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  • 1. Abel, Olubunmi
    et al.
    Powell, John F.
    Andersen, Peter M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Al-Chalabi, Ammar
    ALSoD: A user-friendly online bioinformatics tool for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis genetics2012In: Human Mutation, ISSN 1059-7794, E-ISSN 1098-1004, Vol. 33, no 9, 1345-1351 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the commonest adult onset motor neuron disease, with a peak age of onset in the seventh decade. With advances in genetic technology, there is an enormous increase in the volume of genetic data produced, and a corresponding need for storage, analysis, and interpretation, particularly as our understanding of the relationships between genotype and phenotype mature. Here, we present a system to enable this in the form of the ALS Online Database (ALSoD at http://alsod.iop.kcl.ac.uk), a freely available database that has been transformed from a single gene storage facility recording mutations in the SOD1 gene to a multigene ALS bioinformatics repository and analytical instrument combining genotype, phenotype, and geographical information with associated analysis tools. These include a comparison tool to evaluate genes side by side or jointly with user configurable features, a pathogenicity prediction tool using a combination of computational approaches to distinguish variants with nonfunctional characteristics from disease-associated mutations with more dangerous consequences, and a credibility tool to enable ALS researchers to objectively assess the evidence for gene causation in ALS. Furthermore, integration of external tools, systems for feedback, annotation by users, and two-way links to collaborators hosting complementary databases further enhance the functionality of ALSoD. Hum Mutat 33:1345-1351, 2012. (c) 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • 2.
    Abelson, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Genetic Risk Factors for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: From Candidate Genes to Functional Variants2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis has been to identify genetic variants that increase the susceptibility for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease caused by a complex interplay between various genetic and environmental factors.

    Five different candidate genes were selected through different strategies, and were analysed for association with SLE in an attempt to distinguish some of the underlying mechanisms of this disease. Two of these genes, PD-L1 and PD-L2, appeared not to contain any major risk factors for SLE in the analysed European and Latin American populations. In two other genes, CD24 and STAT4, there appeared to be population-specific effects. The A57V amino acid substitution in the CD24 gene, previously implicated with multiple sclerosis, was associated in a Spanish cohort, with a weak trend in German samples, and no association in Swedish. The previously reported and highly convincing association of the STAT4 transcription factor gene was confirmed in all our cohorts. Interestingly, the results indicate the presence of at least two independent risk variants: the first, represented by a previously reported SNP, was the strongest in individuals of Northern European ancestry, and the second was more pronounced in individuals from Southern Europe and Latin America. We also report the identification of a novel susceptibility gene. The BANK1 gene, encoding a scaffold protein involved in B-cell activation, contains functional variants affecting important domains, which are associated in all investigated cohorts from Europe and Latin America.

    These results confirm the existence of replicable associations between genetic variants and SLE, which are common and present in many populations. The results also illustrate a certain degree of heterogeneity, where some risk factors could have variable effect in different populations.

  • 3. Acevedo, Nathalie
    et al.
    Bornacelly, Adriana
    Mercado, Dilia
    Unneberg, Per
    Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mittermann, Irene
    Valenta, Rudolf
    Kennedy, Malcolm
    Scheynius, Annika
    Caraballo, Luis
    Genetic Variants in CHIA and CHI3L1 Are Associated with the IgE Response to the Ascaris Resistance Marker ABA-1 and the Birch Pollen Allergen Bet v 12016In: plos one, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 12, e0167453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Helminth infections and allergic diseases are associated with IgE hyperresponsiveness but the genetics of this phenotype remain to be defined. Susceptibility to Ascaris lumbricoides infection and antibody levels to this helminth are associated with polymorphisms in locus 13q33-34. We aimed to explore this and other genomic regions to identify genetic variants associated with the IgE responsiveness in humans. Forty-eight subjects from Cartagena, Colombia, with extreme values of specific IgE to Ascaris and ABA-1, a resistance marker of this nematode, were selected for targeted resequencing. Burden analyses were done comparing extreme groups for IgE values. One-hundred one SNPs were genotyped in 1258 individuals of two well-characterized populations from Colombia and Sweden. Two low-frequency coding variants in the gene encoding the Acidic Mammalian Chitinase (CHIA rs79500525, rs139812869, tagged by rs10494133) were found enriched in high IgE responders to ABA-1 and confirmed by genetic association analyses. The SNP rs4950928 in the Chitinase 3 Like 1 gene (CHI3L1) was associated with high IgE to ABA-1 in Colombians and with high IgE to Bet v 1 in the Swedish population. CHIA rs10494133 and ABDH13 rs3783118 were associated with IgE responses to Ascaris. SNPs in the Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily Member 13b gene (TNFSF13B) encoding the cytokine B cell activating Factor were associated with high levels of total IgE in both populations. This is the first report on the association between low-frequency and common variants in the chitinases- related genes CHIA and CHI3L1 with the intensity of specific IgE to ABA-1 in a population naturally exposed to Ascaris and with Bet v 1 in a Swedish population. Our results add new information about the genetic influences of human IgE responsiveness; since the genes encode for enzymes involved in the immune response to parasitic infections, they could be helpful for understanding helminth immunity and allergic responses. We also confirmed that TNFSF13B has an important and conserved role in the regulation of total IgE levels, which supports potential evolutionary links between helminth immunity and allergic response.

