Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 2219
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
Select all
  • 1.
    Aare, Sudhakar Reddy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Intensive Care Unit Muscle Wasting: Skeletal Muscle Phenotype and Underlying Molecular Mechanisms2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Acute quadriplegic myopathy (AQM), or critical illness myopathy, is a common debilitating acquired disorder in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients characterized by generalized muscle wasting and weakness of limb and trunk muscles. A preferential loss of the thick filament protein myosin is considered pathognomonic of this disorder, but the myosin loss is observed relatively late during the disease progression. In attempt to explore the potential role of factors considered triggering AQM in sedated mechanically ventilated (MV) ICU patients, we have studied the early effects, prior to the myosin loss, of neuromuscular blockade (NMB), corticosteroids (CS) and sepsis separate or in combination in a porcine experimental ICU model. Specific interest has been focused on skeletal muscle gene/protein expression and regulation of muscle contraction at the muscle fiber level. This project aims at improving our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying muscle specific differences in response to the ICU intervention and the role played by the different triggering factors.

    The sparing of masticatory muscle fiber function was coupled to an up-regulation of heat shock protein genes and down-regulation of myostatin are suggested to be key factors in the relative sparing of masticatory muscles. Up-regulation of chemokine activity genes and down-regulation of heat shock protein genes play a significant role in the limb muscle dysfunction associated with sepsis. The effects of corticosteroids in the development of limb muscle weakness reveals up-regulation of kinase activity and transcriptional regulation genes and the down-regulation of heat shock protein, sarcomeric, cytoskeletal and oxidative stress responsive genes. In contrast to limb and craniofacial muscles, the respiratory diaphragm muscle responded differently to the different triggering factors. MV itself appears to play a major role for the diaphragm muscle dysfunction. By targeting these genes, future experiments can give an insight into the development of innovative treatments expected at protecting muscle mass and function in critically ill ICU patients.

  • 2.
    Aaseth, Jan
    et al.
    Innlandet Hospital Trust, Norway; Hedmark University of Appl Science, Norway.
    Alexander, Jan
    Norwegian Institute Public Heatlh, Norway; Norwegian University of Life Science NMBU, Norway.
    Bjorklund, Geir
    Council Nutr and Environm Med, Norway.
    Hestad, Knut
    Innlandet Hospital Trust, Norway; Hedmark University of Appl Science, Norway.
    Dusek, Petr
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic; Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic; Gen University Hospital Prague, Czech Republic.
    Roos, Per M.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; St Goran Hospital, Sweden.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Treatment strategies in Alzheimers disease: a review with focus on selenium supplementation2016In: Biometals, ISSN 0966-0844, E-ISSN 1572-8773, Vol. 29, no 5, 827-839 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alzheimers disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder presenting one of the biggest healthcare challenges in developed countries. No effective treatment exists. In recent years the main focus of AD research has been on the amyloid hypothesis, which postulates that extracellular precipitates of beta amyloid (A beta) derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP) are responsible for the cognitive impairment seen in AD. Treatment strategies have been to reduce A beta production through inhibition of enzymes responsible for its formation, or to promote resolution of existing cerebral A beta plaques. However, these approaches have failed to demonstrate significant cognitive improvements. Intracellular rather than extracellular events may be fundamental in AD pathogenesis. Selenate is a potent inhibitor of tau hyperphosphorylation, a critical step in the formation of neurofibrillary tangles. Some selenium (Se) compounds e.g. selenoprotein P also appear to protect APP against excessive copper and iron deposition. Selenoproteins show anti-inflammatory properties, and protect microtubules in the neuronal cytoskeleton. Optimal function of these selenoenzymes requires higher Se intake than what is common in Europe and also higher intake than traditionally recommended. Supplementary treatment with N-acetylcysteine increases levels of the antioxidative cofactor glutathione and can mediate adjuvant protection. The present review discusses the role of Se in AD treatment and suggests strategies for AD prevention by optimizing selenium intake, in accordance with the metal dysregulation hypothesis. This includes in particular secondary prevention by selenium supplementation to elderly with mild cognitive impairment.

  • 3.
    Abdollahi, Nyayesh
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Modifierad constraint-induced movement therapy förbättrar livskvalitet hos unga stroke-patienter2015Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 4. Aberg, A. C.
    et al.
    Thorstensson, A.
    Tarassova, O.
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Calculations of mechanisms for balance control during narrow and single-leg standing in fit older adults: A reliability study2011In: Gait & Posture, ISSN 0966-6362, E-ISSN 1879-2219, Vol. 34, no 3, 352-357 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For older people balance control in standing is critical for performance of activities of daily living without falling. The aims were to investigate reliability of quantification of the usage of the two balance mechanisms M(1) 'moving the centre of pressure' and M(2) 'Segment acceleration' and also to compare calculation methods based on a combination of kinetic (K) and kinematic (Km) data, (K-Km), or Km data only concerning M(2). For this purpose nine physically fit persons aged 70-78 years were tested in narrow and single-leg standing. Data were collected by a 7-camera motion capture system and two force plates. Repeated measure ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests were used to detect differences between the standing tasks. Reliability was estimated by ICCs, standard error of measurement including its 95% Cl, and minimal detectable change, whereas Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to investigate agreement between the two calculation methods. The results indicated that for the tasks investigated, M(1) and M(2) can be measured with acceptable inter- and intrasession reliability, and that both Km and K-Km based calculations may be useful for M(2), although Km data may give slightly lower values. The proportional M(1) :M(2) usage was approximately 9:1, in both anterio-posterior (AP) and medio-lateral (ML) directions for narrow standing, and about 2:1 in the AP and of 1:2 in the ML direction in single-leg standing, respectively. In conclusion, the tested measurements and calculations appear to constitute a reliable way of quantifying one important aspect of balance capacity in fit older people.

  • 5.
    Abrahamsson, Sebastian
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Neuroplasticity induced by exercise2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As opposed to earlier beliefs, the brain is altering itself throughout an individual’s life. The process of functional or structural alterations is referred to as plasticity, and can be induced by several factors such as experience or physical exercise. In this thesis, the research area of experience-dependent plasticity, with focus on exercise-induced plasticity is examined critically. Evidence from a vast array of studies are reviewed and compared in order to find whether physical exercise can induce neural plasticity in the human brain, how it may be beneficial, and what some of the plausible mediators of exercise-induced plasticity are. The findings demonstrated in this thesis suggest that although there are knowledge gaps and limitations in the literature, physical exercise can indeed result in exhibited plasticity as well as being beneficial for the human brain in several ways.

  • 6.
    Adlerz, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Processing of the amyloid precursor protein and its paralogues amyloid precursor-like proteins 1 and 22007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder which is histopathologically characterised by amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Amyloid plaques consist of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) that can form aggregates in the brain. Aβ is generated from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) through proteolytic cleavage. APP belongs to a conserved protein family that also includes the two paralogues, APP-like proteins 1 and 2 (APLP1 and APLP2). Despite the immense amount of research on APP, motivated by its implication in AD, the function of this protein family has not yet been determined. In this thesis, we have studied the expression and proteolytic processing of the APP protein family. Our results are consistent with previous findings that suggest a role for APP during neuronal development. Treatment of cells with retinoic acid (RA) resulted in increased synthesis. In addition, we observed that RA treatment shifted the processing of APP from the amyloidogenic to the non-amyloidogenic pathway. The proteins in the APP family have been hard to distinguish both with respect to function and proteolytic processing. However, for development of new drugs with APP processing enzymes as targets this is of great importance. Our studies suggest similarities, but also differences in the mechanism regulating the processing of the different paralogues. We found that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) had different impact on the members of the APP family. Most interestingly, we also found that the mechanism behind the increased processing in response to IGF-1 was not identical between the homologous proteins. In summary, our results indicate that in terms of regulation APLP1 and APLP2 differ more from each other than from APP. Our studies open up the possibility of finding means to selectively block Aβ production without interfering with the processing and function of the paralogous proteins.

  • 7.
    Adlerz, Linda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Beckman, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Holback, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Tehranian, Roya
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Cortés Toro, Veronica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Iverfeldt, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Accumulation of the amyloid precursor-like protein APLP2 and reduction of APLP1 in retinoic acid-differentiated human neuroblastoma cells upon curcumin-induced neurite retraction2003In: Brain Research. Molecular Brain Research, ISSN 0169-328X, E-ISSN 1872-6941, Vol. 119, no 1, 62-72 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) belongs to a conserved gene family, also including the amyloid precursor-like proteins, APLP1 and APLP2. The function of these three proteins is not yet fully understood. One of the proposed roles of APP is to promote neurite outgrowth. The aim of this study was to investigate the regulation of the expression levels of APP family members during neurite outgrowth. We observed that retinoic acid (RA)-induced neuronal differentiation of human SH-SY5Y cells resulted in increased expression of APP, APLP1 and APLP2. We also examined the effect of the NFκB, AP-1 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor curcumin (diferuloylmethane) on the RA-induced expression levels of these proteins. We found that treatment with curcumin counteracted the RA-induced mRNA expression of all APP family members. In addition, we observed that curcumin treatment resulted in neurite retraction without any effect on cell viability. Surprisingly, curcumin had differential effects on the APLP protein levels in RA-differentiated cells. RA-induced APLP1 protein expression was blocked by curcumin, while the APLP2 protein levels were further increased. APP protein levels were not affected by curcumin treatment. We propose that the sustained levels of APP and the elevated levels of APLP2, in spite of the reduced mRNA expression, are due to altered proteolytic processing of these proteins. Furthermore, our results suggest that APLP1 does not undergo the same type of regulated processing as APP and APLP2.

