro-inflammatory microenvironment and, if confirmed in a larger cohort, suggests novel targets for prevention therapies for women with dense breast tissue.

  • 9.
    Abramenkovs, Andris
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Removal of heat-sensitive clustered damaged DNA sites is independent of double-strand break repair2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 12, article id e0209594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most deleterious lesions that can arise in cells after ionizing radiation or radiometric drug treatment. In addition to prompt DSBs, DSBs may also be produced during repair, evolving from a clustered DNA damaged site, which is composed of two or more distinct lesions that are located within two helical turns. A specific type of cluster damage is the heat-sensitive clustered site (HSCS), which transforms into DSBs upon treatment at elevated temperatures. The actual lesions or mechanisms that mediate the HSCS transformation into DSBs are unknown. However, there are two possibilities; either these lesions are transformed into DSBs due to DNA lesion instability, e.g., transfer of HSCS into single-strand breaks (SSBs), or they are formed due to local DNA structure instability, e.g., DNA melting, where two SSBs on opposite strands meet and transform into a DSB. The importance of these processes in living cells is not understood, but they significantly affect estimates of DSB repair capacity. In this study, we show that HSCS removal in human cells is not affected by defects in DSB repair or inhibition of DSB repair. Under conditions where rejoining of prompt DSBs was almost completely inhibited, heat-sensitive DSBs were successfully rejoined, without resulting in increased DSB levels, indicating that HSCS do not transfer into DSB in cells under physiological conditions. Furthermore, analysis by atomic force microscopy suggests that prolonged heating of chromosomal DNA can induce structural changes that facilitate transformation of HSCS into DSB. In conclusion, the HSCS do not generate additional DSBs at physiological temperatures in human cells, and the repair of HSCS is independent of DSB repair.

  • 10.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Ajan, Aida
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Malignant Transformation of Ossifying Fibroma into Parosteal Osteosarcoma with High-grade Component: Presentation of an Unusual Case and Review of the Literature2018In: The Open Dentistry Journal, E-ISSN 1874-2106, Vol. 12, p. 1059-1068Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Parosteal Osteosarcoma of the Jaw (POSJ) is a rare entity that is associated with a high survival rate. Several case reports and case series of POSJ have been published in the literature, but few authors have described development of this tumor by possible transformation from a fibro-osseous neoplasm. Objective: We present a rare occurrence of parosteal osteosarcoma with involvement of the posterior maxilla, orbit floor, and infra-temporal fossa in a 20-year-old man. Furthermore, we performed a literature review regarding clinical, radiological, and histological features; treatment strategies; and etiology/pathophysiology. Methods: A PubMed search yielded a total of 74 articles and the articles were sorted according to their corresponding key area of focus. Results: This was a case of POSJ with high-grade component in the maxillofacial region of a 20-year old male. Co-expression of MDM2 and CDK4 was confirmed. At 2.5-year follow-up, the patient had died. The literature review revealed 18 articles including 20 cases of POSJ. Four cases represent the possible development of this tumor by transformation from a fibro-osseous neoplasm: Two cases of fibrous dysplasia, one case of cemento-ossifying fibroma, and the case of Ossifying Fibroma (OF) in the present study. Conclusion: In conclusion, we found an unusual case of POSJ of the midface in a patient with a previous diagnosis of OF in the same region. To our knowledge, there have been no previous reports of development of POSJ in OF. Furthermore, this is the first described case of high-grade surface osteosarcoma in the craniofacial region.

  • 11. Adam, René
    et al.
    de Gramont, Aimery
    Figueras, Joan
    Kokudo, Norihiro
    Kunstlinger, Francis
    Loyer, Evelyne
    Poston, Graeme
    Rougier, Philippe
    Rubbia-Brandt, Laura
    Sobrero, Alberto
    Teh, Catherine
    Tejpar, Sabine
    Van Cutsem, Eric
    Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas
    Påhlman, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Colorectal Surgery.
    Managing synchronous liver metastases from colorectal cancer: A multidisciplinary international consensus2015In: Cancer Treatment Reviews, ISSN 0305-7372, E-ISSN 1532-1967, Vol. 41, no 9, p. 729-741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An international panel of multidisciplinary experts convened to develop recommendations for managing patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and synchronous liver metastases (CRCLM). A modified Delphi method was used. CRCLM is defined as liver metastases detected at or before diagnosis of the primary CRC. Early and late metachronous metastases are defined as those detected ⩽12months and >12months after surgery, respectively. To provide information on potential curability, use of high-quality contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) before chemotherapy is recommended. Magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly being used preoperatively to aid detection of subcentimetric metastases, and alongside CT in difficult situations. To evaluate operability, radiology should provide information on: nodule size and number, segmental localization and relationship with major vessels, response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, non-tumoral liver condition and anticipated remnant liver volume. Pathological evaluation should assess response to preoperative chemotherapy for both the primary tumour and metastases, and provide information on the tumour, margin size and micrometastases. Although the treatment strategy depends on the clinical scenario, the consensus was for chemotherapy before surgery in most cases. When the primary CRC is asymptomatic, liver surgery may be performed first (reverse approach). When CRCLM are unresectable, the goal of preoperative chemotherapy is to downsize tumours to allow resection. Hepatic resection should not be denied to patients with stable disease after optimal chemotherapy, provided an adequate liver remnant with inflow and outflow preservation remains. All patients with synchronous CRCLM should be evaluated by a hepatobiliary multidisciplinary team.

  • 12.
    Adamo, Hanibal
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hammarsten, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hägglöf, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Dahl Scherdin, Tove
    Egevad, Lars
    Granfors, Torvald
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Halin Bergström, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Prostate cancer induces C/EBPβ expression in surrounding epithelial cells which relates to tumor aggressiveness and patient outcomeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Implantation of rat prostate cancer cells into the normal rat prostate results in tumor-stimulating adaptations in the tumor-bearing organ. Similar changes are seen in prostate cancer patients and they are related to outcome. One gene previously found to be upregulated in the non-malignant part of a tumor-bearing prostate lobe in rats was the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-β (C/EBPβ). To explore this further, we examined C/EBPβ expression by quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and western blot in normal rat prostate tissue surrounding slow-growing non-metastatic Dunning G, rapidly growing poorly metastatic (AT-1), and rapidly growing highly metastatic (MatLyLu) rat prostate tumors―and also by immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray (TMA) from prostate cancer patients managed by watchful waiting.

    In rats, C/EBPβ mRNA expression was upregulated in the surrounding tumor-bearing prostate lobe. In tumors and in the surrounding non-malignant prostate tissue, C/EBPβ was detected by immunohistochemistry in some epithelial cells and in infiltrating macrophages. The magnitude of glandular epithelial C/EBPβ expression in the tumor-bearing prostates was associated with tumor size, with distance to the tumor, and with tumor cell metastatic capacity.

    In prostate cancer patients, high expression of C/EBPβ in glandular epithelial cells in the surrounding tumor-bearing tissue was associated with accumulation of M1 macrophages (iNOS+) and a favorable outcome. High expression of C/EBPβ in tumor epithelial cells was associated with high Gleason score, high tumor cell proliferation, the presence of metastases at diagnosis, and poor outcome. 

  • 13.
    Adamo, Hanibal
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, 6M, Umea, Sweden.
    Hammarsten, Peter
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, 6M, Umea, Sweden.
    Hägglöf, Christina
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, 6M, Umea, Sweden.
    Scherdin, Tove Dahl
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, 6M, Umea, Sweden.
    Egevad, Lars
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol Pathol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stattin, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Bergström, Sofia Halin
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, 6M, Umea, Sweden.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, 6M, Umea, Sweden.
    Prostate cancer induces C/EBP expression in surrounding epithelial cells which relates to tumor aggressiveness and patient outcome2019In: The Prostate, ISSN 0270-4137, E-ISSN 1097-0045, Vol. 79, no 5, p. 435-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Implantation of rat prostate cancer cells into the normal rat prostate results in tumor-stimulating adaptations in the tumor-bearing organ. Similar changes are seen in prostate cancer patients and they are related to outcome. One gene previously found to be upregulated in the non-malignant part of tumor-bearing prostate lobe in rats was the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein- (C/EBP).

    Methods: To explore this further, we examined C/EBP expression by quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot in normal rat prostate tissue surrounding slow-growing non-metastatic Dunning G, rapidly growing poorly metastatic (AT-1), and rapidly growing highly metastatic (MatLyLu) rat prostate tumors?and also by immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray (TMA) from prostate cancer patients managed by watchful waiting.

    Results: In rats, C/EBP mRNA expression was upregulated in the surrounding tumor-bearing prostate lobe. In tumors and in the surrounding non-malignant prostate tissue, C/EBP was detected by immunohistochemistry in some epithelial cells and in infiltrating macrophages. The magnitude of glandular epithelial C/EBP expression in the tumor-bearing prostates was associated with tumor size, distance to the tumor, and metastatic capacity. In prostate cancer patients, high expression of C/EBP in glandular epithelial cells in the surrounding tumor-bearing tissue was associated with accumulation of M1 macrophages (iNOS+) and favorable outcome. High expression of C/EBP in tumor epithelial cells was associated with high Gleason score, high tumor cell proliferation, metastases, and poor outcome.