  • 4.
    Adams, Hieab H. H.
    et al.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Hibar, Derrek P.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, USC Mark & Mary Stevens Neuroimaging & Informat I, Imaging Genet Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Chouraki, Vincent
    Boston Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Boston, MA 02118 USA.;Univ Lille, RID AGE Risk Factors & Mol Determinants Aging Rel, CHU Lille, Inserm,Inst Pasteur Lille, Lille, France.;Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, Framingham, MA USA..
    Stein, Jason L.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, USC Mark & Mary Stevens Neuroimaging & Informat I, Imaging Genet Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.;Univ N Carolina, Dept Genet, Chapel Hill, NC USA.;Univ N Carolina, UNC Neurosci Ctr, Chapel Hill, NC USA..
    Nyquist, Paul A.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Dept Neurol, Dept Anesthesia Crit Care Med, Dept Neurosurg, Baltimore, MD 21218 USA..
    Renteria, Miguel E.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Trompet, Stella
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Cardiol, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Cognit Neurosci, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Seshadri, Sudha
    Boston Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Boston, MA 02118 USA.;Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, Framingham, MA USA..
    Desrivieres, Sylvane
    Kings Coll London, Inst Psychiat Psychol & Neurosci, MRC SGDP Ctr, London, England..
    Beecham, Ashley H.
    Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Human Genet, Dr John T Macdonald Fdn, Miami, FL 33136 USA.;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, John P Hussman Inst Human Gen, Miami, FL 33136 USA..
    Jahanshad, Neda
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, USC Mark & Mary Stevens Neuroimaging & Informat I, Imaging Genet Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Wittfeld, Katharine
    German Ctr Neurodegenerat Dis DZNE Rostock Greifs, Greifswald, Germany.;Univ Med Greifswald, Dept Psychiat, Greifswald, Germany..
    Van der Lee, Sven J.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Abramovic, Lucija
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Alhusaini, Saud
    McGill Univ, Montreal Neurol Inst, Dept Neurol & Neurosurg, Montreal, PQ, Canada.;Royal Coll Surgeons Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland..
    Amin, Najaf
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Andersson, Micael
    Umea Univ, Dept Integrat Med Biol, Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Umea Ctr Funct Brain Imaging, Umea, Sweden..
    Arfanakis, Konstantinos
    IIT, Dept Biomed Engn, Chicago, IL 60616 USA.;Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Alzheimers Dis Ctr, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.;Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Diagnost Radiol & Nucl Med, Chicago, IL 60612 USA..
    Aribisala, Benjamin S.
    Univ Edinburgh, Brain Res Imaging Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Lagos State Univ, Dept Comp Sci, Lagos, Nigeria.;Univ Edinburgh, Dept Neuroimaging Sci, Scottish Imaging Network, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Armstrong, Nicola J.
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Psychiat, Ctr Hlth Brain Ageing, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;Murdoch Univ, Math & Stat, Perth, WA, Australia..
    Athanasiu, Lavinia
    Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway.;Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Mental Hlth & Addict, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway..
    Axelsson, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Beiser, Alexa
    Boston Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Boston, MA 02118 USA.;Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, Framingham, MA USA.;Boston Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA USA..
    Bernard, Manon
    Univ Toronto, Hosp Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Bis, Joshua C.
    Univ Washington, Dept Med, Cardiovasc Hlth Res Unit, Seattle, WA USA..
    Blanken, Laura M. E.
    Erasmus MC, Generat R Study Grp, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC Sophia Childrens Hosp, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat Psychol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Blanton, Susan H.
    Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Human Genet, Dr John T Macdonald Fdn, Miami, FL 33136 USA.;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, John P Hussman Inst Human Gen, Miami, FL 33136 USA..
    Bohlken, Marc M.
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Boks, Marco P.
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Bralten, Janita
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Brickman, Adam M.
    Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, Taub Inst Res Alzheimers Dis & Aging Brain, New York, NY USA.;Columbia Univ, GH Sergievsky Ctr, Med Ctr, New York, NY USA.;Columbia Univ, Dept Neurol, Med Ctr, New York, NY USA..
    Carmichael, Owen
    Pennington Biomed Res Ctr, 6400 Perkins Rd, Baton Rouge, LA 70808 USA..
    Chakravarty, M. Mallar
    Douglas Mental Hlth Univ Inst, Cerebral Imaging Ctr, Montreal, PQ, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Psychiat & Biomed Engn, Montreal, PQ, Canada..
    Chauhan, Ganesh
    Univ Bordeaux, INSERM Unit U1219, Bordeaux, France..
    Chen, Qiang
    Lieber Inst Brain Dev, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Ching, Christopher R. K.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, USC Mark & Mary Stevens Neuroimaging & Informat I, Imaging Genet Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.;Univ Calif Los Angeles, Sch Med, Interdept Neurosci Grad Program, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Den Braber, Anouk
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Biol Psychol, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Doan, Nhat Trung
    Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway..
    Ehrlich, Stefan
    Tech Univ Dresden, Fac Med, Div Psychol & Social Med & Dev Neurosci, Dresden, Germany.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Martinos Ctr Biomed Imaging, Charlestown, MA USA..
    Filippi, Irina
    Univ Paris Sud, Univ Paris Descartes, NSERM Unit Neuroimaging & Psychiat 1000, Paris, France.;Hosp Cochin, AP HP, Maison Solenn Adolescent Psychopathol & Med Dept, Paris, France..
    Ge, Tian
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Martinos Ctr Biomed Imaging, Charlestown, MA USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Ctr Human Genet Res, Psychiat & Neurodev Genet Unit, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA.;Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Stanley Ctr Psychiat Res, Boston, MA USA..
    Giddaluru, Sudheer
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr Psychosis Res, N-5020 Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Ctr Med Genet & Mol Med, Dr Einar Martens Res Grp Biol Psychiat, Bergen, Norway..
    Goldman, Aaron L.
    Lieber Inst Brain Dev, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Gottesman, Rebecca F.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA..
    Greven, Corina U.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Cognit Neurosci, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Karakter Child & Adolescent Psychiat Univ Ctr, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Kings Coll London, Med Res Council Social, Genet & Dev Psychiat Ctr, Inst Psychol Psychiat & Neurosci, London, England..
    Grimm, Oliver
    Heidelberg Univ, Med Fac Mannheim, Cent Inst Mental Hlth, Mannheim, Germany..
    Griswold, Michael E.
    Univ Mississippi, Med Ctr, Ctr Biostat & Bioinformat, Jackson, MS 39216 USA..
    Guadalupe, Tulio
    Max Planck Inst Psycholinguist, Language & Genet Dept, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Int Max Planck Res Sch Language Sci, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Hass, Johanna
    Tech Univ Dresden, Fac Med, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat, Dresden, Germany..
    Haukvik, Unn K.
    Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway.;Diakonhjemmet Hosp, Dept Res & Dev, Oslo, Norway..
    Hilal, Saima
    Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Pharmacol, Singapore, Singapore.;Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Mem Aging & Cognit Ctr, Singapore, Singapore..
    Hofer, Edith
    Med Univ Graz, Clin Div Neurogeriatr, Dept Neurol, Graz, Austria.;Med Univ Graz, Inst Med Informat Stat & Documentat, Graz, Austria..
    Hoehn, David
    Max Planck Inst Psychiat, Dept Translat Res Psychiat, Munich, Germany..
    Holmes, Avram J.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Yale Univ, Dept Psychol, New Haven, CT USA..
    Hoogman, Martine
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Janowitz, Deborah
    Univ Med Greifswald, Dept Psychiat, Greifswald, Germany..
    Jia, Tianye
    Kings Coll London, Inst Psychiat Psychol & Neurosci, MRC SGDP Ctr, London, England..
    Kasperaviciute, Dalia
    UCL, Inst Neurol, London, England.;Epilepsy Soc, Gerrards Cross, Bucks, England.;Imperial Coll London, Dept Med, London, England..
    Kim, Sungeun
    Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Computat Biol & Bioinformat, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Indiana Alzheimer Dis Ctr, Indianapolis, IN USA..
    Klein, Marieke
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Kraemer, Bernd
    Heidelberg Univ, Dept Gen Psychiat, Sect Expt Psychopathol & Neuroimaging, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Lee, Phil H.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Ctr Human Genet Res, Psychiat & Neurodev Genet Unit, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA.;Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Stanley Ctr Psychiat Res, Boston, MA USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Lurie Ctr Autism, Lexington, MA USA..
    Liao, Jiemin
    Singapore Natl Eye Ctr, Singapore Eye Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore..
    Liewald, David C. M.
    Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Lopez, Lorna M.
    Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Luciano, Michelle
    Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Macare, Christine
    Kings Coll London, Inst Psychiat Psychol & Neurosci, MRC SGDP Ctr, London, England..
    Marquand, Andre
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Ctr Cognit Neuroimaging, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Matarin, Mar
    UCL, Inst Neurol, London, England.;Epilepsy Soc, Gerrards Cross, Bucks, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Reta Lila Weston Inst, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England..
    Mather, Karen A.
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Psychiat, Ctr Hlth Brain Ageing, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Mattheisen, Manuel
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Biomed, Aarhus, Denmark.;iPSYCH, Lundbeck Fdn Initiat Integrat Psychiat Res, Aarhus, Denmark.;iPSYCH, Lundbeck Fdn Initiat Integrat Psychiat Res, Copenhagen, Denmark.;Aarhus Univ, iSEQ, Ctr Integrated Sequencing, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Mazoyer, Bernard
    UMR5296 Univ Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, Bordeaux, France..
    Mckay, David R.
    Yale Univ, Dept Psychiat, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.;Olin Neuropsychiat Res Ctr, Hartford, CT USA..
    McWhirter, Rebekah
    Univ Tasmania, Menzies Inst Med Res, Hobart, Tas, Australia..
    Milaneschi, Yuri
    VU Univ Med Ctr GGZ Geest, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res, Dept Psychiat, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;VU Univ Med Ctr GGZ Geest, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Mirza-Schreiber, Nazanin
    Max Planck Inst Psychiat, Dept Translat Res Psychiat, Munich, Germany..
    Muetzel, Ryan L.
    Erasmus MC, Generat R Study Grp, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC Sophia Childrens Hosp, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat Psychol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Maniega, Susana Munoz
    Univ Edinburgh, Brain Res Imaging Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Dept Neuroimaging Sci, Scottish Imaging Network, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Nho, Kwangsik
    Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Neuroimaging Radiol & Imaging Sci, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Computat Biol & Bioinformat, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Indiana Alzheimer Dis Ctr, Indianapolis, IN USA..
    Nugent, Allison C.
    NIMH, Exp Therapeut & Pathophysiol Branch, Intramural Res Program, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Loohuis, Loes M. Olde
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Ctr Neurobehav Genet, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Oosterlaan, Jaap
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Clin Neuropsychol, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Papmeyer, Martina
    Univ Edinburgh, Royal Edinburgh Hosp, Div Psychiat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Bern, Univ Hosp Psychiat, Translat Res Ctr, Div Syst Neurosci Psychopathol, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Pappa, Irene
    Erasmus MC, Generat R Study Grp, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus Univ, Sch Pedag & Educ Sci, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Pirpamer, Lukas
    Med Univ Graz, Clin Div Neurogeriatr, Dept Neurol, Graz, Austria..
    Pudas, Sara
    Umea Univ, Dept Integrat Med Biol, Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Umea Ctr Funct Brain Imaging, Umea, Sweden..
    Puetz, Benno
    Max Planck Inst Psychiat, Dept Translat Res Psychiat, Munich, Germany..
    Rajan, Kumar B.
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Inst Healthy Aging, Chicago, IL 60612 USA..
    Ramasamy, Adaikalavan
    UCL Inst Neurol, Reta Lila Weston Inst, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England.;Kings Coll London, Dept Med & Mol Genet, London, England.;Univ Oxford, Jenner Inst Labs, Oxford, England..
    Richards, Jennifer S.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Cognit Neurosci, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Karakter Child & Adolescent Psychiat Univ Ctr, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Risacher, Shannon L.
    Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Neuroimaging Radiol & Imaging Sci, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Indiana Alzheimer Dis Ctr, Indianapolis, IN USA..
    Roiz-Santianez, Roberto
    Univ Cantabria IDIVAL, Sch Med, Dept Med & Psychiat, Univ Hosp Marques de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain.;CIBERSAM Ctr Invest Biomed Red Salud Med, Santander, Spain..
    Rommelse, Nanda
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Karakter Child & Adolescent Psychiat Univ Ctr, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Rose, Emma J.
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Psychosis Res Grp, Dept Psychiat, Dublin, Ireland.;Trinity Coll Dublin, Trinity Translat Med Inst, Dublin, Ireland..
    Royle, Natalie A.
    Univ Edinburgh, Brain Res Imaging Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Dept Neuroimaging Sci, Scottish Imaging Network, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Clin Brain Sci, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Rundek, Tatjana
    Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Miami, FL 33136 USA.;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth Sci, Miami, FL 33136 USA..
    Saemann, Philipp G.
    Max Planck Inst Psychiat, Dept Translat Res Psychiat, Munich, Germany..
    Satizabal, Claudia L.
    Boston Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Boston, MA 02118 USA.;Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, Framingham, MA USA..
    Schmaal, Lianne
    Orygen, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;Univ Melbourne, Ctr Youth Mental Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Schork, Andrew J.
    Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Neurosci, Multimodal Imaging Lab, San Diego, CA 92103 USA.;Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Cognit Sci, San Diego, CA 92103 USA..
    Shen, Li
    Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Neuroimaging Radiol & Imaging Sci, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Computat Biol & Bioinformat, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Indiana Alzheimer Dis Ctr, Indianapolis, IN USA..
    Shin, Jean
    Univ Toronto, Hosp Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Shumskaya, Elena
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Ctr Cognit Neuroimaging, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Smith, Albert V.
    Iceland Heart Assoc, Kopavogur, Iceland.;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Sprooten, Emma
    Yale Univ, Dept Psychiat, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.;Olin Neuropsychiat Res Ctr, Hartford, CT USA.;Univ Edinburgh, Royal Edinburgh Hosp, Div Psychiat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Psychiat, New York, NY 10029 USA..
    Strike, Lachlan T.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Univ Queensland, Queensland Brain Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Teumer, Alexander
    Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Community Med, Greifswald, Germany..
    Thomson, Russell
    Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana
    CIBERSAM Ctr Invest Biomed Red Salud Med, Santander, Spain.;Valdecilla Biomed Res Inst IDIVAL, Neuroimaging Unit, Technol Facil, Santander, Cantabria, Spain..
    Toro, Roberto
    Inst Pasteur, Paris, France..
    Trabzuni, Daniah
    UCL Inst Neurol, Reta Lila Weston Inst, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England.;King Faisal Specialist Hosp & Res Ctr, Dept Genet, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Vaidya, Dhananjay
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, GeneSTAR Res Ctr, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA..
    Van der Grond, Jeroen
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Radiol, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Van der Meer, Dennis
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Psychiat, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Van Eijk, Kristel R.
    UMC Utrecht, Human Neurogenet Unit, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Van Erp, Theo G. M.
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Psychiat & Human Behav, Irvine, CA 92717 USA..
    Van Rooij, Daan
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Cognit Neurosci, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Psychiat, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Walton, Esther
    Tech Univ Dresden, Fac Med, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat, Dresden, Germany..
    Westlye, Lars T.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Mental Hlth & Addict, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway.;Univ Oslo, Dept Psychol, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway..
    Whelan, Christopher D.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, USC Mark & Mary Stevens Neuroimaging & Informat I, Imaging Genet Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.;Royal Coll Surgeons Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland..
    Windham, Beverly G.
    Univ Mississippi, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Jackson, MS 39216 USA..
    Winkler, Anderson M.
    Yale Univ, Dept Psychiat, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.;Univ Oxford, FMRIB Ctr, Oxford, England..
    Woldehawariat, Girma
    NIMH, Exp Therapeut & Pathophysiol Branch, Intramural Res Program, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Wolf, Christiane
    Univ Wurzburg, Dept Psychiat Psychosomat & Psychotherapy, Wurzburg, Germany..
    Wolfers, Thomas
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Xu, Bing
    Kings Coll London, Inst Psychiat Psychol & Neurosci, MRC SGDP Ctr, London, England..
    Yanek, Lisa R.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, GeneSTAR Res Ctr, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA..
    Yang, Jingyun
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Alzheimers Dis Ctr, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.;Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Neurol Sci, Chicago, IL 60612 USA..
    Zijdenbos, Alex
    Biospect Inc, Montreal, PQ, Canada..
    Zwiers, Marcel P.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Ctr Cognit Neuroimaging, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Agartz, Ingrid
    Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway.;Diakonhjemmet Hosp, Dept Res & Dev, Oslo, Norway.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Psychiat Res, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Aggarwal, Neelum T.
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Alzheimers Dis Ctr, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.;Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Inst Healthy Aging, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.;Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Neurol Sci, Chicago, IL 60612 USA..
    Almasy, Laura
    Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, San Antonio, TX USA.;Univ Penn, Dept Genet, Perelman Sch Med, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.;Childrens Hosp Philadelphia, Dept Biomed & Hlth Informat, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Ames, David
    Royal Melbourne Hosp, Natl Ageing Res Inst, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;Univ Melbourne, Acad Unit Psychiat Old Age, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Amouyel, Philippe
    Univ Lille, RID AGE Risk Factors & Mol Determinants Aging Rel, CHU Lille, Inserm,Inst Pasteur Lille, Lille, France..
    Andreassen, Ole A.
    Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway.;Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Mental Hlth & Addict, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway..
    Arepalli, Sampath
    NIA, Neurogenet Lab, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Assareh, Amelia A.
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Psychiat, Ctr Hlth Brain Ageing, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Barral, Sandra
    Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, Taub Inst Res Alzheimers Dis & Aging Brain, New York, NY USA..
    Bastin, Mark E.
    Univ Edinburgh, Brain Res Imaging Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Dept Neuroimaging Sci, Scottish Imaging Network, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Clin Brain Sci, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Becker, Diane M.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, GeneSTAR Res Ctr, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA..
    Becker, James T.
    Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Psychiat, Pittsburgh, PA USA.;Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Neurol, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA.;Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Psychol, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA..
    Bennett, David A.
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Alzheimers Dis Ctr, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.;Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Neurol Sci, Chicago, IL 60612 USA..
    Blangero, John
    Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    van Bokhoven, Hans
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Boomsma, Dorret I.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Biol Psychol, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Brodaty, Henry
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Psychiat, Ctr Hlth Brain Ageing, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;UNSW, Dementia Collaborat Res Ctr Assessment & Better, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Brouwer, Rachel M.
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Brunner, Han G.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Maastricht Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Clin Genet, Maastricht, Netherlands..
    Buckner, Randy L.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Harvard Univ, Dept Psychol, Ctr Brain Sci, 33 Kirkland St, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA..
    Buitelaar, Jan K.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Cognit Neurosci, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Karakter Child & Adolescent Psychiat Univ Ctr, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Bulayeva, Kazima B.
    Dagestan State Univ, Dept Evolut & Genet, Makhachkala, Dagestan, Russia..
    Cahn, Wiepke
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Calhoun, Vince D.
    Mind Res Network, Albuquerque, NM USA.;LBERI, Albuquerque, NM USA.;Univ New Mexico, Dept ECE, Albuquerque, NM 87131 USA..
    Cannon, Dara M.
    NIMH, Exp Therapeut & Pathophysiol Branch, Intramural Res Program, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.;Natl Univ Ireland Galway, Ctr Neuroimaging & Cognit Genom NICOG, NCBES Galway Neurosci Ctr, Coll Med Nursing & Hlth Sci,Clin Neuroimaging Lab, Galway, Ireland..
    Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.
    Royal Coll Surgeons Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland..
    Chen, Christopher
    Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Pharmacol, Singapore, Singapore.;Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Mem Aging & Cognit Ctr, Singapore, Singapore..
    Cheng, Ching -Yu
    Singapore Natl Eye Ctr, Singapore Eye Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore.;Duke NUS Grad Med Sch, Acad Med Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore.;Natl Univ Singapore, Yong Loo Lin Sch Med, Dept Ophthalmol, Singapore, Singapore..
    Cichon, Sven
    Univ Basel, Dept Biomed, Div Med Genet, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Bonn, Inst Human Genet, Bonn, Germany.;Res Ctr Julich, Inst Neurosci & Med INM1, Julich, Germany..
    Cookson, Mark R.
    NIA, Neurogenet Lab, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Corvin, Aiden
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Psychosis Res Grp, Dept Psychiat, Dublin, Ireland.;Trinity Coll Dublin, Trinity Translat Med Inst, Dublin, Ireland..
    Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto
    Univ Cantabria IDIVAL, Sch Med, Dept Med & Psychiat, Univ Hosp Marques de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain.;CIBERSAM Ctr Invest Biomed Red Salud Med, Santander, Spain..
    Curran, Joanne E.
    Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Czisch, Michael
    Max Planck Inst Psychiat, Dept Translat Res Psychiat, Munich, Germany..
    Dale, Anders M.
    Univ Calif San Diego, Ctr Multimodal Imaging & Genet, San Diego, CA 92103 USA.;Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Neurosci, San Diego, CA 92103 USA.;Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Radiol, San Diego, CA 92103 USA.;Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Psychiat, San Diego, CA 92103 USA.;Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Cognit Sci, San Diego, CA 92103 USA..
    Davies, Gareth E.
    Avera Inst Human Genet, Sioux Falls, SD USA.;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Neurol, Program Translat NeuroPsychiat Gen, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Psychiat, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA.;Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA..
    De Geus, Eco J. C.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Biol Psychol, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    De Jager, Philip L.
    Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA.;Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA.;Broad Inst, Cambridge, MA USA..
    de Zubicaray, Greig I.
    Queensland Univ Technol, Fac Hlth, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Queensland Univ Technol, Inst Hlth & Biomed Innovat, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Delanty, Norman
    Royal Coll Surgeons Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland.;Beaumont Hosp, Div Neurol, Dublin 9, Ireland..
    Depondt, Chantal
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Hop Erasme, Dept Neurol, Brussels, Belgium..
    DeStefano, Anita L.
    Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, Framingham, MA USA.;Haukeland Hosp, Ctr Med Genet & Mol Med, Dr Einar Martens Res Grp Biol Psychiat, Bergen, Norway..
    Dillman, Allissa
    NIA, Neurogenet Lab, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Djurovic, Srdjan
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr Psychosis Res, N-5020 Bergen, Norway.;Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Oslo, Norway..
    Donohoe, Gary
    Natl Univ Ireland Galway, Cognit Genet & Cognit Therapy Grp, Neuroimaging Cognit & Genom Ctr NICOG, Galway, Ireland.;Natl Univ Ireland Galway, NCBES Galway Neurosci Ctr, Sch Psychol, Galway, Ireland.;Natl Univ Ireland Galway, Discipline Biochem, Galway, Ireland.;Trinity Coll Dublin, Dept Psychiat, Neuropsychiat Genet Res Grp, Dublin 8, Ireland.;Trinity Coll Dublin, Inst Psychiat, Dublin 8, Ireland..
    Drevets, Wayne C.
    NIMH, Exp Therapeut & Pathophysiol Branch, Intramural Res Program, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.;Janssen Res & Dev LLC, Titusville, NJ USA..
    Duggirala, Ravi
    Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Dyer, Thomas D.
    Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Erk, Susanne
    Charite, CCM, Dept Psychiat & Psychotherapy, Berlin, Germany..
    Espeseth, Thomas
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Mental Hlth & Addict, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway.;Univ Oslo, Dept Psychol, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway..
    Evans, Denis A.
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Inst Healthy Aging, Chicago, IL 60612 USA..
    Fedko, Iryna
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Biol Psychol, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Fernandez, Guillen
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Cognit Neurosci, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Ferrucci, Luigi
    NIA, Intramural Res Program, Baltimore, MD 21224 USA..
    Fisher, Simon E.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Max Planck Inst Psycholinguist, Language & Genet Dept, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Fleischman, Debra A.
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Alzheimers Dis Ctr, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.;Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Neurol Sci, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.;Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Behav Sci, Chicago, IL 60612 USA..
    Ford, Ian
    Univ Glasgow, Robertson Ctr Biostat, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Foroud, Tatiana M.
    Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Computat Biol & Bioinformat, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Med & Mol Genet, Indianapolis, IN USA..
    Fox, Peter T.
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 USA..
    Francks, Clyde
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Max Planck Inst Psycholinguist, Language & Genet Dept, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Fukunaga, Masaki
    Natl Inst Physiol Sci, Div Cerebral Integrat, Aichi, Japan..
    Gibbs, J. Raphael
    UCL Inst Neurol, Reta Lila Weston Inst, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England.;NIA, Neurogenet Lab, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Glahn, David C.
    Yale Univ, Dept Psychiat, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.;Olin Neuropsychiat Res Ctr, Hartford, CT USA..
    Gollub, Randy L.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Martinos Ctr Biomed Imaging, Charlestown, MA USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA..
    Goring, Harald H. H.
    Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Grabe, Hans J.
    Univ Med Greifswald, Dept Psychiat, Greifswald, Germany..
    Green, Robert C.
    Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA.;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Div Genet, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Gruber, Oliver
    Heidelberg Univ, Dept Gen Psychiat, Sect Expt Psychopathol & Neuroimaging, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Gudnason, Vilmundur
    Iceland Heart Assoc, Kopavogur, Iceland.;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Guelfi, Sebastian
    UCL Inst Neurol, Reta Lila Weston Inst, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England..
    Hansell, Narelle K.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Univ Queensland, Queensland Brain Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Hardy, John
    UCL Inst Neurol, Reta Lila Weston Inst, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England..
    Hartman, Catharina A.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Psychiat, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Hashimoto, Ryota
    Osaka Univ, Grad Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, Osaka, Japan.;Osaka Univ, United Grad Sch Child Dev, Mol Res Ctr Childrens Mental Dev, Osaka, Japan..
    Hegenscheid, Katrin
    Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Diagnost Radiol & Neuroradiol, Greifswald, Germany..
    Heinz, Andreas
    Charite, CCM, Dept Psychiat & Psychotherapy, Berlin, Germany..
    Le Hellard, Stephanie
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr Psychosis Res, N-5020 Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Ctr Med Genet & Mol Med, Dr Einar Martens Res Grp Biol Psychiat, Bergen, Norway..
    Hernandez, Dena G.
    UCL Inst Neurol, Reta Lila Weston Inst, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England.;NIA, Neurogenet Lab, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.;German Ctr Neurodegenerat Dis DZNE, Tubingen, Germany..
    Heslenfeld, Dirk J.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Psychol, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Ho, Beng-Choon
    Univ Iowa, Dept Psychiat, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA..
    Hoekstra, Pieter J.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Psychiat, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Hoffmann, Wolfgang
    German Ctr Neurodegenerat Dis DZNE Rostock Greifs, Greifswald, Germany.;Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Community Med, Greifswald, Germany..
    Hofman, Albert
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Holsboer, Florian
    Max Planck Inst Psychiat, Dept Translat Res Psychiat, Munich, Germany.;HMNC Brain Hlth, Munich, Germany..
    Homuth, Georg
    Univ Med Greifswald, Interfac Inst Genet & Funct Gen, Greifswald, Germany..
    Hosten, Norbert
    Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Diagnost Radiol & Neuroradiol, Greifswald, Germany..
    Hottenga, Jouke-Jan
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Biol Psychol, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Ikeda, Masashi
    Fujita Hlth Univ, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan..
    Ikram, M. Kamran
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Pharmacol, Singapore, Singapore.;Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Mem Aging & Cognit Ctr, Singapore, Singapore.;Singapore Natl Eye Ctr, Singapore Eye Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore.;Duke NUS Grad Med Sch, Acad Med Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore..
    Jack, Clifford R., Jr.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Radiol, Rochester, MN USA..
    Jenldnson, Mark
    Univ Oxford, FMRIB Ctr, Oxford, England..
    Johnson, Robert
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, NICHD Brain & Tissue Bank Dev Disorders, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA..
    Jonsson, Erik G.
    Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway.;Univ Oxford, FMRIB Ctr, Oxford, England..
    Jukema, J. Wouter
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Cardiol, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Kahn, Rene S.
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Kanai, Ryota
    Univ Sussex, Sch Psychol, Brighton, E Sussex, England.;UCL, Inst Cognit Neurosci, London, England.;Araya Brain Imaging, Dept Neuroinformat, Tokyo, Japan..
    Kloszewska, Iwona
    Med Univ Lodz, Lodz, Poland..
    Knopman, David S.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Neurol, Rochester, MN USA..
    Kochunov, Peter
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Maryland Psychiat Res Ctr, Dept Psychiat, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA..
    Kwok, John B.
    Neurosci Res Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;UNSW, Sch Med Sci, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Lawrie, Stephen M.
    Univ Edinburgh, Royal Edinburgh Hosp, Div Psychiat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Lemaitre, Herve
    Univ Paris Sud, Univ Paris Descartes, NSERM Unit Neuroimaging & Psychiat 1000, Paris, France.;Hosp Cochin, AP HP, Maison Solenn Adolescent Psychopathol & Med Dept, Paris, France..
    Liu, Xinmin
    NIMH, Exp Therapeut & Pathophysiol Branch, Intramural Res Program, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.;Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, New York, NY USA..
    Longo, Dan L.
    NIA, Genet Lab, NIH, Baltimore, MD 21224 USA..
    Longstreth, W. T., Jr.
    Univ Washington, Dept Neurol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Lopez, Oscar L.
    Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Neurol, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA.;Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Psychiat, Pittsburgh, PA USA..
    Lovestone, Simon
    Univ Oxford, Dept Psychiat, Oxford, England.;Kings Coll London, NIHR Dementia Biomed Res Unit, London, England..
    Martinez, Oliver
    Univ Calif Davis, Dept Neurol, Imaging Dementia & Aging IDeA Lab, Sacramento, CA 95817 USA.;Univ Calif Davis, Ctr Neurosci, Sacramento, CA 95817 USA..
    Martinot, Jean-Luc
    Univ Paris Sud, Univ Paris Descartes, NSERM Unit Neuroimaging & Psychiat 1000, Paris, France.;Hosp Cochin, AP HP, Maison Solenn Adolescent Psychopathol & Med Dept, Paris, France..
    Mattay, Venkata S.
    Lieber Inst Brain Dev, Baltimore, MD USA.;Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA.;Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Radiol, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA..
    McDonald, Colm
    Natl Univ Ireland Galway, Ctr Neuroimaging & Cognit Genom NICOG, NCBES Galway Neurosci Ctr, Coll Med Nursing & Hlth Sci,Clin Neuroimaging Lab, Galway, Ireland..
    McIntosh, Andrew M.
    Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Royal Edinburgh Hosp, Div Psychiat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    McMahon, Katie L.
    Univ Queensland, Ctr Adv Imaging, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    McMahon, Francis J.
    NIMH, Exp Therapeut & Pathophysiol Branch, Intramural Res Program, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Mecocci, Patrizia
    Univ Perugia, Dept Med, Sect Gerontol & Geriatr, Perugia, Italy..
    Melle, Ingrid
    Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway.;Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Mental Hlth & Addict, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway..
    Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas
    Heidelberg Univ, Med Fac Mannheim, Cent Inst Mental Hlth, Mannheim, Germany..
    Mohnke, Sebastian
    Charite, CCM, Dept Psychiat & Psychotherapy, Berlin, Germany..
    Montgomery, Grant W.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Morris, Derek W.
    Natl Univ Ireland Galway, Cognit Genet & Cognit Therapy Grp, Neuroimaging Cognit & Genom Ctr NICOG, Galway, Ireland.;Natl Univ Ireland Galway, NCBES Galway Neurosci Ctr, Sch Psychol, Galway, Ireland.;Natl Univ Ireland Galway, Discipline Biochem, Galway, Ireland.;Trinity Coll Dublin, Dept Psychiat, Neuropsychiat Genet Res Grp, Dublin 8, Ireland.;Trinity Coll Dublin, Inst Psychiat, Dublin 8, Ireland..
    Mosley, Thomas H.
    Univ Mississippi, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Jackson, MS 39216 USA..
    Muhleisen, Thomas W.
    Natl Univ Ireland Galway, Ctr Neuroimaging & Cognit Genom NICOG, NCBES Galway Neurosci Ctr, Coll Med Nursing & Hlth Sci,Clin Neuroimaging Lab, Galway, Ireland.;Res Ctr Julich, Inst Neurosci & Med INM1, Julich, Germany..
    Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram
    Max Planck Inst Psychiat, Dept Translat Res Psychiat, Munich, Germany.;Munich Cluster Syst Neurol SyNergy, Munich, Germany.;Univ Liverpool, Inst Translat Med, Liverpool, Merseyside, England..
    Nalls, Michael A.
    NIA, Neurogenet Lab, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Nauck, Matthias
    Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Clin Chem & Lab Med, Greifswald, Germany.;German Ctr Cardiovasc Res DZHK eV, Partner Site Greifswald, Berlin, Germany..
    Nichols, Thomas E.
    Univ Oxford, FMRIB Ctr, Oxford, England.;Univ Warwick, Dept Stat, Coventry, W Midlands, England.;Univ Warwick, Warwick Mfg Grp, Coventry, W Midlands, England..
    Niessen, Wiro J.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Med Informat, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Delft Univ Technol, Fac Sci Appl, Delft, Netherlands..
    Noethen, Markus M.
    Univ Bonn, Inst Human Genet, Bonn, Germany.;Univ Bonn, Life & Brain Ctr, Dept Genom, Bonn, Germany..
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umea Univ, Dept Integrat Med Biol, Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Umea Ctr Funct Brain Imaging, Umea, Sweden..
    Ohi, Kazutaka
    Osaka Univ, Grad Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, Osaka, Japan..
    Olvera, Rene L.
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 USA..
    Ophoff, Roel A.
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands.;Univ Calif Los Angeles, Ctr Neurobehav Genet, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Pandolfo, Massimo
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Hop Erasme, Dept Neurol, Brussels, Belgium..
    Paus, Tomas
    Univ Toronto, Rotman Res Inst, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Dept Psychol, Toronto, ON M5S 1A1, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Dept Psychiat, Toronto, ON M5S 1A1, Canada.;Child Mind Inst, New York, NY USA..
    Pausova, Zdenka
    Univ Toronto, Hosp Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Dept Phys, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Dept Nutr Sci, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Pike, G. Bruce
    Univ Calgary, Dept Radiol, Calgary, AB, Canada.;Univ Calgary, Dept Clin Neurosci, Calgary, AB, Canada..
    Potkin, Steven G.
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Psychiat & Human Behav, Irvine, CA 92717 USA..
    Psaty, Bruce M.
    Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Washington, Dept Med, Seattle, WA USA.;Univ Washington, Dept Hlth Serv, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Grp Hlth Res Inst, Grp Hlth, Seattle, WA USA..
    Reppermund, Simone
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Psychiat, Ctr Hlth Brain Ageing, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;UNSW Med, Sch Psychiat, Dept Dev Disabil Neuropsychiat, Kensington, NSW, Australia..
    Rietschel, Marcella
    Heidelberg Univ, Med Fac Mannheim, Cent Inst Mental Hlth, Mannheim, Germany..
    Roffman, Joshua L.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Boston, MA 02114 USA..
    Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina
    Charite, CCM, Dept Psychiat & Psychotherapy, Berlin, Germany..
    Rotter, Jerome I.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Med Ctr, Ilnst Translat Genom & Populat Sci, Los Angeles Biomed Res Inst & Pediat Harbor, Torrance, CA 90509 USA..
    Ryten, Mina
    UCL Inst Neurol, Reta Lila Weston Inst, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England.;Kings Coll London, Dept Med & Mol Genet, London, England..
    Sacco, Ralph L.
    Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, John P Hussman Inst Human Gen, Miami, FL 33136 USA.;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Miami, FL 33136 USA.;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth Sci, Miami, FL 33136 USA.;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Evelyn F McKnight Brain Inst, Miami, FL 33136 USA..
    Sachdev, Perminder S.
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Psychiat, Ctr Hlth Brain Ageing, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;Prince Wales Hosp, Neuropsychiat Inst, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Saykin, Andrew J.
    Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Neuroimaging Radiol & Imaging Sci, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Indiana Alzheimer Dis Ctr, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Med & Mol Genet, Indianapolis, IN USA..
    Schmidt, Reinhold
    Med Univ Graz, Clin Div Neurogeriatr, Dept Neurol, Graz, Austria..
    Schofield, Peter R.
    Neurosci Res Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;UNSW, Sch Med Sci, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Sigurdsson, Sigurdur
    Iceland Heart Assoc, Kopavogur, Iceland..
    Simmons, Andy
    Kings Coll London, Inst Psychiat, Dept Neuroimaging, London, England.;Kings Coll London, Biomed Res Ctr Mental Hlth, London, England.;Kings Coll London, Biomed Res Unit Dementia, London, England..
    Singleton, Andrew
    NIA, Neurogenet Lab, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Sisodiya, Sanjay M.
    UCL, Inst Neurol, London, England.;Epilepsy Soc, Gerrards Cross, Bucks, England..
    Smith, Colin
    Univ Edinburgh, Acad Dept Neuropathol, Ctr Clin Brain Sci, MRC Edinburgh Brain Bank, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Smoller, Jordan W.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Ctr Human Genet Res, Psychiat & Neurodev Genet Unit, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA.;Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Stanley Ctr Psychiat Res, Boston, MA USA..
    Soininen, Hindu.
    Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Clin Med Neurol, Kuopio, Finland.;Kuopio Univ Hosp, Neuroctr Neurol, Kuopio, Finland..
    Srikanth, Velandai
    Peninsula Hlth & Monash Univ, Dept Med, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Steen, Vidar M.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr Psychosis Res, N-5020 Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Ctr Med Genet & Mol Med, Dr Einar Martens Res Grp Biol Psychiat, Bergen, Norway..
    Stott, David J.
    Univ Glasgow, Fac Med, Inst Cardiovasc & Med Sci, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Sussmann, Jessika E.
    Univ Edinburgh, Royal Edinburgh Hosp, Div Psychiat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Thalamuthu, Anbupalam
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Psychiat, Ctr Hlth Brain Ageing, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Tiemeier, Henning
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC Sophia Childrens Hosp, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat Psychol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Toga, Arthur W.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Inst Neuroimaging & Informat, Lab Neuro Imaging, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Traynor, Bryan J.
    NIA, Neurogenet Lab, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Troncoso, Juan
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Brain Resource Ctr, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Turner, Jessica A.
    Georgia State Univ, Atlanta, GA 30303 USA..
    Tzourio, Christophe
    Univ Bordeaux, Institute Neurodegenerat Disorders, CEA, CNRS,UMR 5293, Bordeaux, France..
    Uitterlinden, Andre G.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Hernandez, Maria C. Valdes
    Univ Edinburgh, Brain Res Imaging Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Dept Neuroimaging Sci, Scottish Imaging Network, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Clin Brain Sci, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Van der Brug, Marcel
    Genentech Inc, San Francisco, CA 94080 USA..
    Van der Lugt, Aad
    Erasmus MC, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Van der Wee, Nic J. A.
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat, Leiden, Netherlands.;Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Leiden Inst Brain & Cognit, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Van Duijn, Cornelia M.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Van Haren, Neeltje E. M.
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Van't Ent, Dennis
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Biol Psychol, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Van Tol, Marie Jose
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Neuroimaging Ctr, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Vardarajan, Badri N.
    Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, Taub Inst Res Alzheimers Dis & Aging Brain, New York, NY USA..
    Veltman, Dick J.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Vernooij, Meike W.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Voelzke, Henry
    Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Community Med, Greifswald, Germany..
    Walter, Henrik
    Charite, CCM, Dept Psychiat & Psychotherapy, Berlin, Germany..
    Wardlaw, Joanna M.
    Univ Edinburgh, Brain Res Imaging Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Dept Neuroimaging Sci, Scottish Imaging Network, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Clin Brain Sci, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Wassink, Thomas H.
    Univ Iowa, Dept Psychiat, Carver Coll Med, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA..
    Weale, Michael E.
    Kings Coll London, Dept Med & Mol Genet, London, England..
    Weinberger, Daniel R.
    Lieber Inst Brain Dev, Baltimore, MD USA.;Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA.;Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA.;Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurosci, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA.;Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Inst Med Genet, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Weiner, Michael W.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, San Francisco VA Med Ctr, Ctr Imaging Neurodegenerat Dis, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA..
    Wen, Wei
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Psychiat, Ctr Hlth Brain Ageing, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Westman, Eric
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden..
    White, Tonya
    Erasmus MC, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC Sophia Childrens Hosp, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat Psychol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Wong, Tien Y.
    Singapore Natl Eye Ctr, Singapore Eye Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore.;Dagestan State Univ, Dept Evolut & Genet, Makhachkala, Dagestan, Russia.;Natl Univ Singapore, Yong Loo Lin Sch Med, Dept Ophthalmol, Singapore, Singapore..
    Wright, Clinton B.
    Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Miami, FL 33136 USA.;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth Sci, Miami, FL 33136 USA.;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Evelyn F McKnight Brain Inst, Miami, FL 33136 USA..
    Zielke, H. Ronald
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, NICHD Brain & Tissue Bank Dev Disorders, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA..
    Zonderman, Alan B.
    NIA, Lab Epidemiol & Populat Sci, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Deary, Ian J.
    Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    DeCarli, Charles
    Univ Calif Davis, Dept Neurol, Imaging Dementia & Aging IDeA Lab, Sacramento, CA 95817 USA.;Univ Calif Davis, Ctr Neurosci, Sacramento, CA 95817 USA..
    Schmidt, Helena
    Med Univ Graz, Inst Mol Biol & Biochem, Graz, Austria..
    Martin, Nicholas G.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    De Craen, Anton J. M.
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Gerontol & Geriatr, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Wright, Margaret J.
    Univ Queensland, Queensland Brain Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Univ Queensland, Ctr Adv Imaging, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Launer, Lenore J.
    NIA, Intramural Res Program, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Schumann, Gunter
    Kings Coll London, Inst Psychiat Psychol & Neurosci, MRC SGDP Ctr, London, England..
    Fornage, Myriam
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr Houston, Inst Mol Med & Human Genet Ctr, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Franke, Barbara
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Debette, Stephanie
    Boston Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Boston, MA 02118 USA.;Lieber Inst Brain Dev, Baltimore, MD USA.;Bordeaux Univ Hosp, Dept Neurol, Bordeaux, France..
    Medland, Sarah E.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Ikram, M. Arfan
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Neurol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Thompson, Paul M.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, USC Mark & Mary Stevens Neuroimaging & Informat I, Imaging Genet Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.;Univ Western Sydney, Sch Comp Engn & Math, Parramatta, NSW, Australia..
    Novel genetic loci underlying human intracranial volume identified through genome-wide association2016In: Nature Neuroscience, ISSN 1097-6256, E-ISSN 1546-1726, Vol. 19, no 12, 1569-1582 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intracranial volume reflects the maximally attained brain size during development, and remains stable with loss of tissue in late life. It is highly heritable, but the underlying genes remain largely undetermined. In a genome-wide association study of 32,438 adults, we discovered five previously unknown loci for intracranial volume and confirmed two known signals. Four of the loci were also associated with adult human stature, but these remained associated with intracranial volume after adjusting for height. We found a high genetic correlation with child head circumference (rho(genetic) = 0.748), which indicates a similar genetic background and allowed us to identify four additional loci through meta-analysis (N-combined = 37,345). Variants for intracranial volume were also related to childhood and adult cognitive function, and Parkinson's disease, and were enriched near genes involved in growth pathways, including PI3K-AKT signaling. These findings identify the biological underpinnings of intracranial volume and their link to physiological and pathological traits.