  • 8.
    Adlerz, Linda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Soomets, Ursel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology. University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Holmlund, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Virland, Saade
    Langel, Ülo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Iverfeldt, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Down-regulation of amyloid precursor protein by peptide nucleic acid oligomer in cultured rat primary neurons and astrocytes2003In: Neuroscience Letters, ISSN 0304-3940, E-ISSN 1872-7972, Vol. 336, no 1, 55-59 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its proteolytic cleavage products, the amyloid P peptides, have been implicated as a cause of Alzheimer's disease. Peptide nucleic acids (PNA), the DNA mimics, have been shown to block the expression of specific proteins at both transcriptional and translational levels. Generally, the cellular uptake of PNA is low. However, recent studies have indicated that the effect of unmodified antisense PNA uptake is more pronounced in nervous tissue. In this study we have shown that biotinylated PNA directed to the initiator codon region of the APP mRNA (-4 - +11) was taken up into the cytoplasm of primary rat cerebellar granule cells and cortical astrocytes, using fluorescence and confocal microscopy studies. Uptake of PNA was faster in neurons than in astrocytes. Western blotting analysis showed that APP was strongly down-regulated in both neurons and astrocytes. Thus, unmodified PNA can be used for studies on the function of APP in neurons and astrocytes.

  • 9. Adori, Csaba
    et al.
    Barde, Swapnali
    Bogdanovic, Nenad
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Reinscheid, Rainer R.
    Kovacs, Gabor G.
    Hokfelt, Tomas
    Neuropeptide S- and Neuropeptide S receptor-expressing neuron populations in the human pons2015In: Frontiers in Neuroanatomy, ISSN 1662-5129, E-ISSN 1662-5129, Vol. 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a regulatory peptide with potent pharmacological effects. In rodents, NPS is expressed in a few pontine cell clusters. Its receptor (NPSR1) is, however, widely distributed in the brain. The anxiolytic and arousal promoting effects of NPS make the NPS NPSR1 system an interesting potential drug target in mood-related disorders. However, so far possible disease-related mechanisms involving NPS have only been studied in rodents. To validate the relevance of these animal studies for i.a. drug development, we have explored the distribution of NPS-expressing neurons in the human pons using in situ hybridization and stereological methods and we compared the distribution of NPS mRNA expressing neurons in the human and rat brain. The calculation revealed a total number of 22,317 +/- 2411 NPS mRNA-positive neurons in human, bilaterally. The majority of cells (84%) were located in the parabrachial area in human: in the extension of the medial and lateral parabrachial nuclei, in the Kolliker-Fuse nucleus and around the adjacent lateral lemniscus. In human, in sharp contrast to the rodents, only very few NPS-positive cells (5%) were found close to the locus coeruleus. In addition, we identified a smaller cell cluster (11% of all NPS cells) in the pontine central gray matter both in human and rat, which has not been described previously even in rodents. We also examined the distribution of NPSR1 mRNA-expressing neurons in the human pons. These cells were mainly located in the rostral laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, the cuneiform nucleus, the microcellular tegmental nucleus region and in the periaqueductal gray. Our results show that both NPS and NPSR1 in the human pons are preferentially localized in regions of importance for integration of visceral autonomic information and emotional behavior. The reported interspecies differences must, however, be considered when looking for targets for new pharmacotherapeutical interventions.

  • 10.
    Adori, Csaba
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, Retzius Lab, Retzius Vag 8, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Barde, Swapnali
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, Retzius Lab, Retzius Vag 8, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vas, Szilvia
    Semmelweis Univ, Dept Pharmacodynam, Nagyvarad Ter 4, H-1089 Budapest, Hungary; Hungarian Acad Sci, Neuropsychopharmacol & Neurochem Res Grp, Nagyvarad Ter 4, H-1089 Budapest, Hungary.
    Ebner, Karl
    Leopold Franzens Univ Innsbruck, CMBI, Inst Pharm, Dept Pharmacol & Toxicol, Innrain 80-82-3, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.
    Su, Jie
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Nanna Svartz Vag 2, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svensson, Camilla
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Nanna Svartz Vag 2, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mathé, Aleksander A
    Karolinska Inst, Sect Psychiat, Dept Clin Neurosci, Tomtebodavagen 18A, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Singewald, Nicolas
    Leopold Franzens Univ Innsbruck, CMBI, Inst Pharm, Dept Pharmacol & Toxicol, Innrain 80-82-3, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.
    Reinscheid, Rainer R
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Pharmaceut Sci, Irvine, CA 92697 USA.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, Sci Life Lab, S-17165 Stockholm, Sweden; Royal Inst Technol, Albanova Univ Ctr, Sci Life Lab, S-17165 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kultima, Kim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Bagdy, György
    Semmelweis Univ, Dept Pharmacodynam, Nagyvarad Ter 4, H-1089 Budapest, Hungary; Hungarian Acad Sci, Neuropsychopharmacol & Neurochem Res Grp, Nagyvarad Ter 4, H-1089 Budapest, Hungary.
    Hökfelt, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, Retzius Lab, Retzius Vag 8, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Exploring the role of neuropeptide S in the regulation of arousal: a functional anatomical study.2016In: Brain Structure and Function, ISSN 1863-2653, E-ISSN 1863-2661, Vol. 221, no 7, 3521-3546 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a regulatory peptide expressed by limited number of neurons in the brainstem. The simultaneous anxiolytic and arousal-promoting effect of NPS suggests an involvement in mood control and vigilance, making the NPS-NPS receptor system an interesting potential drug target. Here we examined, in detail, the distribution of NPS-immunoreactive (IR) fiber arborizations in brain regions of rat known to be involved in the regulation of sleep and arousal. Such nerve terminals were frequently apposed to GABAergic/galaninergic neurons in the ventro-lateral preoptic area (VLPO) and to tyrosine hydroxylase-IR neurons in all hypothalamic/thalamic dopamine cell groups. Then we applied the single platform-on-water (mainly REM) sleep deprivation method to study the functional role of NPS in the regulation of arousal. Of the three pontine NPS cell clusters, the NPS transcript levels were increased only in the peri-coerulear group in sleep-deprived animals, but not in stress controls. The density of NPS-IR fibers was significantly decreased in the median preoptic nucleus-VLPO region after the sleep deprivation, while radioimmunoassay and mass spectrometry measurements showed a parallel increase of NPS in the anterior hypothalamus. The expression of the NPS receptor was, however, not altered in the VLPO-region. The present results suggest a selective activation of one of the three NPS-expressing neuron clusters as well as release of NPS in distinct forebrain regions after sleep deprivation. Taken together, our results emphasize a role of the peri-coerulear cluster in the modulation of arousal, and the importance of preoptic area for the action of NPS on arousal and sleep.

  • 11. Adori, Csaba
    et al.
    Glueck, Laura
    Barde, Swapnali
    Yoshitake, Takashi
    Kovacs, Gabor G.
    Mulder, Jan
    Magloczky, Zsofia
    Havas, Laszlo
    Boelcskei, Kata
    Mitsios, Nicholas
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Szolcsanyi, Janos
    Kehr, Jan
    Ronnback, Annica
    Schwartz, Thue
    Rehfeld, Jens F.
    Harkany, Tibor
    Palkovits, Miklos
    Schulz, Stefan
    Hokfelt, Tomas
    Critical role of somatostatin receptor 2 in the vulnerability of the central noradrenergic system: new aspects on Alzheimer's disease2015In: Acta Neuropathologica, ISSN 0001-6322, E-ISSN 1432-0533, Vol. 129, no 4, 541-563 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alzheimer's disease and other age-related neurodegenerative disorders are associated with deterioration of the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC), a probable trigger for mood and memory dysfunction. LC noradrenergic neurons exhibit particularly high levels of somatostatin binding sites. This is noteworthy since cortical and hypothalamic somatostatin content is reduced in neurodegenerative pathologies. Yet a possible role of a somatostatin signal deficit in the maintenance of noradrenergic projections remains unknown. Here, we deployed tissue microarrays, immunohistochemistry, quantitative morphometry and mRNA profiling in a cohort of Alzheimer's and age-matched control brains in combination with genetic models of somatostatin receptor deficiency to establish causality between defunct somatostatin signalling and noradrenergic neurodegeneration. In Alzheimer's disease, we found significantly reduced somatostatin protein expression in the temporal cortex, with aberrant clustering and bulging of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive afferents. As such, somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2) mRNA was highly expressed in the human LC, with its levels significantly decreasing from Braak stages III/IV and onwards, i.e., a process preceding advanced Alzheimer's pathology. The loss of SSTR2 transcripts in the LC neurons appeared selective, since tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine beta-hydroxylase, galanin or galanin receptor 3 mRNAs remained unchanged. We modeled these pathogenic changes in Sstr2 (-/-) mice and, unlike in Sstr1 (-/-) or Sstr4 (-/-) genotypes, they showed selective, global and progressive degeneration of their central noradrenergic projections. However, neuronal perikarya in the LC were found intact until late adulthood (< 8 months) in Sstr2 (-/-) mice. In contrast, the noradrenergic neurons in the superior cervical ganglion lacked SSTR2 and, as expected, the sympathetic innervation of the head region did not show any signs of degeneration. Our results indicate that SSTR2-mediated signaling is integral to the maintenance of central noradrenergic projections at the system level, and that early loss of somatostatin receptor 2 function may be associated with the selective vulnerability of the noradrenergic system in Alzheimer's disease.