    Conclusions: This study suggest that the expression of C/EBP-beta, a transcription factor mediating multiple biological effects, is differentially expressed both in the benign parts of the tumor-bearing prostate and in prostate tumors, and that alterations in this may be related to patient outcome.

  • 14.
    Adamo, Hanibal Hani
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bergström, Sofia Halin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Characterization of a Gene Expression Signature in Normal Rat Prostate Tissue Induced by the Presence of a Tumor Elsewhere in the Organ2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 6, article id e0130076Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implantation of rat prostate cancer cells into the normal rat prostate results in tumor-stimulating changes in the tumor-bearing organ, for example growth of the vasculature, an altered extracellular matrix, and influx of inflammatory cells. To investigate this response further, we compared prostate morphology and the gene expression profile of tumor-bearing normal rat prostate tissue (termed tumor-instructed/indicating normal tissue (TINT)) with that of prostate tissue from controls. Dunning rat AT-1 prostate cancer cells were injected into rat prostate and tumors were established after 10 days. As controls we used intact animals, animals injected with heat-killed AT-1 cells or cell culture medium. None of the controls showed morphological TINT-changes. A rat Illumina whole-genome expression array was used to analyze gene expression in AT-1 tumors, TINT, and in medium injected prostate tissue. We identified 423 upregulated genes and 38 downregulated genes (p<0.05, >= 2-fold change) in TINT relative to controls. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis verified key TINT-changes, and they were not detected in controls. Expression of some genes was changed in a manner similar to that in the tumor, whereas other changes were exclusive to TINT. Ontological analysis using GeneGo software showed that the TINT gene expression profile was coupled to processes such as inflammation, immune response, and wounding. Many of the genes whose expression is altered in TINT have well-established roles in tumor biology, and the present findings indicate that they may also function by adapting the surrounding tumor-bearing organ to the needs of the tumor. Even though a minor tumor cell contamination in TINT samples cannot be ruled out, our data suggest that there are tumor-induced changes in gene expression in the normal tumor-bearing organ which can probably not be explained by tumor cell contamination. It is important to validate these changes further, as they could hypothetically serve as novel diagnostic and prognostic markers of prostate cancer.

  • 15.
    Adamo, Hanibal Hani
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Hammarsten, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Hägglöf, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Scherdin, Tove Dahl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Egevad, Lars
    Stattin, Paer
    Halin Bergström, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Prostate cancer induces C/EBP expression in surrounding epithelial cells which relates to tumor aggressiveness and patient outcome2019In: The Prostate, ISSN 0270-4137, E-ISSN 1097-0045, Vol. 79, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Implantation of rat prostate cancer cells into the normal rat prostate results in tumor-stimulating adaptations in the tumor-bearing organ. Similar changes are seen in prostate cancer patients and they are related to outcome. One gene previously found to be upregulated in the non-malignant part of tumor-bearing prostate lobe in rats was the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein- (C/EBP).

    Methods: To explore this further, we examined C/EBP expression by quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot in normal rat prostate tissue surrounding slow-growing non-metastatic Dunning G, rapidly growing poorly metastatic (AT-1), and rapidly growing highly metastatic (MatLyLu) rat prostate tumors?and also by immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray (TMA) from prostate cancer patients managed by watchful waiting.

    Results: In rats, C/EBP mRNA expression was upregulated in the surrounding tumor-bearing prostate lobe. In tumors and in the surrounding non-malignant prostate tissue, C/EBP was detected by immunohistochemistry in some epithelial cells and in infiltrating macrophages. The magnitude of glandular epithelial C/EBP expression in the tumor-bearing prostates was associated with tumor size, distance to the tumor, and metastatic capacity. In prostate cancer patients, high expression of C/EBP in glandular epithelial cells in the surrounding tumor-bearing tissue was associated with accumulation of M1 macrophages (iNOS+) and favorable outcome. High expression of C/EBP in tumor epithelial cells was associated with high Gleason score, high tumor cell proliferation, metastases, and poor outcome.

    Conclusions: This study suggest that the expression of C/EBP-beta, a transcription factor mediating multiple biological effects, is differentially expressed both in the benign parts of the tumor-bearing prostate and in prostate tumors, and that alterations in this may be related to patient outcome.

  • 16.
    Adamo, Hanibal Hani
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Strömvall, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nilsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Halin Bergström, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Adaptive (TINT) Changes in the Tumor Bearing Organ Are Related to Prostate Tumor Size and Aggressiveness2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 11, article id e0141601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to grow, tumors need to induce supportive alterations in the tumor-bearing organ, by us named tumor instructed normal tissue (TINT) changes. We now examined if the nature and magnitude of these responses were related to tumor size and aggressiveness. Three different Dunning rat prostate tumor cells were implanted into the prostate of immune-competent rats; 1) fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu tumor cells 2) fast growing and poorly metastatic AT-1 tumor cells, and 3) slow growing and non-metastatic G tumor cells. All tumor types induced increases in macrophage, mast cell and vascular densities and in vascular cell-proliferation in the tumor-bearing prostate lobe compared to controls. These increases occurred in parallel with tumor growth. The most pronounced and rapid responses were seen in the prostate tissue surrounding MatLyLu tumors. They were, also when small, particularly effective in attracting macrophages and stimulating growth of not only micro-vessels but also small arteries and veins compared to the less aggressive AT-1 and G tumors. The nature and magnitude of tumor-induced changes in the tumor-bearing organ are related to tumor size but also to tumor aggressiveness. These findings, supported by previous observation in patient samples, suggest that one additional way to evaluate prostate tumor aggressiveness could be to monitor its effect on adjacent tissues.

  • 17. Adams, Charleen
    et al.
    Richmond, Rebecca C
    Santos Ferreira, Diana L
    Spiller, Wes
    Tan, Vanessa Y
    Zheng, Jie
    Wurtz, Peter
    Donovan, Jenny L
    Hamdy, Freddie C
    Neal, David E
    Lane, J Athene
    Davey Smith, George
    Relton, Caroline L
    Eeles, Rosalind A
    Henderson, Brian E
    Haiman, Christopher A
    Kote-Jarai, Zsofia
    Schumacher, Fredrick R
    Amin Al Olama, Ali
    Benlloch, Sara
    Muir, Kenneth
    Berndt, Sonja I
    Conti, David V
    Wiklund, Fredrik
    Chanock, Stephen J
    Gapstur, Susan M
    Stevens, Victoria L
    Tangen, Catherine M
    Batra, Jyotsna
    Clements, Judith A
    Grönberg, Henrik
    Pashayan, Nora
    Schleutker, Johanna
    Albanes, Demetrius
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    West, Catharine M L
    Mucci, Lorelei A
    Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine
    Koutros, Stella
    Sørensen, Karina D
    Maehle, Lovise
    Travis, Ruth C
    Hamilton, Robert
    Ingles, Sue Ann
    Rosenstein, Barry S
    Lu, Yong-Jie
    Giles, Graham G
    Kibel, Adam S
    Vega, Ana
    Kogevinas, Manolis
    Penney, Kathryn L
    Park, Jong Y
    Stanford, Janet L
    Cybulski, Cezary
    Nordestgaard, Borge G
    Brenner, Hermann
    Maier, Christiane
    Kim, Jeri
    John, Esther M
    Teixeira, Manuel R
    Neuhausen, Susan L
    DeRuyck, Kim
    Razack, Azad
    Newcomb, Lisa F
    Lessel, Davor
    Kaneva, Radka P
    Usmani, Nawaid
    Claessens, Frank
    Townsend, Paul
    Gago Dominguez, Manuela
    Roobol, Monique J
    Menegaux, Florence
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Cannon-Albright, Lisa A
    Pandha, Hardev
    Thibodeau, Stephen N
    Martin, Richard M
    Circulating Metabolic Biomarkers of Screen-Detected Prostate Cancer in the ProtecT Study.2018In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, article id cebp.0079.2018Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Whether associations between circulating metabolites and prostate cancer are causal is unknown. We report on the largest study of metabolites and prostate cancer (2,291 cases and 2,661 controls) and appraise causality for a subset of the prostate cancer-metabolite associations using two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR).

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: The case-control portion of the study was conducted in nine UK centres with men aged 50-69 years who underwent prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening for prostate cancer within the Prostate testing for cancer and Treatment (ProtecT) trial. Two data sources were used to appraise causality: a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of metabolites in 24,925 participants and a GWAS of prostate cancer in 44,825 cases and 27,904 controls within the Association Group to Investigate Cancer Associated Alterations in the Genome (PRACTICAL) consortium.

    RESULTS: Thirty-five metabolites were strongly associated with prostate cancer (p <0.0014, multiple-testing threshold). These fell into four classes: i) lipids and lipoprotein subclass characteristics (total cholesterol and ratios, cholesterol esters and ratios, free cholesterol and ratios, phospholipids and ratios, and triglyceride ratios); ii) fatty acids and ratios; iii) amino acids; iv) and fluid balance. Fourteen top metabolites were proxied by genetic variables, but MR indicated these were not causal.

    CONCLUSIONS: We identified 35 circulating metabolites associated with prostate cancer presence, but found no evidence of causality for those 14 testable with MR. Thus, the 14 MR-tested metabolites are unlikely to be mechanistically important in prostate cancer risk.