  • 5. Adams, Hieab H. H.
    et al.
    Hibar, Derrek P.
    Chouraki, Vincent
    Stein, Jason L.
    Nyquist, Paul A.
    Renteria, Miguel E.
    Trompet, Stella
    Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro
    Seshadri, Sudha
    Desrivieres, Sylvane
    Beecham, Ashley H.
    Jahanshad, Neda
    Wittfeld, Katharine
    Van der Lee, Sven J.
    Abramovic, Lucija
    Alhusaini, Saud
    Amin, Najaf
    Andersson, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Arfanakis, Konstantinos
    Aribisala, Benjamin S.
    Armstrong, Nicola J.
    Athanasiu, Lavinia
    Axelsson, Tomas
    Beiser, Alexa
    Bernard, Manon
    Bis, Joshua C.
    Blanken, Laura M. E.
    Blanton, Susan H.
    Bohlken, Marc M.
    Boks, Marco P.
    Bralten, Janita
    Brickman, Adam M.
    Carmichael, Owen
    Chakravarty, M. Mallar
    Chauhan, Ganesh
    Chen, Qiang
    Ching, Christopher R. K.
    Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel
    Den Braber, Anouk
    Doan, Nhat Trung
    Ehrlich, Stefan
    Filippi, Irina
    Ge, Tian
    Giddaluru, Sudheer
    Goldman, Aaron L.
    Gottesman, Rebecca F.
    Greven, Corina U.
    Grimm, Oliver
    Griswold, Michael E.
    Guadalupe, Tulio
    Hass, Johanna
    Haukvik, Unn K.
    Hilal, Saima
    Hofer, Edith
    Hoehn, David
    Holmes, Avram J.
    Hoogman, Martine
    Janowitz, Deborah
    Jia, Tianye
    Kasperaviciute, Dalia
    Kim, Sungeun
    Klein, Marieke
    Kraemer, Bernd
    Lee, Phil H.
    Liao, Jiemin
    Liewald, David C. M.
    Lopez, Lorna M.
    Luciano, Michelle
    Macare, Christine
    Marquand, Andre
    Matarin, Mar
    Mather, Karen A.
    Mattheisen, Manuel
    Mazoyer, Bernard
    Mckay, David R.
    McWhirter, Rebekah
    Milaneschi, Yuri
    Mirza-Schreiber, Nazanin
    Muetzel, Ryan L.
    Maniega, Susana Munoz
    Nho, Kwangsik
    Nugent, Allison C.
    Loohuis, Loes M. Olde
    Oosterlaan, Jaap
    Papmeyer, Martina
    Pappa, Irene
    Pirpamer, Lukas
    Pudas, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Puetz, Benno
    Rajan, Kumar B.
    Ramasamy, Adaikalavan
    Richards, Jennifer S.
    Risacher, Shannon L.
    Roiz-Santianez, Roberto
    Rommelse, Nanda
    Rose, Emma J.
    Royle, Natalie A.
    Rundek, Tatjana
    Saemann, Philipp G.
    Satizabal, Claudia L.
    Schmaal, Lianne
    Schork, Andrew J.
    Shen, Li
    Shin, Jean
    Shumskaya, Elena
    Smith, Albert V.
    Sprooten, Emma
    Strike, Lachlan T.
    Teumer, Alexander
    Thomson, Russell
    Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana
    Toro, Roberto
    Trabzuni, Daniah
    Vaidya, Dhananjay
    Van der Grond, Jeroen
    Van der Meer, Dennis
    Van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.
    Van Eijk, Kristel R.
    Van Erp, Theo G. M.
    Van Rooij, Daan
    Walton, Esther
    Westlye, Lars T.
    Whelan, Christopher D.
    Windham, Beverly G.
    Winkler, Anderson M.
    Woldehawariat, Girma
    Wolf, Christiane
    Wolfers, Thomas
    Xu, Bing
    Yanek, Lisa R.
    Yang, Jingyun
    Zijdenbos, Alex
    Zwiers, Marcel P.
    Agartz, Ingrid
    Aggarwal, Neelum T.
    Almasy, Laura
    Ames, David
    Amouyel, Philippe
    Andreassen, Ole A.
    Arepalli, Sampath
    Assareh, Amelia A.
    Barral, Sandra
    Bastin, Mark E.
    Becker, Diane M.
    Becker, James T.
    Bennett, David A.
    Blangero, John
    van Bokhoven, Hans
    Boomsma, Dorret I.
    Brodaty, Henry
    Brouwer, Rachel M.
    Brunner, Han G.
    Buckner, Randy L.
    Buitelaar, Jan K.
    Bulayeva, Kazima B.
    Cahn, Wiepke
    Calhoun, Vince D.
    Cannon, Dara M.
    Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.
    Chen, Christopher
    Cheng, Ching -Yu
    Cichon, Sven
    Cookson, Mark R.
    Corvin, Aiden
    Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto
    Curran, Joanne E.
    Czisch, Michael
    Dale, Anders M.
    Davies, Gareth E.
    De Geus, Eco J. C.
    De Jager, Philip L.
    de Zubicaray, Greig I.
    Delanty, Norman
    Depondt, Chantal
    DeStefano, Anita L.
    Dillman, Allissa
    Djurovic, Srdjan
    Donohoe, Gary
    Drevets, Wayne C.
    Duggirala, Ravi
    Dyer, Thomas D.
    Erk, Susanne
    Espeseth, Thomas
    Evans, Denis A.
    Fedko, Iryna
    Fernandez, Guillen
    Ferrucci, Luigi
    Fisher, Simon E.
    Fleischman, Debra A.
    Ford, Ian
    Foroud, Tatiana M.
    Fox, Peter T.
    Francks, Clyde
    Fukunaga, Masaki
    Gibbs, J. Raphael
    Glahn, David C.
    Gollub, Randy L.
    Goring, Harald H. H.
    Grabe, Hans J.
    Green, Robert C.
    Gruber, Oliver
    Gudnason, Vilmundur
    Guelfi, Sebastian
    Hansell, Narelle K.
    Hardy, John
    Hartman, Catharina A.
    Hashimoto, Ryota
    Hegenscheid, Katrin
    Heinz, Andreas
    Le Hellard, Stephanie
    Hernandez, Dena G.
    Heslenfeld, Dirk J.
    Ho, Beng-Choon
    Hoekstra, Pieter J.
    Hoffmann, Wolfgang
    Hofman, Albert
    Holsboer, Florian
    Homuth, Georg
    Hosten, Norbert
    Hottenga, Jouke-Jan
    Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff
    Ikeda, Masashi
    Ikram, M. Kamran
    Jack, Clifford R., Jr.
    Jenldnson, Mark
    Johnson, Robert
    Jonsson, Erik G.
    Jukema, J. Wouter
    Kahn, Rene S.
    Kanai, Ryota
    Kloszewska, Iwona
    Knopman, David S.
    Kochunov, Peter
    Kwok, John B.
    Lawrie, Stephen M.
    Lemaitre, Herve
    Liu, Xinmin
    Longo, Dan L.
    Longstreth, W. T., Jr.
    Lopez, Oscar L.
    Lovestone, Simon
    Martinez, Oliver
    Martinot, Jean-Luc
    Mattay, Venkata S.
    McDonald, Colm
    McIntosh, Andrew M.
    McMahon, Katie L.
    McMahon, Francis J.
    Mecocci, Patrizia
    Melle, Ingrid
    Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas
    Mohnke, Sebastian
    Montgomery, Grant W.
    Morris, Derek W.
    Mosley, Thomas H.
    Muhleisen, Thomas W.
    Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram
    Nalls, Michael A.
    Nauck, Matthias
    Nichols, Thomas E.
    Niessen, Wiro J.
    Noethen, Markus M.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Ohi, Kazutaka
    Olvera, Rene L.
    Ophoff, Roel A.
    Pandolfo, Massimo
    Paus, Tomas
    Pausova, Zdenka
    Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.
    Pike, G. Bruce
    Potkin, Steven G.
    Psaty, Bruce M.
    Reppermund, Simone
    Rietschel, Marcella
    Roffman, Joshua L.
    Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina
    Rotter, Jerome I.
    Ryten, Mina
    Sacco, Ralph L.
    Sachdev, Perminder S.
    Saykin, Andrew J.
    Schmidt, Reinhold
    Schofield, Peter R.
    Sigurdsson, Sigurdur
    Simmons, Andy
    Singleton, Andrew
    Sisodiya, Sanjay M.
    Smith, Colin
    Smoller, Jordan W.
    Soininen, Hindu.
    Srikanth, Velandai
    Steen, Vidar M.
    Stott, David J.
    Sussmann, Jessika E.
    Thalamuthu, Anbupalam
    Tiemeier, Henning
    Toga, Arthur W.
    Traynor, Bryan J.
    Troncoso, Juan
    Turner, Jessica A.
    Tzourio, Christophe
    Uitterlinden, Andre G.
    Hernandez, Maria C. Valdes
    Van der Brug, Marcel
    Van der Lugt, Aad
    Van der Wee, Nic J. A.
    Van Duijn, Cornelia M.
    Van Haren, Neeltje E. M.
    Van't Ent, Dennis
    Van Tol, Marie Jose
    Vardarajan, Badri N.
    Veltman, Dick J.
    Vernooij, Meike W.
    Voelzke, Henry
    Walter, Henrik
    Wardlaw, Joanna M.
    Wassink, Thomas H.
    Weale, Michael E.
    Weinberger, Daniel R.
    Weiner, Michael W.
    Wen, Wei
    Westman, Eric
    White, Tonya
    Wong, Tien Y.
    Wright, Clinton B.
    Zielke, H. Ronald
    Zonderman, Alan B.
    Deary, Ian J.
    DeCarli, Charles
    Schmidt, Helena
    Martin, Nicholas G.
    De Craen, Anton J. M.
    Wright, Margaret J.
    Launer, Lenore J.
    Schumann, Gunter
    Fornage, Myriam
    Franke, Barbara
    Debette, Stephanie
    Medland, Sarah E.
    Ikram, M. Arfan
    Thompson, Paul M.
    Novel genetic loci underlying human intracranial volume identified through genome-wide association2016In: Nature Neuroscience, ISSN 1097-6256, E-ISSN 1546-1726, Vol. 19, no 12, 1569-1582 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intracranial volume reflects the maximally attained brain size during development, and remains stable with loss of tissue in late life. It is highly heritable, but the underlying genes remain largely undetermined. In a genome-wide association study of 32,438 adults, we discovered five previously unknown loci for intracranial volume and confirmed two known signals. Four of the loci were also associated with adult human stature, but these remained associated with intracranial volume after adjusting for height. We found a high genetic correlation with child head circumference (rho(genetic) = 0.748), which indicates a similar genetic background and allowed us to identify four additional loci through meta-analysis (N-combined = 37,345). Variants for intracranial volume were also related to childhood and adult cognitive function, and Parkinson's disease, and were enriched near genes involved in growth pathways, including PI3K-AKT signaling. These findings identify the biological underpinnings of intracranial volume and their link to physiological and pathological traits.