  • 12.
    Aeinehband, Shahin
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lindblom, Rickard P. F.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Al Nimer, Faiez
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Vijayaraghavan, Swetha
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Sandholm, Kerstin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Khademi, Mohsen
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Olsson, Tomas
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. Uppsala University.
    Darreh-Shori, Taher
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Piehl, Fredrik
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Complement Component C3 and Butyrylcholinesterase Activity Are Associated with Neurodegeneration and Clinical Disability in Multiple Sclerosis2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 4, e0122048Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dysregulation of the complement system is evident in many CNS diseases but mechanisms regulating complement activation in the CNS remain unclear. In a recent large rat genomewide expression profiling and linkage analysis we found co-regulation of complement C3 immediately downstream of butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), an enzyme hydrolyzing acetylcholine (ACh), a classical neurotransmitter with immunoregulatory effects. We here determined levels of neurofilament-light (NFL), a marker for ongoing nerve injury, C3 and activity of the two main ACh hydrolyzing enzymes, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and BuChE, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with MS (n = 48) and non-inflammatory controls (n = 18). C3 levels were elevated in MS patients compared to controls and correlated both to disability and NFL. C3 levels were not induced by relapses, but were increased in patients with >= 9 cerebral lesions on magnetic resonance imaging and in patients with progressive disease. BuChE activity did not differ at the group level, but was correlated to both C3 and NFL levels in individual samples. In conclusion, we show that CSF C3 correlates both to a marker for ongoing nerve injury and degree of disease disability. Moreover, our results also suggest a potential link between intrathecal cholinergic activity and complement activation. These results motivate further efforts directed at elucidating the regulation and effector functions of the complement system in MS, and its relation to cholinergic tone.

  • 13.
    af Bjerkén, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Integrative Medical Biology.
    On dopamine neurons: nerve fiber outgrowth and L-DOPA effects2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Parkinson’s disease is a disorder mainly characterized by progressive degeneration of dopamine producing neurons in the substantia nigra of the midbrain. The most commonly used treatment strategy is to pharmacologically restore the lost function by the administration of the dopaminergic precursor L-DOPA. Another treatment strategy is to replace the degenerated neurons with immature fetal ventral mesencephalic tissue, or ultimately stem cell-derived tissue. Grafting trials have, however, revealed poor reinnervation capacity of the grafts, leaving much of the striata dopamine-denervated. An additional drawback is the upcoming of dyskinesia (involuntary movements), a phenomenon also observed during L-DOPA treatment of Parkinson’s disease patients. Attempts to characterize nerve fiber formation from dopamine neurons have demonstrated that the nerve fibers are formed in two morphologically diverse outgrowth patterns, one early outgrowth seen in the absence of astrocytes and one later appearing outgrowth seen in co-existence with astrocytes.

    The overall objective of this thesis has been to study the dopaminergic outgrowth including guidance of nerve fiber formation, and to look into the mechanisms of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. The first paper in this thesis characterizes the different outgrowth patterns described above and their relation to different glial cells. The study demonstrated the two different outgrowth patterns to be a general phenomenon, applying not only to dopamine neurons. Attempts of characterization revealed no difference of origin in terms of dopaminergic subpopulations, i.e. A9 or A10, between the outgrowth patterns. Furthermore, the “roller-drum” technique was found optimal for studying the dual outgrowth sequences.

    The second and the third paper also utilized the “roller-drum” technique in order to promote both patterns of neuronal fiber formation. The effects of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on the formation of dopamine nerve fibers, was investigated. Cultures prepared from gdnf knockout mice revealed that dopaminergic neurons survive and form nerve fiber outgrowth in the absence of GDNF. The dopaminergic nerve fibers exhibited an outgrowth pattern consistent with that previous observed in rat. GDNF was found to exert effect on the glial-associated outgrowth whereas the non-glial-associated was not affected. Astrocytic proliferation was inhibited using cytosine β-D-arabinofuranoside, resulting in reduced glial-associated outgrowth. The non-glial-associated dopaminergic outgrowth was on the other hand promoted, and was retained over longer time in culture. Furthermore, the non-glial-associated nerve fibers were found to target the fetal frontal cortex. Different developmental stages were shown to promote and affect the outgrowths differently. Taken together, these data indicate and state the importance of astrocytes and growth factors for neuronal nerve fiber formation and guidance. It also stresses the importance of fetal donor age at the time for transplantation.

    The fourth and fifth studies focus on L-DOPA dynamics and utilize in vivo chronoamperometry. In study four, 6-OHDA dopamine-depleted rats were exposed to chronic L-DOPA treatment and then rated as dyskinetic or non-dyskinetic. The electrochemical recordings demonstrated reduced KCl-evoked release in the intact striatum after chronic L-DOPA treatment. Time for maximal dopamine concentration after L-DOPA administration was found to be shorter in dyskinetic animals than in non-dyskinetic animals. The serotonergic nerve fiber content in the striatum was evaluated and brains from dyskinetic animals were found to exhibit significantly higher nerve fiber density compared to non-dyskinetic animals. Furthermore, the mechanisms behind the conversion of L-DOPA to dopamine in 6-OHDA dopamine-depleted rats were studied. Local administration of L-DOPA in the striatum increased the KCl-evoked dopamine release in the intact striatum. Acute application of L-DOPA resulted sometimes in a rapid conversion to dopamine, probably without vesicle packaging. This type of direct conversion is presumably occurring in non-neuronal tissue. Furthermore, KCl-evoked dopamine releases were present upon local application of L-DOPA in the dopamine-depleted striatum, suggesting that the conversion to dopamine took place elsewhere, than in dopaminergic nerve fibers. In conclusion, these studies state the importance of astrocytes for neuronal nerve fiber formation and elucidate the complexity of L-DOPA conversion in the brain.

  • 14.
    Agalave, Nilesh M
    et al.
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Max
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Abdelmoaty, Sally
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Su, Jie
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Baharpoor, Azar
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundbäck, Peter
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Palmblad, Karin
    Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Ulf
    Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Harris, Helena
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svensson, Camilla I
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Spinal HMGB1 induces TLR4-mediated long-lasting hypersensitivity and glial activation and regulates pain-like behavior in experimental arthritis.2014In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 155, no 9, 1802-1813 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extracellular high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) plays important roles in the pathogenesis of nerve injury- and cancer-induced pain. However, the involvement of spinal HMGB1 in arthritis-induced pain has not been examined previously and is the focus of this study. Immunohistochemistry showed that HMGB1 is expressed in neurons and glial cells in the spinal cord. Subsequent to induction of collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA), Hmgb1 mRNA and extranuclear protein levels were significantly increased in the lumbar spinal cord. Intrathecal (i.t.) injection of a neutralizing anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody or recombinant HMGB1 box A peptide (Abox), which each prevent extracellular HMGB1 activities, reversed CAIA-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. This occurred during ongoing joint inflammation as well as during the postinflammatory phase, indicating that spinal HMGB1 has an important function in nociception persisting beyond episodes of joint inflammation. Importantly, only HMGB1 in its partially oxidized isoform (disulfide HMGB1), which activates toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), but not in its fully reduced or fully oxidized isoforms, evoked mechanical hypersensitivity upon i.t. injection. Interestingly, although both male and female mice developed mechanical hypersensitivity in response to i.t. HMGB1, female mice recovered faster. Furthermore, the pro-nociceptive effect of i.t. injection of HMGB1 persisted in Tlr2- and Rage-, but was absent in Tlr4-deficient mice. The same pattern was observed for HMGB1-induced spinal microglia and astrocyte activation and cytokine induction. These results demonstrate that spinal HMGB1 contributes to nociceptive signal transmission via activation of TLR4 and point to disulfide HMGB1 inhibition as a potential therapeutic strategy in treatment of chronic inflammatory pain.