    IMPACT: The metabolome provides a promising set of biomarkers that may aid prostate cancer classification.

  • 18.
    Adde, Magdalena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Aggressive B-cell Lymphomas: Studies of Treatment, FDG-PET Evaluation and Prognostic Factors2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To improve outcome in young, high-risk lymphoma patients, treatment was intensified, adding etoposide and rituximab to standard CHOP treatment. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enabled treatment bi-weekly. Results were promising: overall (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) 79% and 60% respectively, median follow up 27 months. Single infusion Ara-C, contrary to expectations, did not prevent relapse in CNS.

    DLBCL were classified as germinal center (GC) or non-GC derived, using immunohistochemical markers, CD10, BCL6 and MUM1. We investigated the outcome for both phenotypes after adding rituximab to chemotherapy. For 106 patients treated with CHOP alone, the GC phenotype displayed significantly better OS and EFS. In contrast, GC phenotype did not predict outcome in 95 patients treated with immunochemotherapy . Thus, addition of rituximab seems to eliminate the prognostic value of immunohistochemically defined GC phenotypes in DLBCL.

    To improve evaluation and find non-responders, mid-treatment FDG-PET CT was incorporated into clinical routine for patients with high-risk aggressive lymphoma. For those with positive PET, biopsy followed by treatment intensification was recommended. Twenty-five patients were examined, five with positive PET. Two of these had lymphoma in the biopsy. Two had a negative biopsy, and one had a false positive investigation. Seven patients had increased uptake of uncertain significance. Two patients with uncertain PET, and two with negative PET have relapsed, giving a negative predictive value of 85%.

    In case of relapse of aggressive lymphoma or if not obtaining CR, high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support (HDT) is standard treatment. HDT outcome for 38 patients with transformed follicular lymphoma was compared to outcome for 79 patients with de novo B-cell lymphoma. At median follow-up of 11.5 years both OS and EFS were superior in the transformed group, OS 67% and 33%, EFS 55% and 27% respectively. Treatment related mortality was less than reported in other studies.

  • 19.
    Adlard, Kirsten N.
    et al.
    Univ Queensland, Sch Human Movement & Nutr Sci, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Devin, James L.
    Univ Queensland, Sch Human Movement & Nutr Sci, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Jenkins, David G.
    Univ Queensland, Sch Human Movement & Nutr Sci, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Bolam, Kate A.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology. Univ Queensland, Sch Human Movement & Nutr Sci, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Aitken, Joanne F.
    Griffith Univ, Menzies Hlth Inst Queensland, Gold Coast, Qld, Australia.;Canc Council Queensland, Canc Res Ctr, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Chambers, Suzanne K.
    Griffith Univ, Menzies Hlth Inst Queensland, Gold Coast, Qld, Australia.;Canc Council Queensland, Canc Res Ctr, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Prostate Canc Fdn Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;Edith Cowan Univ, Hlth & Wellness Inst, Perth, WA, Australia.;Univ Queensland, Clin Res Ctr, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Dunn, Jeffrey C.
    Griffith Univ, Menzies Hlth Inst Queensland, Gold Coast, Qld, Australia.;Canc Council Queensland, Canc Res Ctr, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Univ Queensland, Sch Social Sci, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Skinner, Tina L.
    Univ Queensland, Sch Human Movement & Nutr Sci, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    THE INFLUENCE OF EXERCISE INTENSITY ON FATIGUE IN COLORECTAL CANCER SURVIVORS: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL2016In: Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 1743-7563, E-ISSN 1743-7563, Vol. 12, no S5, p. 78-78, article id 44Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20. Adolfsson, Jan
    et al.
    Garmo, Hans
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Ahlgren, Göran
    Ahlstrand, Christer
    Andren, Ove
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    Bratt, Ola
    Damber, Jan-Erik
    Hellström, Karin
    Hellström, Magnus
    Holmberg, Erik
    Holmberg, Lars
    Hugosson, Jonas
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Petterson, Bill
    Törnblom, Magnus
    Widmark, Anders
    Stattin, Pär
    Clinical characteristics and primary treatment of prostate cancer in Sweden between 1996 and 2005: Data from the national prostate cancer register in Sweden2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 456-477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The incidence of prostate cancer is rising rapidly in Sweden and there is a need to better understand the pattern of diagnosis, tumor characteristics and treatment. Material and methods. Between 1996 and 2005, all new cases of adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland were intended to be registered in the National Prostate Cancer Register (NPCR). This register contains information on diagnosing unit, date of diagnosis, cause of diagnosis, tumor grade, tumor stage according to the TNM classification in force, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels at diagnosis and primary treatment given within the first 6 months after diagnosis. Results. In total, 72 028 patients were registered, comprising >97% of all pertinent incident cases of prostate cancer in the Swedish Cancer Register (SCR). During the study period there was a considerable decrease in median age at the time of diagnosis, a stage migration towards smaller tumors, a decrease in median serum PSA values at diagnosis, a decrease in the age-standardized incidence rate of men diagnosed with distant metastases or with a PSA level of >100 ng/ml at diagnosis and an increase in the proportion of tumors with Gleason score ≤6. Relatively large geographical differences in the median age at diagnosis and the age-standardized incidence of cases with category T1c tumors were observed. Treatment with curative intent increased dramatically and treatment patterns varied according to geographical region. In men with localized tumors and a PSA level of <20 ng/ml at diagnosis, expectant treatment was more commonly used in those aged ≥75 years than in those aged <75 years. Also, the pattern of endocrine treatment varied in different parts of Sweden. Conclusions. All changes in the register seen over time are consistent with increased diagnostic activity, especially PSA testing, resulting in an increased number of cases with early disease, predominantly tumors in category T1c. The patterns of diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer vary considerably in different parts of Sweden. The NPCR continues to be an important source for research, epidemiological surveillance of the incidence, diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer

  • 21.
    Afshari, Kevin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Colorectal Surgery.
    Chabok, Abbas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Colorectal Surgery.
    Naredi, Peter
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Surg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Smedh, Kennet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Colorectal Surgery.
    Nikberg, Maziar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Colorectal Surgery.
    Prognostic factors for survival in stage IV rectal cancer: A Swedish nationwide case-control study2019In: Surgial oncology, ISSN 0960-7404, E-ISSN 1879-3320, Vol. 29, p. 102-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim was to identify patient-, tumor- and treatment-related prognostic factors for five-year survival in rectal cancer patients with synchronous stage IV disease. Material and methods: This nationwide case-control study was based on the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry with supplementary information from medical records and the Swedish Inpatient Registry during the period 2000-2008. All resected rectal cancer patients with synchronous metastases that survived more than five years were included as cases. The control group consisted of corresponding patients who lived less than five years, matched in a 1:2 based on gender, age, resection of the rectal tumor, and the study period. Results: A total of 405 patients were identified; 99 long-term survivors (LTS) and 182 short-term survivors (STS). Patient-related factors of symptoms and comorbidity did not differ between LTS and STS. Among the treatment-related factors, multiple site metastases (p = 0.007), bilobar liver metastasis (p = 0.002), and increasing number of liver metastasis (p < 0.001) were associated with STS. Prognostic treatment-related factors were preoperative radiotherapy (p = 0.001), metastasectomy (p < 0.001), and radical resection of the primary tumor (p = 0.014). In the multivariable analysis, the single most important factor for becoming a LTS was a metastasectomy (hazard ratio: 8.474, 95% confidence interval: 4.098-17.543). Conclusions: The most important prognostic factor for long-term survival in patients with stage IV rectal cancer was metastasectomy, especially liver surgery. With thorough selection of patients for metastasectomy more patients with metastasized rectal cancer may survive beyond five years.

  • 22.
    Aftab, Obaid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Engskog, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Haglöf, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Elmsjö, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Arvidsson, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Pettersson, Curt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Hammerling, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Gustafsson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    NMR spectroscopy based metabolic profiling of drug induced changes in vitro can discriminate between pharmacological classes2014In: Journal of chemical information and modeling, ISSN 1549-9596, Vol. 54, no 11, p. 3251-3258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drug induced changes in mammalian cell line models have already been extensively profiled at the systemic mRNA level and subsequently used to suggest mechanisms of action for new substances as well as to support drug repurposing, i.e. identifying new potential indications for drugs already licensed for other pharmacotherapy settings. The seminal work in this field, which includes a large database and computational algorithms for pattern matching, is known as the “Connectivity Map” (CMap). The potential of similar exercises at the metabolite level is, however, still largely unexplored. Only recently the first high throughput metabolomic assay pilot study was published, involving screening of metabolic response to a set of 56 kinase inhibitors in a 96-well format. Here we report results from a separately developed metabolic profiling assay, which leverages 1H NMR spectroscopy to the quantification of metabolic changes in the HCT116 colorectal cancer cell line, in response to each of 26 compounds. These agents are distributed across 12 different pharmacological classes covering a broad spectrum of bioactivity. Differential metabolic profiles, inferred from multivariate spectral analysis of 18 spectral bins, allowed clustering of most tested drugs according to their respective pharmacological class. A more advanced supervised analysis, involving one multivariate scattering matrix per pharmacological class and using only 3 spectral bins (three metabolites), showed even more distinct pharmacology-related cluster formations. In conclusion, this kind of relatively fast and inexpensive profiling seems to provide a promising alternative to that afforded by mRNA expression analysis, which is relatively slow and costly. As also indicated by the present pilot study, the resulting metabolic profiles do not seem to provide as information rich signatures as those obtained using systemic mRNA profiling, but the methodology holds strong promise for significant refinement.