  • 6. Adoue, Veronique
    et al.
    Schiavi, Alicia
    Light, Nicholas
    Carlsson Almlöf, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundmark, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ge, Bing
    Kwan, Tony
    Caron, Maxime
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Wang, Chuan
    Chen, Shu-Huang
    Goodall, Alison H
    Cambien, Francois
    Deloukas, Panos
    Ouwehand, Willem H
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pastinen, Tomi
    Allelic expression mapping across cellular lineages to establish impact of non-coding SNPs2014In: Molecular Systems Biology, ISSN 1744-4292, Vol. 10, no 10, 754- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most complex disease-associated genetic variants are located in non-coding regions and are therefore thought to be regulatory in nature. Association mapping of differential allelic expression (AE) is a powerful method to identify SNPs with direct cis-regulatory impact (cis-rSNPs). We used AE mapping to identify cis-rSNPs regulating gene expression in 55 and 63 HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines from a Caucasian and an African population, respectively, 70 fibroblast cell lines, and 188 purified monocyte samples and found 40-60% of these cis-rSNPs to be shared across cell types. We uncover a new class of cis-rSNPs, which disrupt footprint-derived de novo motifs that are predominantly bound by repressive factors and are implicated in disease susceptibility through overlaps with GWAS SNPs. Finally, we provide the proof-of-principle for a new approach for genome-wide functional validation of transcription factor-SNP interactions. By perturbing NFκB action in lymphoblasts, we identified 489 cis-regulated transcripts with altered AE after NFκB perturbation. Altogether, we perform a comprehensive analysis of cis-variation in four cell populations and provide new tools for the identification of functional variants associated to complex diseases.

  • 7.
    Afrakhte, Mozhgan
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Growth control mechanisms in normal and neoplastic mammalian cells1998Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The main theme of the studies presented in this thesis is, the growth control mechanisms whose loss in normal cells predispose to or cause cancer. The balance between growth inhibitory and stimulatory mechanisms is crucial for the development and maintenance of a normal animal.

    PDGF, a growth factor for cells of mesenchymal origin, is implicated in normal developmental processes as well as neoplasia. The alternative splicing of exon 6 in PDGF-A gene transcripts gives rise to two different proteins with different compartmentalization properties. The PDGF-A chain homodimers, PDGF-AAL, encoded PDGF A-splice variant remain associated with the cell membrane. Studies of a human fibrosarcoma cell line, U-2197, revealed a high expression level of the cell associated PDGF-AAL which upon release increased autophosphorylation of the endogenous PDGF receptors, suggesting an autocrine loop. PDGF-A gene and PDGFR-α gene found to be co-amplified in the U-2197, indicating an optimised system for growth in these cells, i.e. amplified growth factor receptor as well as a local autocrine supply of the mitogen.

    Members of TGFβ superfamily are potent regulators of the growth and differentiation of a wide range of cell types. Intracellular mediators of TGF-β signalling, SMADs, transduce signals from serine/threonine kinase receptors to the nucleus where they affect transcription of target genes. A new class of SMAD proteins has been identified whose members, the inhibitory SMADS, antagonise TGF-β signals by interfering with agonistic SMADs activity. Smad6 and Smad7 are two closely related TGF-β antagonists identified in mammalian cells. Overexpression of Smad7 inhibited the cellular response to TGF-β whereas expression of an anti-sense Smad7 construct showed an enhancing effect on this response. The inhibitory SMADs may act in a negative feedback loop, as their expression is induced by the same ligands whose action they antagonise.

    Density dependent growth inhibition is a growth control mechanism often lost in transformed and malignant cells. Cells in dense culture are refractory to the mitogen stimulation although, the mitogenic signals were shown to be processed to some extent. The expression of immediate-early genes in dense culture stimulated with mitogen was induced. The activity of cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs), the pivotal kinases in G1/S transition, showed to be density dependent and decreased by increasing cell density. pRb, a tumour suppressor and growth regulatory protein, remained unphosphorylated in mitogen treated dense culture. The cessation of CDKs kinase activity in dense cultures was shown to be accompanied with increasing expression of inhibitory proteins of these kinases, CKIs. The impaired expression of a positive regulator of CDKs, Cdc25A phosphatase, was another feature of dense cultures.

  • 8.
    Agarwal, Prasoon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Collier, Paul
    Fritz, Markus Hsi-Yang
    Benes, Vladimir
    Wiklund, Helena Jernberg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Singh, Umashankar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    CGGBP1 mitigates cytosine methylation at repetitive DNA sequences2015In: BMC Genomics, ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 16, 390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: CGGBP1 is a repetitive DNA-binding transcription regulator with target sites at CpG-rich sequences such as CGG repeats and Alu-SINEs and L1-LINEs. The role of CGGBP1 as a possible mediator of CpG methylation however remains unknown. At CpG-rich sequences cytosine methylation is a major mechanism of transcriptional repression. Concordantly, gene-rich regions typically carry lower levels of CpG methylation than the repetitive elements. It is well known that at interspersed repeats Alu-SINEs and L1-LINEs high levels of CpG methylation constitute a transcriptional silencing and retrotransposon inactivating mechanism. Results: Here, we have studied genome-wide CpG methylation with or without CGGBP1-depletion. By high throughput sequencing of bisulfite-treated genomic DNA we have identified CGGBP1 to be a negative regulator of CpG methylation at repetitive DNA sequences. In addition, we have studied CpG methylation alterations on Alu and L1 retrotransposons in CGGBP1-depleted cells using a novel bisulfite-treatment and high throughput sequencing approach. Conclusions: The results clearly show that CGGBP1 is a possible bidirectional regulator of CpG methylation at Alus, and acts as a repressor of methylation at L1 retrotransposons.

  • 9.
    Ahlford, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine.
    Applications of Four-Colour Fluorescent Primer Extension Technology for SNP Analysis and Discovery2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies on genetic variation can reveal effects on traits and disease, both in humans and in model organisms. Good technology for the analysis of DNA sequence variations is critical. Currently the development towards assays for large-scale and parallel DNA sequencing and genotyping is progressing rapidly. Single base primer extension (SBE) is a robust reaction principle based on four-colour fluorescent terminating nucleotides to interrogate all four DNA nucleotides in a single reaction. In this thesis, SBE methods were applied to the analysis and discovery of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster and in humans.

    The tag-array minisequencing system in a microarray format is convenient for intermediate sized genotyping projects. The system is scalable and flexible to adapt to specialized and novel applications. In Study I of the thesis a tool was established to automate quality control of clustered genotype data. By calculating “Silhouette scores”, the SNP genotype assignment can be evaluated by a single numeric measure. Silhouette scores were then applied in Study I to compare the performance of four DNA polymerases and in Study III to evaluate freeze-dried reagents in the tag-array minisequencing system.

    The characteristics of the tag-array minisequencing system makes it suitable for inexpensive genome-wide gene mapping in the fruit fly. In Study II a high-resolution SNP map, and 293 genotyping assays, were established across the X, 2nd and 3rd chromosomes to distinguish commonly used Drosophila strains. A database of the SNP markers and a program for automatic allele calling and identification of map positions of mutants was also developed. The utility of the system was demonstrated by rapid mapping of 14 genes that disrupt embryonic muscle patterning.

    In Study III the tag-array minisequencing system was adapted to a lab-on-a-chip format for diagnostic testing for mutations in the TP53 gene. Freeze-drying was evaluated for storing reagents, including thermo-sensitive enzymes, on the microchip to reduce the complexity of the integrated test. Correct genotyping results were obtained using freeze-dried reagents in each reaction step of the genotyping protocol, both in test tubes and in single polymer test chambers. The results showed the potential of the approach to be implemented in fully integrated systems.

    The four-colour chemistry of SBE has been developed further to allow massively parallel sequencing (MPS) of short DNA fragments as in the Genome Analyzer system (Solexa/Illumina). In Study IV MPS was used to compare Nimblegen arrays and the SureSelect solution-based system for targeted enrichment of 56 continuous human candidate-gene regions totalling 3.1 Mb in size. Both methods detected known SNPs and discovered novel SNPs in the target regions, demonstrating the feasibility for complexity reduction of sequencing libraries by hybridization methods.

  • 10. Ahmad, Shafqat
    et al.
    Rukh, Gull
    Varga, Tibor V
    Ali, Ashfaq
    Kurbasic, Azra
    Shungin, Dmitry
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Lund University.
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Koivula, Robert W
    Chu, Audrey Y
    Rose, Lynda M
    Ganna, Andrea
    Qi, Qibin
    Stancakova, Alena
    Sandholt, Camilla H
    Elks, Cathy E
    Curhan, Gary
    Jensen, Majken K
    Tamimi, Rulla M
    Allin, Kristine H
    Jorgensen, Torben
    Brage, Soren
    Langenberg, Claudia
    Aadahl, Mette
    Grarup, Niels
    Linneberg, Allan
    Pare, Guillaume
    Magnusson, Patrik KE
    Pedersen, Nancy L
    Boehnke, Michael
    Hamsten, Anders
    Mohlke, Karen L
    Pasquale, Louis T
    Pedersen, Oluf
    Scott, Robert A
    Ridker, Paul M
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Laakso, Markku
    Hansen, Torben
    Qi, Lu
    Wareham, Nicholas J
    Chasman, Daniel I
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Hu, Frank B
    Renström, Frida
    Orho-Melander, Marju
    Franks, Paul W.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Lund University and Harvard University.
    Gene x physical activity interactions in obesity: combined analysis of 111,421 individuals of European ancestry2013In: PLOS Genetics, ISSN 1553-7390, E-ISSN 1553-7404, Vol. 9, no 7, e1003607- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous obesity loci have been identified using genome-wide association studies. A UK study indicated that physical activity may attenuate the cumulative effect of 12 of these loci, but replication studies are lacking. Therefore, we tested whether the aggregate effect of these loci is diminished in adults of European ancestry reporting high levels of physical activity. Twelve obesity-susceptibility loci were genotyped or imputed in 111,421 participants. A genetic risk score (GRS) was calculated by summing the BMI-associated alleles of each genetic variant. Physical activity was assessed using self-administered questionnaires. Multiplicative interactions between the GRS and physical activity on BMI were tested in linear and logistic regression models in each cohort, with adjustment for age, age(2), sex, study center (for multicenter studies), and the marginal terms for physical activity and the GRS. These results were combined using meta-analysis weighted by cohort sample size. The meta-analysis yielded a statistically significant GRS x physical activity interaction effect estimate (P-interaction = 0.015). However, a statistically significant interaction effect was only apparent in North American cohorts (n = 39,810, P-interaction = 0.014 vs. n = 71,611, P-interaction = 0.275 for Europeans). In secondary analyses, both the FTO rs1121980 (P-interaction = 0.003) and the SEC16B rs10913469 (P-interaction = 0.025) variants showed evidence of SNP x physical activity interactions. This meta-analysis of 111,421 individuals provides further support for an interaction between physical activity and a GRS in obesity disposition, although these findings hinge on the inclusion of cohorts from North America, indicating that these results are either population-specific or non-causal.