  • 15.
    Agelii, Anna
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    TREATING HORROR WITH ECSTASY: Neurobiological Rationale for Treating Post- Traumatic Stress Disorder with 3,4- methylenedioxymethylamphetamine2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a disabling condition that afflicts 1-10% of the general population, with twice as high lifetime prevalence for women than men. Treatments exist, but none have proven reliable and consistent efficacy. A large minority of patients remain treatment-resistant despite undergoing several different types of treatment over extended periods of time. Recently completed studies in the U.S. and in Switzerland have demonstrated the potential of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)-assisted psychotherapy for treatment-resistant PTSD. One of the major problems of treating PTSD is the patients’ fear state and inability to form a therapeutic alliance. Both these issues can be facilitated through administration of MDMA; the psychological effects - such as heightened empathy, increased openness and diminished anxiety – seem well-suited for therapeutic purposes. The rationale behind treating PTSD with MDMA has been indicated in neuroimaging studies; MDMA affects some of the neural structures altered in patients with PTSD, most notably the amygdala and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Using the Schedule 1 substance MDMA for this purpose is however controversial; animal studies have indicated that MDMA is neurotoxic, although no adverse effects on humans related to incidental use of MDMA in a controlled setting have been found. In conclusion, the data support that MDMA may be an efficient tool for treating PTSD, as well as safe and effective to use in a clinical context.

  • 16.
    Agnvall, Beatrix
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bélteky, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jensen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brain size is reduced by selectionfor tameness in Red Junglefowl–correlated effects in vital organs2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, 3306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During domestication animals have undergone changes in size of brain and other vital organs. We hypothesize that this could be a correlated effect to increased tameness. Red Junglefowl (ancestors of domestic chickens) were selected for divergent levels of fear of humans for five generations. The parental (P0) and the fifth selected generation (S5) were culled when 48–54 weeks old and the brains were weighed before being divided into telencephalon, cerebellum, mid brain and optic lobes. Each single brain part as well as the liver, spleen, heart and testicles were also weighed. Brains of S5 birds with high fear scores (S5 high) were heavier both in absolute terms and when corrected for body weight. The relative weight of telencephalon (% of brain weight) was significantly higher in S5 high and relative weight of cerebellum was lower. Heart, liver, testes and spleen were all relatively heavier (% of body weight) in S5 high. Hence, selection for tameness has changed the size of the brain and other vital organs in this population and may have driven the domesticated phenotype as a correlated response.

  • 17.
    Ahmad, Abdulbaghi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Children of Kurdistan: Survivors of trauma and terror2000In: Child suffering in the world: Child maltreatment by parents, culture and governments in different countries and cultures / [ed] Marvasti JA, New York: 010 Publishers, 2000, 153-177 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18. Ahmad, Abdulbaghi
    et al.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Tiden läkar inte alla sår2006In: Stress, molekyl, individ, organisation och samhälle / [ed] Ekman R & Arnetz B, Liber, 2006, 2, 128-138 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Ahmad, Abdulbaghi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Tiden läkar inte alla sår2002In: Stress: molekylerna, individen, organisationen samhället / [ed] Ekman R & Arnetz B, Liber, 2002, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Ahmed, Laeeq
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Edlund, Åke
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Laure, Erwin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Whitmarsh, S.
    Parallel real time seizure detection in large EEG data2016In: IoTBD 2016 - Proceedings of the International Conference on Internet of Things and Big Data, SciTePress, 2016, 214-222 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is one of the main techniques for detecting and diagnosing epileptic seizures. Due to the large size of EEG data in long term clinical monitoring and the complex nature of epileptic seizures, seizure detection is both data-intensive and compute-intensive. Analysing EEG data for detecting seizures in real time has many applications, e.g., in automatic seizure detection or in allowing a timely alarm signal to be presented to the patient. In real time seizure detection, seizures have to be detected with negligible delay, thus requiring lightweight algorithms. MapReduce and its variations have been effectively used for data analysis in large dataset problems on general-purpose machines. In this study, we propose a parallel lightweight algorithm for epileptic seizure detection using Spark Streaming. Our algorithm not only classifies seizures in real time, it also learns an epileptic threshold in real time. We furthermore present "top-k amplitude measure" as a feature for classifying seizures in the EEG, that additionally assists in reducing data size. In a benchmark experiment we show that our algorithm can detect seizures in real time with low latency, while maintaining a good seizure detection rate. In short, our algorithm provides new possibilities in using private cloud infrastructures for real time epileptic seizure detection in EEG data.

  • 21. Ahmed, Omar Jamil
    et al.
    McFarland, James
    Kumar, Arvind
    Brown University, United States.
    Reactivation in ventral striatum during hippocampal ripples: evidence for the binding of reward and spatial memories?2008In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 28, no 40, 9895-9897 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Aho, Nikolas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Proczkowska-Björklund, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Victimization, polyvictimization , and health in Swedish adolescents2016In: Adolescent Health, Medicine and Therapeutics, ISSN 1179-318X, Vol. 7, 89-99 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of this article was to study the relationship between the different areas of victimization (eg, sexual victimization) and psychological symptoms, taking into account the full range of victimization domains. The final aim was to contribute further evidence regarding the bias that studies that focus on just one area of victimization may be introduced into our psychological knowledge. The sample included 5,960 second-year high school students in Sweden with a mean age of 17.3 years (range =16–20 years, standard deviation =0.652), of which 49.6% were females and 50.4% males. The Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire and the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children were used to assess victimization and psychological problems separately. The results show that a majority of adolescents have been victimized, females reported more total events and more sexual victimization and childhood maltreatment, and males were more often victims of conventional crime. The majority of victimization domains as well as the sheer number of events (polyvictimization [PV]) proved to be harmful to adolescent health, affecting females more than males. PV explained part of the health effect and had an impact on its own and in relation to each domain. This suggests the possibility that PV to a large degree explains trauma symptoms. In order to understand the psychological effects of trauma, clinicians and researchers should take into account the whole range of possible types of victimization.

  • 23.
    Akerstedt, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Hallvig, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Anund, Anna
    Fors, Carina
    Schwarz, Johanna F A
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Kecklund, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Having to stop driving at night because of dangerous sleepiness - awareness, physiology and behaviour2013In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 22, no 4, 380-388 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A large number of accidents are due to the driver falling asleep at the wheel, but details of this link have not been studied on a real road. The purpose of the present study was to describe the development of sleepiness indicators, leading to the drive being terminated prematurely by the onboard expert driving instructor because of imminent danger. Eighteen individuals participated during a day drive and a night drive on a motorway (both 90 min). Eight drivers terminated (N) prematurely (after 43 min) because of sleep-related imminent danger [according to the driving instructor or their own judgement (two cases)]. The results showed very high sleepiness ratings (8.5 units on the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale) immediately before termination (<7 at a similar time interval for those 10 who completed the drive). Group N also showed significantly higher levels of sleep intrusions on the electroencephalography/electro-oculography (EEG/EOG) than those who completed the drive (group C). The sleep intrusions were increased in group N during the first 40 min of the night drive. During the day drive, sleep intrusions were increased significantly in group N. The night drive showed significant increases of all sleepiness indicators compared to the day drive, but also reduced speed and driving to the left in the lane. It was concluded that 44% of drivers during late-night driving became dangerously sleepy, and that this group showed higher perceived sleepiness and more sleep intrusions in the EEG/EOG.

  • 24.
    Akimoto, Chizuru
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Forsgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Linder, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Birve, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Backlund, Irene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Andersson, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Nilsson, Ann-Charloth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Alstermark, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Andersen, Peter M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    No GGGGCC-hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 in parkinsonism patients in Sweden2013In: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration, ISSN 2167-8421, Vol. 14, no 1, 26-29 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An intronic GGGGCC-hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 was recently identified as a major cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. Some amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients have signs of parkinsonism, and many parkinsonism patients develop dementia. In this study we examined if the hexanucleotide repeat expansion was present in parkinsonism patients, to clarify if there could be a relationship between the repeat expansion and disease. We studied the size of the hexanucleotide repeat expansion in a well defined population-based cohort of 135 Parkinson's disease patients and 39 patients with atypical parkinsonism and compared with 645 Swedish control subjects. We found no correlation between Parkinson's disease or atypical parkinsonism and the size of the GGGGCC repeat expansion in C9ORF72. In conclusion, this GGGGCC-repeat expansion in C9ORF72 is not a cause of parkinsonism in the Swedish population.