  • 23.
    Aftab, Obaid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Fryknäs, Mårten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Hassan, Saadia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Nygren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Hammerling, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Gustafsson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Label free quantification of time evolving morphologies using time-lapse video microscopy enables identity control of cell lines and discovery of chemically induced differential activity in iso-genic cell line pairs2015In: Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems, ISSN 0169-7439, E-ISSN 1873-3239, Vol. 141, p. 24-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Label free time-lapse video microscopy based monitoring of time evolving cell population morphology has potential to offer a simple and cost effective method for identity control of cell lines. Such morphology monitoring also has potential to offer discovery of chemically induced differential changes between pairs of cell lines of interest, for example where one in a pair of cell lines is normal/sensitive and the other malignant/resistant. A new simple algorithm, pixel histogram hierarchy comparison (PHHC), for comparison of time evolving morphologies (TEM) in phase contrast time-lapse microscopy movies was applied to a set of 10 different cell lines and three different iso-genic colon cancer cell line pairs, each pair being genetically identical except for a single mutation. PHHC quantifies differences in morphology by comparing pixel histogram intensities at six different resolutions. Unsupervised clustering and machine learning based classification methods were found to accurately identify cell lines, including their respective iso-genic variants, through time-evolving morphology. Using this experimental setting, drugs with differential activity in iso-genic cell line pairs were likewise identified. Thus, this is a cost effective and expedient alternative to conventional molecular profiling techniques and might be useful as part of the quality control in research incorporating cell line models, e.g. in any cell/tumor biology or toxicology project involving drug/agent differential activity in pairs of cell line models.

  • 24.
    Aftab, Obaid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Nazir, Madiha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Fryknäs, Mårten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Hammerling, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Gustafsson, Mats G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Label free high throughput screening for apoptosis inducing chemicals using time-lapse microscopy signal processing2014In: Apoptosis (London), ISSN 1360-8185, E-ISSN 1573-675X, Vol. 19, no 9, p. 1411-1418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Label free time-lapse microscopy has opened a new avenue to the study of time evolving events in living cells. When combined with automated image analysis it provides a powerful tool that enables automated large-scale spatiotemporal quantification at the cell population level. Very few attempts, however, have been reported regarding the design of image analysis algorithms dedicated to the detection of apoptotic cells in such time-lapse microscopy images. In particular, none of the reported attempts is based on sufficiently fast signal processing algorithms to enable large-scale detection of apoptosis within hours/days without access to high-end computers. Here we show that it is indeed possible to successfully detect chemically induced apoptosis by applying a two-dimensional linear matched filter tailored to the detection of objects with the typical features of an apoptotic cell in phase-contrast images. First a set of recorded computational detections of apoptosis was validated by comparison with apoptosis specific caspase activity readouts obtained via a fluorescence based assay. Then a large screen encompassing 2,866 drug like compounds was performed using the human colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT116. In addition to many well known inducers (positive controls) the screening resulted in the detection of two compounds here reported for the first time to induce apoptosis.

  • 25.
    Agarwal, Divyansh
    et al.
    Univ Penn, Dept Genom & Computat Biol, Perelman Sch Med, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.;Univ Penn, Wharton Sch, Dept Stat, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Nowak, Christoph
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Zhang, Nancy R.
    Univ Penn, Dept Genom & Computat Biol, Perelman Sch Med, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.;Univ Penn, Wharton Sch, Dept Stat, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Pusztai, Lajos
    Yale Univ, Yale Sch Med, Breast Med Oncol, Dept Med, New Haven, CT 06520 USA..
    Hatzis, Christos
    Yale Univ, Yale Sch Med, Breast Med Oncol, Dept Med, New Haven, CT 06520 USA..
    Functional germline variants as potential co-oncogenes2017In: NPJ BREAST CANCER, ISSN 2374-4677, Vol. 3, article id 46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Germline variants that affect the expression or function of proteins contribute to phenotypic variation in humans and likely determine individual characteristics and susceptibility to diseases including cancer. A number of high penetrance germline variants that increase cancer risk have been identified and studied, but germline functional polymorphisms are not typically considered in the context of cancer biology, where the focus is primarily on somatic mutations. Yet, there is evidence from familial cancers indicating that specific cancer subtypes tend to arise in carriers of high-risk germline variants (e.g., triple negative breast cancers in mutated BRCA carriers), which suggests that pre-existing germline variants may determine which complementary somatic driver mutations are needed to drive tumorigenesis. Recent genome sequencing studies of large breast cancer cohorts reported only a handful of highly recurrent driver mutations, suggesting that different oncogenic events drive individual cancers. Here, we propose that germline polymorphisms can function as oncogenic modifiers, or co-oncogenes, and these determine what complementary subsequent somatic events are required for full malignant transformation. Therefore, we propose that germline aberrations should be considered together with somatic mutations to determine what genes drive cancer and how they may be targeted.

  • 26.
    Agarwal, Prasoon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Alzrigat, Mohammad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Párraga, Alba Atienza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Enroth, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Singh, Umashankar
    Ungerstedt, Johanna
    Österborg, Anders
    Brown, Peter J
    Ma, Anqi
    Jin, Jian
    Nilsson, Kenneth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    Öberg, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Kalushkova, Antonia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Jernberg-Wiklund, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Genome-wide profiling of histone H3 lysine 27 and lysine 4 trimethylation in multiple myeloma reveals the importance of Polycomb gene targeting and highlights EZH2 as a potential therapeutic target.2016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 6809-6923Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignancy of the antibody-producing plasma cells. MM is a highly heterogeneous disease, which has hampered the identification of a common underlying mechanism for disease establishment as well as the development of targeted therapy. Here we present the first genome-wide profiling of histone H3 lysine 27 and lysine 4 trimethylation in MM patient samples, defining a common set of active H3K4me3-enriched genes and silent genes marked by H3K27me3 (H3K27me3 alone or bivalent) unique to primary MM cells, when compared to normal bone marrow plasma cells. Using this epigenome profile, we found increased silencing of H3K27me3 targets in MM patients at advanced stages of the disease, and the expression pattern of H3K27me3-marked genes correlated with poor patient survival. We also demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of EZH2 had anti-myeloma effects in both MM cell lines and CD138+ MM patient cells. In addition, EZH2 inhibition decreased the global H3K27 methylation and induced apoptosis. Taken together, these data suggest an important role for the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in MM, and highlights the PRC2 component EZH2 as a potential therapeutic target in MM.

  • 27.
    Agathangelidis, Andreas
    et al.
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Strateg Res Program CLL, Milan, Italy;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Div Expt Oncol, B Cell Neoplasia Unit, Milan, Italy;IRCCS Ist Sci San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.
    Ljungström, Viktor
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Scarfo, Lydia
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Strateg Res Program CLL, Milan, Italy;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Div Expt Oncol, B Cell Neoplasia Unit, Milan, Italy;IRCCS Ist Sci San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.
    Fazi, Claudia
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Strateg Res Program CLL, Milan, Italy;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Div Expt Oncol, B Cell Neoplasia Unit, Milan, Italy;IRCCS Ist Sci San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.
    Gounari, Maria
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Strateg Res Program CLL, Milan, Italy;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Div Expt Oncol, B Cell Neoplasia Unit, Milan, Italy;IRCCS Ist Sci San Raffaele, Milan, Italy;Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Pandzic, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sutton, Lesley-Ann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Tonon, Giovanni
    IRCCS Ist Sci San Raffaele, Funct Genom Canc Unit, Div Expt Oncol, Milan, Italy.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ghia, Paolo
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Strateg Res Program CLL, Milan, Italy;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Div Expt Oncol, B Cell Neoplasia Unit, Milan, Italy;IRCCS Ist Sci San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.
    Highly similar genomic landscapes in monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis and ultra-stable chronic lymphocytic leukemia with low frequency of driver mutations2018In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 103, no 5, p. 865-873Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the recent discovery of recurrent driver mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the genetic factors involved in disease onset remain largely unknown. To address this issue, we per-formed whole-genome sequencing in 11 individuals with monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, both of the low-count and high-count subtypes, and 5 patients with ultra-stable chronic lymphocytic leukemia (>10 years without progression from initial diagnosis). All three entities were indistinguishable at the genomic level exhibiting low genomic complexity and similar types of somatic mutations. Exonic mutations were not frequently identified in putative chronic lymphocytic leukemia driver genes in all settings, including low-count monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis. To corroborate these findings, we also performed deep sequencing in 11 known frequently mutated genes in an extended cohort of 28 monoclonal B-cell lym phocytosis/chronic lymphocytic leukemia cases. Interestingly, shared mutations were detected between clonal B cells and paired polymorphonuclear cells, strengthening the notion that at least a fraction of somatic mutations may occur before disease onset, likely at the hematopoietic stem cell level. Finally, we identified previously unreported non-coding variants targeting pathways relevant to B-cell and chronic lymphocytic leukemia development, likely associated with the acquisition of the characteristic neoplastic phenotype typical of both monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis and chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