  • 11. Ahmad, Shafqat
    et al.
    Varga, Tibor V
    Franks, Paul W
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Gene x environment interactions in obesity: the state of the evidence2013In: Human Heredity, ISSN 0001-5652, E-ISSN 1423-0062, Vol. 75, no 2-4, 106-115 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims: Obesity is a pervasive and highly prevalent disease that poses substantial health risks to those it affects. The rapid emergence of obesity as a global epidemic and the patterns and distributions of the condition within and between populations suggest that interactions between inherited biological factors (e.g. genes) and relevant environmental factors (e.g. diet and physical activity) may underlie the current obesity epidemic.

    Methods: We discuss the rationale for the assertion that gene x lifestyle interactions cause obesity, systematically appraise relevant literature, and consider knowledge gaps future studies might seek to bridge. Results: We identified >200 relevant studies, of which most are relatively small scale and few provide replication data.

    Conclusion: Although studies on gene x lifestyle interactions in obesity point toward the presence of such interactions, improved data standardization, appropriate pooling of data and resources, innovative study designs, and the application of powerful statistical methods will be required if translatable examples of gene x lifestyle interactions in obesity are to be identified. Future studies, of which most will be observational, should ideally be accompanied by appropriate replication data and, where possible, by analogous findings from experimental settings where clinically relevant traits (e.g. weight regain and weight cycling) are outcomes.

    (C) 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel

  • 12.
    Ahmadian, Afshin
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Andersson, Helene
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    SNP analysis by allele-specific extension in a micromachined filter chamber2002In: BioTechniques, ISSN 0736-6205, Vol. 32, no 4, 748-754 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Akimoto, Chizuru
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Volk, Alexander E.
    van Blitterswijk, Marka
    Van den Broeck, Marleen
    Leblond, Claire S.
    Lumbroso, Serge
    Camu, William
    Neitzel, Birgit
    Onodera, Osamu
    van Rheenen, Wouter
    Pinto, Susana
    Weber, Markus
    Smith, Bradley
    Proven, Melanie
    Talbot, Kevin
    Keagle, Pamela
    Chesi, Alessandra
    Ratti, Antonia
    van der Zee, Julie
    Alstermark, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Birve, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Calini, Daniela
    Nordin, Angelica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Tradowsky, Daniela C.
    Just, Walter
    Daoud, Hussein
    Angerbauer, Sabrina
    DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely
    Konno, Takuya
    Lloyd-Jani, Anjali
    de Carvalho, Mamede
    Mouzat, Kevin
    Landers, John E.
    Veldink, Jan H.
    Silani, Vincenzo
    Gitler, Aaron D.
    Shaw, Christopher E.
    Rouleau, Guy A.
    van den Berg, Leonard H.
    Van Broeckhoven, Christine
    Rademakers, Rosa
    Andersen, Peter M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Kubisch, Christian
    A blinded international study on the reliability of genetic testing for GGGGCC-repeat expansions in C9orf72 reveals marked differences in results among 14 laboratories2014In: Journal of Medical Genetics, ISSN 0022-2593, E-ISSN 1468-6244, Vol. 51, no 6, 419-424 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The GGGGCC-repeat expansion in C9orf72 is the most frequent mutation found in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Most of the studies on C9orf72 have relied on repeat-primed PCR (RP-PCR) methods for detection of the expansions. To investigate the inherent limitations of this technique, we compared methods and results of 14 laboratories. Methods The 14 laboratories genotyped DNA from 78 individuals (diagnosed with ALS or FTD) in a blinded fashion. Eleven laboratories used a combination of amplicon-length analysis and RP-PCR, whereas three laboratories used RP-PCR alone; Southern blotting techniques were used as a reference. Results Using PCR-based techniques, 5 of the 14 laboratories got results in full accordance with the Southern blotting results. Only 50 of the 78 DNA samples got the same genotype result in all 14 laboratories. There was a high degree of false positive and false negative results, and at least one sample could not be genotyped at all in 9 of the 14 laboratories. The mean sensitivity of a combination of amplicon-length analysis and RP-PCR was 95.0% (73.9-100%), and the mean specificity was 98.0% (87.5-100%). Overall, a sensitivity and specificity of more than 95% was observed in only seven laboratories. Conclusions Because of the wide range seen in genotyping results, we recommend using a combination of amplicon-length analysis and RP-PCR as a minimum in a research setting. We propose that Southern blotting techniques should be the gold standard, and be made obligatory in a clinical diagnostic setting.

  • 14.
    Alaerts, Maaike
    et al.
    Applied Molecular Genomics Group, Department of Molecular Genetics, Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), University of Antwerp (UA), Belgium.
    Venken, Tine
    Applied Molecular Genomics Group, Department of Molecular Genetics, Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), University of Antwerp (UA), Belgium.
    Lenaerts, An-Sofie
    Applied Molecular Genomics Group, Department of Molecular Genetics, Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), University of Antwerp (UA), Belgium.
    De Zutter, Sonia
    Applied Molecular Genomics Group, Department of Molecular Genetics, Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), University of Antwerp (UA), Belgium.
    Norrback, Karl-Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Del-Favero, Jurgen
    Applied Molecular Genomics Group, Department of Molecular Genetics, Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), University of Antwerp (UA), Belgium.
    Lack of association of an insertion/deletion polymorphism in the G protein-coupled receptor 50 with bipolar disorder in a Northern Swedish population2006In: Psychiatric Genetics, ISSN 0955-8829, E-ISSN 1473-5873, Vol. 16, no 6, 235-236 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    GPR50 is a G protein-coupled receptor, located on Xq28 and related to the melatonin receptor family. It is suggested as a functional and positional candidate gene for bipolar disorder (BP). Recently an insertion/deletion polymorphism in GPR50, Delta502-505, was found to be associated with BP in a Scottish association sample (P=0.007). When the analysis was restricted to female subjects, the association increased in significance (P=0.00023). We attempted to replicate this finding in a Northern Swedish association sample, but no significant association was detected (P=0.7, women only: P=0.65).

  • 15.
    Albagha, O M E
    et al.
    University of Aberdeen.
    Pettersson, Ulrika
    University of Aberdeen .
    Stewart, A
    University of Aberdeen.
    McGuigan, F E A
    University of Aberdeen.
    MacDonald, H M
    University of Aberdeen.
    Reid, D M
    University of Aberdeen.
    Ralston, S H
    University of Aberdeen.
    Association of oestrogen receptor alpha gene polymorphisms with postmenopausal bone loss, bone mass, and quantitative ultrasound properties of bone.2005In: Journal of Medical Genetics, ISSN 0022-2593, E-ISSN 1468-6244, Vol. 42, no 3, 240-6 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The gene encoding oestrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) appears to regulate bone mineral density (BMD) and other determinants of osteoporotic fracture risk.

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relation between common polymorphisms and haplotypes of the ESR1 gene and osteoporosis related phenotypes in a population based cohort of 3054 Scottish women.

    RESULTS: There was a significant association between a common haplotype "px", defined by the PvuII and XbaI restriction fragment length polymorphisms within intron 1 of the ESR1 gene, and femoral neck bone loss in postmenopausal women who had not received hormone replacement therapy (n = 945; p = 0.009). Annual rates of femoral neck bone loss were approximately 14% higher in subjects who carried one copy of px and 22% higher in those who carried two copies, compared with those who did not carry the px haplotype. The px haplotype was associated with lower femoral neck BMD in the postmenopausal women (p = 0.02), and with reduced calcaneal broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) values in the whole study population (p = 0.005). There was no association between a TA repeat polymorphism in the ESR1 promoter and any phenotype studied, though on long range haplotype analysis subjects with a smaller number of TA repeats who also carried the px haplotype had reduced BUA values.

    CONCLUSIONS: The ESR1px haplotype is associated with reduced hip BMD values and increased rates of femoral neck bone loss in postmenopausal women. An association with BUA may explain the fact that ESR1 intron 1 alleles predict osteoporotic fractures by a mechanism partly independent of differences in BMD.

  • 16.
    Alemi, Mansour
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Molecular biological techniques as a tool in diagnostic pathology: Applications in B-cell lymphoproliferative disease, medullary thyroid carcinoma and cervical carcinoma2000Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Identification of malignancy associated with mutations in gene sequences requires detection ofas little as a single base difference. A powerful technique in mutation detection is polymerasechain reaction (PCR) followed by single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) andsequencing.

    The present investigation is focused on improving tests for the following diagnostic questions:(i) clonality in malignancy of lymphoid origin by developing simple laboratory methodsbased on PCR in which the monoclonal B-cell lineage can be distinguished from thepolyclonal, (ii) presence of mutations in RET proto-oncogene involved in sporadic medullarythyroid carcinoma (MTC), and (iii) development of a simple test which can distinguishbetween prototype human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) and variant HPV16 containing a pointmutation at codon 83 of the E6 gene.

    The rearrangement of the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene can be used as a marker of B-celllineage and clonality. By using PCR with specific primers corresponding to the variable and joining regions, it is possible to detect the rearrangement of a small amount of clonal B-cells ina polyclonal background. This study has shown that the SSCP analysis of PCR fragmentsincreases the sensitivity and the specificity of the test.

    Oncogenic activation of the RET related to somatic missense mutations has been shown insporadic MTC. These mutations are believed to play an important role in the tumorigenesis ofMTC. By combining microdissection of tumor cells followed by PCR-SSCP, fragment sizeanalysis and sequencing, a small proportion of cells with mutation in a subpopulation of cellswithin a tumor can be detected. A variant of HPV 16 has previously been shown to be moreprevalent in invasive cervical carcinoma than in preinvasive lesions. In the present study asimple, rapid PCR-SSCP assay has been developed to identify women who are at increasedrisk of progression to invasive cervical carcinoma.

  • 17.
    Alexander, Helen K.
    et al.
    Cancer Care Manitoba, Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, University of Manitoba.
    Booy, Evan P.
    Cancer Care Manitoba, Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, University of Manitoba; Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada .
    Xiao, Wenyan
    Cancer Care Manitoba, Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, University of Manitoba.
    Ezzati, Peyman
    Cancer Care Manitoba, Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, University of Manitoba.
    Baust, Heinrich
    Department of Radiooncology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany .
    Los, Marek Jan
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, Cancer Care Manitoba; Manitoba Institute of Child Health; Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics; Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science, University Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada, .
    Selected technologies to control genes and their products for experimental and clinical purposes2007In: Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis, ISSN 0004-069X, E-ISSN 1661-4917, Vol. 55, no 3, 139-149 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    "On-demand" regulation of gene expression is a powerful tool to elucidate the functions of proteins and biologically-active RNAs. We describe here three different approaches to the regulation of expression or activity of genes or proteins. Promoter-based regulation of gene expression was among the most rapidly developing techniques in the 1980s and 1990s. Here we provide basic information and also some characteristics of the metallothionein-promoter-based system, the tet-off system, Muristerone-A-regulated expression through the ecdysone response element, RheoSwitch (R), coumermycin/novobiocin-regulated gene expression, chemical dimerizer-based promoter activation systems, the "Dual Drug Control" system, "constitutive androstane receptor"-based regulation of gene expression, and RU486/mifepristone-driven regulation of promoter activity. A large part of the review concentrates on the principles and usage of various RNA interference techniques (RNAi: siRNA, shRNA, and miRNA-based methods). Finally, the last part of the review deals with historically the oldest, but still widely used, methods of temperature-dependent regulation of enzymatic activity or protein stability (temperature-sensitive mutants). Due to space limitations we do not describe in detail but just mention the tet-regulated systems and also fusion-protein-based regulation of protein activity, such as estrogen-receptor fusion proteins. The information provided below is aimed to assist researchers in choosing the most appropriate method for the planned development of experimental systems with regulated expression or activity of studied proteins.

  • 18. Ali, Ashfaq
    et al.
    Varga, Tibor V.
    Stojkovic, Ivana A.
    Schulz, Christina-Alexandra
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Barroso, Ines
    Poveda, Alaitz
    Renström, Frida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Orho-Melander, Marju
    Franks, Paul W.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
    Do Genetic Factors Modify the Relationship Between Obesity and Hypertriglyceridemia?: Findings From the GLACIER and the MDC Studies2016In: Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics, ISSN 1942-325X, E-ISSN 1942-3268, Vol. 9, no 2, 162-171 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Obesity is a major risk factor for dyslipidemia, but this relationship is highly variable. Recently published data from 2 Danish cohorts suggest that genetic factors may underlie some of this variability.

    Methods and Results We tested whether established triglyceride-associated loci modify the relationship of body mass index (BMI) and triglyceride concentrations in 2 Swedish cohorts (the Gene-Lifestyle Interactions and Complex Traits Involved in Elevated Disease Risk [GLACIER Study; N=4312] and the Malmo Diet and Cancer Study [N=5352]). The genetic loci were amalgamated into a weighted genetic risk score (WGRS(TG)) by summing the triglyceride-elevating alleles (weighted by their established marginal effects) for all loci. Both BMI and the WGRS(TG) were strongly associated with triglyceride concentrations in GLACIER, with each additional BMI unit (kg/m(2)) associated with 2.8% (P=8.4x10(-84)) higher triglyceride concentration and each additional WGRS(TG) unit with 2% (P=7.6x10(-48)) higher triglyceride concentration. Each unit of the WGRS(TG) was associated with 1.5% higher triglyceride concentrations in normal weight and 2.4% higher concentrations in overweight/obese participants (P-interaction=0.056). Meta-analyses of results from the Swedish cohorts yielded a statistically significant WGRS(TG)xBMI interaction effect (P-interaction=6.0x10(-4)), which was strengthened by including data from the Danish cohorts (P-interaction=6.5x10(-7)). In the meta-analysis of the Swedish cohorts, nominal evidence of a 3-way interaction (WGRS(TG)xBMIxsex) was observed (P-interaction=0.03), where the WGRS(TG)xBMI interaction was only statistically significant in females. Using protein-protein interaction network analyses, we identified molecular interactions and pathways elucidating the metabolic relationships between BMI and triglyceride-associated loci.

    Conclusions Our findings provide evidence that body fatness accentuates the effects of genetic susceptibility variants in hypertriglyceridemia, effects that are most evident in females.

  • 19. Ali, Magdi M. M.
    et al.
    ElGhazali, Gehad
    Montgomery, Scott M.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Farouk, Salah E.
    Nasr, Amre
    Noori, Suzan I. A.
    Shamad, Mahdi M.
    Fadlelseed, Omar E.
    Berzins, Klavs
    Fc gamma RIIa (CD32) polymorphism and onchocercal skin disease: implications for the development of severe reactive onchodermatitis (ROD)2007In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, ISSN 0002-9637, Vol. 77, no 6, 1074-8 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pathologic manifestations of Onchocerca volvulus infection depend on the interplay between the host and the parasite. A genetic single nucleotide polymorphism in the Fc gamma RIIa gene, resulting in arginine (R) or histidine (H) at position 131, affects the binding to the different IgG subclasses and may influence the clinical variations seen in onchocerciasis. This study investigated the relationship between this polymorphism and disease outcome. Fc gamma RIIa genotyping was performed on clinically characterized onchocerciasis patients (N = 100) and healthy controls (N = 74). Fc gamma RIIa genotype R/R131 frequencies were significantly higher among patients with severe dermatopathology (P < 0.001). Increased risk of developing this form was mostly associated with one tribe (Masalit) (OR = 3.2, 95% CI 1-9.9, P = 0.042). The H131 allele was found to be significantly associated with a reduced risk of having the severe form of the disease (adjusted OR = 0.26, 95% CI = 0.13-0.46, P < 0.001). Our findings suggest that the polymorphism influences the clinical outcome of onchocerciasis.

  • 20.
    Ali, Muhammad Akhtar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Understanding Cancer Mutations by Genome Editing2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutational analyses of cancer genomes have identified novel candidate cancer genes with hitherto unknown function in cancer. To enable phenotyping of mutations in such genes, we have developed a scalable technology for gene knock-in and knock-out in human somatic cells based on recombination-mediated construct generation and a computational tool to design gene targeting constructs. Using this technology, we have generated somatic cell knock-outs of the putative cancer genes ZBED6 and DIP2C in human colorectal cancer cells. In ZBED6-/- cells complete loss of functional ZBED6 was validated and loss of ZBED6 induced the expression of IGF2. Whole transcriptome and ChIP-seq analyses revealed relative enrichment of ZBED6 binding sites at upregulated genes as compared to downregulated genes. The functional annotation of differentially expressed genes revealed enrichment of genes related to cell cycle and cell proliferation and the transcriptional modulator ZBED6 affected the cell growth and cell cycle of human colorectal cancer cells. In DIP2C-/-cells, transcriptome sequencing revealed 780 differentially expressed genes as compared to their parental cells including the tumour suppressor gene CDKN2A. The DIP2C regulated genes belonged to several cancer related processes such as angiogenesis, cell structure and motility. The DIP2C-/-cells were enlarged and grew slower than their parental cells. To be able to directly compare the phenotypes of mutant KRAS and BRAF in colorectal cancers, we have introduced a KRASG13D allele in RKO BRAFV600E/-/-/ cells. The expression of the mutant KRAS allele was confirmed and anchorage independent growth was restored in KRASG13D cells. The differentially expressed genes both in BRAF and KRAS mutant cells included ERBB, TGFB and histone modification pathways. Together, the isogenic model systems presented here can provide insights to known and novel cancer pathways and can be used for drug discovery.

  • 21.
    Ali, Muhammad Akhtar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Younis, Shady
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Wallerman, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Gupta, Rajesh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Tobias Sjöblom, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    The transcriptional modulator ZBED6 regulates cell cycle and growth of human colorectal cancer cellsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The transcription factor ZBED6 is a repressor of IGF2 whose action impacts development, cell proliferation and growth in placental mammals. In human colorectal cancers, IGF2 overexpression is mutually exclusive with somatic mutations in PI3K signaling components, providing genetic evidence for a role in the PI3K pathway. To understand the role of ZBED6 in tumorigenesis, we engineered and validated somatic cell ZBED6 knock-outs in the human colorectal cancer cell lines RKO and HCT116. Transcriptome analyses revealed enrichment of cell cycle-related processes among differentially expressed genes in both cell lines. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing analyses displayed enrichment of ZBED6 binding at genes upregulated in ZBED6-/- knockout clones. Ten differentially expressed genes were identified as putative direct gene targets and their downregulation by ZBED6 was experimentally validated. Eight of these genes were linked to the Wnt, Hippo, TGF-b, EGFR or PI3K pathways, all involved in colorectal cancer development. Ablation of ZBED6 affected the cell cycle and led to increased growth rate of ZBED6-/- RKO cells. These observations support a role for transcriptional modulation by ZBED6 in cell cycle regulation and growth of colorectal cancers.

  • 22.
    Almén, Markus Sällman
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Nilsson, Emil K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Jacobsson, Josefin A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Kalnina, Ineta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Klovins, Janis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Genome-wide analysis reveals DNA methylation markers that vary with both age and obesity2014In: Gene, ISSN 0378-1119, E-ISSN 1879-0038, Vol. 548, no 1, 61-67 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The combination of the obesity epidemic and an aging population presents growing challenges for the healthcare system. Obesity and aging are major risk factors for a diverse number of diseases and it is of importance to understand their interaction and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Herein the authors examined the methylation levels of 27578 CpG sites in 46 samples from adult peripheral blood. The effect of obesity and aging was ascertained with general linear models. More than one hundred probes were correlated to aging, nine of which belonged to the KEGG group map04080. Additionally, 10 CpG sites had diverse methylation profiles in obese and lean individuals, one of which was the telomerase catalytic subunit (TERT). In eight of ten cases the methylation change was reverted between obese and lean individuals. One region proved to be differentially methylated with obesity (LINC00304) independent of age. This study provides evidence that obesity influences age driven epigenetic changes, which provides a molecular link between aging and obesity. This link and the identified markers may prove to be valuable biomarkers for the understanding of the molecular basis of aging, obesity and associated diseases.

  • 23.
    Ameur, Adam
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Bunikis, Ignas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Enroth, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    CanvasDB: a local database infrastructure for analysis of targeted- and whole genome re-sequencing projects2014In: Database: The Journal of Biological Databases and Curation, ISSN 1758-0463, bau098- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CanvasDB is an infrastructure for management and analysis of genetic variants from massively parallel sequencing (MPS) projects. The system stores SNP and indel calls in a local database, designed to handle very large datasets, to allow for rapid analysis using simple commands in R. Functional annotations are included in the system, making it suitable for direct identification of disease-causing mutations in human exome-(WES) or whole-genome sequencing (WGS) projects. The system has a built-in filtering function implemented to simultaneously take into account variant calls from all individual samples. This enables advanced comparative analysis of variant distribution between groups of samples, including detection of candidate causative mutations within family structures and genome-wide association by sequencing. In most cases, these analyses are executed within just a matter of seconds, even when there are several hundreds of samples and millions of variants in the database. We demonstrate the scalability of canvasDB by importing the individual variant calls from all 1092 individuals present in the 1000 Genomes Project into the system, over 4.4 billion SNPs and indels in total. Our results show that canvasDB makes it possible to perform advanced analyses of large-scale WGS projects on a local server.

  • 24. Aminoff, Anna
    et al.
    Gunnar, Erika
    Barbaro, Michela
    Mannila, Maria Nastase
    Duponchel, Christiane
    Tosi, Mario
    Robinson, Kristina Lagerstedt
    Hernell, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Ehrenborg, Ewa
    Novel mutations in microsomal triglyceride transfer protein including maternal uniparental disomy in two patients with abetalipoproteinemia2012In: Clinical Genetics, ISSN 0009-9163, E-ISSN 1399-0004, Vol. 82, no 2, 197-200 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Andersson, Ann-Catrin
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Studies on Human Endogenous Retroviruses (HERVs) with Special Focus on ERV32002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) represent approximately 7% of the human genome. This investigation was focused on one particular HERV, ERV3, with the main purpose of characterising its gene expression patterns and genomic distribution of ERV3-like sequences. Furthermore, this careful expression study should provide insights into the biological role of HERVs. The impact of HERVs in health and disease is not yet clarified. ERV3 is expressed as three envelope (env) transcripts, of which two also contain a cellular gene, H-plk (human proviral linked Krüppel). ERV3 env expression was mainly investigated at the RNA level. The gene expression of two other HERVs, HERV-K and HERV-E was analysed and compared with ERV3 activity.

    Real-time PCRs were developed and in combination with in situ hybridisation, it was found that ERV3 is expressed in a tissue- and cell-specific way. High levels of ERV3 mRNA (up to six times over Histone3.3) were demonstrated in placenta, sebaceous glands, foetal and adult adrenal glands, brown adipose tissue, corpus luteum, pituitary gland, thymus and testis. In monocytic cells including both normal monocytes and malignant U-937 cells, elevated mRNA levels were observed after retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation. ERV3-encoded Env protein was detected in selected cases, one following RA-treatment. In addition, several new ERV3-like sequences were discovered in the human genome.

    ERV3 was found to have conserved open reading frames in contrast to other ERV3-like sequences in the human genome. This suggests that ERV3 may be involved in important cellular processes such as differentiation, cell fusion, immunomodulation and protection against infectious retroviruses. The developed techniques and obtained results will allow further studies of HERV expression to better correlate HERV activity to both normal development and disease.

  • 26.
    Andersson, Christian
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Pesonen, John
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Anhörigas upplevelser av omvårdnaden av närstående i särskilt boende i Västra Götaland år 20102010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: When a senior person has a large need for special care there is an option to relocate to a nursing home. The seniors every day varies there for it is of outmost importance the nursing care staff can support the senior that he maybe adapt to the new situation. Purpose: The purpose with this study is to enlighten how relatives experience their close ones in special nursing home receive good care treatment. Method: A quality approach with empirical elements is used where relatives experiences of care, being part of and recievment was collected with the help of interviews. Results: Three categories Care, Involvment and Recievment with nine sub categories. An important part in care is to create good contact between relatives and nursing care staff to evolve good ways for communication. It was revealed how important it is as a health care patient to feel they’re being looked upon for who they are and they be part of treatment measures and decisions made by nursing care staff. Discussion: The results can contribute to an increased understanding to how relatives experience care is being conducted in a special accommodation. When relatives are made more involved in care, may lead to a better care for care patient in a nursing home. Conclusion: The results which have been concluded could be used in educational purposes when the care of senior people demands that nursing care staff continuously renews their knowledges. This could be of use for the nurse, the relatives and the seniors living in a nursing home.

  • 27. Andersson, Evelyn
    et al.
    Rück, Christian
    Lavebratt, Catharina
    Hedman, Erik
    Schalling, Martin
    Lindefors, Nils
    Eriksson, Elias
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Furmark, Tomas
    Genetic Polymorphisms in Monoamine Systems and Outcome of Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 11, e79015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The role of genetics for predicting the response to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD) has only been studied in one previous investigation. The serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR), the catechol-o-methyltransferase (COMT) val158met, and the tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH2) G-703Tpolymorphisms are implicated in the regulation of amygdala reactivity and fear extinction and therefore might be of relevance for CBT outcome. The aim of the present study was to investigate if these three gene variants predicted response to CBT in a large sample of SAD patients.

    Method

    Participants were recruited from two separate randomized controlled CBT trials (trial 1: n = 112, trial 2: n = 202). Genotyping were performed on DNA extracted from blood or saliva samples. Effects were analyzed at follow-up (6 or 12 months after treatment) for both groups and for each group separately at post-treatment. The main outcome measure was the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale Self-Report.

    Results

    At long-term follow-up, there was no effect of any genotype, or gene × gene interactions, on treatment response. In the subsamples, there was time by genotype interaction effects indicating an influence of the TPH2 G-703T-polymorphism on CBT short-term response, however the direction of the effect was not consistent across trials.

    Conclusions

    None of the three gene variants, 5-HTTLPR, COMTval158met and TPH2 G-703T, was associated with long-term response to CBT for SAD.

  • 28. Andersson, Lars
    et al.
    Petersen, Greta
    Ståhl, Fredrik
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ranking candidate genes in rat models of type 2 diabetes2009In: Theoretical Biology Medical Modelling, ISSN 1742-4682, E-ISSN 1742-4682, Vol. 6, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Rat models are frequently used to find genomic regions that contribute to complex diseases, so called quantitative trait loci (QTLs). In general, the genomic regions found to be associated with a quantitative trait are rather large, covering hundreds of genes. To help selecting appropriate candidate genes from QTLs associated with type 2 diabetes models in rat, we have developed a web tool called Candidate Gene Capture (CGC), specifically adopted for this disorder. Methods CGC combines diabetes-related genomic regions in rat with rat/human homology data, textual descriptions of gene effects and an array of 789 keywords. Each keyword is assigned values that reflect its co-occurrence with 24 different reference terms describing sub-phenotypes of type 2 diabetes (for example "insulin resistance"). The genes are then ranked based on the occurrences of keywords in the describing texts. Results CGC includes QTLs from type 2 diabetes models in rat. When comparing gene rankings from CGC based on one sub-phenotype, with manual gene ratings for four QTLs, very similar results were obtained. In total, 24 different sub-phenotypes are available as reference terms in the application and based on differences in gene ranking, they fall into separate clusters. Conclusion The very good agreement between the CGC gene ranking and the manual rating confirms that CGC is as a reliable tool for interpreting textual information. This, together with the possibility to select many different sub-phenotypes, makes CGC a versatile tool for finding candidate genes. CGC is publicly available at http://ratmap.org/CGC.

  • 29.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, Uppsala, Sweden.;Texas A&M Univ, Dept Vet Integrat Biosci, College Stn, TX USA..
    Domestic animals as models for biomedical research2016In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 121, no 1, 1-11 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Domestic animals are unique models for biomedical research due to their long history (thousands of years) of strong phenotypic selection. This process has enriched for novel mutations that have contributed to phenotype evolution in domestic animals. The characterization of such mutations provides insights in gene function and biological mechanisms. This review summarizes genetic dissection of about 50 genetic variants affecting pigmentation, behaviour, metabolic regulation, and the pattern of locomotion. The variants are controlled by mutations in about 30 different genes, and for 10 of these our group was the first to report an association between the gene and a phenotype. Almost half of the reported mutations occur in non-coding sequences, suggesting that this is the most common type of polymorphism underlying phenotypic variation since this is a biased list where the proportion of coding mutations are inflated as they are easier to find. The review documents that structural changes (duplications, deletions, and inversions) have contributed significantly to the evolution of phenotypic diversity in domestic animals. Finally, we describe five examples of evolution of alleles, which means that alleles have evolved by the accumulation of several consecutive mutations affecting the function of the same gene.

  • 30.
    Andersson, S
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Quantitative genetics of leaf morphology in Crepis tectorum ssp. pumila (Asteraceae).1999In: J Hered, Vol. 90, 556-561 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Andersson, S
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Differences in the genetic basis of leaf dissectin between two populations of Crepis tectorum (Asteraceae).1995In: Heredity, Vol. 75, 62-69 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Andrae, Johanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Gouveia, Maria Leonor Seguardo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    He, Liqun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Betsholtz, Christer
    Characterization of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-A Expression in Mouse Tissues Using a lacZ Knock-In Approach2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 8, e105477- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Expression of the platelet-derived growth factor A-chain gene (Pdgfa) occurs widely in the developing mouse, where it is mainly localized to various epithelial and neuronal structures. Until now, in situ mRNA hybridization (ISH) has been the only reliable method to identify Pdgfa expression in tissue sections or whole mount preparations. Validated protocols for in situ detection of PDGF-A protein by immunohistochemistry is lacking. In particular, this has hampered understanding of Pdgfa expression pattern in adult tissues, where ISH is technically challenging. Here, we report a gene targeted mouse Pdgfa allele, Pdgfa(ex4COIN), which is a combined conditional knockout and reporter allele. Cre-mediated inversion of the COIN cassette inactivates Pdgfa coding while simultaneously activating a beta-galactosidase (lacZ) reporter under endogenous Pdgfa transcription control. The generated Pdgfa(ex4COIN-INV-lacZ) allele can next be used to identify cells carrying a Pdgfa null allele, as well as to map endogenous Pdgfa expression. We evaluated the Pdgfa(ex4COIN-INV-lacZ) allele as a reporter for endogenous Pdgfa expression patterns in mouse embryos and adults. We conclude that the expression pattern of Pdgfa(ex4COIN-INV-lacZ) recapitulates known expression patterns of Pdgfa. We also report on novel embryonic and adult Pdgfa expression patterns in the mouse and discuss their implications for Pdgfa physiology.

  • 33.
    Andræ, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    PDGF in cerebellar development and tumorigenesis2001Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant cerebellar childhood tumor. As in many other brain tumors, expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and its receptors has been shown in medulloblastoma. To reveal the importance of this growth factor in cerebellar development and tumorigenesis, analyses were performed on human medulloblastoma cell lines and on tissue from normal mouse brain at different stages of development. The in vivo effect of a forced expression of PDGF-B in the cerebellar primordium was examined in transgenic mice.

    In the normal mouse embryo, we found PDGF receptor-α-positive cells in the early neuroepithelium and on neuronal precursors. In the postnatal cerebellum, cells in the external germinal layer and Purkinje cells expressed the receptor. In the medulloblastoma cells, expression of all the three PDGF isoforms and PDGF receptors was seen and correlated to neuronal differentiation. Endogenously activated, i.e. tyrosine phosphorylated, PDGF receptors were identified. To reveal the role of PDGF in normal cerebellar development, we established transgenic mice where a PDGF-B cDNA was introduced via homologous recombination into the engrailed-1 gene. Engrailed-1 is specifically expressed at the mid-/hindbrain boundary of the early neural tube, i.e. in an area from which the cerebellar primordium develops. The ectopic expression of PDGF-B caused a disturbance of cerebellar development. Midline fusion of the cerebellar primordium did not occur properly, which resulted in cerebellar dysplasia in the adult mouse.

    In a parallel study, the expression pattern of a glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-lacZ transgene was followed in the embryonic mouse central nervous system. It was shown that the human GFAP promoter was already active by embryonic day 9.5 and as development proceeded, expression occured in different, independent cell populations. Among these cell populations were the radial glial cells in the neocortex.

  • 34.
    Andréasson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Sensitive Forensic DNA Analysis: Application of Pyrosequencing and Real-time PCR Quantification2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of forensic genetics is growing fast and the development and optimisation of more sensitive, faster and more discriminating forensic DNA analysis methods is highly important. In this thesis, an evaluation of the use of novel DNA technologies and the development of specific applications for use in forensic casework investigations are presented.

    In order to maximise the use of valuable limited DNA samples, a fast and user-friendly Real-time PCR quantification assay, of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA copies, was developed. The system is based on the 5’ exonuclease detection assay and was evaluated and successfully used for quantification of a number of different evidence material types commonly found on crime scenes. Furthermore, a system is described that allows both nuclear DNA quantification and sex determination in limited samples, based on intercalation of the SYBR Green dye to double stranded DNA.

    To enable highly sensitive DNA analysis, Pyrosequencing of short stretches of mitochondrial DNA was developed. The system covers both control region and coding region variation, thus providing increased discrimination power for mitochondrial DNA analysis. Finally, due to the lack of optimal assays for quantification of mitochondrial DNA mixture, an alternative use of the Pyrosequencing system was developed. This assay allows precise ratio quantification of mitochondrial DNA in samples showing contribution from more than one individual.