  • 25. Al Nimer, Faiez
    et al.
    Elliott, Christina
    Bergman, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Khademi, Mohsen
    Dring, Ann M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Aeinehband, Shahin
    Bergenheim, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Christensen, Jeppe Romme
    Sellebjerg, Finn
    Svenningsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Linington, Christopher
    Olsson, Tomas
    Piehl, Fredrik
    Lipocalin-2 is increased in progressive multiple sclerosis and inhibits remyelination2016In: Neurology: Neuroimmunology and neuroinflammation, ISSN 0948-6259, E-ISSN 2332-7812, Vol. 3, no 1, e191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: We aimed to examine the regulation of lipocalin-2 (LCN2) in multiple sclerosis (MS) and its potential functional relevance with regard to myelination and neurodegeneration. Methods: We determined LCN2 levels in 3 different studies: (1) in CSF and plasma from a case-control study comparing patients with MS (n = 147) with controls (n = 50) and patients with relapsing-remitting MS (n = 75) with patients with progressive MS (n = 72); (2) in CSF and brain tissue microdialysates from a case series of 7 patients with progressive MS; and (3) in CSF at baseline and 60 weeks after natalizumab treatment in a cohort study of 17 patients with progressive MS. Correlation to neurofilament light, a marker of neuroaxonal injury, was tested. The effect of LCN2 on myelination and neurodegeneration was studied in a rat in vitro neuroglial cell coculture model. Results: Intrathecal production of LCN2 was increased predominantly in patients with progressive MS (p < 0.005 vs relapsing-remitting MS) and displayed a positive correlation to neurofilament light (p = 0.005). Levels of LCN2 in brain microdialysates were severalfold higher than in the CSF, suggesting local production in progressive MS. Treatment with natalizumab in progressive MS reduced LCN2 levels an average of 13% (p < 0.0001). LCN2 was found to inhibit remyelination in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. Conclusions: LCN2 production is predominantly increased in progressive MS. Although this moderate increase does not support the use of LCN2 as a biomarker, the correlation to neurofilament light and the inhibitory effect on remyelination suggest that LCN2 might contribute to neurodegeneration through myelination-dependent pathways.

  • 26. Al Nimer, Faiez
    et al.
    Thelin, Eric
    Nystrom, Harriet
    Dring, Ann M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Svenningsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Piehl, Fredrik
    Nelson, David W.
    Bellander, Bo-Michael
    Comparative Assessment of the Prognostic Value of Biomarkers in Traumatic Brain Injury Reveals an Independent Role for Serum Levels of Neurofilament Light2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 7, e0132177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common cause of death and disability, worldwide. Early determination of injury severity is essential to improve care. Neurofilament light (NF-L) has been introduced as a marker of neuroaxonal injury in neuroinflammatory/-degenerative diseases. In this study we determined the predictive power of serum (s-) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF-) NF-L levels towards outcome, and explored their potential correlation to diffuse axonal injury (DAI). A total of 182 patients suffering from TBI admitted to the neurointensive care unit at a level 1 trauma center were included. S-NF-L levels were acquired, together with S100B and neuron-specific enolase (NSE). CSF-NF-L was measured in a subcohort (n = 84) with ventriculostomies. Clinical and neuro-radiological parameters, including computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging, were included in the analyses. Outcome was assessed 6 to 12 months after injury using the Glasgow Outcome Score (1-5). In univariate proportional odds analyses mean s-NF-L, -S100B and -NSE levels presented a pseudo-R-2 Nagelkerke of 0.062, 0.214 and 0.074 in correlation to outcome, respectively. In a multivariate analysis, in addition to a model including core parameters (pseudo-R-2 0.33 towards outcome; Age, Glasgow Coma Scale, pupil response, Stockholm CT score, abbreviated injury severity score, S100B), S-NF-L yielded an extra 0.023 pseudo-R-2 and a significantly better model (p = 0.006) No correlation between DAI or CT assessed-intracranial damage and NF-L was found. Our study thus demonstrates that SNF-L correlates to TBI outcome, even if used in models with S100B, indicating an independent contribution to the prediction, perhaps by reflecting different pathophysiological processes, not possible to monitor using conventional neuroradiology. Although we did not find a predictive value of NF-L for DAI, this cannot be completely excluded. We suggest further

  • 27.
    Alaerts, Maaike
    et al.
    Applied Molecular Genomics Group, Department of Molecular Genetics, Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), University of Antwerp (UA), Belgium.
    Venken, Tine
    Applied Molecular Genomics Group, Department of Molecular Genetics, Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), University of Antwerp (UA), Belgium.
    Lenaerts, An-Sofie
    Applied Molecular Genomics Group, Department of Molecular Genetics, Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), University of Antwerp (UA), Belgium.
    De Zutter, Sonia
    Applied Molecular Genomics Group, Department of Molecular Genetics, Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), University of Antwerp (UA), Belgium.
    Norrback, Karl-Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Del-Favero, Jurgen
    Applied Molecular Genomics Group, Department of Molecular Genetics, Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), University of Antwerp (UA), Belgium.
    Lack of association of an insertion/deletion polymorphism in the G protein-coupled receptor 50 with bipolar disorder in a Northern Swedish population2006In: Psychiatric Genetics, ISSN 0955-8829, E-ISSN 1473-5873, Vol. 16, no 6, 235-236 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    GPR50 is a G protein-coupled receptor, located on Xq28 and related to the melatonin receptor family. It is suggested as a functional and positional candidate gene for bipolar disorder (BP). Recently an insertion/deletion polymorphism in GPR50, Delta502-505, was found to be associated with BP in a Scottish association sample (P=0.007). When the analysis was restricted to female subjects, the association increased in significance (P=0.00023). We attempted to replicate this finding in a Northern Swedish association sample, but no significant association was detected (P=0.7, women only: P=0.65).

  • 28.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Tau pathology in aging and AD: beyond neurofibrillary tangles (grains, astrocytes, etc.)2014In: Brain Pathology, ISSN 1015-6305, E-ISSN 1750-3639, Vol. 24, no S1, 20-21 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Pikkarainen, Maria
    Univ Eastern Finland, Dept Clin Med, Kuopio, Finland.
    Neumann, Manuela
    Univ Tubingen, German Ctr Neurodegenerat Dis, Dept Neuropatol, Tubingen, Germany; DZNE, Tubingen, Germany.
    Arzberger, Thomas
    Univ Munich, Ctr Neuropathol & Prion Res, Munich, Germany.
    Al-Sarraj, Safa
    Kings Coll Hosp London, Inst Psychiat, Dept Clin Neuropathol, London, England; MRC, London Neurodegenerat Dis Brain Bank, London, England.
    Bodi, Istvan
    Kings Coll Hosp London, Inst Psychiat, Dept Clin Neuropathol, London, England; MRC, London Neurodegenerat Dis Brain Bank, London, England.
    Bogdanovic, Nenad
    Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, Dept Geriatr, Oslo, Norway.
    Bugiani, Orso
    IRCSS Fdn Ist Neurol Carlo Besta, Div Neuropathol & Neurol 5, Milan, Italy.
    Ferrer, Isidro
    Univ Barcelona, CEBERNED, Bellvitge Univ Hosp, Inst Neuropathol, Barcelona, Spain.
    Gelpi, Ellen
    Biobanc Hosp Clin IDIBAPS, Neurol Tissue Bank, Barcelona, Spain.
    Gentleman, Stephen
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Dept Med, Neuropathol Unit, London, England.
    Giaccone, Giorgio
    IRCSS Fdn Ist Neurol Carlo Besta, Div Neuropathol & Neurol 5, Milan, Italy.
    Graeber, Manuel B.
    Univ Sydney, Fac Med, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia; Univ Sydney, Fac Hlth Sci, Brain & Mind Res Inst, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.
    Hortobagyi, Tibor
    Univ Debrecen, Instutute Pathol, Dept Neuropathol, Debrecen, Hungary.
    Ince, Paul G.
    Univ Sheffield, Sheffield Inst Translat Neurosci, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England.
    Ironside, James W.
    Univ Edinburgh, Western Gen Hosp, Natl CJD Res & Surveillance Unit, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.
    Kavantzas, Nikolaos
    Natl & Capodistrian Univ Athens, Dept Pathol, Athens, Greece.
    King, Andrew
    Kings Coll Hosp London, Inst Psychiat, Dept Clin Neuropathol, London, England; MRC, London Neurodegenerat Dis Brain Bank, London, England.
    Korkolopoulou, Penelope
    Natl & Capodistrian Univ Athens, Dept Pathol, Athens, Greece.
    Kovács, Gábor G.
    Med Univ Vienna, Inst Neurol, Vienna, Austria.
    Meyronet, David
    Univ Lyon, Hosp Civils Lyon, Ctr Pathol & Neuropathol Est, Lyon Neurosci Res Ctr, Lyon, France.
    Monoranu, Camelia
    Univ Wurzburg, Abt Neuropathol, Pathol Inst, D-97070 Wurzburg, Germany.
    Nilsson, Tatjana
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Geriatr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Parchi, Piero
    Univ Bologna, Ist Sci Neurol, Dept Biomed & Neuromotor Sci, IRCCS, Bologna, Italy.
    Patsouris, Efstratios
    Natl & Capodistrian Univ Athens, Dept Pathol, Athens, Greece.
    Revesz, Tamas
    UCL Inst Neurol, Queen Sq Brain Bank, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England.
    Roggendorf, Wolfgang
    Univ Wurzburg, Abt Neuropathol, Pathol Inst, D-97070 Wurzburg, Germany.
    Rozemuller, Annemieke
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Seilhean, Danielle
    Univ Paris 06, AP HP, Lab Neuropathol Raymond Escourolle, Paris, France; INSERM, Paris, France.
    Streichenberger, Nathalie
    Univ Lyon, Hosp Civils Lyon, Ctr Pathol & Neuropathol Est, Lyon Neurosci Res Ctr, Lyon, France.
    Thal, Dietmar R.
    Univ Ulm, Inst Pathol, Neuropathol Lab, D-89069 Ulm, Germany.
    Wharton, Stephen B.
    Univ Sheffield, Sheffield Inst Translat Neurosci, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England.
    Kretzschmar, Hans
    Univ Munich, Ctr Neuropathol & Prion Res, Munich, Germany.
    Neuropathological assessments of the pathology in frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP43-positive inclusions: an inter-laboratory study by the BrainNet Europe consortium2015In: Journal of neural transmission, ISSN 0300-9564, E-ISSN 1435-1463, Vol. 122, no 7, 957-972 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The BrainNet Europe consortium assessed the reproducibility in the assignment of the type of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP) 43 following current recommendations. The agreement rates were influenced by the immunohistochemical (IHC) method and by the classification strategy followed. p62-IHC staining yielded good uniform quality of stains, but the most reliable results were obtained implementing specific Abs directed against the hallmark protein TDP43. Both assessment of the type and the extent of lesions were influenced by the Abs and by the quality of stain. Assessment of the extent of the lesions yielded poor results repeatedly; thus, the extent of pathology should not be used in diagnostic consensus criteria. Whilst 31 neuropathologists typed 30 FTLD-TDP cases, inter-rater agreement ranged from 19 to 100 per cent, being highest when applying phosphorylated TDP43/IHC. The agreement was highest when designating Type C or Type A/B. In contrast, there was a poor agreement when attempting to separate Type A or Type B FTLD-TDP. In conclusion, we can expect that neuropathologist, independent of his/her familiarity with FTLD-TDP pathology, can identify a TDP43-positive FTLD case. The goal should be to state a Type (A, B, C, D) or a mixture of Types (A/B, A/C or B/C). Neuropathologists, other clinicians and researchers should be aware of the pitfalls whilst doing so. Agreement can be reached in an inter-laboratory setting regarding Type C cases with thick and long neurites, whereas the differentiation between Types A and B may be more troublesome.