  • 28. Agathangelidis, Andreas
    et al.
    Vardi, Anna
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Stereotyped B-cell receptors in chronic lymphocytic leukemia2014In: Leukemia and Lymphoma, ISSN 1042-8194, E-ISSN 1029-2403, Vol. 55, no 10, p. 2252-2261Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last decade, immunogenetic analysis of B-cell receptor immunoglobulins (BcR IGs) has proved to be a particularly fruitful field in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), not only for understanding disease pathogenesis but also for discriminating clinical subgroups with markedly distinct course and outcome. Of utmost importance was the identification of quasi-identical BcR IGs among unrelated patients with CLL, fittingly coined as "stereotypy," that set the wheels in motion for unraveling the role of antigen(s) in the selection and expansion of the leukemic clones. The categorization of CLL clones into "subsets" according to shared BcR IG structural characteristics provided a compartmentalized view of this otherwise heterogeneous disease, which eventually led to defining strikingly homogeneous groups of patients in terms of: (i) functional properties of the clonal BcR IGs, e. g. BcR reactivity and signaling; (ii) clonal genetic landscape, e. g. genomic aberrations, gene expression/methylation profiles, microRNA signatures; and (iii) clinical course and outcome. The remarkable restriction of the CLL IG gene repertoire, resulting to a great degree from the high impact of BcR IG stereotypy, may also prompt speculations regarding CLL ontogenesis. Overall, the BcR IG molecule justifiably lies at the heart of CLL clinical research, holding the promise of subset-tailored therapies.

  • 29. Agudo, Antonio
    et al.
    Bonet, Catalina
    Sala, Núria
    Muñoz, Xavier
    Aranda, Núria
    Fonseca-Nunes, Ana
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine
    Vineis, Paolo
    Panico, Salvatore
    Palli, Domenico
    Tumino, Rosario
    Grioni, Sara
    Quirós, J Ramón
    Molina, Esther
    Navarro, Carmen
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Chamosa, Saioa
    Allen, Naomi E
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Siersema, Peter D
    Numans, Mattijs E
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Kaaks, Rudof
    Canzian, Federico
    Boeing, Heiner
    Meidtner, Karina
    Johansson, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine. WHO, IARC, Lyon, France.
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Manjer, Jonas
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Lund, Eiliv
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Jenab, Mazda
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Offerhaus, G Johan A
    Riboli, Elio
    González, Carlos A
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Hemochromatosis (HFE) gene mutations and risk of gastric cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study2013In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 1244-1250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a strong risk factor for hepatocellular cancer, and mutations in the HFE gene associated with HH and iron overload may be related to other tumors, but no studies have been reported for gastric cancer (GC). A nested case-control study was conducted within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), including 365 incident gastric adenocarcinoma and 1284 controls matched by center, sex, age and date of blood collection. Genotype analysis was performed for two functional polymorphisms (C282Y/rs1800562 and H63D/rs1799945) and seven tagSNPs of the HFE genomic region. Association with all gastric adenocarcinoma, and according to anatomical localization and histological subtype, was assessed by means of the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for the matching variables. We observed a significant association for H63D with OR (per rare allele) of 1.32 (CI = 1.03-1.69). In subgroup analyses, the association was stronger for non-cardia anatomical subsite (OR = 1.60, CI = 1.16-2.21) and intestinal histological subtype (OR = 1.82, CI = 1.27-2.62). Among intestinal cases, two tagSNPs (rs1572982 and rs6918586) also showed a significant association that disappeared after adjustment for H63D. No association with tumors located in the cardia or with diffuse subtype was found for any of the nine SNPs analyzed. Our results suggest that H63D variant in HFE gene seems to be associated with GC risk of the non-cardia region and intestinal type, possibly due to its association with iron overload although a role for other mechanisms cannot be entirely ruled out.

  • 30. Agudo, Antonio
    et al.
    Cayssials, Valerie
    Bonet, Catalina
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Overvad, Kim
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Affret, Aurélie
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Katzke, Verena
    Schübel, Ruth
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Karakatsani, Anna
    La Vecchia, Carlo
    Palli, Domenico
    Grioni, Sara
    Tumino, Rosario
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Panico, Salvatore
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Skeie, Guri
    Nøst, Theresa H.
    Lasheras, Cristina
    Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel
    Amiano, Pilar
    Chirlaque, María-Dolores
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Dias, Joana A.
    Nilsson, Lena M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Myte, Robin
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Perez-Cornago, Aurora
    Gunter, Marc
    Huybrechts, Inge
    Cross, Amanda J.
    Tsilidis, Kostas
    Riboli, Elio
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Inflammatory potential of the diet and risk of gastric cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study2018In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 107, no 4, p. 607-616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic inflammation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of the 2 major types of gastric cancer. Several foods, nutrients, and nonnutrient food components seem to be involved in the regulation of chronic inflammation. We assessed the association between the inflammatory potential of the diet and the risk of gastric carcinoma, overall and for the 2 major subsites: cardia cancers and noncardia cancers. A total of 476,160 subjects (30% men, 70% women) from the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study were followed for 14 y, during which 913 incident cases of gastric carcinoma were identified, including 236 located in the cardia, 341 in the distal part of the stomach (noncardia), and 336 with overlapping or unknown tumor site. The dietary inflammatory potential was assessed by means of an inflammatory score of the diet (ISD), calculated with the use of 28 dietary components and their corresponding inflammatory scores. The association between the ISD and gastric cancer risk was estimated by HRs and 95% CIs calculated by multivariate Cox regression models adjusted for confounders. The inflammatory potential of the diet was associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. The HR (95% CI) for each increase in 1 SD of the ISD were 1.25 (1.12, 1.39) for all gastric cancers, 1.30 (1.06, 1.59) for cardia cancers, and 1.07 (0.89, 1.28) for noncardia cancers. The corresponding values for the highest compared with the lowest quartiles of the ISD were 1.66 (1.26, 2.20), 1.94 (1.14, 3.30), and 1.07 (0.70, 1.70), respectively. Our results suggest that low-grade chronic inflammation induced by the diet may be associated with gastric cancer risk. This pattern seems to be more consistent for gastric carcinomas located in the cardia than for those located in the distal stomach. This study is listed on the ISRCTN registry as ISRCTN12136108.

  • 31.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Matthiessen, P.
    School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fang, X.
    Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; .
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery.
    Lindgren, R.
    Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Surgery.
    Effect of beta-blocker therapy on early mortality after emergency colonic cancer surgery2019In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 106, no 4, p. 477-483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Emergency colorectal cancer surgery is associated with significant mortality. Induced adrenergic hyperactivity is thought to be an important contributor. Downregulating the effects of circulating catecholamines may reduce the risk of adverse outcomes. This study assessed whether regular preoperative beta-blockade reduced mortality after emergency colonic cancer surgery.

    METHODS: This cohort study used the prospectively collected Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry to recruit all adult patients requiring emergency colonic cancer surgery between 2011 and 2016. Patients were subdivided into those receiving regular beta-blocker therapy before surgery and those who were not (control). Demographics and clinical outcomes were compared. Risk factors for 30-day mortality were evaluated using Poisson regression analysis.

    RESULTS: A total of 3187 patients were included, of whom 685 (21·5 per cent) used regular beta-blocker therapy before surgery. The overall 30-day mortality rate was significantly reduced in the beta-blocker group compared with controls: 3·1 (95 per cent c.i. 1·9 to 4·7) versus 8·6 (7·6 to 9·8) per cent respectively (P < 0·001). Beta-blocker therapy was the only modifiable protective factor identified in multivariable analysis of 30-day all-cause mortality (incidence rate ratio 0·31, 95 per cent c.i. 0·20 to 0·47; P < 0·001) and was associated with a significant reduction in death of cardiovascular, respiratory, sepsis and multiple organ failure origin.

    CONCLUSION: Preoperative beta-blocker therapy may be associated with a reduction in 30-day mortality following emergency colonic cancer surgery.

  • 32.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Matthiessen, Peter
    School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Division of Colorectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    The Relationship Between Severe Complications, Beta-Blocker Therapy and Long-Term Survival Following Emergency Surgery for Colon Cancer2019In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Emergency surgery for colon cancer carries significant morbidity, and studies show more than doubled mortality when comparing elective to emergency surgery. The relationship between postoperative complications and survival has been outlined. Beta-blocker therapy has been linked to improved postoperative outcomes. This study aims to assess the impact of postoperative complications on long-term survival following emergency surgery for colon cancer and to determine whether beta-blockade can reduce complications.

    STUDY DESIGN: This cohort study utilized the prospective Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry to identify adults undergoing emergency colon cancer surgery between 2011 and 2016. Prescription data for preoperative beta-blocker therapy were collected from the national drug registry. Cox regression was used to evaluate the effect of beta-blocker exposure and complications on 1-year mortality, and Poisson regression was used to evaluate beta-blocker exposure in patients with major complications.

    RESULTS: A total of 3139 patients were included with a mean age of 73.1 [12.4] of which 671 (21.4%) were prescribed beta-blockers prior to surgery. Major complications occurred in 375 (11.9%) patients. Those suffering major complications showed a threefold increase in 1-year mortality (adjusted HR = 3.29; 95% CI 2.75-3.94; p < 0.001). Beta-blocker use was linked to a 60% risk reduction in 1-year mortality (adjusted HR = 0.40; 95% CI 0.26-0.62; p < 0.001) but did not show a statistically significant association with reductions in major complications (adjusted IRR = 0.77; 95% CI 0.59-1.00; p = 0.055).