    In conclusion, the development of optimised forensic DNA analysis methods in this thesis provides several novel quantification assays and increased knowledge of typical DNA amounts in various forensic samples. The new, fast and sensitive mitochondrial DNA Pyrosequencing assay was developed and has the potential for increased discrimination power.

  • 35.
    Antson, Dan-Oscar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Genotyping RNA and DNA using padlock probes2001Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Novel techniques are needed to investigate the genetic variation revealed in the first draft of the human genome sequence. Padlock probes are recently developed reagents, suitable for detecting single-nucleotide variations of DNA and RNA in situ or in solution. The probes are oligonucleotides of about 70-140 nucleotides that can be circularized by ligation in the presence of a correct target sequence. Standard chemical synthesis of padlock probes is difficult due to the requirement for intact 5' and 3' ends of these long oligonucleotides.

    A novel PCR-based method is presented in this thesis, whereby longer, densely labeled padlock probes can be made as compared to conventional chemical synthesis. PCR-generated padlock probes produced a stronger signal and a more resolved staining pattern, compared to chemically synthesized probes in fluorescence in situ analysis of an alpha-satellite sequence variant present in human chromosomes 13 and 21. Padlock probes used for in situ analysis of metaphase chromosomes had an optimal length of 140 nucleotides. They were used to identify individual chromosomes 7 and 15, and to follow the transmission of chromosome homologues for two consecutive generations. The specificity of the padlock probes to detect single copy genes in genomic DNA samples was demonstrated by detecting a single-nucleotide mutation in the ATP7B gene.

    It has not previously been known if T4 DNA ligase can be used for RNA sequence analysis. In this thesis, it is demonstrated that T4 DNA ligase can be used for distinguishing single-nucleotide RNA sequence variants. Reaction conditions were defined where most mismatches could be discriminated by a factor of 80 and all mismatches by a factor of at least 20. Under these conditions padlock probes could detect and distinguish RNA sequence variants with ligation efficiency almost as high as on the corresponding DNA sequence.

    A detailed study of the parameters influencing RNA-templated DNA ligation revealed that DNA ligation on RNA templates proceeds at a much slower rate compared to the same reaction on DNA, and that a molar excess of enzyme is required. Furthermore, the ligation reaction is inhibited by high concentrations of the cofactor ATP and NaCl.

    The work presented in this thesis demonstrates that PCR-generated padlock probes can detect and distinguish single-nucleotide variation in both RNA and DNA.

  • 36.
    Artemenko, Konstantin A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry.
    Lind, Sara Bergström
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Elfineh, Lioudmila
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Mayrhofer, Corina
    Zubarev, Roman A.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry.
    Pettersson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Optimization of immunoaffinity enrichment and detection: toward a comprehensive characterization of the phosphotyrosine proteome of K562 cells by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry2011In: The Analyst, ISSN 0003-2654, E-ISSN 1364-5528, Vol. 136, no 9, 1971-1978 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphorylation of protein tyrosine residues regulates many cell functions and has also been proved to be involved in oncogenesis. Thus, the identification of the phosphotyrosine (pTyr) proteome of cells is a very important task. Since tyrosine phosphorylation represents only around 1% of the total human phosphoproteome, the study of pTyr proteins is rather challenging. Here we report the optimization study of the phosphotyrosine proteome using K562 cells as a model system. A substantial segment of the phosphotyrosine proteome of K562 cells was characterized by immunoaffinity enrichment with 4G10 and PYKD1 antibodies followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. 480 non-redundant pTyr peptides corresponding to 342 pTyr proteins were found. 141 pTyr peptides were not described elsewhere. The mass spectrometry approach involving high-resolving FTMS analysis of precursor ions and subsequent detection of CID fragments in a linear ion trap was considered as optimal. For detection of low abundant pTyr peptides pooling of individual immunoaffinity enrichments for one LC-MS/MS analysis was crucial. The enrichment properties of the monoclonal PYKD1 antibody were presented for the first time, also in comparison to the 4G10 antibody. PYKD1 was found to be more effective for protein enrichment (1.2 and 5% efficiency at peptide and protein level correspondingly), while 4G10 showed better results when peptide enrichment was performed (15% efficiency versus 3.6% at protein level). Substantially different subsets of the phosphoproteome were enriched by these antibodies. This finding together with previous studies demonstrates that comprehensive pTyr proteome characterization by immunoprecipitation requires multiple antibodies to be used for the affinity enrichment.

  • 37.
    Arzoo, Pakeeza Shaiq
    et al.
    Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Klar, Joakim
    Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bergendal, Birgitta
    National Oral Disability Centre, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Dahl, Niklas
    Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    WNT10A mutations account for ¼ of population-based isolated oligodontia and show phenotypic correlations2014In: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A, ISSN 1552-4825, E-ISSN 1552-4833, Vol. 164, no 2, 353-359 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A large proportion (>50%) of patients with isolated oligodontia were recently reported with WNT10A mutations. We have analyzed a population-based cohort of 102 individuals diagnosed with non-syndromic oligodontia and a mean of 8.2 missing teeth. The cohort included 94 families and screening of WNT10A identified that 26 probands (27.7%) had at least one WNT10A variant. When we included the MSX1, PAX9, AXIN2, EDA, EDAR, and EDARADD genes, 38.3% of probands were positive for a mutation. Biallelic WNT10A mutations were strongly associated with a larger number of missing teeth (11.09) when compared to both monoallelic WNT10 mutations (6.82) and the group without mutations in WNT10A, MSX1, PAX9, AXIN2, EDA, EDAR, or EDARADD (7.77). Genotype–phenotype analysis of individuals with WNT10A mutations showed that premolars were the most common missing teeth. Furthermore, biallelic WNT10A mutations were associated with absence of maxillary and mandibular molars as well as mandibular central incisors. Maxillary central incisors were always present. Thus, our study indicates that WNT10A mutations are associated with both the type and numbers of missing teeth. Furthermore, we show that this population-based cohort of isolated oligodontia had a considerably lower frequency of mutated WNT10A alleles and a lower mean number of missing teeth when compared to patients recruited from dental specialist centers.

  • 38.
    Aspegren, Anders
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Nuclear Organization of Gene Expression in Adenovirus Infected Cells2001Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Adenovirus infected cells provide a good model system for studying nuclear organization during RNA production and transport. This thesis is focused on the dynamic organization of splicing factors during the late phase of Adenovirus infection in HeLa cells, the nuclear localization of viral RNA, and the pathway used for viral RNA transport to the cytoplasm.

    Splicing factors are relocalized from interchromatin granule clusters to sites of transcription in Adenovirus infected cells at intermediate times of infection. Later, splicing factors and viral RNA accumulate posttranscriptionally in interchromatin granule clusters. The release of the splicing factors from transcription sites was energy dependent or preceded by energy requiring mechanisms. Our data indicated that phosphorylation events inhibited by staurosporine, and 3' cleavage of the transcript are two possible mechanisms involved prior to the release of the RNP complex from transcription sites.

    A viral protein derived from orf6 of early region 4, 34K, is important for the nuclear stability and transport of late viral mRNA derived from the major late transcription unit. A viral mutant lacking this region is defective for posttranscriptional accumulation of viral mRNA in interchromatin granule clusters, and for the accumulation of viral RNA in the cytoplasm. These results suggest that posttranscriptional accumulation of viral RNA in interchromatin granule clusters may contribute to the maturation of the RNP complex or sorting of RNAs and proteins, to prepare the final RNP complex for transport to the cytoplasm.

    A previous model suggested that adenoviral late mRNA is transported to the cytoplasm by utilizing the CRM-1 pathway. This pathway can be blocked by the drug leptomycin B. The data presented in paper IV suggests that this model might not be applicable, since leptomycin B did not inhibit adenoviral late gene expression.

  • 39.
    Assadi, G.
    et al.
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Saleh, R.
    Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hadizadeh, F.
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vesterlund, L.
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bonfiglio, F.
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Gastroenterology.
    Törkvist, L.
    Gastrocentrum, Karolinska University Hospital, StockhoCrohn'slm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, A. S.
    Gatroenterology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Sahlgren's University Hospital/Östra, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Harris, H. E.
    Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sundberg, E.
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    D'Amato, M.
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; BioCruces Health Research Institute and IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao, Spain.
    LACC1 polymorphisms in inflammatory bowel disease and juvenile idiopathic arthritis2016In: Genes and Immunity, ISSN 1466-4879, E-ISSN 1476-5470, Vol. 17, no 4, 261-264 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The function of the Laccase domain-containing 1 (LACC1) gene is unknown, but genetic variation at this locus has been reported to consistently affect the risk of Crohn's disease (CD) and leprosy. Recently, a LACC1 missense mutation was found in patients suffering from monogenic forms of CD, but also systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. We tested the hypothesis that LACC1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in addition to CD, are associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, non-systemic), and another major form of inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis (UC). We selected 11 LACC1 tagging SNPs, and tested their effect on disease risk in 3855 Swedish individuals from three case-control cohorts of CD, UC and JIA. We detected false discovery rate corrected significant associations with individual markers in all three cohorts, thereby expanding previous results for CD also to UC and JIA. LACC1's link to several inflammatory diseases suggests a key role in the human immune system and justifies further characterization of its function(s).

  • 40.
    Ata, Ahmad Khaled
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Expression of TGF- isoforms, their receptors and related SMAD proteins in brain pathology: Immunohistochemical studies focusing on infarcts, abscesses and malignant gliomas1999Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on the immunohistochemical expression of transforming growth factor beta(TGFβ) isoforms, their receptors and TGF-β-related SMAD proteins in brain pathology, chiefly in-farcts. One key question was whether the expressions of these compounds are altered within glial cells, endothelial cells of microvessels and other cell types in the vicinity of infarcts. Studies on human and animal brain infarcts were made. Immunoreactivities to TGF-β isoforms -β1, -β2 and -β3, and TGF-βreceptor (TβR) type I were seen in astrocytes, macrophages, neurons, endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells of human brain infarcts. Similar observations were made in an experimental model of rat brain infarct at day 1 and 3 following occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Increased expression of Smad2, -3, -4, -6 and -7 was seen already at 6 h after MCA occlusion in neurons, microvascular endothelial cells, astroglial cells and inflammatory cells. Later on, immunopositive macrophages were present in the infarcts. The changes persisted even at day 7 after MCA occlusion.

    Several alterations thus occur during the evolution of brain infarcts with regard to the immuno­histochemical expression of TGF-β, its receptors and related SMAD proteins. Such changes are, however, not unique to brain infarcts. Thus, patterns of high expression for TGF-β- isoforms -β1, -β2 -β3, and TβR-I in cases of brain abscess (human), and of Smad2, -3, -4, -6 and -7 in tumor cells and neoplastic blood vessels of malignant gliomas (human) were also observed.

    In addition, immunohistochemical expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) andits receptors was investigated since this growth factor is involved in angiogenesis and edemaformation, two cardinal features of brain infarcts. Increased immunoreactivities, seen particularly in the edges of infarcts, were observed already at day 1 after MCA occlusion.

    In conclusion, the various TGF-β isoforms, receptors and related SMAD proteins, together with other factors, seem to be involved in the very complicated and important changes taking place in the vicinity of brain infarcts.

  • 41.
    Atteia, A.
    et al.
    Depto. de Genética Molecular, Inst. de Fisiología Celular, Univ. Nacl. Auton. de Mex., Mexico.
    van Lis, R.
    Depto. de Genética Molecular, Inst. de Fisiología Celular, Univ. Nacl. Auton. de Mex., Mexico.
    Wetterskog, Daniel
    Department of Plant Physiology, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Gutiérrez-Cirlos, E.-B.
    Department of Biochemistry, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, United States.
    Ongay-Larios, L.
    Unidad de Biología Molecular, Inst. de Fisiología Celular, Univ. Nacl. Auton. de Mex., Mexico.
    Franzén, Lars-Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Plant Cell Biology: Energy transduction in plant cells.
    González-Halphen, D.
    Depto. de Genética Molecular, Inst. de Fisiología Celular, Univ. Nacl. Auton. de Mex., Mexico.
    Structure, organization and expression of the genes encoding mitochondrial cytochrome c1 and the Rieske iron-sulfur protein in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii2003In: Molecular Genetics and Genomics, ISSN 1617-4615, Vol. 268, no 5, 637-644 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sequence and organization of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii genes encoding cytochrome c 1 ( Cyc1) and the Rieske-type iron-sulfur protein ( Isp), two key nucleus-encoded subunits of the mitochondrial cytochrome bc 1 complex, are presented. Southern hybridization analysis indicates that both Cyc1 and Isp are present as single-copy genes in C. reinhardtii. The Cyc1 gene spans 6404 bp and contains six introns, ranging from 178 to 1134 bp in size. The Isp gene spans 1238 bp and contains four smaller introns, ranging in length from 83 to 167 bp. In both genes, the intron/exon junctions follow the GT/AG rule. Internal conserved sequences were identified in only some of the introns in the Cyc1 gene. The levels of expression of Isp and Cyc1 genes are comparable in wild-type C. reinhardtii cells and in a mutant strain carrying a deletion in the mitochondrial gene for cytochrome b (dum-1). Nevertheless, no accumulation of the nucleus-encoded cytochrome c 1 or of core proteins I and II was observed in the membranes of the respiratory mutant. These data show that, in the green alga C. reinhardtii, the subunits of the cytochrome bc1 complex fail to assemble properly in the absence of cytochrome b.

  • 42. Auer-Grumbach, Michaela
    et al.
    Toegel, Stefan
    Schabhuettl, Maria
    Weinmann, Daniela
    Chiari, Catharina
    Bennett, David L. H.
    Beetz, Christian
    Klein, Dennis
    Andersen, Peter M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Boehme, Ilka
    Fink-Puches, Regina
    Gonzalez, Michael
    Harms, Matthew B.
    Motley, William
    Reilly, Mary M.
    Renner, Wilfried
    Rudnik-Schoeneborn, Sabine
    Schlotter-Weigel, Beate
    Themistocleous, Andreas C.
    Weishaupt, Jochen H.
    Ludolph, Albert C.
    Wieland, Thomas
    Tao, Feifei
    Abreu, Lisa
    Windhager, Reinhard
    Zitzelsberger, Manuela
    Strom, Tim M.
    Walther, Thomas
    Scherer, Steven S.
    Zuchner, Stephan
    Martini, Rudolf
    Senderek, Jan
    Rare Variants in MME, Encoding Metalloprotease Neprilysin, Are Linked to Late-Onset Autosomal-Dominant Axonal Polyneuropathies2016In: American Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 0002-9297, E-ISSN 1537-6605, Vol. 99, no 3, 607-623 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Axonal polyneuropathies are a frequent cause of progressive disability in the elderly. Common etiologies comprise diabetes mellitus, paraproteinaemia, and inflammatory disorders, but often the underlying causes remain elusive. Late-onset axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMT2) is an autosomal-dominantly inherited condition that manifests in the second half of life and is genetically largely unexplained. We assumed age-dependent penetrance of mutations in a so far unknown gene causing late-onset CMT2. We screened 51 index case subjects with late-onset CMT2 for mutations by whole-exome (WES) and Sanger sequencing and subsequently queried WES repositories for further case subjects carrying mutations in the identified candidate gene. We studied nerve pathology and tissue levels and function of the abnormal protein in order to explore consequences of the mutations. Altogether, we observed heterozygous rare loss-of-function and missense mutations in MME encoding the metalloprotease neprilysin in 19 index case subjects diagnosed with axonal polyneuropathies or neurodegenerative conditions involving the peripheral nervous system. MME mutations segregated in an autosomal-dominant fashion with age-related incomplete penetrance and some affected individuals were isolated case subjects. We also found that MME mutations resulted in strongly decreased tissue availability of neprilysin and impaired enzymatic activity. Although neprilysin is known to degrade beta-amyloid, we observed no increased amyloid deposition or increased incidence of dementia in individuals with MME mutations. Detection of MME mutations is expected to increase the diagnostic yield in late-onset polyneuropathies, and it will be tempting to explore whether substances that can elevate neprilysin activity could be a rational option for treatment.

