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  • 1.
    Aaltonen, Kristina E.
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Rosendahl, Ann H.
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Malmstrom, Per
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hartman, Linda
    Lund University, Sweden; Regional Cancer Centre South, Sweden.
    Ferno, Marten
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Association between insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) negativity and poor prognosis in a cohort of women with primary breast cancer2014In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 14, no 794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Resistance towards endocrine therapy is a great concern in breast cancer treatment and may partly be explained by the activation of compensatory signaling pathways. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) signaling pathway was activated or deregulated in breast cancer patients and to explore if any of the markers were prognostic, with or without adjuvant tamoxifen. This signaling pathway has been suggested to cause estrogen independent cell growth and thus contribute to resistance to endocrine treatment in estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. Methods: The protein expression of IGF1R, phosphorylated Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (p-mTOR) and phosphorylated S6 ribosomal protein (p-S6rp) were investigated by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays in two patient cohorts. Cohort I (N = 264) consisted of mainly postmenopausal women with stage II breast cancer treated with tamoxifen for 2 years irrespective of ER status. Cohort II (N = 206) consisted of mainly medically untreated, premenopausal patients with node-negative breast cancer. Distant disease-free survival (DDFS) at 5 years was used as end-point for survival analyses. Results: We found that lower IGF1R expression was associated with worse prognosis for tamoxifen treated, postmenopausal women (HR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.52 - 0.94, p = 0.016). The effect was seen mainly in ER-negative patients where the prognostic effect was retained after adjustment for other prognostic markers (adjusted HR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.29 - 0.82, p = 0.007). Expression of IGF1R was associated with ER positivity (p less than 0.001) in the same patient cohort. Conclusions: Our results support previous studies indicating that IGF1R positivity reflects a well differentiated tumor with low metastatic capacity. An association between lack of IGF1R expression and worse prognosis was mainly seen in the ER-negative part of Cohort I. The lack of co-activation of downstream markers (p-mTOR and p-S6rp) in the IGF1R pathway suggested that the prognostic effect was not due to complete activation of this pathway. Thus, no evidence could be found for a compensatory function of IGF1R signaling in the investigated cohorts.

  • 2. Aanesen, Arthur
    et al.
    Westerbotn, Margareta
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Prospective study of a Swedish infertile cohort 2005-08: population characteristics, treatments and pregnancy rates2014In: Family Practice, ISSN 0263-2136, E-ISSN 1460-2229, Vol. 31, no 3, 290-7 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: We here report on results from a prospective study comprising 380 infertile couples undergoing infertility work-up and various treatments for infertility in our clinic. The aim was to investigate the overall birth rate as a result of different treatments, as well as spontaneous pregnancies.

    METHODS: Three hundred and eighty couples were consecutively included between December 2005 and May 2008. All couples underwent a fertility work-up, including hysterosalpingogram, hormonal characterization, clinical examination, screening for infectious diseases and semen analysis. The mean age of the women at the time of inclusion was 33.2 years. The mean duration of infertility prior to inclusion was 1.8 years. And 46.6% (n = 177) of the women had been pregnant prior to their first visit to the clinic and 30.0% (n = 114) had been pregnant earlier in their present relationship.

    RESULTS: As of November 2010, 57.3% (n = 218) of the women had given birth to a child when they were lost to follow up by the study. Spontaneous conception was observed in 11.3% (n = 43) of the women, 14.5% (n = 64) conceived after intrauterine insemination (IUI), 4.2% (n = 16) conceived after ovarian hyperstimulation and ovulation induction (OH/OI) and 28.4% (n = 113) after in vitro fertilization. There were 280 pregnancies and 58 spontaneous abortions (22.3%) in the group. Mean anti-mullerian hormone significantly correlated with antral follicle count and age and was significantly higher in the subgroup that became pregnant after IUI.

    CONCLUSIONS: Spontaneous pregnancies and IUI + OH/OI contributed significantly to the pregnancies observed in the total population. Predictive factors for pregnancy were anti-mullerian hormone in the group undergoing IUI treatment and in the age group ≥38-duration of infertility. Previous pregnancies, body mass index, estradiol, follicle stimulating hormone or having given birth prior to the infertility period were not predictive of pregnancy for the infertile couples in this study.

  • 3.
    Aanestad, Øystein
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Quantitative electromyographic studies of the perineal muscles in normal subjects and patients suffering from anal or urinary incontinence1998Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of the study were to characterize the interference pattern in perineal muscles in healthy subjects with the use of quantitative EMG techniques, to evaluate if prostatic surgery had any effect on the interference pattern and furthermore to examine the interference pattern in the perineal muscles in patients suffering from urinary or anal incontinence.

    The interference pattern in the perineal muscles was examined with a computerized analysis, the Turns and Amplitude (T/A) analysis, and the innervation pattern of the muscles was examined with single fiber electromyography measuring the fiber density. Reference values were collected from 30 normal subjects. The patient material consisted of 20 males subjected to transurethral prostatectomy (TUR-P), 10 males who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP), 20 patients suffering from anal incontinence and 24 women withurinary incontinence.

    T/A analysis of the interference pattern in the perineal muscles in normal subjects showed a significant increase in number of turns/sec and mean amplitude correlating to increasing force but no age-related changes.

    TUR-P and RRP did effect the innervation of the distal urethral sphincter muscle as shown by increased fiber density indicating a peripheral nerve lesion. T/A analysis did not shown any increased activation of the distal urethral sphincter as a compensation for the loss in bladder neck sphincter function but rather signs of decreasedcentral activation.

    Patients with idiopathic faecal incontinence showed signs of impaired innervation of the external anal sphincter muscle. A decreased interference pattern at maximal contraction indicated a reduced central activation of perineal muscles, in particular for patients with partial rupture of the external anal sphincter muscle. The reduced central activation could play a role for the aetiology of faecal incontinence.

    Patients with urinary stress incontinence also showed signs of impaired innervation of the external anal sphincter muscle as well as reduced interference pattern at maximal contraction and during continuous recording of the EMG activity during cystometry. A reduced central activation of the motor units was predicted as one factor involved in the aetiology.

  • 4.
    Aardal-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Mobäck, Caroline
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Jakobsson, Sandra
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Germany.
    Hoffmann, Johannes J. M. L.
    Abbott GmbH and Co KG, Germany.
    Iron depletion in blood donors - Have extended erythrocyte and reticulocyte parameters diagnostic utility?2015In: Transfusion and apheresis science, ISSN 1473-0502, E-ISSN 1878-1683, Vol. 53, no 1, 76-81 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Blood donation is associated with iron depletion, but donor iron status is not usually investigated, as such tests are cumbersome and costly. It would therefore be desirable to have simple, fast and inexpensive tests that give information on a donors risk of developing iron depletion. In a pilot study we investigated whether novel erythrocyte and reticulocyte parameters can serve this goal. Methods: In regular blood donors extended red cell parameters were measured using the Abbott CELL-DYN Sapphire hematology analyzer and conventional biochemical tests of iron status. Donors were compared with a regionally matched group of non-donating controls. Results: In the controls, the reference ranges of extended RBC parameters were well comparable to published data. Donors had significantly more microcytic RBC than controls (median 0.9 vs 0.6%), lower serum ferritin concentration (median 43 vs 91 mg/L) and higher soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin index (median 1.60 vs 1.27). Overall 18-28% of the donors were iron depleted. Moreover, 3.3% of donors had iron-restricted erythropoiesis. Microcytic RBC and reticulocyte mean cell hemoglobin content predicted iron depletion with 70% and 64% sensitivities and specificities of 72% and 78%, respectively. When combined these two parameters increased the sensitivity to 82%. Conclusions: Our results in Swedish blood donors confirm a high prevalence of iron depletion, despite iron supplementation used by about half of the donors. Microcytic RBC and MCHr appeared to be helpful in identifying iron-depleted donors, who might benefit from iron supplementation. We recommend larger prospective investigations in order to confirm and extend the findings of this pilot study. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    Aare, Sudhakar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Ochala, Julien
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Norman, Holly S
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Radell, Peter
    Eriksson, Lars I
    Göransson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Chen, Yi-Wen
    Hoffman, Eric P
    Larsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Mechanisms underlying the sparing of masticatory versus limb muscle function in an experimental critical illness model2011In: Physiological Genomics, ISSN 1094-8341, E-ISSN 1531-2267, Vol. 43, no 24, 1334-1350 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acute quadriplegic myopathy (AQM) is a common debilitating acquired disorder in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients which is characterized by tetraplegia/generalized weakness of limb and trunk muscles. Masticatory muscles, on the other hand, are typically spared or less affected, yet the mechanisms underlying this striking muscle-specific difference remain unknown. This study aims to evaluate physiological parameters and the gene expression profiles of masticatory and limb muscles exposed to factors suggested to trigger AQM, such as mechanical ventilation, immobilization, neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA), corticosteroids (CS) and sepsis for five days by using a unique porcine model mimicking the ICU conditions. Single muscle fiber cross-sectional area and force-generating capacity, i.e., maximum force normalized to fiber cross-sectional area (specific force), revealed maintained masseter single muscle fiber cross-sectional area and specific-force after five days exposure to all triggering factors. This is in sharp contrast to observations in limb and trunk muscles, showing a dramatic decline in specific force in response to five days exposure to the triggering factors. Significant differences in gene expression were observed between craniofacial and limb muscles, indicating a highly complex and muscle specific response involving transcription and growth factors, heat shock proteins, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, oxidative stress responsive elements and sarcomeric proteins underlying the relative sparing of cranial versus spinal nerve innervated muscles during exposure to the ICU intervention.

  • 6.
    Aarts, Clara
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Exclusive breastfeeding-Does it make a difference?: A longitudinal, prospective study of daily feeding practices, health and growth in a sample of Swedish infants2001Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of exclusive breastfeeding in relation to daily feeding practices and to health and growth of infants in an affluent society was examined. In a descriptive longitudinal prospective study 506 mother-infant pairs were followed from birth through the greater part of the first year. Feeding was recorded daily, and health and growth were recorded fortnightly.

    Large individual variations were seen in breastfeeding patterns. A wide discrepancy between the exclusive breastfeeding rates obtained from "current status" data and data "since birth" was found.

    Using a strict definition of exclusive breastfeeding from birth and taking into account the reasons for giving complementary feeding, the study showed that many exclusively breastfed infants had infections early in life, the incidence of which increased with age, despite continuation of exclusive breastfeeding. However, truly exclusively breastfed infants seem less likely to suffer infections than infants who receive formula in addition to breast milk. Increasing formula use was associated with an increasing likelihood of suffering respiratory illnesses. The growth of exclusively breastfed infants was similar to that of infants who were not exclusively breastfed.

    The health of newborn infants during the first year of life was associated with factors other than feeding practices alone. Some of these factors may be prenatal, since increasing birth weight was associated with an increasing likelihood of having respiratory symptoms, even in exclusively breastfed infants. However, exclusive breastfeeding was shown to be beneficial for the health of the infant even in an affluent society.

  • 7.
    Aasa, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics. Norrlandsklinikens hälsocentral, Umeå, Sweden.
    Berglund, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Michaelson, Peter
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Avdelningen för hälsa och rehabilitering, Fysioterapi.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Individualized low-load motor control exercises and education versus a high-load lifting exercise and education to improve activity, pain intensity, and physical performance in patients with low back pain: a randomized controlled trial2015In: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, ISSN 0190-6011, E-ISSN 1938-1344, Vol. 45, no 2, 77-85 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Design Randomized controlled trial. Background Low back pain is a common disorder. Patients with low back pain frequently have aberrant and pain-provocative movement patterns that often are addressed with motor control exercises. Objective To compare the effects of low-load motor control (LMC) exercise and those of a high-load lifting (HLL) exercise. Methods Seventy participants with recurrent low back pain, who were diagnosed with nociceptive mechanical pain as their dominating pain pattern, were randomized to either LMC or HLL exercise treatments. Participants were offered 12 treatment sessions over an 8-week period. All participants were also provided with education regarding pain mechanisms. Methods Participants were assessed prior to and following treatment. The primary outcome measures were activity (the Patient-Specific Functional Scale) and average pain intensity over the last 7 days (visual analog scale). The secondary outcome measure was a physical performance test battery that included 1 strength, 3 endurance, and 7 movement control tests for the lumbopelvic region. Results Both interventions resulted in significant within-group improvements in pain intensity, strength, and endurance. The LMC group showed significantly greater improvement on the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (4.2 points) compared with the HLL group (2.5 points) (P<.001). There were no significant between-group differences in pain intensity (P = .505), strength, and 1 of the 3 endurance tests. However, the LMC group showed an increase (from 2.9 to 5.9) on the movement control test subscale, whereas the HLL group showed no change (from 3.9 to 3.1) (P<.001). Conclusion An LMC intervention may result in superior outcomes in activity, movement control, and muscle endurance compared to an HLL intervention, but not in pain intensity, strength, or endurance.