    CONCLUSION: The development of major complications after emergency colon cancer surgery is associated with increased mortality during one year after surgery. Beta-blocker therapy may protect against postoperative complications.

  • 33.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Matthiessen, Peter
    School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fang, Xin
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Rickard
    Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Surgery.
    β-Blockade in Rectal Cancer Surgery: A Simple Measure of Improving Outcomes2018In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain whether regular β-blocker exposure can improve short- and long-term outcomes after rectal cancer surgery.

    BACKGROUND: Surgery for rectal cancer is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. There is increasing evidence to suggest that there is a survival benefit in patients exposed to β-blockers undergoing non-cardiac surgery. Studies investigating the effects on outcomes in patients subjected to surgery for rectal cancer are lacking.

    METHODS: All adult patients undergoing elective abdominal resection for rectal cancer over a 10-year period were recruited from the prospectively collected Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry. Patients were subdivided according to preoperative β-blocker exposure status. Outcomes of interest were 30-day complications, 30-day cause-specific mortality, and 1-year all-cause mortality. The association between β-blocker use and outcomes were analyzed using Poisson regression model with robust standard errors for 30-day complications and cause-specific mortality. One-year survival was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression model.

    RESULTS: A total of 11,966 patients were included in the current study, of whom 3513 (29.36%) were exposed to regular preoperative β-blockers. A significant decrease in 30-day mortality was detected (incidence rate ratio = 0.06, 95% confidence interval: 0.03-0.13, P < 0.001). Deaths of cardiovascular nature, respiratory origin, sepsis, and multiorgan failure were significantly lower in β-blocker users, as were the incidences in postoperative infection and anastomotic failure. The β-blocker positive group had significantly better survival up to 1 year postoperatively with a risk reduction of 57% (hazard ratio = 0.43, 95% confidence interval: 0.37-0.52, P < 0.001).

    CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative β-blocker use is strongly associated with improved survival and morbidity after abdominal resection for rectal cancer.

  • 34. Ahlberg, Alexander
    et al.
    Nikolaidis, Polymnia
    Engström, Therese
    Gunnarsson, Karin
    Johansson, Hemming
    Sharp, Lena
    Laurell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Morbidity of supraomohyoidal and modified radical neck dissection combined with radiotherapy for head and neck cancer: a prospective longitudinal study2012In: Head and Neck, ISSN 1043-3074, E-ISSN 1097-0347, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 66-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to show the investigated impact of supraomohyoidal neck dissection and modified radical neck dissection, both combined with radiotherapy, on cervical range of motion (CROM), mouth opening, swallowing, lymphedema, and shoulder function.

    METHODS: One hundred eight patients who had neck dissections and 98 patients who had non-neck dissections were evaluated in a prospective, nonselective, longitudinal cohort study by a physiotherapist and a speech-language pathologist (SLP) before the start of radiotherapy and up to 12 months after treatment.

    RESULTS: The incidence of shoulder disability after neck dissection was 18%. Supraomohyoidal neck dissection had no significant effect on the evaluated parameters at any time point. Modified radical neck dissection significantly reduced CROM and mouth opening 2 months after treatment, but after 12 months only cervical rotation was still significantly reduced.

    CONCLUSION: In patients treated with external beam radiation (EBRT), modified radical neck dissection induced additional morbidity regarding CROM but not regarding mouth opening, swallowing, and lymphedema 1 year after treatment. Both modified radical neck dissection and supraomohyoidal neck dissection induced shoulder disability.

  • 35.
    Ahlgren, Johan
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Studies on Prediction of Axillary Lymph Node Status in Invasive Breast Cancer2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among females in Sweden. Axillary lymph-node dissection is a standard procedure in the management of breast cancer, aiming at obtaining prognostic information for adjuvant therapy decisions. Axillary dissection entails considerable morbidity. The aims of this study were to establish more selective surgical approaches and to investigate angiogenesis, a potential predictor for lymph-node metastases and prognosis.

    Clinical nodal status, tumour size and S-phase were associated with nodal metastases in cohort of 1145 women. The proportion of nodal metastases was 13% in the subgroup with the lowest risk.

    In a study from two registries, 675 and 1035 breast cancers ≤10 mm diagnosed by screening mammography had nodal metastases in 6,5% and 7%, respectively. Clinically detected cancers had a risk of 16% and 14%, respectively.

    In a study on 415 women, a 5-node biopsy of the axilla had a sensitivity of 97,3% and a false negative rate of 2,7% in comparison with axillary dissection.

    Six sections from 21 breast cancers were analysed for microvessel density (MVD). The inter-section variation contributed more to the total variance than inter-tumour variation, 45,0% and 37,3%, respectively.

    In a cohort of 315 women, breast cancers with high MVD more frequently had p53 mutations (27,1%) compared with cases with low MVD (18,4%). This difference was not statistically significant (p=0,075). p53 mutations were associated with a worse outcome, whereas MVD was not.

    In conclusion, women with screening detected ≤10 mm breast cancers have a low risk of lymph node metastases and some may not need axillary dissection in the future. The 5-node biopsy could be an alternative to axillary dissection. MVD is associated with methodological weaknesses and routine use is not recommended.

  • 36.
    Ahlgren, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Molecular Radionuclide Imaging Using Site-specifically Labelled Recombinant Affibody Molecules: Preparation and Preclinical Evaluation2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Radionuclide molecular imaging is an emerging multidisciplinary technique that is used in modern medicine to visualise diseases at cellular and molecular levels. This thesis is based on five papers (I-V) and focuses on the development of site-specific radiolabelled recombinant anti-HER2 Affibody molecules and preclinical evaluations in vitro and in vivo of the labelled conjugates. This work is part of a preclinical development of an Affibody molecule-based tracer for molecular imaging of HER2 expressing tumours.

    Papers I and II report the evaluation of the Affibody molecule ZHER2:2395-C, site-specifically labelled with the radiometals 111In (for SPECT) and 57Co (as a surrogate for 55Co, suitable for PET applications) using a thiol reactive DOTA derivative as a chelator. Both conjugates demonstrated very suitable biodistribution properties, enabling high contrast imaging just a few hours after injection.

    Papers III and IV report the development and optimization of a technique for site-specific labelling of ZHER2:2395-C with 99mTc using an N3S chelating peptide sequence. 99mTc-ZHER2:2395-C demonstrated high and specific tumour uptake and rapid clearance of non-bound tracer from the blood, resulting in high tumour-to-non-tumour ratios shortly after injection, enabling high contrast imaging. In addition, in the study described in paper IV, freeze-dried kits previously developed for 99mTc-labelling were optimised, resulting in the development of a kit in which all the reagents and protein needed for labelling of ZHER2:2395-C with 99mTc were contained in a single vial.

    Paper V reports the evaluation of an anti-HER2 Affibody molecule, ABY-025, with a fundamentally re-engineered scaffold. Despite the profound re-engineering, the biodistribution pattern of 111In-ABY-025 was very similar to that of two variants of the parental molecule.

    It seems reasonable to believe that these results will also be applicable to Affibody molecules towards other targets. Hopefully, this work will also be helpful in the development of other small proteinaceous tracers.

  • 37.
    Ahlin, Cecilia
    et al.
    Orebro Univ, Dept Oncol, Orebro, Sweden..
    Lundgren, Claudia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Embretsen-Varro, Elin
    Orebro Univ, Dept Oncol, Orebro, Sweden..
    Jirstrom, Karin
    Lund Univ, Dept Pathol & Oncol, Lund, Sweden..
    Blomqvist, Carl
    Orebro Univ, Dept Oncol, Orebro, Sweden.;Univ Helsinki, Dept Oncol, Helsinki, Finland..
    Fjällskog, Marie-Louise
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrin Oncology.
    High expression of cyclin D1 is associated to high proliferation rate and increased risk of mortality in women with ER-positive but not in ER-negative breast cancers2017In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 164, no 3, p. 667-678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyclin D1 has a central role in cell cycle control and is an important component of estrogen regulation of cell cycle progression. We have previously shown that high cyclin D expression is related to aggressive features of ER-positive but not ER-negative breast cancer. The aims of the present study were to validate this differential ER-related effect and furthermore explore the relationship between cyclin D overexpression and CCND1 gene amplification status in a node-negative breast cancer case-control study. Immunohistochemical nuclear expression of cyclin D1 (n = 364) and amplification of the gene CCND1 by fluorescent in situ hybridization (n = 255) was performed on tissue microarray sections from patients with T1-2N0M0 breast cancer. Patients given adjuvant chemotherapy were excluded. The primary event was defined as breast cancer death. Breast cancer-specific survival was analyzed in univariate and multivariable models using conditional logistic regression. Expression of cyclin D1 above the median (61.7%) in ER breast cancer was associated with an increased risk for breast cancer death (OR 3.2 95% CI 1.5-6.8) also when adjusted for tumor size and grade (OR 3.1). No significant prognostic impact of cyclin D1 expression was found among ER-negative cases. Cyclin D1 overexpression was significantly associated to high expression of the proliferation markers cyclins A (rho 0.19, p = 0.006) and B (rho 0.18, p = 0.003) in ER-positive tumors, but not in ER-negative cases. There was a significant association between CCND1 amplification and cyclin D1 expression (p = 0.003), but CCND1 amplification was not statistically significantly prognostic (HR 1.4, 95% CI 0.4-4.4). We confirmed our previous observation that high cyclin D1 expression is associated to high proliferation and a threefold higher risk of death from breast cancer in ER-positive breast cancer.