  • 30.
    Alaie, Iman
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Frick, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    Hartvig, Per
    Tillfors, Maria
    Eriksson, Elias
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Serotonin Synthesis Rate and the Tryptophan Hydroxylase-2 G-703T Polymorphism in Social Anxiety Disorder2014In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 75, no 9, 357S-357S p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Albert, Frederic
    et al.
    Laboratoire de Neurobiologie Humaine, Université de Provence, Marseille, France.
    Bergenheim, Mikael
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Department of Surgery, Central Hospital Karlstad, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Ribot-Ciscar, Edith
    Laboratoire de Neurobiologie Humaine, Université de Provence, Marseille, France.
    Roll, Jean-Pierre
    Laboratoire de Neurobiologie Humaine, Université de Provence, Marseille, France.
    The Ia afferent feedback of a given movement evokes the illusion of the same movement when returned to the subject via muscle tendon vibration2006In: Experimental Brain Research, ISSN 0014-4819, E-ISSN 1432-1106, Vol. 172, no 2, 163-174 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to further investigate the contribution of primary muscle spindle feedback to proprioception and higher brain functions, such as movement trajectory recognition. For this purpose, complex illusory movements were evoked in subjects by applying patterns of muscle tendon vibration mimicking the natural Ia afferent pattern. Ia afferent messages were previously recorded using microneurographic method from the six main muscle groups acting on the ankle joint during imposed "writing like" movements. The mean Ia afferent pattern was calculated for each muscle group and used as a template to pilot each vibrator. Eleven different vibratory patterns were applied to ten volunteers. Subjects were asked both to copy the perceived illusory movements by hand on a digitizing tablet and to recognize and name the corresponding graphic symbol. The results show that the Ia afferent feedback of a given movement evokes the illusion of the same movement when it is applied to the subject via the appropriate pattern of muscle tendon vibration. The geometry and the kinematic parameters of the imposed and illusory movements are very similar and the so-called "two-thirds power law" is present in the reproduction of the vibration-induced illusory movements. Vibrations within the "natural" frequency range of Ia fibres firing (around 30 Hz) produce clear illusions of movements in all the tested subjects. In addition, increasing the mean frequency of the vibration patterns resulted in a linear increase in the size of the illusory movements. Lastly, the subjects were able to recognize and name the symbols evoked by the vibration-induced primary muscle spindle afferent patterns in 83% of the trials. These findings suggest that the "proprioceptive signature" of a given movement is associated with the corresponding "perceptual signature". The neural mechanisms possibly underlying the sensory to perceptual transformation are discussed in the general framework of "the neuronal population vector model".

  • 32.
    Aldskogius, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Animal models of spinal cord repair2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 33. Aldskogius, Håkan
    et al.
    Kozlova, Elena
    Dorsal root injury for the study of spinal cord injury repair2012In: Animal models of spinal cord repair, New York Heidelberg Dordrecht London: Humana Press, 2012, 109-129 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Dorsal root injury provides opportunities for highly reproducible lesions and for detailed anatomical, physiological and behavioral outcome assessment with high precision and validity. Dorsal root injury models are used to several aspects of relevance to spinal cord injury repair: i) mechanisms of regeneration failure in the central nervous system and how to overcome it, ii) axon degeneration, as well as myelin degradation and elimination in the central nervous system - their roles and possible manipulations in spinal cord repair, iii) consequences in the spinal cord of mimicking human plexus injuries by dorsal root avulsion, including its effect on neuron survival, inflammatory processes and vascular dysfunction, and iv) therapeutic strategies which may be translated to the treatment of clinical plexus avulsion injuries. This chapter describes various dorsal root injury models, their relationship to basic and translational aspects of spinal cord injury repair, as well as basic experimental procedures associated with these models in rat and mouse.

  • 34. Alheim, K
    et al.
    Andersson, C
    Tingsborg, S
    Ziolkowska, M
    Schultzberg, M
    Bartfai, T
    Interleukin 1 expression is inducible by nerve growth factor in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells.1991In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 88, no 20, 9302-6 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Expression of the cytokine interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) was demonstrated in the rat PC12 pheochromocytoma cell line by (i) immunohistochemistry using rabbit polyclonal antisera raised against the recombinant murine IL-1 alpha, (ii) an ELISA, and (iii) a specific cell conversion bioassay based on the use of LBRM33-1A5 cells. IL-1 alpha mRNA was demonstrated in the PC12 cells, by PCR amplification. Constitutive expression of IL-1 alpha in PC12 cells was demonstrated in all experiments, although the cellular levels of IL-1 alpha-like immunoreactivity varied. The expression of IL-1 alpha, as studied at the mRNA level, was inducible by mouse nerve growth factor (7S NGF), and the gene product level was inducible in a dose- and time-dependent fashion by 7S NGF. The maximum induction corresponds to a 600% increase in IL-1 alpha-like immunoreactivity above the expression level found in noninduced cells and occurred after a 3-day incubation of the cells with NGF at 0.75 micrograms/ml of culture medium. The significance of the ability of NGF to induce IL-1 expression lies in the fact that IL-1 itself also acts as a growth factor that promotes glial proliferation and, even more importantly, IL-1 itself induces the expression of NGF at peripheral nerve injury [Lindholm, D., Heumann, R., Meyer, M. & Thoenen, H. (1987) Nature (London) 330, 658-659].

  • 35. Alier, Kwai
    et al.
    Chen, Yishen
    Eriksson Sollenberg, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Langel, Ülo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Smith, Peter
    Selective stimulation of GalR1 and GalR2 in rat substantia gelatinosa reveals a cellular basis for the anti- and pro-nociceptive actions of galanin2008In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 137, no 1, 138-146 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Galanin modulates spinal nociceptive processing by interacting with two receptors, GalR1 and GalR2. The underlying neurophysiological mechanisms were examined by whole-cell recording from identified neurons in the substantia gelatinosa of young adult rats. GalR1 was activated with a 'cocktail' containing the GalR1/2 agonist, AR-M 961 (0.5 mu M), in the presence of the GalR2 antagonist, M871 (1.0-2.5 mu M). GalR2 was activated with the selective agonist, AR-M 1896 (0.5-1.0 mu M). Application of the 'GalR1 agonist cocktail' often activated an inwardly-rectifying conductance in delay firing (excitatory) and tonically firing (inhibitory) neurons. This conductance was not activated by AR-M 1896 which instead decreased or increased an outwardly-rectifying conductance at voltages positive to -70 rnV. Despite this variability in its actions on current-voltage relationships, AR-M 1896 very consistently decreased membrane excitability, as measured by cumulative action potential latency in response to a depolarizing current ramp. This strong GalR2-mediated effect was seen in neurons where membrane conductance was decreased, and where membrane excitability might be predicted to increase. GalR2 was also located presynaptically, as AR-M 1896 increased the interevent interval of spontaneous EPSCs in both delay and tonic cells. By contrast, the 'GalR1 agonist cocktail' had little effect on spontaneous EPSCs, suggesting that presynaptic terminals do not express GalR1. These diverse actions of GalR1 and GalR2 activation on both inhibitory and excitatory neurons are discussed in relation to the known spinal antinociceptive and pro-nociceptive actions of galanin, to the possible association of GalR1 with the inhibitory G-protein, G(i/o) and to report that GalR2 activation suppresses Ca(2+) channel currents.