  • 43.
    Auffray, Charles
    et al.
    European Institute Syst Biol and Med, France; University of Lyon, France.
    Balling, Rudi
    University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Barroso, Ines
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, England.
    Bencze, Laszlo
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Bergeron, Jay
    Pfizer Inc, MA 02139 USA.
    Bernal-Delgado, Enrique
    IACS IIS Aragon, Spain.
    Blomberg, Niklas
    EL IXIR, England.
    Bock, Christoph
    Austrian Academic Science, Austria; Medical University of Vienna, Austria; Max Planck Institute Informat, Germany.
    Conesa, Ana
    Principe Felipe Research Centre, Spain; University of Florida, FL 32610 USA.
    Del Signore, Susanna
    Bluecompan Ltd, England.
    Delogne, Christophe
    KPMG Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Devilee, Peter
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Di Meglio, Alberto
    European Org Nucl Research CERN, Switzerland.
    Eijkemans, Marinus
    University of Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Flicek, Paul
    European Bioinformat Institute EMBL EBI, England.
    Graf, Norbert
    University of Saarland, Germany.
    Grimm, Vera
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Germany.
    Guchelaar, Henk-Jan
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Guo, Yi-Ke
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Glynne Gut, Ivo
    BIST, Spain.
    Hanbury, Allan
    TU Wien, Austria.
    Hanif, Shahid
    Assoc British Pharmaceut Ind, England.
    Hilgers, Ralf-Dieter
    University of Klinikum Aachen, Germany.
    Honrado, Angel
    SYNAPSE Research Management Partners, Spain.
    Rod Hose, D.
    University of Sheffield, England.
    Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine
    University of Leeds, England.
    Hubbard, Tim
    Kings Coll London, England; Genom England, England.
    Helen Janacek, Sophie
    European Bioinformat Institute EMBL EBI, England.
    Karanikas, Haralampos
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Kievits, Tim
    Vitr Healthcare Holding BV, Netherlands.
    Kohler, Manfred
    Fraunhofer Institute Molecular Biol and Appl Ecol ScreeningPor, Germany.
    Kremer, Andreas
    ITTM SA, Luxembourg.
    Lanfear, Jerry
    Pfizer Ltd, England.
    Lengauer, Thomas
    Max Planck Institute for Informatics, Saarbrucken, Germany.
    Maes, Edith
    Health Econ and Outcomes Research, Belgium.
    Meert, Theo
    Janssen Pharmaceut NV, Belgium.
    Mueller, Werner
    University of Manchester, England.
    Nickel, Dorthe
    Institute Curie, France.
    Oledzki, Peter
    Linguamat Ltd, England.
    Pedersen, Bertrand
    PwC Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Petkovic, Milan
    Philips, Netherlands.
    Pliakos, Konstantinos
    KU Leuven Kulak, Belgium.
    Rattray, Magnus
    University of Manchester, England.
    Redon i Mas, Josep
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Schneider, Reinhard
    University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Sengstag, Thierry
    SIB, Switzerland; University of Basel, Switzerland.
    Serra-Picamal, Xavier
    Agency Health Qual and Assessment Catalonia AQuAS, Spain.
    Spek, Wouter
    EuroBioForum Fdn, Netherlands.
    Vaas, Lea A. I.
    Fraunhofer Institute Molecular Biol and Appl Ecol ScreeningPor, Germany.
    van Batenburg, Okker
    EuroBioForum Fdn, Netherlands.
    Vandelaer, Marc
    Integrated BioBank Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Varnai, Peter
    Technopolis Grp, England.
    Villoslada, Pablo
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Antonio Vizcaino, Juan
    European Bioinformat Institute EMBL EBI, England.
    Peter Mary Wubbe, John
    European Platform Patients Org Science and Ind Epposi, Belgium.
    Zanetti, Gianluigi
    CRS4, Italy; BBMRI ERIC, Austria.
    Making sense of big data in health research: Towards an EU action plan2016In: Genome Medicine, ISSN 1756-994X, E-ISSN 1756-994X, Vol. 8, no 71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Medicine and healthcare are undergoing profound changes. Whole-genome sequencing and high-resolution imaging technologies are key drivers of this rapid and crucial transformation. Technological innovation combined with automation and miniaturization has triggered an explosion in data production that will soon reach exabyte proportions. How are we going to deal with this exponential increase in data production? The potential of "big data" for improving health is enormous but, at the same time, we face a wide range of challenges to overcome urgently. Europe is very proud of its cultural diversity; however, exploitation of the data made available through advances in genomic medicine, imaging, and a wide range of mobile health applications or connected devices is hampered by numerous historical, technical, legal, and political barriers. European health systems and databases are diverse and fragmented. There is a lack of harmonization of data formats, processing, analysis, and data transfer, which leads to incompatibilities and lost opportunities. Legal frameworks for data sharing are evolving. Clinicians, researchers, and citizens need improved methods, tools, and training to generate, analyze, and query data effectively. Addressing these barriers will contribute to creating the European Single Market for health, which will improve health arid healthcare for all Europearis.

  • 44. Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    Chaouch, Amina
    Lochmueller, Hanns
    Politano, Luisa
    Bertini, Enrico
    Spitali, Pietro
    Hiller, Monika
    Niks, Eric H.
    Gualandi, Francesca
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bushby, Kate
    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke
    Schwartz, Elena
    Le Priol, Yannick
    Straub, Volker
    Uhlen, Mathias
    Cirak, Sebahattin
    't Hoen, Peter A. C.
    Muntoni, Francesco
    Ferlini, Alessandra
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili
    Affinity proteomics within rare diseases: a BIO-NMD study for blood biomarkers of muscular dystrophies2014In: EMBO Molecular Medicine, ISSN 1757-4676, E-ISSN 1757-4684, Vol. 6, no 7, 918-936 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the recent progress in the broad-scaled analysis of proteins in body fluids, there is still a lack in protein profiling approaches for biomarkers of rare diseases. Scarcity of samples is the main obstacle hindering attempts to apply discovery driven protein profiling in rare diseases. We addressed this challenge by combining samples collected within the BIO-NMD consortium from four geographically dispersed clinical sites to identify protein markers associated with muscular dystrophy using an antibody bead array platform with 384 antibodies. Based on concordance in statistical significance and confirmatory results obtained from analysis of both serum and plasma, we identified eleven proteins associated with muscular dystrophy, among which four proteins were elevated in blood from muscular dystrophy patients: carbonic anhydrase III (CA3) and myosin light chain 3 (MYL3), both specifically expressed in slow-twitch muscle fibers and mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase 2 (MDH2) and electron transfer flavo-protein A (ETFA). Using age-matched sub-cohorts, 9 protein profiles correlating with disease progression and severity were identified, which hold promise for the development of new clinical tools for management of dystrophinopathies.

  • 45.
    Badhai, Jitendra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Ribosomal Proteins in Diamond-Blackfan Anemia: Insights into Failure of Ribosome Function2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a severe congenital anemia characterized by a defect in red blood cell production. The disease is associated with growth retardation, malformations, a predisposition for malignant disease and heterozygous mutations in either of the ribosomal protein (RP) genes RPS7, RPS17, RPS19, RPS24, RPL5, RPL11 and RPL35a.

    In a cellular model for DBA, siRNA knock-down of RPS19 results in a relative decrease of other ribosomal (r) proteins belonging to the small subunit (RPS20, RPS21, RPS24) when compared to r-proteins from the large ribosomal subunit (RPL3, RPL9, RPL30, RPL38). RPS19 mutant cells from DBA patients show a similar and coordinated down-regulation of small subunit proteins. The mRNA levels of the small subunit r-proteins remain relatively unchanged. We also show that RPS19 has an extensive number of transcriptional start sites resulting in mRNAs of variable 5’UTR length. The short variants are translated more efficiently. Structural sequence variations in the 5’UTR of RPS19 found in DBA patients show a 20%-30% reduced translational activity when compared to normal transcripts.

    Primary fibroblast from DBA patients with truncating mutations in RPS19 or RPS24 showed specific cell cycle defects. RPS19 mutant fibroblasts accumulate in the G1 phase whereas the RPS24 mutant cells show a defect in G2/M phase. The G1 phase arrest is associated with a reduced level of phosphorylated retinoblastoma (Rb) protein, cyclin E and cdk2 whereas the G2/M phase defect is associated with increased levels of p21, cyclin E, cdk4 and cdk6.

    RPS19 interacts with PIM-1 kinase. We investigated the effects of targeted disruptions of both Rps19 and Pim-1 in mice. Double mutant (Rps19+/-, Pim-1-/-) mice have increased peripheral white- and red blood cell counts when compared to the wild-type mice (Rps19+/+, Pim-1+/+). Bone marrow cells in Rps19+/-, Pim-1-/- mice showed up-regulated levels of c-Myc and the anti-apoptotic factors Bcl2, Bcl-xl and Mcl-1 and reduced levels of the apoptotic factors Bak and Caspase 3 as well as the cell cycle regulator p21.

    In summary, this thesis clarifies several mechanisms in the pathogenesis of DBA. Mutations in RPS19 results in coordinated down-regulation of several small subunit r-proteins causing haploinsufficiency for the small ribosomal subunit. RPS19 have multiple transcriptional start sites and mutations in the RPS19 5’UTR found in DBA patients result in reduced translational activity. At the cellular level, mutations in RPS19 and RPS24 cause distinct cell cycle defects and reduced cell proliferation. Finally, PIM-1 kinase and RPS19 cooperates in the proliferation of myeloid cells.

  • 46.
    Badhai, Jitendra
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Genetics.
    Fröjmark, Anne-Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Genetics.
    Gidlöf, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Genetics.
    Schuster, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Genetics.
    Dahl, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Genetics.
    Differential expression of RPS19 5’UTR variants implicated in Diamond-Blackfan anemia2012Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Heterozygous mutations in the ribosomal protein (RP) S19 gene RPS19 are found in about 25% of patients with the congenital erythroblastopenia Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA). The RPS19 gene encodes a single RPS19 isoform from three known transcriptional start sites (TSS) with different 5’ untranslated region (UTR). The regulation of RPS19 expression is poorly understood as well as the significance of different 5’UTRs. A few rare sequence variants within the 5’UTR have also been reported in patients with DBA. We determined the transcriptional start sites (TSS) and the tissue distribution of variant 5’UTRs of RPS19. Twenty-nine novel TSS in K562 cells and testis were identified. We then analyzed the relative proportion of three selected 5’UTRs of different length on a panel of primary tissues. The shorter 5’UTR were most abundant in all tissues but with large variations in relative levels of shorter versus longer transcripts. To clarify the effect of different RPS19 5’UTRs on translation we designed and expressed constructs using three 5’UTRs of different length. The short 5’UTR(+35nt.) translate 4-6 folds more efficiently than the two longer variants with 5’UTRs of 382nt. and 467nt., respectively We also introduced DBA associated insertion (c.-149_-148insGCCA, c.-149_-148insAGCC ) and deletion (c.-144_-141delTTTC) variants in the 5’UTR. . Interestingly, the DBA associated 5’UTR sequence variants showed a 20-30% reduction in RPS19 levels when compared to the corresponding w.t. constructs. Our results indicate that the RPS19 gene has a broad range of TSS with tissue specific variations. We also show that sequence variants in the 5’UTR in some DBA patients reduce RPS19 expression with implications for the pathophysiology of the disease.

  • 47. Bahl, Aileen
    et al.
    Pöllänen, Eija
    Ismail, Khadeeja
    Sipilä, Sarianna
    Mikkola, Tuija M
    Berglund, Eva C
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lindqvist, Carl Mårten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rantanen, Taina
    Kaprio, Jaakko
    Kovanen, Vuokko
    Ollikainen, Miina
    Hormone Replacement Therapy Associated White Blood Cell DNA Methylation and Gene Expression are Associated With Within-Pair Differences of Body Adiposity and Bone Mass2015In: Twin Research and Human Genetics, ISSN 1832-4274, E-ISSN 1839-2628, Vol. 18, no 6, 647-661 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The loss of estrogen during menopause causes changes in the female body, with wide-ranging effects on health. Estrogen-containing hormone replacement therapy (HRT) leads to a relief of typical menopausal symptoms, benefits bone and muscle health, and is associated with tissue-specific gene expression profiles. As gene expression is controlled by epigenetic factors (including DNA methylation), many of which are environmentally sensitive, it is plausible that at least part of the HRT-associated gene expression is due to changes in DNA methylation profile. We investigated genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression patterns of white blood cells (WBCs) and their associations with body composition, including muscle and bone measures of monozygotic (MZ) female twin pairs discordant for HRT. We identified 7,855 nominally significant differentially methylated regions (DMRs) associated with 4,044 genes. Of the genes with DMRs, five (ACBA1, CCL5, FASLG, PPP2R2B, and UHRF1) were also differentially expressed. All have been previously associated with HRT or estrogenic regulation, but not with HRT-associated DNA methylation. All five genes were associated with bone mineral content (BMC), and ABCA1, FASLG, and UHRF1 were also associated with body adiposity. Our study is the first to show that HRT associates with genome-wide DNA methylation alterations in WBCs. Moreover, we show that five differentially expressed genes with DMRs associate with clinical measures, including body fat percentage, lean body mass, bone mass, and blood lipids. Our results indicate that at least part of the known beneficial HRT effects on body composition and bone mass may be regulated by DNA methylation associated alterations in gene expression in circulating WBCs.

  • 48.
    Bahram, Fuad
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    VEGF-mediated signal transduction in lymphatic endothelial cells2010In: Pathophysiology : the official journal of the International Society for Pathophysiology / ISP, ISSN 0928-4680, Vol. 17, no 4, 253-261 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The VEGF family of angiogenic ligands consists of VEGFA, VEGFB, VEGFC, VEGFD and placenta growth factor, PlGF. These growth factors bind in an overlapping pattern to three receptor tyrosine kinases, denoted VEGFR1, VEGFR2 and VEGFR3. Originally, VEGFA (the prototype VEGF) was described as a master regulator of vascular endothelial cell biology in vitro and in vivo, transducing its effect through VEGFR2. VEGFA, VEGFB and PlGF bind to VEGFR1, which is a negative regulator of endothelial cell function at least during embryogenesis. VEGFC and VEGFD were identified as lymphatic endothelial factors, acting via VEGFR3. With time, the very clear distinction between the roles of the VEGF ligands in angiogenesis/lymphangiogenesis has given way for a more complex pattern. It seems that the biology of the different VEGFR2 and VEGFR3 ligands overlaps quite extensively and that both receptor types contribute to angiogenesis as well as lymphangiogenesis. This paradigm shift in our understanding is due to the access to more sophisticated reagents and techniques revealing dynamic and plastic expression of ligands and receptors in different physiological and pathological conditions. Moreover, knowledge on the important role of VEGF coreceptors, the neuropilins, in regulating the responsiveness to VEGF has changed our perception on the mechanism of VEGF signal transduction. This review will primarily focus on the properties of VEGR3, its signal transduction and the resulting biology.

  • 49.
    Bakall, Benjamin
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Analysis of the Gene and Protein Causing Best Macular Dystrophy2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Best macular dystrophy (BMD) is an autosomal dominant inherited eye disease with a juvenile onset. Accumulation of the pigment lipofuscin in the retinal pigment epithelium can later cause macular degeneration and loss of vision. BMD have histopathologic similarities with age-related macular degeneration, the most common cause of blindness among elderly. BMD diagnosis is made with fundus examination and electrophysiology. The VMD2 gene, causing BMD, has previously been localized to 11q13 using linkage and recombination of a 12 generation family with BMD.

    In this study the genetic region has been further narrowed using polymorphic markers in the BMD family. A human homolog for a C. elegans protein family, expressed in retina, was identified as the VMD2 gene. It has a 1755 bp open reading frame with 11 exons and encodes a 585 amino acid protein called bestrophin. Mutation analysis of the VMD2 gene in BMD families from Sweden, Denmark and Netherlands revealed 15 missense mutations, altering single amino acids in bestrophin, accumulating in the N-terminal half of the protein. VMD2 expression analysis with in situ hybridization revealed specific localization in the retinal pigment epithelium and Northern blot showed expression in retina and brain. Clinical and genetic analysis of a BMD family with generally late onset revealed a novel bestrophin mutation.

    Analysis of mouse Vmd2 and bestrophin during development showed presence of mouse bestrophin in retinal pigment epithelium at postnatal day 10 and in photoreceptor outer segments during the entire postnatal period. Vmd2 expression levels were highest around birth.

  • 50.
    Balciuniene, Jorune
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Genetic studies of two inherited human phenotypes: Hearing loss and monoamine oxidase activity2001Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on the identification of genetic factors underlying two inherited human phenotypes: hearing loss and monoamine oxidase activity.

    Non-syndromic hearing loss segregating in a Swedish family was tested for linkage to 13 previously reported candidate loci for hearing disabilities. Linkage was found to two loci: DFNA12 (llq22-q24) and DFNA2 (lp32). A detailed analysis of the phenotypes and haplotypes shared by the affected individuals supported the hypothesis of digenic inheritance of hearing disability in the Swedish family. Mutation screening of α-tectorin, a gene residing within the DFNA12 region revealed a mutation of a conserved amino acid (Cys to Ser), that segregated with the disease. The identification of the mutation added support to the involvement of α-tectorin in hearing disabilities. In contrast, no mutations were identified in two candidate genes at the DFNA2 locus, that were reported to cause hearing loss in other families. It is possible that the DFNA2 locus contains a third, not yet identified, hearing loss gene.

    Monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) and B (MAOB) catalyze the degradation of certain neurotransmitters in the central nervous system and are associated with specific behavioral and neuropsychiatric human traits. Activity levels of both monoamine oxidases (MAO) are highly variable among humans and are determined by unknown genetic factors. This study investigated the relationship of different MAO alleles with MAO mRNA levels and enzyme activity in human brain. Several novel DNA polymorphisms were identified in a group of Swedish individuals. Haplotypes containing several closely located MAOA polymorphisms were assessed in Asian, African, and Caucasian populations. The haplotype distribution and diversity pattern found among the three populations supported the occurrence of a bottleneck during the dispersion of modem humans from Africa.

    Allelic association studies conducted on postmortem human brain samples, revealed the association between a SNP in the MAOB intron 13, and different levels of both MAO enzyme activities. This suggested that this SNP is in linkage disequilibrium with at least one novel functional DNA polymorphism that controls MAO enzyme activities in human brain. The identification of functional polymorphisms regulating the activity of these enzymes will help to elucidate the involvement of MAO in human behavior and neuropsychiatric conditions.

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