  • 38.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ekström, Simon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Sjöholm, Therese
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Strand, Robin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Kullberg, Joel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Johansson, E.
    Antaros Med, Molndal, Sweden..
    Hagmar, P.
    Antaros Med, Molndal, Sweden..
    Malmberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Registration-based automated lesion detection and therapy evaluation of tumors in whole body PET-MR images2017In: Annals of Oncology, ISSN 0923-7534, E-ISSN 1569-8041, Vol. 28, no S5, article id 78PArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Ahmad, Abrar
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Askari, Shlear
    Department of Clinical Medicine, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Befekadu, Rahel
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Section for Transfusion Medicine.
    Hahn-Strömberg, Victoria
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Investigating the association between polymorphisms in connective tissue growth factor and susceptibility to colon carcinoma2015In: Molecular Medicine Reports, ISSN 1791-2997, E-ISSN 1791-3004, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 2493-2503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There have been numerous studies on the gene expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in colorectal cancer, however very few have investigated polymorphisms in this gene. The present study aimed to determine whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CTGF gene are associated with a higher susceptibility to colon cancer and/or an invasive tumor growth pattern. The CTGF gene was genotyped for seven SNPs (rs6918698, rs1931002, rs9493150, rs12526196, rs12527705, rs9399005 and rs12527379) by pyrosequencing. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples (n=112) from patients diagnosed with colon carcinoma, and an equal number of blood samples from healthy controls, were selected for genomic DNA extraction. The complexity index was measured using images of tumor samples (n=64) stained for cytokeratin-8. The images were analyzed and correlated with the identified CTGF SNPs and clinicopathological parameters of the patients, including age, gender, tumor penetration, lymph node metastasis, systemic metastasis, differentiation and localization of tumor. It was demonstrated that the frequency of the SNP rs6918698 GG genotype was significantly associated (P=0.05) with an increased risk of colon cancer, as compared with the GC and CC genotypes. The other six SNPs (rs1931002, rs9493150, rs12526196, rs12527705, rs9399005 and rs12527379) exhibited no significant difference in the genotype and allele frequencies between patients diagnosed with colon carcinoma and the normal healthy population. A trend was observed between genotype variation at rs6918698 and the complexity index (P=0.052). The complexity index and genotypes for any of the studied SNPs were not significantly correlated with clinical or pathological parameters of the patients. These results indicate that the rs6918698 GG genotype is associated with an increased risk of developing colon carcinoma, and genetic variations at the rs6918698 are associated with the growth pattern of the tumor. The present results may facilitate the identification of potential biomarkers of the disease in addition to drug targets.

  • 40.
    Ahmad, Abrar
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Research, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Venizelos, Nikolaos
    Department of Clinical Research, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hahn-Strömberg, Victoria
    Department of Clinical Research, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; ; Department of Medical Cell Biology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Prognostic Effect of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor +936C/T Polymorphism on Tumor Growth Pattern and Survival in Patients Diagnosed with Colon Carcinoma2016In: Journal of Tumor Research, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 1-6, article id 1000108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is considered as endothelial cell-specific mitogen that plays an important role in the process of angiogenesis, thereby affecting the prognosis of tumor as angiogenesis is a crucial phase in tumor growth and metastasis. Accordingly, we carried out a case-control study to assess whether VEGF rs3025039 polymorphism affects the growth pattern and susceptibility to colon carcinoma.

    Materials and methods: One hundred and fifty, formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue samples from patients diagnosed with colon carcinoma and the same number of blood controls were used in the present study. VEGF +936 C>T (rs3025039) polymorphism was evaluated by pyrosequencing. Computer image analysis was used to analyse the growth pattern of the colon carcinoma tumor by using cytokeratin-8 stained slides.

    Results: A heterozygous genotype TC in rs3025039 polymorphism was found as a significantly protective genotype as compared to homozygous genotypes (CC and TT). However we found no significant correlation between investigated polymorphisms, tumor growth pattern, 5 years survival and other clinicopathological parameters.

    Conclusion: We concluded that the heterogenous genotype of VEGF rs3025039 polymorphism appears to be a protective factor for colon carcinoma that could be a useful marker in follow-up studies and may be a genetic determinant for colon carcinoma.

  • 41.
    Ahmadi, Zainab
    et al.
    Univ Lund Hosp, Div Resp Med & Allergol, Dept Clin Sci, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Lundstrom, Staffan
    Stockholms Sjukhem Fdn, Palliat Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci Resp Med & Allergol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Strang, Peter
    Stockholms Sjukhem Fdn, Palliat Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Emtner, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy.
    Currow, David C.
    Flinders Univ S Australia, Discipline Serv, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia.;Flinders Univ S Australia, Palliat Serv, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia.;Flinders Univ S Australia, Support Serv, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia..
    Ekström, Magnus
    Univ Lund Hosp, Div Resp Med & Allergol, Dept Clin Sci, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden.;Flinders Univ S Australia, Discipline Serv, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia.;Flinders Univ S Australia, Palliat Serv, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia.;Flinders Univ S Australia, Support Serv, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia..
    End-of-life care in oxygen-dependent COPD and cancer: a national population-based study2015In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 1190-1193Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42. Ahnesjö, Anders
    Dose calculation methods in photon beam therapy using energy deposition kernels1991Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 43. Akeus, Paulina
    et al.
    Langenes, Veronica
    von Mentzer, Astrid
    Yrlid, Ulf
    Sjoling, Asa
    Saksena, Pushpa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Raghavan, Sukanya
    Quiding-Jarbrink, Marianne
    Altered chemokine production and accumulation of regulatory T cells in intestinal adenomas of APC(Min/+) mice2014In: Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy, ISSN 0340-7004, E-ISSN 1432-0851, Vol. 63, no 8, p. 807-819Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tumor progression in the colon moves from aberrant crypt foci to adenomatous polyps to invasive carcinomas. The composition of the tumor-infiltrating leukocyte population affects the ability of the immune system to fight the tumor. T cell infiltration into colorectal adenocarcinomas, particularly T helper 1 (Th1) type T cells as well as increased regulatory T cell (Treg) frequencies, is correlated with improved prognosis. However, whether Th1 cells and Tregs are already present at the adenoma stage is not known. In this study, the APC(Min/+) mouse model of intestinal adenomatous polyposis was used to investigate tumor-associated lymphocyte subsets and the mechanisms of their accumulation into gastrointestinal adenomas. Compared to unaffected tissue, adenomas accumulated CD4(+)FoxP3(+) putative Treg in parallel with lower frequencies of conventional T cells and B cells. The accumulation of Treg was also observed in human adenomatous polyps. Despite high Treg numbers, the function of conventional T cells present in the APC(Min/+) adenomas was not different from those in the unaffected tissue. Adenomas displayed an altered chemokine balance, with higher CCL17 and lower CXCL11 and CCL25 expression than in the unaffected tissue. In parallel, CXCR3(+) Tregs were largely absent from adenomas. The data indicate that already in early stages of tumor development, the balance of lymphocyte-recruiting chemokines is altered possibly contributing to the observed shift toward higher frequencies of Treg.

  • 44.
    Akre [Fall], Katja
    et al.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Ekström, A. M.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Signorello, L B
    2International Epidemiology Institute, Rockville, USA.
    Hansson, L.-E.
    Mora Hospital, Mora.
    Nyrén, O.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Aspirin and risk for gastric cancer: a population-based case-control study in Sweden2001In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 84, no 7, p. 965-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While aspirin and other non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with gastric mucosal damage, they might reduce the risk for gastric cancer. In a population-based case-control study in 5 Swedish counties, we interviewed 567 incident cases of gastric cancer and 1165 controls about their use of pain relievers. The cases were uniformly classified to subsite (cardia/non-cardia) and histological type and information collected on other known risk factors for gastric cancer. Helicobacter pylori serology was tested in a subset of 542 individuals. Users of aspirin had a moderately reduced risk of gastric cancer compared to never users; odds ratio (OR) adjusted for age, gender and socioeconomic status was 0.7 (95% CI = 0.6-1.0). Gastric cancer risk fell with increasing frequency of aspirin use (P for trend = 0.02). The risk reduction was apparent for both cardia and non-cardia tumours but was uncertain for the diffuse histologic type. No clear association was observed between gastric cancer risk and non-aspirin NSAIDs or other studied pain relievers. Our finding lends support to the hypothesis that use of aspirin reduces the risk for gastric cancer.

  • 45.
    Akre [Fall], Katja
    et al.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
    Signorello, Lisa B.
    Engstrand, Lars
    Bergström, Reinhold
    Larsson, Sune
    Eriksson, Bengt I.
    Nyrén, Olof
    Risk for gastric cancer after antibiotic prophylaxis in patients undergoing hip replacement2000In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 60, no 22, p. 6376-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite strong evidence of an association between Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer, the benefit of eradicating H. pylori infection is unknown. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that exposure to high doses of antibiotics reduces risk for gastric cancer via possible eradication of H. pylori We conducted a nationwide case-control study nested in a cohort of 39,154 patients who underwent hip replacement surgery between 1965 and 1983. Such patients frequently receive prophylactic antibiotic treatment. During follow-up through 1989, we identified 189 incident cases of gastric cancer. For each case, three controls were selected from the cohort. Exposure data were abstracted from hospital records. Blood samples from a separate cohort undergoing hip replacement surgery were analyzed for anti-H. pylori IgG before and after surgery. Both long-term antibiotic treatment before surgery [odds ratio (OR), 0.3; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.1-0.7] and prophylactic antibiotic treatment (OR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.5-1.1) conferred a reduction in gastric cancer risk. The reduction appeared stronger after 5 years (OR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.3-1.2) than during shorter follow-up after hip replacement (OR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.4-1.7). There was an apparent decrease in risk with increasing body weight-adjusted doses of antibiotics (P = 0.13). However, the rate of H. pylori antibody disappearance was not strikingly higher in the cohort of patients undergoing hip replacement than in a control cohort. Our findings provide indirect support for the hypothesis that treatment with antibiotics at a relatively advanced age reduces the risk of gastric cancer.

  • 46. Akre, O
    et al.
    Ekbom, A
    Sparén, Pär
    Södertörn University, Avdelning 4, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Tretli, S
    Body size and testicular cancer2000In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, ISSN 0027-8874, E-ISSN 1460-2105, Vol. 92, no 13, p. 1093-1096Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Albertsen, Birgitte Klug
    et al.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Children & Adolescent Hlth, Palle Juul Jensens Blvd 99, DK-8200 Aarhus N, Denmark.
    Harila-Saari, Arja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology.
    Jahnukainen, Kirsi
    Univ Helsinki, Childrens Hosp, Helsinki, Finland;Univ Helsinki, Cent Hosp, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lahteenmaki, Paivi
    Turku Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat & Adolescent Med, Turku, Finland;Turku Univ, Turku, Finland.
    Riikonen, Pekka
    Kuopio Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat, Kuopio, Finland.
    Mottonen, Merja
    Univ Oulu, PEDEGO Res Ctr, Oulu, Finland;Univ Oulu, Med Res Ctr Oulu, Oulu, Finland;Oulu Univ Hosp, Dept Children & Adolescents, Oulu, Finland.
    Lausen, Birgitte
    Univ Hosp, Rigshosp, Dept Pediat & Adolescent Med, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Asparaginase treatment in infants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia; pharmacokinetics and asparaginase hypersensitivity in Interfant-062019In: Leukemia and Lymphoma, ISSN 1042-8194, E-ISSN 1029-2403, Vol. 60, no 6, p. 1469-1475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a rare disease in infants. Asparaginase is an essential part of the treatment, and there Acute is a need to evaluate the efficiency and safety of this drug in this age group. We evaluated the pharmacokinetics of intramuscularly administered native E. coli asparaginase (Asparaginase Medac((R))) and PEG-asparaginase (Oncaspar((R))) as well as hypersensitivity reactions during treatment in Interfant-06 (www.clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01025804). All patients without hypersensitivity had sufficiently high enzyme activity levels during treatment with both preparations. Patients with hypersensitivity reactions during treatment, characterized by the presence of either or not of clinical symptoms and no measurable enzyme activity, received ineffective therapy. For optimization of the bad prognosis in infant ALL, therapeutic drug monitoring should be performed for identification of patients who should be switched to a different asparaginase preparation because of inactivation of the drug.

  • 48.
    Albrow, Rebecca
    et al.
    Sch Canc & Enabling Sci, Univ Manchester, Manchester, England.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kitchener, Henry
    Sch Canc & Enabling Sci, Univ Manchester, Manchester, England.
    Brabin, Loretta
    Sch Canc & Enabling Sci, Univ Manchester, Manchester, England.
    Patnick, Julietta
    NHS Canc Screening Programmes, Sheffield, England.
    Tishelman, Carol
    Med Management Ctr, Dept Learning Informat Management & Eth, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Törnberg, Sven
    Regional Cancer Center, Dept Cancer Screening, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sparen, Par
    Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Widmark, Catarina
    Med Management Ctr, Dept Learning Informat Management & Eth, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden; Dept Qual & Patient Safety, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Interventions to improve cervical cancer screening uptake amongst young women: A systematic review2014In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 445-451Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. In view of declining screening uptake in young women, this review aims to summarise the available evidence relating to interventions designed to increase cervical screening uptake amongst women aged <= 35 years.

    Methods. Electronic databases were searched and further articles located by manual searches. Study designs employing a valid comparison group and including women aged <= 35 years published through 2012 were considered. Data was extracted on the uptake from either screening programme statistics or as reported by the study subjects. A narrative synthesis was undertaken for each category of interventions identified.

    Results. Ninety-two records were screened with 36 articles retrieved for further assessment. Four studies met the inclusion criteria, two of which evaluated more than one intervention. One of the studies evaluated the use of a modified invitation letter and reported no significant increase in uptake compared to a standard invitation. Three studies investigated the use of a reminder letter, with two reporting a positive effect on screening uptake in women aged 24-34. Three studies were included which supported the use of physician and telephone reminders. One study on HPV self-sampling reported a positive effect when compared with a reminder letter.

    Conclusions. There is a lack of randomised controlled trials designed to specifically address falling cervical screening uptake in amongst young women. Cervical screening programmes need to look beyond the use of invitation/reminders letters in this group of women to develop interventions which attempt to overcome as many barriers to uptake as possible.

  • 49. Alcorn, S. R.
    et al.
    Nilsson, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Dieckmann, K.
    McNutt, T. R.
    Chen, M. J.
    Ermoian, R. P.
    Ford, E. C.
    MacDonald, S.
    Nechesnyuk, A.
    Tryggestad, E. J.
    Smith, K.
    Villar, R. C.
    Winey, B.
    Terezakis, S. A.
    Predictors of Setup Accuracy in Image-Guided CNS Radiation Therapy: Prospective Data From a Multinational Pediatrics Consortium2014In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, ISSN 0360-3016, E-ISSN 1879-355X, Vol. 90, no S1, p. S723-S723Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Alcorn, Sara
    et al.
    Johns Hopkins Sch Med, Dept Radiat Oncol & Mol Radiat Sci, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Nilsson, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Rao, Avani D.
    Johns Hopkins Sch Med, Dept Radiat Oncol & Mol Radiat Sci, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Ladra, Matthew M.
    Johns Hopkins Sch Med, Dept Radiat Oncol & Mol Radiat Sci, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Ermoian, Ralph P.
    Univ Washington, Dept Radiat Oncol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Villar, Rosangela C.
    Ctr Infantil Boldrini, Dept Radiat Oncol, Campinas, SP, Brazil.
    Chen, Michael J.
    Grp Apoio Adolescente & Crianca Canc, Dept Radiat, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Kobyzeva, Daria
    Fed Sci Clin Ctr Childrens Hematol Oncol & Immuno, Dept Radiotherapy, Moscow, Russia.
    Nechesnyuk, Alexey V.
    Fed Sci Clin Ctr Childrens Hematol Oncol & Immuno, Dept Radiotherapy, Moscow, Russia.
    Ford, Eric
    Univ Washington, Dept Radiat Oncol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    MacDonald, Shannon
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Radiat Oncol, Boston, MA 02114 USA.
    Winey, Brian
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Radiat Oncol, Boston, MA 02114 USA.
    Dieckmann, Karin
    Univ Klin Strahlentherapie & Strahlenbiol, Dept Radiat Oncol, Vienna, Austria.
    Terezakis, Stephanie A.
    Johns Hopkins Sch Med, Dept Radiat Oncol & Mol Radiat Sci, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Practice Patterns of Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Pediatrics: Results From an International Pediatric Research Consortium2018In: Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology (Print), ISSN 1077-4114, E-ISSN 1536-3678, Vol. 40, no 7, p. 522-526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose/Objectives: There is little consensus regarding the application of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) in pediatrics. We evaluated patterns of pediatric SRT practice through an international research consortium. Materials and Methods: Eight international institutions with pediatric expertise completed a 124-item survey evaluating patterns of SRT use for patients 21 years old and younger. Frequencies of SRT use and median margins applied with and without SRT were evaluated. Results: Across institutions, 75% reported utilizing SRT in pediatrics. SRT was used in 22% of brain, 18% of spine, 16% of other bone, 16% of head and neck, and <1% of abdomen/pelvis, lung, and liver cases across sites. Of the hypofractionated SRT cases, 42% were delivered with definitive intent. Median gross tumor volume to planning target volume margins for SRT versus non-SRT plans were 0.2 versus 1.4 cm for brain, 0.3 versus 1.5 cm for spine/other bone, 0.3 versus 2.0 cm for abdomen/pelvis, 0.7 versus 1.5 cm for head and neck, 0.5 versus 1.7 cm for lung, and 0.5 versus 2.0 cm for liver sites. Conclusions: SRT is commonly utilized in pediatrics across a range of treatment sites. Margins used for SRT were substantially smaller than for non-SRT planning, highlighting the utility of this approach in reducing treatment volumes.

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