  • 36.
    Alikhani, Nyosha
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Guo, Lan
    Yan, Shiqiang
    Du, Heng
    Pinho, Catarina Moreira
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Chen, John Xi
    Glaser, Elzbieta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Yan, Shirley ShiDu
    Decreased proteolytic activity of the mitochondrial amyloid-β degrading enzyme, PreP peptidasome, in Alzheimer's disease brain mitochondria2011In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 27, no 1, 75-87 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accumulation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), the neurotoxic peptide implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), has been shown in brain mitochondria of AD patients and of AD transgenic mouse models. The presence of Aβ in mitochondria leads to free radical generation and neuronal stress. Recently, we identified the presequence protease, PreP, localized in the mitochondrial matrix in mammalian mitochondria as the novel mitochondrial Aβ-degrading enzyme. In the present study, we examined PreP activity in the mitochondrial matrix of the human brain's temporal lobe, an area of the brain highly susceptible to Aβ accumulation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. We found significantly lower hPreP activity in AD brains compared with non-AD age-matched controls. By contrast, in the cerebellum, a brain region typically spared from Aβ accumulation, there was no significant difference in hPreP activity when comparing AD samples to non-AD controls. We also found significantly reduced PreP activity in the mitochondrial matrix of AD transgenic mouse brains (Tg mAβPP and Tg mAβPP/ABAD) when compared to non-transgenic aged-matched mice. Furthermore, mitochondrial fractions isolated from AD brains and Tg mAβPP mice had higher levels of 4-hydroxynonenal, an oxidative product, as compared with those from non-AD and nonTg mice. Accordingly, activity of cytochrome c oxidase was significantly reduced in the AD mitochondria. These findings suggest that decreased PreP proteolytic activity, possibly due to enhanced ROS production, contributes to Aβ accumulation in mitochondria leading to the mitochondrial toxicity and neuronal death that is exacerbated in AD. Clearance of mitochondrial Aβ by PreP may thus be of importance in the pathology of AD.

  • 37. Allwood, Jens
    et al.
    Jensen, MikaelUniversity of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Kognitionsvetenskap2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Alm, Per A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Stuttering in relation to anxiety, temperament, and personality: Review and analysis with focus on causality2014In: Journal of fluency disorders, ISSN 0094-730X, E-ISSN 1873-801X, Vol. 40, 5-21 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anxiety and emotional reactions have a central role in many theories of stuttering, for example that persons who stutter would tend to have an emotionally sensitive temperament. The possible relation between stuttering and certain traits of temperament or personality were reviewed and analyzed, with focus on temporal relations (i.e., what comes first). It was consistently found that preschool children who stutter (as a group) do not show any tendencies toward elevated temperamental traits of shyness or social anxiety compared with children who do not stutter. Significant group differences were, however, repeatedly reported for traits associated with inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity, which is likely to reflect a subgroup of children who stutter. Available data is not consistent with the proposal that the risk for persistent stuttering is increased by an emotionally reactive temperament in children who stutter. Speech-related social anxiety develops in many cases of stuttering, before adulthood. Reduction of social anxiety in adults who stutter does not in itself appear to result in significant improvement of speech fluency. Studies have not revealed any relation between the severity of the motor symptoms of stuttering and temperamental traits. It is proposed that situational variability of stuttering, related to social complexity, is an effect of interference from social cognition and not directly from the emotions of social anxiety. In summary, the studies in this review provide strong evidence that persons who stutter are not characterized by constitutional traits of anxiety or similar constructs. Educational Objectives: This paper provides a review and analysis of studies of anxiety, temperament, and personality, organized with the objective to clarify cause and effect relations. Readers will be able to (a) understand the importance of effect size and distribution of data for interpretation of group differences; (b) understand the role of temporal relations for interpretation of cause and effect; (c) discuss the results of studies of anxiety, temperament and personality in relation to stuttering; and (d) discuss situational variations of stuttering and the possible role of social cognition. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 39.
    Alm, Per A
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Division of Psychiatry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Stuttering, emotions, and heart rate during anticipatory anxiety:: a critical review2004In: Journal of fluency disorders, ISSN 0094-730X, E-ISSN 1873-801X, Vol. 29, no 2, 123-133 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Persons who stutter often report their stuttering is influenced by emotional reactions, yet the nature of such relation is still unclear. Psychophysiological studies of stuttering have failed to find any major association between stuttering and the activity of the sympathetic nervous system. A review of published studies of heart rate in relation to stressful speech situations indicate that adults who stutter tend to show a paradoxical reduction of heart rate compared with nonstuttering persons. Reduction of heart rate has also been observed in humans and mammals during anticipation of an unpleasant stimulus, and is proposed to be an indication of anticipatory anxiety resulting in a “freezing response” with parasympathetic inhibition of the heart rate. It is suggested that speech-related anticipatory anxiety in persons who stutter is likely to be a secondary, conditioned reaction based on previous experiences of stuttering.

  • 40.
    Alm, Per A
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Stamning och skenande tal (løbsk tale): Om orsaker, mekanismer och behandling, med utgångspunkt från hjärnan2008In: Proceedings fra 1ste nordiske konference om stammen løbsk tale, Nyborg, Danmark, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Almkvist, Ove
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital at Huddinge, Sweden.
    Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena
    Thordardottir, Steinunn
    Amberla, Kaarina
    Axelman, Karin
    Basun, Hans
    Kinhult-Ståhlbom, Anne
    Lilius, Lena
    Remes, Anne
    Wahlund, Lars-Olof
    Viitanen, Matti
    Lannfelt, Lars
    Graff, Caroline
    Predicting Cognitive Decline across Four Decades in Mutation Carriers and Non-carriers in Autosomal-Dominant Alzheimer's Disease2017In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, ISSN 1355-6177, E-ISSN 1469-7661, Vol. 23, no 3, 195-203 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate cognitive performance including preclinical and clinical disease course in carriers and non-carriers of autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease (adAD) in relation to multiple predictors, that is, linear and non-linear estimates of years to expected clinical onset of disease, years of education and age. Methods: Participants from five families with early-onset autosomal-dominant mutations (Swedish and Arctic APP, PSEN1 M146V, H163Y, and I143T) included 35 carriers (28 without dementia and 7 with) and 44 non-carriers. All participants underwent a comprehensive clinical evaluation, including neuropsychological assessment at the Memory Clinic, Karolinska University Hospital at Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. The time span of disease course covered four decades of the preclinical and clinical stages of dementia. Neuropsychological tests were used to assess premorbid and current global cognition, verbal and visuospatial functions, short-term and episodic memory, attention, and executive function. Results: In carriers, the time-related curvilinear trajectory of cognitive function across disease stages was best fitted to a formulae with three predictors: years to expected clinical onset (linear and curvilinear components), and years of education. In non-carriers, the change was minimal and best predicted by two predictors: education and age. The trajectories for carriers and non-carriers began to diverge approximately 10 years before the expected clinical onset in episodic memory, executive function, and visuospatial function. Conclusions: The curvilinear trajectory of cognitive functions across disease stages was mimicked by three predictors in carriers. In episodic memory, executive and visuospatial functions, the point of diverging trajectories occurred approximately 10 years ahead of the clinical onset compared to non-carriers.