  • 8.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Lundell, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Aasa, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics. Norrlandskliniken, Umeå, Sweden.
    Westerståhl, Maria
    Institutionen för laboratoriemedicin, Karolinska institutet.
    Physical Activity Might Be of Greater Importance for Good Spinal Control Than If You Have Had Pain or Not: A Longitudinal Study2015In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 40, no 24, 1926-1933 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY DESIGN: Longitudinal design. A cohort followed in 3 waves of data collection.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to describe the relationships between the performance of 2 tests of spinal control at the age of 52 years and low back pain, physical activity level, and fitness earlier in life, as well as to describe the cross-sectional relationships between these measures.

    SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Altered spinal control has been linked to pain; however, other stimuli may also lead to inability to control the movements of the spine.

    METHODS: Participants answered questions about physical activity and low back pain, and performed physical fitness tests at the age of 16, 34, and 52 years. The fitness test battery included tests of endurance in the back and abdominal muscles, a submaximal bicycle ergometer test to estimate maximal oxygen uptake, and measurements of hip flexion, thoracic spine flexibility, and anthropometrics. Two tests were aggregated to a physical fitness index. At the age of 52, also 2 tests of spinal control, the standing Waiter's bow (WB) and the supine double leg lower (LL) were performed.

    RESULTS: Logistic regression analyses showed that higher back muscle endurance at the age of 34 years could positively predict WB performance at 52 years and higher physical fitness at the age of 34 could positively predict LL performance at 52 years. Regarding cross-sectional relationships, an inability to perform the WB correctly was associated with lower physical fitness, flexibility and physical activity, and larger waist circumference. An inability to correctly perform the LL was associated with lower physical fitness. One-year prevalence of pain was not significantly associated with WB or LL test performance.

    CONCLUSION: An active life resulting in higher physical fitness is related to better spinal control in middle-aged men and women. This further strengthens the importance of physical activity throughout the life span.

    LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 3.

  • 9.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Wiitavaara, Birgitta
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences.
    Personalens hälsa och arbetsmiljö2016In: Prehospital akutsjukvård / [ed] Björn-Ove Suserud, Lars Lundberg, Stockholm: Liber, 2016, 2, 72-79 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Aase, Audun
    et al.
    Norwegian Institute Public Heatlh, Norway.
    Hajdusek, Ondrej
    Academic Science Czech Republic, Czech Republic.
    Oines, Oivind
    Norwegian Vet Institute, Norway.
    Quarsten, Hanne
    Sorlandet Hospital Health Enterprise, Norway.
    Wilhelmsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Herstad, Tove K.
    Norwegian Institute Public Heatlh, Norway.
    Kjelland, Vivian
    University of Agder, Norway; Sorlandet Hospital Health Enterprise, Norway.
    Sima, Radek
    Academic Science Czech Republic, Czech Republic.
    Jalovecka, Marie
    Academic Science Czech Republic, Czech Republic.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Aaberge, Ingeborg S.
    Norwegian Institute Public Heatlh, Norway.
    Validate or falsify: Lessons learned from a microscopy method claimed to be useful for detecting Borrelia and Babesia organisms in human blood2016In: INFECTIOUS DISEASES, ISSN 2374-4235, Vol. 48, no 6, 411-419 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background A modified microscopy protocol (the LM-method) was used to demonstrate what was interpreted as Borrelia spirochetes and later also Babesia sp., in peripheral blood from patients. The method gained much publicity, but was not validated prior to publication, which became the purpose of this study using appropriate scientific methodology, including a control group. Methods Blood from 21 patients previously interpreted as positive for Borrelia and/or Babesia infection by the LM-method and 41 healthy controls without known history of tick bite were collected, blinded and analysed for these pathogens by microscopy in two laboratories by the LM-method and conventional method, respectively, by PCR methods in five laboratories and by serology in one laboratory. Results Microscopy by the LM-method identified structures claimed to be Borrelia- and/or Babesia in 66% of the blood samples of the patient group and in 85% in the healthy control group. Microscopy by the conventional method for Babesia only did not identify Babesia in any samples. PCR analysis detected Borrelia DNA in one sample of the patient group and in eight samples of the control group; whereas Babesia DNA was not detected in any of the blood samples using molecular methods. Conclusions The structures interpreted as Borrelia and Babesia by the LM-method could not be verified by PCR. The method was, thus, falsified. This study underlines the importance of doing proper test validation before new or modified assays are introduced.

  • 11. Aavik, Einari
    et al.
    Lumivuori, Henri
    Leppänen, Olli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Wirth, Thomas
    Hakkinen, Sanna-Kaisa
    Braesen, Jan-Hinrich
    Beschorner, Ulrich
    Zeller, Thomas
    Braspenning, Maarten
    van Criekinge, Wim
    Makinen, Kimmo
    Yla-Herttuala, Seppo
    Global DNA methylation analysis of human atherosclerotic plaques reveals extensive genomic hypomethylation and reactivation at imprinted locus 14q32 involving induction of a miRNA cluster2015In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, no 16, 993-U23 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Genetics can explain just above 10% of the observed heritability in cardiovascular diseases. Epigenetics is about to provide some further explanations, but the information needed for that is in the accumulation phase. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis has revealed thousands of genes, which are epigenetically differentially regulated in atherosclerotic plaques. Our results point to an additional level of complexity that needs to be integrated into the aetiology of atherogenesis.We conducted a genome-wide analysis to identify differentially methylated genes in atherosclerotic lesions. Methods DNA methylation at promoters, exons and introns was identified by massive parallel sequencing. Gene expression was analysed by microarrays, qPCR, immunohistochemistry and western blots. Results Globally, hypomethylation of chromosomal DNA predominates in atherosclerotic plaques and two-thirds of genes showing over 2.5-fold differential in DNA methylation are up-regulated in comparison to healthy mammary arteries. The imprinted chromatin locus 14q32 was identified for the first time as an extensively hypomethylated area in atherosclerosis with highly induced expression of miR127, -136, -410, -431, -432, -433 and capillary formation-associated gene RTL1. The top 100 list of hypomethylated promoters exhibited over 1000-fold enrichment for miRNAs, many of which mapped to locus 14q32. Unexpectedly, also gene body hypermethylation was found to correlate with stimulated mRNA expression. Conclusion Significant changes in genomic methylation were identified in atherosclerotic lesions. The most prominent gene cluster activated via hypomethylation was detected at imprinted chromosomal locus 14q32 with several clustered miRNAs that were up-regulated. These results suggest that epigenetic changes are involved in atherogenesis and may offer new potential therapeutic targets for vascular diseases.

  • 12.
    Abad-Gurumeta, A.
    et al.
    Hosp Univ la Paz, Dept Anaesthesia, Madrid, Spain.
    Ripolles-Melchor, J.
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Hosp Univ Infanta Leonor, Dept Anaesthesia, Madrid, Spain.
    Casans-Frances, R.
    Hosp Clin Univ Lozano Blesa, Dept Anaesthesia, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Espinosa, A.
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Anaesthesia, Orebro, Sweden.
    Martinez-Hurtado, E.
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Hosp Univ Infanta Leonor, Dept Anaesthesia, Madrid, Spain.
    Fernandez-Perez, C.
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Dept Consultant Prevent Med & Publ Hlth, Madrid, Spain.
    Ramirez, J. M.
    Univ Zaragoza, Dept Colorectal Surg, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Lopez-Timoneda, F.
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Hosp Clin San Carlos, Dept Anaesthesia, Madrid, Spain.
    Calvo-Vecino, J. M.
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Hosp Univ Infanta Leonor, Dept Anaesthesia, Madrid, Spain.
    A systematic review of sugammadex vs neostigmine for reversal of neuromuscular blockade2015In: Anaesthesia, ISSN 0003-2409, E-ISSN 1365-2044, Vol. 70, no 12, 1441-1452 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We reviewed systematically sugammadex vs neostigmine for reversing neuromuscular blockade. We included 17 randomised controlled trials with 1553 participants. Sugammadex reduced all signs of residual postoperative paralysis, relative risk (95% CI) 0.46 (0.29-0.71), p=0.0004 and minor respiratory events, relative risk (95% CI) 0.51 (0.32-0.80), p=0.0034. There was no difference in critical respiratory events, relative risk (95% CI) 0.13 (0.02-1.06), p=0.06. Sugammadex reduced drug-related side-effects, relative risk (95% CI) 0.72 (0.54-0.95), p=0.02. There was no difference in the rate of postoperative nausea or the rate of postoperative vomiting, relative risk (95% CI) 0.94 (0.79-1.13), p=0.53, and 0.87 (0.65-1.17), p=0.36 respectively.

  • 13.
    Abate, E.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. University of Gondar, Ethiopia.
    Elias, D.
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Getachew, A.
    University of Gondar, Ethiopia.
    Alemu, S.
    University of Gondar, Ethiopia.
    Diro, E.
    University of Gondar, Ethiopia.
    Britton, S.
    Karolinska Hospital, Sweden.
    Aseffa, A.
    Armauer Hansen Research Institute, Ethiopia.
    Stendahl, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Schön, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Effects of albendazole on the clinical outcome and immunological responses in helminth co-infected tuberculosis patients: a double blind randomised clinical trial2015In: International Journal of Parasitology, ISSN 0020-7519, E-ISSN 1879-0135, Vol. 45, no 2-3, 133-140 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite several review papers and experimental studies concerning the impact of chronic helminth infection on tuberculosis in recent years, there is a scarcity of data from clinical field studies in highly endemic areas for these diseases. We believe this is the first randomised clinical trial investigating the impact of albendazole treatment on the clinical and immunological outcomes of helminth co-infected tuberculosis patients. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of albendazole (400 mg per day for 3 days) in helminth-positive tuberculosis patients was conducted in Gondar, Ethiopia. The primary outcome was clinical improvement (Delta TB score) after 2 months. Among secondary outcomes were changes in the levels of eosinophils, CD4+ T cells, regulatory T cells, IFN-gamma, IL-5 and IL-10 after 3 months. A total of 140 helminth co-infected tuberculosis patients were included with an HIV co-infection rate of 22.8%. There was no significant effect on the primary outcome (Delta TB score: 5.6 +/- 2.9 for albendazole versus 5.9 +/- 2.5 for placebo, P = 0.59). The albendazole-treated group showed a decline in eosinophil cells (P = 0.001) and IL-10 (P = 0.017) after 3 months. In an exploratory analysis after 12 weeks, the albendazole treated group showed a trend towards weight gain compared with the placebo group (11.2 +/- 8.5 kg versus 8.2 +/- 8.7 kg, P = 0.08)). The reductions in eosinophil counts and IL-10 show that asymptomatic helminth infection significantly affects host immunity during tuberculosis and can be effectively reversed by albendazole treatment. The clinical effects of helminth infection on chronic infectious diseases such as tuberculosis merit further characterisation. (C) 2014 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 14.
    Abbas, Ashraf H.
    et al.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Dept., Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Dept., Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Adly, Osama A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Dept., Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elbadawy, Mohamed A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Dept., Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Moati, Taha Ali
    General Surgery department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Aesthetic Outcome After Reconstruction of Complex SoftTissue Defects with Free Antero-Lateral Thigh Flap UsingSimple Equipment2015In: Journal of surgery, ISSN 2330-0914, Vol. 3, no 2-1, 36-41 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: We aimed to assess the aesthetic outcome of surgical reconstruction by free ALT flap using binocular single-refraction magnifying glasses and a modified post- operative surveillance protocol. Methods: 16 patients were operated for free antero-lateral thigh flap to reconstruct complex soft tissue defects with a close clinical follow up protocol for post operative care depending on the attending personnel in the Plastic surgery unit, Suez Canal University hospital, Ismailia, Egypt. Aesthetic outcome was assessed using a questionnaire based on Posch et al. 2005, including the following items colour, contour, presence of hair, overall appearance and donor site scar. Results: The patients’ assessed aesthetic outcome was acceptable in majority of the cases; median score was 4 for all assessed items. Complete flap loss occurred in one case, other complications as arterial thrombosis and hematomas and infection were detected and managed accordingly with flap salvage in the 3 complicated cases. Conclusion: The result suggests that the proposed protocol is sufficient as an alternative. The aesthetic outcome assessed by the patient and the failure rate was in line with other studies.

  • 15. Abbas, S
    et al.
    Linseisen, J
    Rohrmann, S
    Beulens, JWJ
    Buijsse, B
    Amiano, P
    Ardanaz, E
    Balkau, B
    Boeing, H
    Clavel-Chapelon, F
    Fagherazzi, G
    Franks, Paul W
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Gavrila, D
    Grioni, S
    Kaaks, R
    Key, TJ
    Khaw, KT
    Kuehn, T
    Mattiello, A
    Molina-Montes, E
    Nilsson, PM
    Overvad, K
    Quiros, JR
    Rolandsson, Olov
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Sacerdote, C
    Saieva, C
    Slimani, N
    Sluijs, I
    Spijkerman, AMW
    Tjonneland, A
    Tumino, R
    van der A, DL
    Zamora-Ros, R
    Sharp, SJ
    Langenberg, C
    Forouhi, NG
    Riboli, E
    Wareham, NJ
    Dietary vitamin D intake and risk of type 2 diabetes in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition: the EPIC-InterAct study2014In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 68, no 2, 196-202 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Prospective cohort studies have indicated that serum vitamin D levels are inversely related to risk of type 2 diabetes. However, such studies cannot determine the source of vitamin D. Therefore, we examined the association of dietary vitamin D intake with incident type 2 diabetes within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-InterAct study in a heterogeneous European population including eight countries with large geographical variation.

    SUBJECTS/METHODS: Using a case-cohort design, 11 245 incident cases of type 2 diabetes and a representative subcohort (N = 15 798) were included in the analyses. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for type 2 diabetes were calculated using a Prentice-weighted Cox regression adjusted for potential confounders. Twenty-four-hour diet-recall data from a subsample (N = 2347) were used to calibrate habitual intake data derived from dietary questionnaires.

    RESULTS: Median follow-up time was 10.8 years. Dietary vitamin D intake was not significantly associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes. HR and 95% CIs for the highest compared to the lowest quintile of uncalibrated vitamin D intake was 1.09 (0.97-1.22) (P-trend = 0.17). No associations were observed in a sex-specific analysis. The overall pooled effect (HR (95% CI)) using the continuous calibrated variable was 1.00 (0.97-1.03) per increase of 1 mg/day dietary vitamin D.

    CONCLUSIONS: This observational study does not support an association between higher dietary vitamin D intake and type 2 diabetes incidence. This result has to be interpreted in light of the limited contribution of dietary vitamin D on the overall vitamin D status of a person.

  • 16. Abbas, Sascha
    et al.
    Linseisen, Jakob
    Rohrmann, Sabine
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    Peeters, Petra H
    Engel, Pierre
    Brustad, Magritt
    Lund, Eiliv
    Skeie, Guri
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Overvad, Kim
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Boeing, Heiner
    Buijsse, Brian
    Adarakis, George
    Ouranos, Vassilis
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Masala, Giovanna
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Buckland, Genevieve
    Suárez, Marcial Vicente Argüelles
    Sánchez, Maria-José
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Amiano, Pilar
    Manjer, Jonas
    Wirfält, Elisabet
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B
    van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nick
    Key, Timothy J
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Gallo, Valentina
    Norat, Teresa
    Wark, Petra A
    Riboli, Elio
    Dietary intake of vitamin d and calcium and breast cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition2013In: Nutrition and Cancer, ISSN 0163-5581, E-ISSN 1532-7914, Vol. 65, no 2, 178-187 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies assessing the effects of vitamin D or calcium intake on breast cancer risk have been inconclusive. Furthermore, few studies have evaluated them jointly. This study is the largest so far examining the association of dietary vitamin D and calcium intake with breast cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. During a mean follow-up of 8.8 yr, 7760 incident invasive breast cancer cases were identified among 319,985 women. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for pre- and postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Comparing the highest with the lowest quintile of vitamin D intake, HR and 95% CI were 1.07 (0.87-1.32) and 1.02 (0.90-1.16) for pre- and postmenopausal women, respectively. The corresponding HR and 95% CIs for calcium intake were 0.98 (0.80-1.19) and 0.90 (0.79-1.02), respectively. For calcium intake in postmenopausal women, the test for trend was borderline statistically significant (P(trend) = 0.05). There was no significant interaction between vitamin D and calcium intake and cancer risk (P(interaction) = 0.57 and 0.22 in pre- and postmenopausal women, respectively). In this large prospective cohort, we found no evidence for an association between dietary vitamin D or calcium intake and breast cancer risk.

  • 17.
    Abbasinejad Enger, Shirin
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Dosimetry Studies of Different Radiotherapy Applications using Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Calculations2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing radiation delivery systems for optimisation of absorbed dose to the target without normal tissue toxicity requires advanced calculations for transport of radiation. In this thesis absorbed dose and fluence in different radiotherapy applications were calculated by using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations.

    In paper I-III external neutron activation of gadolinium (Gd) for intravascular brachytherapy (GdNCB) and tumour therapy (GdNCT) was investigated. MC codes MCNP and GEANT4 were compared. MCNP was chosen for neutron capture reaction calculations. Gd neutron capture reaction includes both very short range (Auger electrons) and long range (IC electrons and gamma) products. In GdNCB the high-energetic gamma gives an almost flat absorbed dose delivery pattern, up to 4 mm around the stent. Dose distribution at the edges and inside the stent may prevent stent edge and in-stent restenosis. For GdNCT the absorbed dose from prompt gamma will dominate over the dose from IC and Auger electrons in an in vivo situation. The absorbed dose from IC electrons will enhance the total absorbed dose in the tumours and contribute to the cell killing.

    In paper IV a model for calculation of inter-cluster cross-fire radiation dose from β-emitting radionuclides in a breast cancer model was developed. GEANT4 was used for obtaining absorbed dose. The dose internally in cells binding the isotope (self-dose) increased with decreasing β-energy except for the radionuclides with substantial amounts of conversion electrons and Auger electrons. An effective therapy approach may be a combination of radionuclides where the high self-dose from nuclides with low β-energy should be combined with the inter-cell cluster cross-fire dose from high energy β-particles.

    In paper V MC simulations using correlated sampling together with importance sampling were used to calculate spectra perturbations in detector volumes caused by the detector silicon chip and its encapsulation. Penelope and EGSnrc were used and yielded similar results. The low energy part of the electron spectrum increased but to a less extent if the silicon detector was encapsulated in low z-materials.

  • 18. Abbott, A. L.
    et al.
    Adelman, M. A.
    Alexandrov, A. V.
    Barnett, H. J. M.
    Beard, J.
    Bell, P.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Blacker, D.
    Buckley, C. J.
    Cambria, R. P.
    Comerota, A. J.
    Connolly, E. S., Jr.
    Davies, A. H.
    Eckstein, H. H.
    Faruqi, R.
    Fraedrich, G.
    Gloviczki, P.
    Hankey, G. J.
    Harbaugh, R. E.
    Heldenberg, E.
    Kittner, S. J.
    Kleinig, T. J.
    Mikhailidis, D. P.
    Moore, W. S.
    Naylor, R.
    Nicolaides, A.
    Paraskevas, K. I.
    Pelz, D. M.
    Prichard, J. W.
    Purdie, G.
    Ricco, J. B.
    Riles, T.
    Rothwell, P.
    Sandercock, P.
    Sillesen, H.
    Spence, J. D.
    Spinelli, F.
    Tan, A.
    Thapar, A.
    Veith, F. J.
    Zhou, W.
    Why the United States Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Should not Extend Reimbursement Indications for Carotid Artery Angioplasty/Stenting2012In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, ISSN 1078-5884, E-ISSN 1532-2165, Vol. 43, no 3, 247-251 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Abbott, Allan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    The Coping Strategy Questionnaire2010In: Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 1836-9553, E-ISSN 1836-9561, Vol. 56, no 1, 63-63 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Orthopaedics, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm , Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Department of Orthopaedics, Institute for Clinical Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tyni-Lenné, Raija
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Patient’s experience post-lumbar fusion regarding back problems, recovery and expectations in terms of the international classification of functioning, disability and health.2011In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 33, no 15-16, 1399-1408 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To describe within the context of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), patient's experiences post-lumber fusion regarding back problems, recovery and expectations of rehabilitation and to contrast with the content of outcome measures and the ICF low back pain (LBP) core sets.

    METHODS:

    The study has a cross-sectional and retrospective design and involves 20 lumbar fusion patients. Using the ICF, qualitative content analysis of semi-structured interviews 3-6 months post-surgery was performed. This was compared with the ICF related content of the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Medical Outcome Study Short Form 36 (SF-36), European Quality of Life Questionnaire (EQ5D) and the ICF LBP core sets.

    RESULTS:

    Patient's experiences were most frequently linked to psychological, sensory, neuromusculoskeletal and movement related body function chapters of the ICF. The most frequently linked categories of activity and participation were mobility, domestic activities, family relationships, work, recreation and leisure. Environmental factors frequently linked were the use of analgesics, walking aids, family support, social security systems, health care systems and labour market employment services.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    This study highlights important ICF related aspects of patient's experiences post-lumber fusion. The use of the comprehensive ICF core sets is recommended in conjunction with ODI, SF-36 and the EQ5D for a broader analysis of patient outcomes post-lumbar fusion.

  • 21.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Bond University, Gold Coast, Australia.
    Möller, Hans
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gerdhem, Paul
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    CONTRAIS: CONservative TReatment for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: a randomised controlled trial protocol2013In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 14, 261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Idiopathic scoliosis is a three-dimensional structural deformity of the spine that occurs in children and adolescents. Recent reviews on bracing and exercise treatment have provided some evidence for effect of these interventions. The purpose of this study is to improve the evidence base regarding the effectiveness of conservative treatments for preventing curve progression in idiopathic scoliosis.

    Methods/design:

    Patients: Previously untreated girls and boys with idiopathic scoliosis, 9 to 17 years of age with at least one year of remaining growth and a curve Cobb angle of 25–40 degrees will be included. A total of 135 participants will be randomly allocated in groups of 45 patients each to receive one of the three interventions.Interventions: All three groups will receive a physical activity prescription according to the World Health Organisation recommendations. One group will additionally wear a hyper-corrective night-time brace. One group will additionally perform postural scoliosis-specific exercises.Outcome: Participation in the study will last until the curve has progressed, or until cessation of skeletal growth. Outcome variables will be measured every 6 months. The primary outcome variable, failure of treatment, is defined as progression of the Cobb angle more than 6 degrees, compared to the primary x-ray, seen on two consecutive spinal standing x-rays taken with 6 months interval. Secondary outcome measures include the SRS-22r and EQ5D-Y quality of life questionnaires, the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) short form, and Cobb angle atend of the study.

    Discussion:This trial will evaluate which of the tested conservative treatment approaches that is the most effective for patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Trial registration: NCT01761305

  • 22.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital; Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Orthopaedics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tyni-Lenné, Raija
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Department for Orthopaedics, Institute for Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Early rehabilitation targeting cognition, behaviour and motor function after lumbar fusion: A randomized controlled trial2010In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 35, no 8, 848-857 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Design - Open label randomized controlled trial with 3-, 6-, 12-month, and 2- to 3-year follow-up.

    Objective - To investigate the effectiveness of a psychomotor therapy focusing on cognition, behavior, and motor relearning compared with exercise therapy applied during the first 3 months after lumbar fusion.

    Summary of Background Data - Postoperative management after lumbar fusion commonly focuses on analgesic pain control and activities of daily living. After 3 months, exercise therapy is often implemented. No randomized controlled trial has investigated early rehabilitation techniques conducted during the first 3 months after surgery.

    Methods - The study recruited 107 patients, aged 18 to 65 years, selected for lumbar fusion because of 12 months of symptomatic spinal stenosis, spondylosis, degenerative/isthmic spondylolisthesis, or degenerative disc disease. The exercise therapy group received a home program focusing on pain contingent training of back, abdominal, and leg muscle functional strength and endurance, stretching, and cardiovascular fitness. The psychomotor therapy group received a home program and 3 outpatient sessions focusing on modifying maladaptive pain cognitions, behaviors, and motor control. Rated questionnaires investigating functional disability, pain, health-related quality of life, functional self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, fear of movement/(re)injury, and coping were assessed at 3, 6, 12 months, and 2 to 3 years after surgery.

    Results - Follow-up rates were 93% at 12 months and 81% at 2 to 3 years after surgery. Psychomotor therapy improved functional disability, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and fear of movement/(re)injury significantly more than exercise therapy at respective follow-up occasions. Similar results occurred for pain coping but group differences were nonsignificant at 2 to 3 years follow-up. Potentially clinical relevant higher reoperation rates occurred after psychomotor therapy but rates were within normal ranges.

    Conclusion - The study shows that postoperative rehabilitation can be safely implemented during the first 3 months after lumbar fusion and should include measures to modify psychological as well as motor functions.

  • 23.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Orthopaedics, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tyni-Lenné, Raija
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Department for Orthopaedics, Institute for Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Leg pain and psychological variables predict outcome 2-3 years after lumber fusion surgery2011In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 20, no 10, 1626-1634 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prediction studies testing a thorough range of psychological variables in addition to demographic, work-related and clinical variables are lacking in lumbar fusion surgery research. This prospective cohort study aimed at examining predictions of functional disability, back pain and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) 2-3 years after lumbar fusion by regressing nonlinear relations in a multivariate predictive model of pre-surgical variables. Before and 2-3 years after lumbar fusion surgery, patients completed measures investigating demographics, work-related variables, clinical variables, functional self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, fear of movement/(re)injury, mental health and pain coping. Categorical regression with optimal scaling transformation, elastic net regularization and bootstrapping were used to investigate predictor variables and address predictive model validity. The most parsimonious and stable subset of pre-surgical predictor variables explained 41.6, 36.0 and 25.6% of the variance in functional disability, back pain intensity and HRQOL 2-3 years after lumbar fusion. Pre-surgical control over pain significantly predicted functional disability and HRQOL. Pre-surgical catastrophizing and leg pain intensity significantly predicted functional disability and back pain while the pre-surgical straight leg raise significantly predicted back pain. Post-operative psychomotor therapy also significantly predicted functional disability while pre-surgical outcome expectations significantly predicted HRQOL. For the median dichotomised classification of functional disability, back pain intensity and HRQOL levels 2-3 years post-surgery, the discriminative ability of the prediction models was of good quality. The results demonstrate the importance of pre-surgical psychological factors, leg pain intensity, straight leg raise and post-operative psychomotor therapy in the predictions of functional disability, back pain and HRQOL-related outcomes.

  • 24.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Orthopaedics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tyni-Lenné, Raija
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Institute for Clinical Sciences, Department for Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The influence of psychological factors on pre-operative levels of pain intensity, disability and HRQOL in lumbar spinal fusion surgery patients2010In: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 96, no 3, 213-221 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    To assess the extent to which perceived pain and psychological factors explain levels of disability and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients scheduled for lumbar fusion surgery, and to test the hypothesis that relationships between pain intensity, mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, disability and HRQOL are mediated by cognitive beliefs and appraisals.

    DESIGN:

    Cross-sectional, correlation study.

    SETTING:

    Orthopaedic outpatient setting in a tertiary hospital.

    PARTICIPANTS:

    One hundred and seven chronic back pain patients scheduled for lumbar fusion surgery.

    MEASURES:

    Visual analogue scale for pain intensity, Short Form 36 mental health subscale, Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, Back Beliefs Questionnaire, Self-efficacy Scale, Coping Strategy Questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Index and European Quality of Life Questionnaire.

    RESULTS:

    The group effect of multiple mediators significantly influenced the relationships between pain intensity and mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, functional disability and HRQOL. Pain catastrophising significantly mediated the relationship between pain intensity and mental health, control over pain significantly mediated the relationship between mental health and functional disability, self-efficacy and pain outcome expectancy significantly mediated the relationship between mental health and HRQOL, and self-efficacy also significantly mediated the relationship between pain intensity, fear of movement/(re)jury and functional disability. The model explained 28, 30, 52 and 42% of the variation in mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, functional disability and HRQOL, respectively.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    This study highlights the strong influence and mediation roles of psychological factors on pain, mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, disability and HRQOL in patients scheduled for lumber fusion. Future research should focus on screening as well as pre- and post-operative interventions based on these psychological factors for the potential improvement of lumber fusion surgery outcomes.

    Copyright 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 25. Abbott, Anne L.
    et al.
    Adelman, Mark A.
    Alexandrov, Andrei V.
    Barnett, Henry J. M.
    Beard, Jonathan
    Bell, Peter
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Blacker, David
    Buckley, Clifford J.
    Cambria, Richard P.
    Comerota, Anthony J.
    Connolly, E. Sander
    Davies, Alun H.
    Eckstein, Hans-Henning
    Faruqi, Rishad
    Fraedrich, Gustav
    Gloviczki, Peter
    Hankey, Graeme J.
    Harbaugh, Robert E.
    Heldenberg, Eitan
    Kittner, Steven J.
    Kleinig, Timothy J.
    Mikhailidis, Dimitri P.
    Moore, Wesley S.
    Naylor, Ross
    Nicolaides, Andrew
    Paraskevas, Kosmas I.
    Pelz, David M.
    Prichard, James W.
    Purdie, Grant
    Ricco, Jean-Baptiste
    Riles, Thomas
    Rothwell, Peter
    Sandercock, Peter
    Sillesen, Henrik
    Spence, J. David
    Spinelli, Francesco
    Tan, Aaron
    Thapar, Ankur
    Veith, Frank J.
    Zhou, Wei
    Why the United States Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services should not extend reimbursement indications for carotid artery angioplasty/stenting2012In: VASCULAR, ISSN 1708-5381, Vol. 20, no 1, 1-7 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Abd Al Qahar Al-Kubaisy, Waqar
    et al.
    MARA University of Technology, Sungai Buloh, Malaysia; MARA University of Technology UiTM, Malaysia.
    Jawad Obaid, Kadhim
    MARA University of Technology, Sungai Buloh, Malaysia.
    Aini Mohd Noor, Nor
    MARA University of Technology, Sungai Buloh, Malaysia; MARA University of Technology UiTM, Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia.
    Shamsidah Binti Nik Ibrahim, Nik
    MARA University of Technology, Sungai Buloh, Malaysia.
    Albu-Kareem Al-Azawi, Ahmed
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Hepatitis C virus prevalence and genotyping among hepatocellular carcinoma patients in Baghdad2014In: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, ISSN 1513-7368, Vol. 15, no 18, 7725-7730 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third most common cause for cancer death in the world, now being especially linked to chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. This case-control study consisting of 65 HCC patients and 82 patients with other malignant tumours as controls was conducted to determine the association of HCV markers with HCC. Serum of each participant was obtained for detection of HCV Ab and RNA by DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA). Twenty six per cent (26.0%) of HCC patients had positive anti-HCV which was significantly greater than the control group (p=0.001). HCC patients significantly have a risk of exposure to HCV infection almost 3 times than the control group (OR=2.87, 95% C.I=1.1-7). Anti-HCV seropositive rate was significantly (p=0.03) higher among old age HCC patients and increases with age. Males with HCC significantly showed to have more than 9 times risk of exposure to HCV infection (OR=9.375, 95 % CI=1.299-67.647) than females. HCV-RNA seropositive rate was (70.8%) significantly higher among HCC patients compared to (22.2%) the control group (p=0.019). The most prevalent genotype (as a single or mixed pattern of infection) was HCV-1b. This study detected a significantly higher HCV seropositive rate of antibodies and RNA in HCC patients.

  • 27.
    Abdalla, Maie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Landerholm, Kalle
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Andersson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Risk of Rectal Cancer After Colectomy for Patients With Ulcerative Colitis: A National Cohort Study2017In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, Vol. 15, no 7, 1055-+ p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND amp; AIMS: Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) have an increased risk of rectal cancer, therefore reconstruction with an ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) generally is preferred to an ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) after subtotal colectomy. Similarly, completion proctectomy is recommended for patients with ileostomy and a diverted rectum, although this approach has been questioned because anti-inflammatory agents might reduce cancer risk. We performed a national cohort study in Sweden to assess the risk of rectal cancer in patients with UC who have an IRA, IPAA, or diverted rectum after subtotal colectomy. METHODS: We collected data from the Swedish National Patient Register for a cohort of 5886 patients with UC who underwent subtotal colectomy with an IRA, IPAA, or diverted rectum from 1964 through 2010. Patients who developed rectal cancer were identified from the Swedish National Cancer Register. The risk of rectal cancer was compared between this cohort and the general population by standardized incidence ratio analysis. RESULTS: Rectal cancer occurred in 20 of 1112 patients (1.8%) who received IRA, 1 of 1796 patients (0.06%) who received an IPAA, and 25 of 4358 patients (0.6%) with a diverted rectum. Standardized incidence ratios for rectal cancer were 8.7 in patients with an IRA, 0.4 in patients with an IPAA, and 3.8 in patients with a diverted rectum. Risk factors for rectal cancer were primary sclerosing cholangitis in patients with an IRA (hazard ratio, 6.12), and colonic severe dysplasia or cancer before subtotal colectomy in patients with a diverted rectum (hazard ratio, 3.67). CONCLUSIONS: In an analysis of the Swedish National Patient Register, we found that the risk for rectal cancer after colectomy in patients with UC is low, in relative and absolute terms, after reconstruction with an IPAA. An IRA and diverted rectum are associated with an increased risk of rectal cancer, compared with the general population, but the absolute risk is low. Patients and their health care providers should consider these findings in making decisions to leave the rectum intact, perform completion proctectomy, or reconstruct the colon with an IRA or IPAA.

  • 28.
    Abdeldaim, Guma M. K.
    et al.
    Section of Clinical Bacteriology, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Clinical Mycobacteriology, National Center for Diseases Control, Benghazi, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya.
    Strålin, Kristoffer
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olcén, Per
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Jonas
    Section of Clinical Virology, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mölling, Paula
    Orebro University Hospital. Department of Laboratory Medicine.
    Herrmann, Björn
    Section of Clinical Bacteriology, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Quantitative fucK gene polymerase chain reaction on sputum and nasopharyngeal secretions to detect Haemophilus influenzae pneumonia2013In: Diagnostic microbiology and infectious disease, ISSN 0732-8893, E-ISSN 1879-0070, Vol. 76, no 2, 141-146 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the fucK gene was developed for specific detection of Haemophilus influenzae. The method was tested on sputum and nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) from 78 patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). With a reference standard of sputum culture and/or serology against the patient's own nasopharyngeal isolate, H. influenzae etiology was detected in 20 patients. Compared with the reference standard, fucK PCR (using the detection limit 10(5) DNA copies/mL) on sputum and NPA showed a sensitivity of 95.0% (19/20) in both cases, and specificities of 87.9% (51/58) and 89.5% (52/58), respectively. In a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, sputum fucK PCR was found to be significantly superior to sputum P6 PCR for detection of H. influenzae CAP. NPA fucK PCR was positive in 3 of 54 adult controls without respiratory symptoms. In conclusion, quantitative fucK real-time PCR provides a sensitive and specific identification of H. influenzae in respiratory secretions.

  • 29.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.;.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Division of overall duration of stay into operative stay and postoperative stay improves the overall estimate as a measure of quality of outcome in burn care.2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, e0174579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients and Methods: Surgically managed burn patients admitted between 2010-14 were included. Operative stay was defined as the time from admission until the last operation, postoperative stay as the time from the last operation until discharge. The difference in variation was analysed with F-test. A retrospective review of medical records was done to explore reasons for extended postoperative stay. Multivariable regression was used to assess factors associated with operative stay and postoperative stay.less thanbr /greater thanResults: Operative stay/TBSA% showed less variation than total duration/TBSA% (F test = 2.38, pless than0.01). The size of the burn, and the number of operations, were the independent factors that influenced operative stay (R2 0.65). Except for the size of the burn other factors were associated with duration of postoperative stay: wound related, psychological and other medical causes, advanced medical support, and accommodation arrangements before discharge, of which the two last were the most important with an increase of (mean) 12 and 17 days (pless than0.001, R2 0.51).less thanbr /greater thanConclusion: Adjusted operative stay showed less variation than total hospital stay and thus can be considered a more accurate outcome measure for surgically managed burns. The size of burn and number of operations are the factors affecting this outcome measure.

  • 30.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. a Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Improvement in mortality at a National Burn Centre since 2000: Was it the result of increased resources?2017In: Medicine (Baltimore, Md.), ISSN 0025-7974, E-ISSN 1536-5964, Vol. 96, no 25, e6727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract The aim of this study was to find out whether the charging costs (calculated using interventional burn score) increased as mortality decreased. During the last 2 decades, mortality has declined significantly in the Linköping Burn Centre. The burn score that we use has been validated as a measure of workload and is used to calculate the charging costs of each burned patient. We compared the charging costs and mortality in 2 time periods (2000–2007 and 2008–2015). A total of 1363 admissions were included. We investigated the change in the burn score, as a surrogate for total costs per patient. Multivariable regression was used to analyze risk-adjusted mortality and burn score. The median total body surface area % (TBSA%) was 6.5% (10–90 centile 1.0–31.0), age 33 years (1.3–72.2), duration of stay/ TBSA% was 1.4 days (0.3–5.3), and 960 (70%) were males. Crude mortality declined from 7.5% in 2000–2007 to 3.4% in 2008–2015, whereas the cumulative burn score was not increased (P=.08). Regression analysis showed that risk-adjusted mortality decreased (odds ratio 0.42, P=.02), whereas the adjusted burn score did not change (P=.14, model R2 0.86). Mortality decreased but there was no increase in the daily use of resources as measured by the interventional burn score. The data suggest that the improvements in quality obtained have been achieved within present routines for care of patients (multidisciplinary/ orientated to patients’ safety).

    Abbreviation: TBSA% = total body surface area %.

  • 31.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Moghazy, Amr
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abbas, Ashraf
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Adly, Osama
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Elbadawy, Mohamed
    Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    A prospective randomized cost billing comparison of local fasciocutaneous perforator versus free Gracilis flap reconstruction for lower limb in a developing economy2016In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, ISSN 1748-6815, E-ISSN 1532-1959, Vol. 69, no 8, 1121-1127 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Distal half leg complex wounds are usually a formidable problem that necessitates either local or free flap coverage. The aim of this study was to compare cost billing charges in free Gracilis flap (fGF) and local fasciocutaneous perforator flap (lFPF) in reconstructing complex soft tissue leg and foot defects. Patients and methods: Thirty consecutive adult (amp;gt; 15-year-old) patients with soft tissue defects in the leg and/or foot requiring tissue coverage with a flap in the period between 2012 and 2015 were randomly assigned (block randomization) to either an fGF or lFPF procedure. The outcome measures addressed were total billed charges costs, perioperative billed charges cost, partial or complete flap loss, length of hospital stay, inpatient postsurgical care duration, complications, operating time and number of operative scrub staff. Results: One patient suffered from complete flap loss in each group. Reconstruction with lFPF showed total lower billed charges costs by 62% (2509 USD) (p amp;lt; 0.001) and perioperative billed charges cost by 54% (779 USD) (p amp;lt; 0.001), and shorter total hospital stay (36.5 days; p amp;lt; 0.001), inpatient postsurgical care duration (6.4 days; p amp;lt; 0.001), operating time (4.3 h; p amp;lt; 0.001) and fewer scrub staff (2.2 persons; p amp;lt; 0.001). Conclusion: These results suggest that neither flap is totally superior to the other; the choice should instead be based on the outcome sought and logistics. lFPF requires lower billed charges cost and resource use and saves operative time and personnel and reduces length of hospital stay. Our approach changed towards using perforator flaps in medium-sized defects, keeping the free flap option for larger defects. (C) 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 32. Abdon, NJ
    et al.
    Herlitz, J
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Andrersson, B
    Peripartumcardiomyopathi an often mised diagnosis2013In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 110, no 23-24, 1152-1154 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Peripartumkardiomyopati är en sällsynt form av hjärtsvikt. Diagnostiska kriterier är nytillkommen hjärtsvikt från sen graviditet och upp till fem månader efter förlossning, avsaknad av annan förklaring till hjärtsvikt och nedsatt systolisk vänsterkammarfunktion Orsaken till tillståndet tros vara omvandling av prolaktin till en kardiotoxisk variant. Terapin är den etablerade, men ACE-hämmare och ARB får inte ges till ammande mödrar. Hjärttransplantation har tillgripits. Maligna hjärtarytmier har krävt behandling med implanterbar defibrillator och pacemaker. Hämning av produktionen av prolaktin med bromokriptin har gett goda resultat i en liten studie. Resultaten har inte bekräftats.

  • 33.
    Abdsaleh, Shahin
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Core Biopsy of Breast and Axillary Lesions: Technical and Clinical Aspects2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this work were to image and analyze the needle behavior at automated core biopsy, to investigate the clinical utility of an alternative core biopsy technique using a semiautomated gun in breast and axillary lesions, and also to compare core biopsy with surgical specimens in malignant breast lesions regarding histologic features and hormone receptor expression.

    In two experimental studies, using butter and silicon phantoms, respectively, the needle pass was imaged and its dynamic behavior studied. It was shown that the needle took a curved course in phantoms. It deviated to the same side as where the tip lay, and the degree of the curvature increased with increasing hardness of the phantoms. Our experimental methods can be applied for imaging of needle behavior and thereby improvement of needle configuration.

    In two clinical studies, a semiautomated gun was used for large needle core biopsy of breast and axillary lesions in two series of 145 and 21 patients, respectively. The sensitivity of the method for diagnosis of malignancy was 87% (108/124), and in 37% (31/83) of cases the full length of the needle notch was filled with specimen. No injury to the neurovascular structures of the axillary area was observed. It was concluded that the semiautomated gun can be used as an alternative to the automated gun when the size and location of the lesion render use of the automatic device uncertain or dangerous, e.g., in small breast lesions or lesions located in the axilla.

    In a series of 129 cases of breast cancer, comparison of core biopsy and surgical specimens showed that core biopsy provided enough information on the histologic type and grade of the lesions. Also, there was moderate to high concordance between the two methods for assessment of progesterone receptors and estrogen receptors (Spearman`s kappa 0.67 and 0.89, respectively).

  • 34.
    Abdsaleh, Shahin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wärnberg, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Azavedo, E
    Lindgren, P G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Comparison of core needle biopsy and surgical specimens in malignant breast lesions regarding histological features and hormone receptor expression2008In: Histopathology, ISSN 0309-0167, E-ISSN 1365-2559, Vol. 52, no 6, 773-775 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Abdul Jabbar, Mashahel
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Elshebani, Noor
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society.
    Metoder för tobaksavvänjning2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with tobacco habits visit the dental care regularly, therefore it is well placed to carry out tobacco cessation for those who smoke or use snuff. The purpose of this study was to highlight methods available for tobacco cessation and results of these methods. The authors searched in the database PubMed and was limited to articles published during the last ten years and performed in the dental care. The framework was limited to eight studies which were performed in the dental care. The results showed that there are several different combination methods for tobacco cessation. In three articles, the 5A method was used in combination with nicotine replacement therapy. In other articles five different combination methods with different follow-up times were used. In one of those with

    combined approach two methods are described. In addition a method was used for snuff cessation. The result showed differences in frequency of success to tobacco stop. The best result was shown after twelve months tobacco cessation and a follow up in two of the combination methods and the method for snuff cessation (36%, 25% and 30%). The lowest success rate was 7% after twelve months follow up with one of the 5A methods. The conclusion of the study is that there are few published studies regarding tobacco cessation in the dental care, which are based on evaluation of methods performed among patients. Follow up, counselling and support have essential effects on the result.

  • 36.
    Abdulahad, Noor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    The effects of short-term use of proton pump inhibitors on plasma and salivary nitrate/nitrite and exhaled NO in patients with established coronary artery disease2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Recent studies have suggested several vasoprotective/cardioprotective effects of dietary nitrate (NO3-) and nitrite (NO2-), including blood pressure regulating, antiplatelet effect, enhanced endothelial function and increased oxygen supply in healthy volunteers. There is, on the other hand, concern that an increase in gastric pH may blunt these beneficial effects due to the low pH requirement (pH< 2) for nitric oxide (NO) generation from nitrate in the stomach. This effect has not previously been investigated in 'real life' patients. Aim: To investigate the effects of an increased gastric pH caused by short-term (5 days) use of esomeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor, on plasma and salivary nitrate/nitrite and exhaled NO in patients with established coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: A total of seven patients with CAD were enrolled in the study. An on-line method was used to determine fractional exhaled concentration of NO (FeNO) at multiple flow rates, data was modeled to estimate alveolar airways NO concentration (Calv) and bronchial NO flux (JNO). Plasma and salivary nitrate/nitrite levels were also analyzed. Results: There was a statistically (P = 0.0469) significant reduction in Calv in the overall patient group after treatment with esomeprazole. There was a trend toward an increase, albeit non-statistically significant (P = 0.0781) in salivary nitrate after treatment with esomeprazole. Conclusion: The major finding in this study is the significant reduction in the alveolar NO concentration in the overall patient group after treatment with esomeprazole. Further research is needed in this area.

  • 37.
    Abdulhusen, Maria
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Binokulärseende hos elitidrottare: En studie om djupseende, ackommodationsfacilitet och vergensfacilitet2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syfte: Syftet med denna studie var att ta reda på om elitidrottare som spelar en bollsport har bättre djupseende, bättre förmåga att kunna ändra fokus mellan olika avstånd och mer uthålliga ögonmuskler än personer som inte spelar någon bollsport alls.

    Metod: Mätningarna utfördes på femton innebandyspelare som spelar på elitnivå och femton personer som inte spelar någon bollsport. Medelåldern var 22 år i båda grupperna. Först fick varje försöksperson svara på en enkät, sedan mättes visus upp monokulärt och binokulärt på 3 m med en logMAR visustavla. Efter det mättes djupseendet med Randot stereotest på 40 cm och sedan mättes försökspersonens förmåga att kunna ändra fokus mellan olika avstånd. Detta gjordes på 40 cm med en flipper med styrkorna ±2,00D. Sista mätningen var att få ett mått på hur uthålliga försökspersonens ögonmuskler var, detta gjordes på 40 cm med en flipper av styrkorna 3Δ Bas In/ 12Δ Bas Ut.

    Resultat: Medelvärdet på djupseendet i respektive grupp visade ingen statistisk signifikant skillnad mellan de båda grupperna (p=0,70). Det fanns en signifikant skillnad på medelvärdet mellan de båda grupperna när det gäller förmågan att kunna ändra fokus mellan olika avstånd (p=0,02). Medelvärdet på uthålligheten av ögonmusklerna visade ingen signifikant skillnad mellan de båda grupperna (p=0,08).

    Slutsats: Studien visade att innebandyspelare på elitnivå har bättre förmåga att ändra fokus mellan olika avstånd. Studien visade även att innebandypelare på elitnivå inte har mer uthålliga ögonmuskler eller bättre djupseende än de som inte spelar någon bollsport alls.

  • 38.
    Abdul-Hussein, Saba
    et al.
    Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rahl, Karin
    Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Moslemi, Ali-Reza
    Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tajsharghi, Homa
    Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Clinical and Medical Genetics, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Phenotypes of myopathy-related beta-tropomyosin mutants in human and mouse tissue cultures2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 9, e72396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutations in TPM2 result in a variety of myopathies characterised by variable clinical and morphological features. We used human and mouse cultured cells to study the effects of β-TM mutants. The mutants induced a range of phenotypes in human myoblasts, which generally changed upon differentiation to myotubes. Human myotubes transfected with the E41K-β-TM(EGFP) mutant showed perinuclear aggregates. The G53ins-β-TM(EGFP) mutant tended to accumulate in myoblasts but was incorporated into filamentous structures of myotubes. The K49del-β-TM(EGFP) and E122K-β-TM(EGFP) mutants induced the formation of rod-like structures in human cells. The N202K-β-TM(EGFP) mutant failed to integrate into thin filaments and formed accumulations in myotubes. The accumulation of mutant β-TM(EGFP) in the perinuclear and peripheral areas of the cells was the striking feature in C2C12. We demonstrated that human tissue culture is a suitable system for studying the early stages of altered myofibrilogenesis and morphological changes linked to myopathy-related β-TM mutants. In addition, the histopathological phenotype associated with expression of the various mutant proteins depends on the cell type and varies with the maturation of the muscle cell. Further, the phenotype is a combinatorial effect of the specific amino acid change and the temporal expression of the mutant protein.

  • 39.
    Abdul-Hussein, Saba
    et al.
    Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    van der Ven, Peter F. M.
    Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute for Cell Biology, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Tajsharghi, Homa
    Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Clinical and Medical Genetics, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Expression profiles of muscle disease-associated genes and their isoforms during differentiation of cultured human skeletal muscle cells2012In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 13, 262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The formation of contractile myofibrils requires the stepwise onset of expression of muscle specific proteins. It is likely that elucidation of the expression patterns of muscle-specific sarcomeric proteins is important to understand muscle disorders originating from defects in contractile sarcomeric proteins.

    METHODS: We investigated the expression profile of a panel of sarcomeric components with a focus on proteins associated with a group of congenital disorders. The analyses were performed in cultured human skeletal muscle cells during myoblast proliferation and myotube development.

    RESULTS: Our culture technique resulted in the development of striated myotubes and the expression of adult isoforms of the sarcomeric proteins, such as fast TnI, fast TnT, adult fast and slow MyHC isoforms and predominantly skeletal muscle rather than cardiac actin. Many proteins involved in muscle diseases, such as beta tropomyosin, slow TnI, slow MyBPC and cardiac TnI were readily detected in the initial stages of muscle cell differentiation, suggesting the possibility of an early role for these proteins as constituent of the developing contractile apparatus during myofibrillogenesis. This suggests that in disease conditions the mechanisms of pathogenesis for each of the mutated sarcomeric proteins might be reflected by altered expression patterns, and disturbed assembly of cytoskeletal, myofibrillar structures and muscle development.

    CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, we here confirm that cell cultures of human skeletal muscle are an appropriate tool to study developmental stages of myofibrillogenesis. The expression of several disease-associated proteins indicates that they might be a useful model system for studying the pathogenesis of muscle diseases caused by defects in specific sarcomeric constituents.

  • 40.
    Abdulla, Maysaa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Laszlo, Sofia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Triumf, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hedström, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Berglund, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Core needle biopsies for the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma - a great concern for research2017In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 56, no 1, 106-109 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Abdulla, Maysaa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Laszlo, Sofia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Triumf, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Hedström, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Berglund, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Novum, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, Unit Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden.;Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    A population-based study of cellular markers in R-CHOP treated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients2016In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 55, no 9-10, 1126-1131 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To determine the prognostic significance of co-expression of MYC, BCL-2 and BCL-6 proteins in combination with other biomarkers and clinical characteristics within a population-based cohort of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients uniformly treated with R-CHOP.

    Patients and methods: The immunohistochemical (IHC) expression of CD10, BCL-2, BCL-6, MUM1, MYC, CD5, CD30, Ki-67 and p53 was evaluated in a retrospective, population-based study comprising 188 DLBCL patients treated with R-CHOP and diagnosed in Sweden between 2002 and 2012.

    Results: Patients had a median age at diagnosis of 64 years (26-85 years) with a male:female ratio of 1.4:1. Approximately half (52%) of the patients presented with an International Prognostic Index (IPI) age adjusted (IPIaa)2. Median follow-up time was 51 months (range 0.4-158) and the five-year lymphoma-specific survival (LSS) was 76%, five-year overall survival (OS) was 65% and five-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 61%. A high Ki-67 value was found in 59% of patients, while p53 overexpression was detected in 12% of patients and MYC, BCL-2 and BCL-6 expression were detected in 42%, 55% and 74% of patients, respectively. IPIaa2 (p=0.002), Ki-6770% (p=0.04) and p53 overexpression50% (p=0.02) were associated with inferior LSS and OS. Co-expression of both MYC (>40%) and BCL-2 (>70%) proteins was detected in 27% of patients and correlated with a significantly inferior LSS (p=0.0002), OS (p=0.009) and PFS (p=0.03). In addition, triple expression of MYC, BCL-2 and BCL-6, also correlated with a significantly inferior LSS (p=0.02).

    Conclusion: Concurrent expression of MYC and BCL-2 proteins, as detected by IHC, was strongly associated with an inferior survival in DLBCL patients treated with R-CHOP. Other markers affecting survival were triple expression of MYC, BCL-2 and BCL-6, IPIaa, high Ki-67 and p53 overexpression.

  • 42.
    Abdulla, Salim
    et al.
    Ifakara Hlth Inst, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Adam, Ishag
    Univ Khartoum, Fac Med, Khartoum, Sudan..
    Adjei, George O.
    Univ Ghana, Sch Med, Ctr Trop Clin Pharmacol & Therapeut, Accra, Ghana..
    Adjuik, Martin A.
    INDEPTH Network Secretariat, Accra, Ghana..
    Alemayehu, Bereket
    Int Ctr AIDS Care & Treatment Programs, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia..
    Allan, Richard
    MENTOR Initiat, Crawley, England..
    Arinaitwe, Emmanuel
    Infect Dis Res Collaborat, Kampala, Uganda..
    Ashley, Elizabeth A.
    Epictr, Paris, France..
    Ba, Mamadou S.
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Barennes, Hubert
    Ctr Muraz, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso.;French Foreign Affairs, Biarritz, France..
    Barnes, Karen I.
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Cape Town, South Africa.;Univ Cape Town, Dept Med, Div Clin Pharmacol, ZA-7925 Cape Town, South Africa..
    Bassat, Quique
    Ctr Invest Saude Manhica, Manhica, Mozambique.;Univ Barcelona, Barcelona Ctr Int Hlth Res CRESIB, ISGlobal, Hosp Clin, Barcelona, Spain..
    Baudin, Elisabeth
    MENTOR Initiat, Crawley, England..
    Berens-Riha, Nicole
    Univ Munich LMU, Med Ctr, Div Infect Dis & Trop Med, Munich, Germany.;LMU, German Ctr Infect Res DZIF, Munich, Germany..
    Bjoerkman, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumour & Cell Biol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bompart, Francois
    Sanofi Aventis, Direct Acces Med Access Med, Gentilly, France..
    Bonnet, Maryline
    Epictr, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Borrmann, Steffen
    Wellcome Trust Res Programme, Kenya Med Res Inst, Kilifi, Kenya.;Univ Tubingen, Inst Trop Med, Tubingen, Germany.;German Ctr Infect Res, Tubingen, Germany..
    Bousema, Teun
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Infect & Immun, London WC1, England.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Med Microbiol, Njimegen, Netherlands..
    Brasseur, Philippe
    IRD, Dakar, Senegal..
    Bukirwa, Hasifa
    Uganda Malaria Surveillance Project, Kampala, Uganda..
    Checchi, Francesco
    Epictr, Paris, France..
    Dahal, Prabin
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England..
    D'Alessandro, Umberto
    Inst Trop Med, Unit Malariol, B-2000 Antwerp, Belgium.;MRC Unit, Fajara, Gambia.;London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Dis Control, London WC1, England..
    Desai, Meghna
    Ctr Dis Control & Prevent, Div Parasit Dis & Malaria, Malaria Branch, Atlanta, GA USA..
    Dicko, Alassane
    Univ Bamako, Fac Med Pharm & Dent, Malaria Res & Training Ctr, Bamako, Mali.;Univ Bamako, Fac Med Pharm & Dent, Dept Publ Hlth, Bamako, Mali..
    Djimde, Abdoulaye A.
    Univ Bamako, Fac Med Pharm & Dent, Malaria Res & Training Ctr, Bamako, Mali..
    Dorsey, Grant
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Med, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA..
    Doumbo, Ogobara K.
    Univ Bamako, Fac Med Pharm & Dent, Malaria Res & Training Ctr, Bamako, Mali..
    Drakeley, Chris J.
    German Ctr Infect Res, Tubingen, Germany..
    Duparc, Stephan
    Med Malaria Venture, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Eshetu, Teferi
    Univ Barcelona, Barcelona Ctr Int Hlth Res CRESIB, ISGlobal, Hosp Clin, Barcelona, Spain.;Jimma Univ, Dept Med Lab Sci & Pathol, Jimma, Ethiopia..
    Espie, Emmanuelle
    Epictr, Paris, France..
    Etard, Jean-Francois
    Epictr, Paris, France.;IRD, Montpellier, France..
    Faiz, Abul M.
    Mahidol Univ, Fac Trop Med, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Falade, Catherine O.
    Univ Ibadan, Coll Med, Dept Pharmacol & Therapeut, Ibadan, Nigeria..
    Fanello, Caterina I.
    Mahidol Univ, Fac Trop Med, Mahidol Oxford Res Unit, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Faucher, Jean-Francois
    IRD, Mother & Child Hlth Trop Res Unit, Paris, France.;Univ Paris 05, PRES Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris, France.;Univ Besancon, Med Ctr, Dept Infect Dis, F-25030 Besancon, France..
    Faye, Babacar
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Faye, Oumar
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Filler, Scott
    Global Fund Fight AIDS TB & Malaria, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Flegg, Jennifer A.
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Monash Univ, Sch Math Sci, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia.;Monash Univ, Monash Acad Cross & Interdisciplinary Math Applic, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia..
    Fofana, Bakary
    Univ Bamako, Fac Med Pharm & Dent, Malaria Res & Training Ctr, Bamako, Mali..
    Fogg, Carole
    Univ Portsmouth, Portsmouth Hosp NHS Trust, Portsmouth, Hants, England..
    Gadalla, Nahla B.
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Infect & Immun, London WC1, England.;Natl Res Ctr, Res Inst Trop Med, Dept Epidemiol, Khartoum, Sudan.;NIAID, Rockville, MD USA..
    Gaye, Oumar
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Genton, Blaise
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Lausanne Hosp, Div Infect Dis, Lausanne, Switzerland.;Univ Lausanne Hosp, Dept Ambulatory Care & Community Med, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Gething, Peter W.
    Univ Oxford, Dept Zool, Spatial Ecol & Epidemiol Grp, Oxford OX1 3PS, England..
    Gil, Jose P.
    Karolinska Inst, Pharmacogenet Sect, Drug Resistance Unit, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Lisbon, Fac Sci, Biosyst & Integrat Sci Inst BioISI, P-1699 Lisbon, Portugal.;SUNY Binghamton, Harpur Coll Arts & Sci, Binghamton, NY USA..
    Gonzalez, Raquel
    Ctr Invest Saude Manhica, Manhica, Mozambique.;Univ Barcelona, Barcelona Ctr Int Hlth Res CRESIB, ISGlobal, Hosp Clin, Barcelona, Spain..
    Grandesso, Francesco
    Epictr, Paris, France..
    Greenhouse, Bryan
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Med, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA..
    Greenwood, Brian
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Dis Control, London WC1, England..
    Grivoyannis, Anastasia
    Univ Washington, Div Emergency Med, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Guerin, Philippe J.
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England..
    Guthmann, Jean-Paul
    Inst Veille Sanit, Dept Malad Infect, St Maurice, France..
    Hamed, Kamal
    Novartis Pharmaceut, E Hanover, NJ USA..
    Hamour, Sally
    Royal Free Hosp, UCL Ctr Nephrol, London NW3 2QG, England..
    Hay, Simon I.
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.;Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;NIH, Fogarty Int Ctr, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Hodel, Eva Maria
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Liverpool, Liverpool Sch Trop Med, Dept Parasitol, Liverpool L3 5QA, Merseyside, England..
    Humphreys, Georgina S.
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England..
    Hwang, Jimee
    Ctr Dis Control & Prevent, Div Parasit Dis & Malaria, Malaria Branch, Atlanta, GA USA.;Univ Calif San Francisco, Global Hlth Grp, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA..
    Ibrahim, Maman L.
    Ctr Rech Med & Sanit, Niamey, Niger..
    Jima, Daddi
    Fed Minist Hlth, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia..
    Jones, Joel J.
    Minist Hlth & Social Welf, Natl Malaria Control Programme, Monrovia, Liberia..
    Jullien, Vincent
    Univ Paris 05, AP HP, Paris, France..
    Juma, Elizabeth
    Kenya Govt Med Res Ctr, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Kachur, Patrick S.
    Ctr Dis Control & Prevent, Div Parasit Dis & Malaria, Malaria Branch, Atlanta, GA USA..
    Kager, Piet A.
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Ctr Infect & Immun Amsterdam CINIMA, Div Infect Dis Trop Med & AIDS, NL-1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Kamugisha, Erasmus
    Catholic Univ Hlth & Allied Sci, Mwanza, Tanzania..
    Kamya, Moses R.
    Makerere Univ, Coll Hlth Sci, Kampala, Uganda..
    Karema, Corine
    Minist Hlth, Malaria & Other Parasit Dis Div RBC, Kigali, Rwanda..
    Kayentao, Kassoum
    Univ Bamako, Fac Med Pharm & Dent, Malaria Res & Training Ctr, Bamako, Mali..
    Kiechel, Jean-Rene
    Drugs Neglected Dis initiat, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Kironde, Fred
    Makerere Univ, Dept Biochem, Kampala, Uganda..
    Kofoed, Poul-Erik
    Projecto Saude Bandim, Bissau, Guinea Bissau.;Kolding Cty Hosp, Dept Paediat, Kolding, Denmark..
    Kremsner, Peter G.
    Univ Tubingen, Inst Trop Med, Tubingen, Germany.;Ctr Rech Med Lambarene, Lambarene, Gabon..
    Krishna, Sanjeev
    Univ London, Inst Infect & Immun, London, England. Operat Ctr Barcelona Athens, Med Sans Frontieres, Barcelona, Spain..
    Lameyre, Valerie
    Sanofi Aventis, Direct Acces Med Access Med, Gentilly, France..
    Lell, Bertrand
    Univ Tubingen, Inst Trop Med, Tubingen, Germany.;Ctr Rech Med Lambarene, Lambarene, Gabon..
    Lima, Angeles
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England..
    Makanga, Michael
    European & Dev Countries Clin Trials Partnership, Cape Town, South Africa..
    Malik, ElFatih M.
    Fed Minist Hlth, Khartoum, Sudan..
    Marsh, Kevin
    Wellcome Trust Res Programme, Kenya Med Res Inst, Kilifi, Kenya.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England..
    Mårtensson, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumour & Cell Biol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Massougbodji, Achille
    Univ Abomey Calavi, FSS, CERPAGE, Cotonou, Benin..
    Menan, Herve
    Univ Cocody, Fac Pharm, Dept Parasitol, Abidjan, Cote Ivoire..
    Menard, Didier
    Inst Pasteur Cambodia, Malaria Mol Epidemiol Unit, Phnom Penh, Cambodia..
    Menendez, Clara
    Ctr Invest Saude Manhica, Manhica, Mozambique.;Univ Barcelona, Barcelona Ctr Int Hlth Res CRESIB, ISGlobal, Hosp Clin, Barcelona, Spain..
    Mens, Petra F.
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Ctr Infect & Immun Amsterdam CINIMA, Div Infect Dis Trop Med & AIDS, NL-1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands.;KIT Biomed Res, Royal Trop Inst, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Meremikwu, Martin
    Univ Calabar, Dept Paediat, Calabar, Nigeria.;Inst Trop Dis Res & Prevent, Calabar, Nigeria..
    Moreira, Clarissa
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England..
    Nabasumba, Carolyn
    Epictr, Paris, France.;Mbarara Univ Sci & Technol, Fac Med, Mbarara, Uganda..
    Nambozi, Michael
    Trop Dis Res Ctr, Ndola, Zambia..
    Ndiaye, Jean-Louis
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Ngasala, Billy E.
    Muhimbili Univ Hlth & Allied Sci, Dept Parasitol, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Infect Dis Unit, Malaria Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nikiema, Frederic
    Inst Rech Sci Sante, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso..
    Nsanzabana, Christian
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England..
    Ntoumi, Francine
    Univ Tubingen, Inst Trop Med, Tubingen, Germany.;Univ Marien Ngouabi, FCRM, Fac Sci Sante, Brazzaville, Congo..
    Oguike, Mary
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Infect & Immun, London WC1, England..
    Ogutu, Bernhards R.
    United States Army Med Res Unit, Kenya Med Res Inst, Kisumu, Kenya..
    Olliaro, Piero
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;UNICEF UNDP World Bank WHO Special Programme Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Omar, Sabah A.
    Kenya Govt Med Res Ctr, Ctr Biotechnol Res & Dev, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Ouedraogo, Jean-Bosco
    Ctr Muraz, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso.;Inst Rech Sci Sante, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso..
    Owusu-Agyei, Seth
    Kintampo Hlth Res Ctr, Kintampo, Ghana..
    Penali, Louis K.
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN W, Dakar, Senegal..
    Pene, Mbaye
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Peshu, Judy
    Wellcome Trust Res Programme, Kenya Med Res Inst, Kilifi, Kenya..
    Piola, Patrice
    Inst Pasteur Madagascar, Epidemiol Unit, Antananarivo, Madagascar..
    Plowe, Christopher V.
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Howard Hughes Med Inst, Ctr Vaccine Dev, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA..
    Premji, Zul
    Muhimbili Univ Hlth & Allied Sci, Dept Parasitol, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Price, Ric N.
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;Menzies Sch Hlth Res, Darwin, NT, Australia.;Charles Darwin Univ, Darwin, NT 0909, Australia..
    Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona
    Inst Pasteur Madagascar, Malaria Res Unit, Antananarivo, Madagascar..
    Rombo, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Infect Dis Unit, Malaria Res Lab,Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Malarsjukhuset, Dept Infect Dis, S-63188 Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Roper, Cally
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Pathogen Mol Biol, London WC1, England..
    Rosenthal, Philip J.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Med, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA..
    Sagara, Issaka
    Univ Bamako, Fac Med Pharm & Dent, Malaria Res & Training Ctr, Bamako, Mali..
    Same-Ekobo, Albert
    Ctr Hosp Univ Yaounde, Fac Med & Sci Biomed, Yaounde, Cameroon..
    Sawa, Patrick
    Int Ctr Insect Physiol & Ecol, Human Hlth Div, Mbita, Kenya..
    Schallig, Henk D. F. H.
    KIT Biomed Res, Royal Trop Inst, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Schramm, Birgit
    Epictr, Paris, France..
    Seck, Amadou
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN W, Dakar, Senegal..
    Shekalaghe, Seif A.
    Ifakara Hlth Inst, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.;Kilimanjaro Christian Med Ctr, Kilimanjaro Clin Med Res Inst, Moshi, Tanzania..
    Sibley, Carol H.
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Univ Washington, Dept Genome Sci, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Sinou, Vronique
    Aix Marseille Univ, Fac Pharm, UMR MD3, Marseille, France..
    Sirima, Sodiomon B.
    CNRFP, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso..
    Som, Fabrice A.
    Inst Rech Sci Sante, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso..
    Sow, Doudou
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Staedke, Sarah G.
    Infect Dis Res Collaborat, Kampala, Uganda.;London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Clin Res, London WC1, England..
    Stepniewska, Kasia
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England..
    Sutherland, Colin J.
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Infect & Immun, London WC1, England..
    Swarthout, Todd D.
    Med Sans Frontieres, London, England..
    Sylla, Khadime
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Talisuna, Ambrose O.
    East Africa Reg Ctr, WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Nairobi, Kenya.;Univ Oxford, KEMRI, Wellcome Trust Res Programme, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Taylor, Walter R. J.
    UNICEF UNDP World Bank WHO Special Programme Res, Geneva, Switzerland.;Hop Cantonal Univ Geneva, Serv Med Int & Humanitaire, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Temu, Emmanuel A.
    MENTOR Initiat, Crawley, England.;Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Basel, Basel, Switzerland..
    Thwing, Julie I.
    Ctr Dis Control & Prevent, Div Parasit Dis & Malaria, Malaria Branch, Atlanta, GA USA..
    Tine, Roger C. K.
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Tinto, Halidou
    Ctr Muraz, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso.;Inst Rech Sci Sante, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso..
    Tommasini, Silva
    Sigma Tau Ind Farmaceut Riunite SpA, Rome, Italy..
    Toure, Offianan A.
    Inst Pasteur Cote Ivoire, Malariol Dept, Abidjan, Cote Ivoire..
    Ursing, Johan
    Projecto Saude Bandim, Bissau, Guinea Bissau.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Infect Dis Unit, Malaria Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Vaillant, Michel T.
    CRP Sante, Ctr Hlth Studies, Methodol & Stat Unit, Luxembourg, Luxembourg.;Univ Bordeaux 2, Unite Bases Therapeut Inflammat & Infect 3677, F-33076 Bordeaux, France..
    Valentini, Giovanni
    Sigma Tau Ind Farmaceut Riunite SpA, Rome, Italy..
    Van den Broek, Ingrid
    Med Sans Frontieres, London, England.;Natl Inst Publ Hlth & Environm, Ctr Infect Dis Control, NL-3720 BA Bilthoven, Netherlands..
    Van Vugt, Michele
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Ctr Trop Med & Travel Med, Div Infect Dis, NL-1012 WX Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Ward, Stephen A.
    Univ Liverpool, Liverpool Sch Trop Med, Dept Parasitol, Liverpool L3 5QA, Merseyside, England..
    Winstanley, Peter A.
    Univ Warwick, Warwick Med Sch, Coventry CV4 7AL, W Midlands, England..
    Yavo, William
    Univ Cocody, Fac Pharmaceut & Biol Sci, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Abidjan, Cote Ivoire.;Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Malaria Res & Control Ctr, Abidjan, Cote Ivoire..
    Yeka, Adoke
    Uganda Malaria Surveillance Project, Kampala, Uganda..
    Zolia, Yah M.
    Minist Hlth & Social Welf, Natl Malaria Control Programme, Monrovia, Liberia..
    Zongo, Issaka
    Inst Rech Sci Sante, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso..
    Clinical determinants of early parasitological response to ACTs in African patients with uncomplicated falciparum malaria: a literature review and meta-analysis of individual patient data2015In: BMC Medicine, ISSN 1741-7015, E-ISSN 1741-7015, Vol. 13, 212Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum has emerged in the Greater Mekong sub-region and poses a major global public health threat. Slow parasite clearance is a key clinical manifestation of reduced susceptibility to artemisinin. This study was designed to establish the baseline values for clearance in patients from Sub-Saharan African countries with uncomplicated malaria treated with artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). Methods: A literature review in PubMed was conducted in March 2013 to identify all prospective clinical trials (uncontrolled trials, controlled trials and randomized controlled trials), including ACTs conducted in Sub-Saharan Africa, between 1960 and 2012. Individual patient data from these studies were shared with the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) and pooled using an a priori statistical analytical plan. Factors affecting early parasitological response were investigated using logistic regression with study sites fitted as a random effect. The risk of bias in included studies was evaluated based on study design, methodology and missing data. Results: In total, 29,493 patients from 84 clinical trials were included in the analysis, treated with artemether-lumefantrine (n = 13,664), artesunate-amodiaquine (n = 11,337) and dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (n = 4,492). The overall parasite clearance rate was rapid. The parasite positivity rate (PPR) decreased from 59.7 % (95 % CI: 54.5-64.9) on day 1 to 6.7 % (95 % CI: 4.8-8.7) on day 2 and 0.9 % (95 % CI: 0.5-1.2) on day 3. The 95th percentile of observed day 3 PPR was 5.3 %. Independent risk factors predictive of day 3 positivity were: high baseline parasitaemia (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.16 (95 % CI: 1.08-1.25); per 2-fold increase in parasite density, P <0.001); fever (>37.5 degrees C) (AOR = 1.50 (95 % CI: 1.06-2.13), P = 0.022); severe anaemia (AOR = 2.04 (95 % CI: 1.21-3.44), P = 0.008); areas of low/moderate transmission setting (AOR = 2.71 (95 % CI: 1.38-5.36), P = 0.004); and treatment with the loose formulation of artesunate-amodiaquine (AOR = 2.27 (95 % CI: 1.14-4.51), P = 0.020, compared to dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine). Conclusions: The three ACTs assessed in this analysis continue to achieve rapid early parasitological clearance across the sites assessed in Sub-Saharan Africa. A threshold of 5 % day 3 parasite positivity from a minimum sample size of 50 patients provides a more sensitive benchmark in Sub-Saharan Africa compared to the current recommended threshold of 10 % to trigger further investigation of artemisinin susceptibility.

  • 43.
    Abdulla, Suzanne
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Stråldos och bildkvalitet vid konventionell frontalbild av ländryggen med och utan kompression2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 44.
    Abdullahi Mohamed, Mohamed
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
     GLP-1 REGULATES PROLIFERATION OF GLP-1 SECRETING CELLS THROUGH A FEEDBACK MECHANISM2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Background and aim:

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic and progressive illness that affects all type of populations and ages. According to World health organization (WHO) by 2030 it will be 366 million people effected world wild. Many new drugs are Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) based therapy for treatment of type 2diabetes. GLP-1 is released from the intestinal L-cells, and is a potent stimulator of glucose-dependent insulin secretion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of GLP-1 and its stable analogs on cell proliferation of GLP-1 secreting GLUTag cells.

    Material and methods:

    GluTag cells were incubated for 48h in DMEM medium containing (0.5% fetal bovine serum and 100 IU/ml penicillin and 100 μg/ml streptomycin and 3mM glucose concentration) in the present or absence of the agents. DNA synthesis was measured using 3H- thymidine incorporation and Ki67 antigen staining. Western blot were performed to investigate the present of GLP-1 receptor in GLUTag cells.

    Results/conclusions:

    These results suggest that GLP-1 regulates proliferation of the GLP-1-secreting cell through a feedback mechanism via its receptor. Since serum GLP-1 levels are decreased in type 2 diabetic patients, the effect of GLP-1 on the GLP-1-secreting cell proliferation suggested here provides a novel beneficial long-term effect of the incretin-based drugs in clinical practice i.e. through increase of the GLP-1-secreting cell mass, augmenting the incretin effect. In addition, the feedback mechanism action of GLP-1 reveals a new insight in regulation manner of the L-cell proliferation.

    GLP-1(7-36) increased cell proliferation in GLUTag cells, an effect which was blocked by the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39). The GLP-1 receptor was expressed in GluTag cells.

    Keywords:

    Incretin hormone, GLP-1, GLP-1 receptor, Exendin-4, Diabetes

  • 45.
    Abdurahman, Samir
    et al.
    Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, F68, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Barqasho, Babilonia
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Nowak, Piotr
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Cuong, Do Duy
    Infectious Diseases Department, Bach Mai Hospital, Hanoi, Viet Nam .
    Amogné, Wondwossen
    Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia .
    Larsson, Mattias
    Division of Global Health (IHCAR), Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Oxford University Clinical Research Unit (OUCRU), Hanoi, Viet Nam .
    Lindquist, Lars
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Marrone, Gaetano
    Division of Global Health (IHCAR), Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Sönnerborg, Anders
    Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, F68, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Pattern of microbial translocation in patients living with HIV-1 from Vietnam, Ethiopia and Sweden2014In: Journal of the International AIDS Society, ISSN 1758-2652, Vol. 17, 18841- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The role of microbial translocation (MT) in HIV patients living with HIV from low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is not fully known. The aim of this study is to investigate and compare the patterns of MT in patients from Vietnam, Ethiopia and Sweden.

    METHODS: Cross-sectional samples were obtained from treatment-naïve patients living with HIV-1 and healthy controls from Vietnam (n=83; n=46), Ethiopia (n=9492; n=50) and Sweden (n=51; n=19). Longitudinal samples were obtained from a subset of the Vietnamese (n=24) in whom antiretroviral therapy (ART) and tuberculostatics were given. Plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS), sCD14 and anti-flagellin IgG were determined by the endpoint chromogenic Limulus Amebocyte Assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    RESULTS: All three biomarkers were significantly increased in patients living with HIV-1 from all countries as compared to controls. No differences were found between males and females. Vietnamese and Ethiopian patients had significantly higher levels of anti-flagellin IgG and LPS, as compared to Swedes. ART reduced these levels for the Vietnamese. Vietnamese patients given tuberculostatics at initiation of ART had significantly lower levels of anti-flagellin IgG and higher sCD14. The biomarkers were lower in Vietnamese who did not develop opportunistic infection.

    CONCLUSIONS: Higher MT is common in patients living with HIV compared to healthy individuals, and in patients from LMICs compared to patients from a high-income country. Treatment with tuberculostatics decreased MT while higher levels of MT are associated with a poorer clinical outcome.

  • 46.
    Abedi, Mohammad R.
    et al.
    Orebro University Hospital. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Section for Transfusion Medicine.
    Doverud, Ann-Charlotte
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Section for Transfusion Medicine, Örebro University Hospital.
    Preparation and Pathogen Inactivation of Double Dose Buffy Coat Platelet Products using the INTERCEPT Blood System2012In: Journal of Visualized Experiments, ISSN 1940-087X, E-ISSN 1940-087X, no 70, UNSP e4414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blood centers are faced with many challenges including maximizing production yield from the blood product donations they receive as well as ensuring the highest possible level of safety for transfusion patients, including protection from transfusion transmitted diseases. This must be accomplished in a fiscally responsible manner which minimizes operating expenses including consumables, equipment, waste, and personnel costs, among others.

    Several methods are available to produce platelet concentrates for transfusion. One of the most common is the buffy coat method in which a single therapeutic platelet unit (>= 2.0 x10(11) platelets per unit or per local regulations) is prepared by pooling the buffy coat layer from up to six whole blood donations. A procedure for producing "double dose" whole blood derived platelets has only recently been developed.

    Presented here is a novel method for preparing double dose whole blood derived platelet concentrates from pools of 7 buffy coats and subsequently treating the double dose units with the INTERCEPT Blood System for pathogen inactivation. INTERCEPT was developed to inactivate viruses, bacteria, parasites, and contaminating donor white cells which may be present in donated blood. Pairing INTERCEPT with the double dose buffy coat method by utilizing the INTERCEPT Processing Set with Dual Storage Containers (the "DS set"), allows blood centers to treat each of their double dose units in a single pathogen inactivation processing set, thereby maximizing patient safety while minimizing costs. The double dose buffy coat method requires fewer buffy coats and reduces the use of consumables by up to 50% (e.g. pooling sets, filter sets, platelet additive solution, and sterile connection wafers) compared to preparation and treatment of single dose buffy coat platelet units. Other cost savings include less waste, less equipment maintenance, lower power requirements, reduced personnel time, and lower collection cost compared to the apheresis technique.

  • 47. Abedini, Sadollah
    et al.
    Holme, Ingar
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Jardine, Alan
    Cole, Ed
    Maes, Bart
    Holdaas, Hallvard
    Cerebrovascular events in renal transplant recipients2009In: Transplantation, ISSN 0041-1337, Vol. 87, no 1, 112-7 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of stroke and risk factors for different subtypes of cerebrovascular (CBV) events in renal transplant recipients have not been examined in any large prospective controlled trial. METHODS: The Assessment of Lescol in Renal Transplantation was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the effect of fluvastatin (40-80 mg) daily on cardiovascular, and renal outcomes in renal transplant recipients. Patients initially randomized to fluvastatin or placebo in the 5 to 6 year trial was offered open-label fluvastatin in a 2-year extension to the original study. We investigated the incidence of stroke and risk factors for ischemic and hemorrhagic CBV events in 2102 renal graft recipients participating in the Assessment of Lescol in Renal Transplantation core and extension trial with a mean follow-up of 6.7 years. RESULTS: The incidence and type of CBV events did not differ between the lipid lowering arm and the placebo arm. A total of 184 (8.8%, 95% confidence interval 4.6-12.9) of 2102 patients experienced a CBV event during follow-up, corresponding to an incidence of 1.3% CBV event per year. The mortality for patients experiencing a hemorrhagic stroke was 48% (13 of 27), whereas the mortality for ischemic strokes was 6.0% (8 of 133). Diabetes mellitus, previous CBV event, age, and serum creatinine were independent risk factors for cerebral ischemic events. The risk of a hemorrhagic cerebral event was increased by diabetes mellitus, polycystic kidney disease, left ventricular hypertrophy, and systolic blood pressure. INTERPRETATION: Risk factors for CBV events in renal transplant recipients differ according to subtype.

  • 48. Abedini, Sadollah
    et al.
    Holme, Ingar
    März, Winfried
    Weihrauch, Gisela
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Jardine, Alan
    Cole, Edward
    Maes, Bart
    Neumayer, Hans-Hellmut
    Grönhagen-Riska, Carola
    Ambühl, Patrice
    Holdaas, Halvard
    Inflammation in renal transplantation2009In: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, ISSN 1046-6673, Vol. 4, no 7, 1246-1254 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Renal transplant recipients experience premature cardiovascular disease and death. The association of inflammation, all-cause mortality, and cardiovascular events in renal transplant recipients has not been examined in a large prospective controlled trial. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: ALERT was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the effect of fluvastatin on cardiovascular and renal outcomes in 2102 renal transplant recipients. Patients initially randomized to fluvastatin or placebo in the 5- to 6-yr trial were offered open-label fluvastatin in a 2-yr extension to the original study. The association between inflammation markers, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), and IL-6 on cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality was investigated. RESULTS: The baseline IL-6 value was 2.9 +/- 1.9 pg/ml (n = 1751) and that of hsCRP was 3.8 +/- 6.7 mg/L (n = 1910). After adjustment for baseline values for established risk factors, the hazard ratios for a major cardiac event and all-cause mortality for IL-6 were 1.08 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01 to 1.15, P = 0.018] and 1.11 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.18, P < 0.001), respectively. The adjusted hazard ratio for hsCRP for a cardiovascular event was 1.10 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.20, P = 0.027) and for all-cause mortality was 1.15 (95% CI, 1.06 to 1.1.25, P = 0.049). CONCLUSIONS: The inflammation markers IL-6 and hsCRP are independently associated with major cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality in renal transplant recipients.

  • 49. Abedini, Sadollah
    et al.
    Meinitzer, Andreas
    Holme, Ingar
    März, Winfried
    Weihrauch, Gisela
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Jardine, Alan
    Holdaas, Halvard
    Asymmetrical dimethylarginine is associated with renal and cardiovascular outcomes and all-cause mortality in renal transplant recipients2010In: Kidney International, ISSN 0085-2538, E-ISSN 1523-1755, Vol. 77, no 1, 44-50 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased plasma levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) are associated with endothelial dysfunction and predict the progression to dialysis and death in patients with chronic kidney disease. The effects of these increased ADMA levels in renal transplant recipients, however, are unknown. We used the data from ALERT, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the effect of fluvastatin on cardiovascular and renal outcomes in 2102 renal transplant recipients with stable graft function on enrollment. Patients who were initially randomized to fluvastatin or placebo in the 5- to 6-year trial were offered open-label fluvastatin in a 2-year extension of the original study. After adjustment for baseline values for established factors in this post hoc analysis, ADMA was found to be a significant risk factor for graft failure or doubling of serum creatinine (hazard ratio 2.78), major cardiac events (hazard ratio 2.61), cerebrovascular events (hazard ratio 6.63), and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 4.87). In this trial extension, the number of end points increased with increasing quartiles of plasma ADMA levels. All end points were significantly increased in the fourth compared to the first quartile. Our study shows that elevated plasma levels of ADMA are associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and the deterioration of graft function in renal transplant recipients.

  • 50.
    Abednazari, Hossin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. PEAS Institute, Linköping.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Nilsson, Ingela
    Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Nayeri, Fariba
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Hepatocyte growth factor is a reliable marker for efficient anti-bacterial therapy within the first day of treatment2014In: Advances in Bioscience and Biotechnology, ISSN 2156-8456, E-ISSN 2156-8502, Vol. 5, no 10, 823-830 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid diagnosis and choice of appropriate antibiotic treatment might be life-saving in serious infectious diseases. Still the available markers that can evaluate and monitor the diagnosis and treatment are few. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has been studied as a potent regenerative factor produced and released during injuries such as infectious diseases. Monitoring of HGF levels might predict therapy results better than C-reactive protein (CRP) within the first day of treatment in pneumonia. For further investigation of previous observations we aimed to study HGF as a first-day marker in over-representing infectious diseases in comparison to procalcitonin (PCT), CRP and body temperature. Fifty-one patients with community acquired infectious diseases were included consequently at admittance and the serum samples were collected before and within 18 - 24 hours of treatment. HGF levels decreased significantly in case of efficient antibiotic therapy and HGF was shown to be better than PCT, CRP and body temperature to evaluate treatment. In patients with pneumonia, monitoring of HGF was most reasonable. HGF might be used as a therapeutic marker within the first day of empiric antibiotic treatment during infection.

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