  • 42. Alping, P.
    et al.
    Islam-Jakobsson, Protik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Novakova, L.
    Salzer, Jonatan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Björck, A.
    Axelsson, M.
    Malmeström, C.
    Fink, K.
    Frisell, T.
    Lycke, J.
    Svenningsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Piehl, F.
    Superior efficacy and tolerability of rituximab as compared to fingolimod for MS patients switching from natalizumab due to positive JC virus serology2015In: Multiple Sclerosis, ISSN 1352-4585, E-ISSN 1477-0970, Vol. 21, no 11, 555-555 p., P1079Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43. Alping, P.
    et al.
    Svenningsson, A.
    Clinical Science Danderyd´s Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Salzer, Jonatan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Burman, J.
    Dahle, C.
    Fink, K.
    Hillert, J.
    Lycke, J.
    Landtblom, A. -M
    Martin, C.
    Nilsson, P.
    Walentin, F.
    Olsson, T.
    Frisell, T.
    Piehl, F.
    Rituximab in multiple sclerosis: data from the swedish MS registry2016In: Multiple Sclerosis Journal, ISSN 1352-4585, E-ISSN 1477-0970, Vol. 22, 49-49 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Alsiö, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Univ Cambridge, Dept Psychol, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England.;Univ Cambridge, Behav & Clin Neurosci Inst, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England..
    Nilsson, S. R. O.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Psychol, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England.;Univ Cambridge, Behav & Clin Neurosci Inst, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England..
    Gastambide, F.
    Eli Lilly & Co Ltd, Lilly Ctr Cognit Neurosci, Erl Wood Manor, Windlesham GU20 6PH, Surrey, England..
    Wang, R. A. H.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Psychol, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England.;Univ Cambridge, Behav & Clin Neurosci Inst, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England..
    Dam, S. A.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Psychol, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England.;Univ Cambridge, Behav & Clin Neurosci Inst, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England..
    Mar, A. C.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Psychol, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England.;Univ Cambridge, Behav & Clin Neurosci Inst, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England..
    Tricklebank, M.
    Eli Lilly & Co Ltd, Lilly Ctr Cognit Neurosci, Erl Wood Manor, Windlesham GU20 6PH, Surrey, England..
    Robbins, T. W.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Psychol, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England.;Univ Cambridge, Behav & Clin Neurosci Inst, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England..
    The role of 5-HT2C receptors in touchscreen visual reversal learning in the rat: a cross-site study2015In: Psychopharmacology, ISSN 0033-3158, E-ISSN 1432-2072, Vol. 232, no 21-22, 4017-4031 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reversal learning requires associative learning and executive functioning to suppress non-adaptive responding. Reversal-learning deficits are observed in e.g. schizophrenia and obsessive-compulsive disorder and implicate neural circuitry including the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Serotonergic function has been strongly linked to visual reversal learning in humans and experimental animals but less is known about which receptor subtypes are involved. The objectives of the study were to test the effects of systemic and intra-OFC 5-HT2C-receptor antagonism on visual reversal learning in rats and assess the psychological mechanisms underlying these effects within novel touchscreen paradigms. In experiments 1-2, we used a novel 3-stimulus task to investigate the effects of 5-HT2C-receptor antagonism through SB 242084 (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg i.p.) cross-site. Experiment 3 assessed the effects of SB 242084 in 2-choice reversal learning. In experiment 4, we validated a novel touchscreen serial visual reversal task suitable for neuropharmacological microinfusions by baclofen-/muscimol-induced OFC inactivation. In experiment 5, we tested the effect of intra-OFC SB 242084 (1.0 or 3.0 mu g/side) on performance in this task. In experiments 1-3, SB 242084 reduced early errors but increased late errors to criterion. In experiment 5, intra-OFC SB 242084 reduced early errors without increasing late errors in a reversal paradigm validated as OFC dependent (experiment 4). Intra-OFC 5-HT2C-receptor antagonism decreases perseveration in novel touchscreen reversal-learning paradigms for the rat. Systemic 5-HT2C-receptor antagonism additionally impairs late learning-a robust effect observed cross-site and potentially linked to impulsivity. These conclusions are discussed in terms of neural mechanisms underlying reversal learning and their relevance to psychiatric disorders.

  • 45.
    Alsiö, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics.
    Nordenankar, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics.
    Arvidsson, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics.
    Birgner, Carolina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics.
    Mahmoudi, Souha
    Halbout, Briac
    Smith, Casey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics.
    Fortin, Guillaume M.
    Olson, Lars
    Descarries, Laurent
    Trudeau, Louis-Eric
    Kullander, Klas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics.
    Levesque, Daniel
    Wallén-Mackenzie, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics.
    Enhanced Sucrose and Cocaine Self-Administration and Cue-Induced Drug Seeking after Loss of VGLUT2 in Midbrain Dopamine Neurons in Mice2011In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 31, no 35, 12593-12603 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mesostriatal dopamine (DA) system contributes to several aspects of responses to rewarding substances and is implicated in conditions such as drug addiction and eating disorders. A subset of DA neurons has been shown to express the type 2 Vesicular glutamate transporter (Vglut2) and may therefore corelease glutamate. In the present study, we analyzed mice with a conditional deletion of Vglut2 in DA neurons (Vglut2(f/f;DAT-Cre)) to address the functional significance of the glutamate-DA cophenotype for responses to cocaine and food reinforcement. Biochemical parameters of striatal DA function were also examined by using DA receptor autoradiography, immediate-early gene quantitative in situ hybridization after cocaine challenge, and DA-selective in vivo chronoamperometry. Mice in which Vglut2 expression had been abrogated in DA neurons displayed enhanced operant self-administration of both high-sucrose food and intravenous cocaine. Furthermore, cocaine seeking maintained by drug-paired cues was increased by 76%, showing that reward-dependent plasticity is perturbed in these mice. In addition, several lines of evidence suggest that adaptive changes occurred in both the ventral and dorsal striatum in the absence of VGLUT2: DA receptor binding was increased, and basal mRNA levels of the DA-induced early genes Nur77 and c-fos were elevated as after cocaine induction. Furthermore, in vivo challenge of the DA system by potassium-evoked depolarization revealed less DA release in both striatal areas. This study demonstrates that absence of VGLUT2 in DA neurons leads to perturbations of reward consumption as well as reward-associated memory, features of particular relevance for addictive-like behavior.

  • 46.
    Alsiö, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Pickering, Christopher
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Roman, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Lindblom, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Schiöth, Helgi B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Anxiolytic response after palatable diet consumption but not food restriction in rats2009In: Appetite, ISSN 0195-6663, E-ISSN 1095-8304, Vol. 52, no 3, 816-816 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Alsiö, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Roman, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Hulting, Anna-Lena
    Meyerson, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Lindblom, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Schiöth, Helgi B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Anxiety-like behaviour predicts the preference for a high-carbohydrate diet in outbred rats2007In: Behavioural Pharmacology, ISSN 0955-8810, E-ISSN 1473-5849, Vol. 18, S41-S41 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Alstermark, Bror
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Hultborn, H
    University of Copenhagen Department of Neuroscience and Pharmacology Copenhagen N. Denmark.
    Jankowska, E
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg Department of Physiology Gothenburg Sweden.
    Pettersson, L-G
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg Department of Physiology Gothenburg Sweden.
    Anders Lundberg (1920-2009).2010In: Experimental Brain Research, ISSN 0014-4819, E-ISSN 1432-1106, Vol. 200, no 3-4, 193-195 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Anders Lundberg was one of the founding editorial board members for EBR when it began its life in 1976 under the editorship of John Eccles. He was also one of the most prolific contributors to the journal with a total of 49 papers, including a series of 16 on the topic of “integration in descending motor pathways controlling the forelimb in the cat”. He continued as an editor of the journal until volume 16 when he persuaded his younger colleague Hans Hultborn to take his place. Hans is one of the authors of the obituary. –John Rothwell

  • 49.
    Alstermark, Bror
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Isa, Tadashi
    Natl Inst Physiol Sci, Dept Dev Physiol, Okazaki, Aichi 4448585, Japan.
    Circuits for skilled reaching and grasping2012In: Annual Review of Neuroscience, Palo alto: ANNUAL REVIEWS, 2012, 559-578 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From an evolutionary perspective, it is clear that basic motor functions such as locomotion and posture are largely controlled by neural circuitries residing in the spinal cord and brain-stem. The control of voluntary movements such as skillful reaching and grasping is generally considered to be governed by neural circuitries in the motor cortex that connect directly to motoneurons via the corticomotoneuronal (CM) pathway. The CM pathway may act together with several brain-stem systems that also act directly with motoneurons. This simple view was challenged by work in the cat, which lacks the direct CM system, showing that the motor commands for reaching and grasping could be mediated via spinal interneurons with input from the motor-cortex and brain-stem systems. It was further demonstrated that the spinal interneurons mediating the descending commands for reaching and grasping constitute separate and distinct populations from those involved in locomotion and posture. The aim of this review is to describe populations of spinal interneurons that are involved in the control of skilled reaching and grasping in the cat, monkey, and human.

  • 50.
    Alstermark, Bror
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Pettersson, Lars-Gunnar
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg , Gothenburg.
    Skilled reaching and grasping in the rat: lacking effect of corticospinal lesion2014In: Frontiers in Neurology, ISSN 1664-2295, Vol. 5, 103- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The corticospinal system is a major motor pathway in the control of skilled voluntary movements such as reaching and grasping. It has developed considerably phylogenetically to reach a peak in humans. Because rodents possess advanced forelimb movements that can be used for reaching and grasping food, it is commonly considered that the corticospinal tract (CST) is of major importance for this control also in rodents. A close homology to primate reaching and grasping has been described but with obvious limitations as to independent digit movements, which are lacking in rodents. Nevertheless, it was believed that there are, as in the primate, direct cortico-motoneuronal connections. Later, it was shown that there are no such connections. The fastest excitatory pathway is disynaptic, mediated via cortico-reticulospinal neurons and in the spinal cord the excitation is mainly polysynaptically mediated via segmental interneurons. Earlier behavioral studies have aimed at investigating the role of the CST by using pyramidotomy in the brainstem. However, in addition to interrupting the CST, a pyramidal transection abolishes the input to reticulospinal neurons. It is therefore not possible to conclude if the deficits after pyramidotomy result from interruption of the CST or the input to reticulospinal neurons or both. We have re-investigated the role of the CST by examining the effect of a CST lesion in the C1-C2 spinal segments on the success rate of reaching and grasping. This lesion spares the cortico-reticulospinal pathway. In contrast to investigations using pyramidal transections, the present study did not demonstrate marked deficits in reaching and grasping. We propose that the difference in results can be explained by the intact cortical input to reticulospinal neurons in our study and thus implicate an important role of this pathway in the control of reaching and grasping in the rat.

1234567 1 - 50 of 2219
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf