Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 337
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
Select all
  • 1.
    Ahmed, Sheikh Ali
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Hansson, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Distribution of preservatives in thermally modified Scots pine and Norway spruce sapwood2013In: Wood Science and Technology, ISSN 0043-7719, E-ISSN 1432-5225, Vol. 47, no 3, 499-513 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studying the impregnation and distribution of oil-based preservative in dried wood is complicated as wood is a nonhomogeneous, hygroscopic and porous material, and especially of anisotropic nature. However, this study is important since it has influence on the durability of wood. To enhance the durability of thermally modified wood, a new method for preservative impregnation is introduced, avoiding the need for external pressure or vacuum. This article presents a study on preservative distribution in thermally treated Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) sapwood using computed tomography scanning, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Secondary treatment of thermally modified wood was performed on a laboratory scale by impregnation with two types of preservatives, viz. Elit Träskydd (Beckers) and pine tar (tar), to evaluate their distribution in the wood cells. Preservative solutions were impregnated in the wood using a simple and effective method. Samples were preheated to 170°C in a drying oven and immediately submerged in preservative solutions for simultaneous impregnation and cooling. Tar penetration was found higher than Beckers, and their distribution decreased with increasing sample length. Owing to some anatomical properties, uptake of preservatives was low in spruce. Besides, dry-induced interstitial spaces, which are proven important flow paths for seasoned wood, were not observed in this species.

  • 2.
    Ahmed, Sheikh Ali
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Moisture properties of heat-treated Scots pine and Norway spruce sapwood impregnated with wood preservatives2012In: Wood and Fiber Science, ISSN 0735-6161, Vol. 44, no 1, 85-93 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An experiment was conducted on commercially heat-treated (HT) Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) sapwood collected from Ht Wood AB, Arvidsjaur, Sweden. Secondary treatment on HT wood was performed in laboratory scale by impregnating with water-repellent preservatives (a commercial one and pine tar) to evaluate their retention and different moisture-related properties. Preservative solutions were impregnated using a simple and effective method. Wood samples were heated at 170°C in a dry oven and were immediately immersed in preservative solutions. Considerable retention was observed in HT wood, particularly in pine. Moisture adsorption properties were measured after conditioning in a high-humidity environmental chamber (4°C and 84% RH). Experimental results showed that secondary treatment enhanced moisture excluding efficiencies by decreasing equilibrium moisture content, suggesting better hydrophobicity. Soaking test in water showed that antiswelling and water repellence efficiencies improved, especially in tar-treated wood. In addition, this type of treatment significantly decreased water absorption. It was also possible to decrease volumetric swellings. Thus, secondary treatment of HT wood with preservative, in particular with tar, improved dimensional stability and water repellency.

  • 3.
    Ahmed, Sheikh Ali
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Hagman, Olle
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Cloutier, Alain
    Wood Research Center (CRB), Department of Wood and Forest Sciences, Faculty of Forestry, Geography and Geomatics, Laval University, Quebec.
    Fang, Chang-Hua
    Wood Research Center (CRB), Department of Wood and Forest Sciences, Faculty of Forestry, Geography and Geomatics, Laval University, Quebec.
    Elustondo, Diego
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Anatomical properties and process parameters affecting blister/blow formation in densified European aspen and downy birch sapwood boards by thermo-hygro-mechanical compression2013In: Journal of Materials Science, ISSN 0022-2461, E-ISSN 1573-4803, Vol. 48, no 24, 8571-8579 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Approximately, 13.5 % of the standing volume of productive forest land in Sweden is covered by birch and aspen, which provides the vast potential to produce value-added products such as densified wood. This study shows whether it is possible to densify those species with a thermo-hygro-mechanical (THM) process using heat, steam, and pressure. In this process, transverse compression on thin European aspen (Populus tremula) and downy birch (Betula pubescens) boards was performed at 200 ºC with a maximum steam pressure of 550 kPa. To obtain a theoretical 50 % compression set, the press’s maximum hydraulic pressure ranged from 1.5 to 7.3 MPa. Preliminary tests showed that ~75 % of the birch boards produced defects (blisters/blows) while only 25 % of the aspen boards did. Mainly, radial delamination associated with internal checks in intrawall and transwall fractures caused small cracks (termed blisters) while blows are characterized by relatively larger areas of delamination visible as a bumpy surface on the panel. Anatomical investigations revealed that birch was more prone to those defects than aspen. However, those defects could be minimized by increasing the pre-treatment time during the THM processing.

  • 4.
    Ahmed, Sheikh Ali
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Hansson, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Evaluation of preservative distribution in thermally modified European aspen and birch boards using computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy2013In: Journal of Wood Science, ISSN 1435-0211, E-ISSN 1611-4663, Vol. 59, no 1, 57-66 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this experiment was to impregnate thermally modified wood using an easy and cost-effective method. Industrially processed thermally modified European aspen (Populus tremula L.) and birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh.) were collected and secondarily treated at the laboratory scale with the preservatives tung oil, pine tar and Elit Träskydd (Beckers) using a simple and effective method. Preservative uptake and distribution in sample boards were evaluated using computed tomography (CT) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. Preservative uptake and treatability in terms of void volume filled were found the highest in Beckers and the lowest in tung oil-treated samples. Thermally modified samples had lower treatability than their counterpart control samples. More structural changes after thermal modification, especially in birch, significantly reduced the preservative uptake and distribution. The differences of preservatives uptake near the end grain were high and then decreased near the mid position of the samples length as compared with similar type of wood sample. Non-destructive evaluation by CT scanning provided a very useful method to locate the preservative gradients throughout the sample length. SEM analysis enabled the visualization of the preservative deposits in wood cells at the microstructural level.

  • 5. Ahmed, Sheikh Ali
    et al.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Karlsson, Olov
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Uneven distribution of preservative in kiln-dried sapwood lumber of Scots pine: Impact of wood structure and resin allocation2012In: Holzforschung, ISSN 0018-3830, E-ISSN 1437-434X, Vol. 66, no 2, 251-258 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) sapwood lumber was collected after kiln drying and preservative treatment with Celcure AC 800 (a copper-amine wood preservative). Distribution of the preservative throughout the lumber was visually examined. Not all, but some samples showed specific localized areas without any preservative distribution throughout their entire length. Those samples were assessed further for anatomical properties, specifically in impregnated and unimpregnated areas. Additional study was conducted on the morphological nature and redistribution of lipophilic extractives using three different histochemical staining methods. Intrinsic wood properties – especially the frequency of axial resin canals and the percentage of canals blocked – were found to be responsible for the irregular distribution of the preservative. Furthermore, the inability to create continuous and frequent interstitial spaces due to the collapse of thin-walled ray cells throughout the lumber resulted in uneven distribution of preservatives. Staining techniques were useful to localize places with more or less abundance of extractives (e.g., fats) in impregnated and unimpregnated wood, which varied considerably. Histochemical observations revealed information pertaining to the kiln dry specific distribution and redistribution of extractives between the areas. Moreover, resin reallocation and modification in ray parenchyma and resin canals induced by kiln drying would be another reason for the impregnation anomalies.

  • 6.
    Ahmed, Sheikh Ali
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Mould susceptibility of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) sapwood: Impact of drying, thermal modification, and copper-based preservative2013In: International Biodeterioration & Biodegradation, ISSN 0964-8305, E-ISSN 1879-0208, Vol. 85, 284-288 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of mould on wood surfaces depends on several factors. Although mould does not affect the mechanical properties of wood, it greatly reduces the aesthetic value of wood like the sapwood of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), which is very prone to mould. In addition, adverse health effects of mould on humans are also a great concern. Different types of dried and treated wood were used to observe whether they had enhanced durability against mould following an accelerated laboratory test method in a climate chamber. Samples were green, air-dried, industrially thermally-modified, treated with copper-based preservative, and kiln-dried wood, which were tested within a single test run. The test produced the following main results: the thermal modification increased the durability of the wood, and the protective effectiveness of alternative treatments was comparable to that of commercially available copper-based treatment. However, the initial moisture content of the samples during mould exposure had a great influence on the onset of mould growth. The risk of mould susceptibility of industrial kiln-dried lumber can be reduced by drying using the double-layering technique which likely forced the nutrients to deposit near the evaporation surfaces followed by planing off the nutrient enriched edges.

  • 7.
    Ahmed, Sheikh Ali
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Development of a new rapid method for mould testing in a climate chamber: Preliminary tests2013In: European Journal of Wood and Wood Products, ISSN 0018-3768, E-ISSN 1436-736X, Vol. 71, no 4, 451-461 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to develop fast, simple and robust solid wood mould testing methods for the use in small-scale laboratory tests. The objective was to investigate mould susceptibility of different wood materials within the batches. The proposed method is based on natural contamination of non-sterile surfaces in climates conducive to mould growth. For this purpose, a climate chamber with regulated temperature and relative humidity was used. The conditioning chamber was divided into upper and lower chamber by a thin layer of stainless steel placed horizontally above the fan to minimise air circulation to the sample in the upper compartment. Mould-infected samples from outdoor tests were used as a source of mould inocula, and test trials were conducted on Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) sapwood. Samples were suspended from the top of the upper chamber, and the chamber was exposed to different temperature and humidity levels. Severe mould infestation was observed after 12-14 days of incubation. Visual mould rating was then performed. Regardless of some constraints, this test method was very simple, fast, and effective. More importantly, unlike other test methods, it closely models mould infestation as it would occur under natural condition.

  • 8.
    Ahmed, Sheikh Ali
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Yang, Qian
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Accelerated mold test on dried pine sapwood boards: Impact of contact heat treatment2013In: Journal of wood chemistry and technology, ISSN 0277-3813, E-ISSN 1532-2319, Vol. 33, no 3, 174-187 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We test the hypothesis that the combination of kiln drying of double-stacked boards and contact heat treatment will reduce the susceptibility of treated boards to colonization by mold fungi. Winter-felled Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) sapwood boards were double-stacked in an industrial kiln in ‘‘sapwood out’’ and ‘‘sapwood in’’ positions. Dried samples were then contact heat-treated using a hot press at three different temperatures (140°C, 170°C, and 200°C) for three different periods (1, 3, and 10 min). Accelerated mold test was performed in a climate chamber where naturally mold infected samples were used as a source of mold inocula. Contact heat treatment degraded the saccharides which accumulated at dried surfaces, and reduced the mold growth. The threshold temperature and time for inhibiting mold growth was 170°C for 10 min. But, for industrial application, the most feasible combination of temperature and time would be 200°C for 3 min. We concluded that double stacking/contact heat treatment used is an environmentally friendly alternative to chemicals for reducing mold on Scots pine sapwood boards.

  • 9.
    Aid, Graham
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Brandt, Nils
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Bygg- och rivningsavfall: Action Research vid KTH2010In: Återvinnare För Industrin / [ed] Kjell-Arne Larsson, Stockholm: Rekord Media och Produktion AB , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Allard, Christina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Lin, Janet
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Sandström, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    LTU Teaching guide to e-learning: how to clear the mist of teaching through the cloud2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Berglund, Linn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Noël, Maxime
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Linder, Tomas
    Löfqvist, Torbjörn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Light scattering in cellulose nanofibre suspensions: Model and experiments2016In: Computers in Chemistry Proceeding from ACS National Meeting San Diego: Proceeding from ACS National Meeting San Diego, American Chemical Society (ACS), 2016, 122- p., CELL 235Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Here light scattering theory is used to assess the size distribution in a suspension of cellulose as it is fibrillated from micro-scaled to nano-scaled fibres. A model based on Monte carlo simulations of the scattering of photons by different sizes of cellulose fibres was used to predict the UV-IF spectrum of the suspensions. Bleached cellulose hardwood pulp was tested and compared to the visually transparent tempo-oxidised hardwood cellulose nanofibres (CNF) suspension. The theoretical results show that different diameter size classes exhibit very different scattering patterns. These classes could be identified in the experimental results and used to establish the size class dominating the suspension. A comparison to AFM/microscope size distribution was made and the results indicated that using the UV-IF light scattering spectrum maybe more reliable that size distribution measurement using AFM and microscopy on dried CNF samples. The UV-IF spectrum measurement combined with the theoretical prediction can be used even at this initial stage of development of this model to assess the degree of fibrillation when processing CNF.

  • 12.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Swerea SICOMP AB, Box 271, 941 26, Piteå.
    Hagström, Bengt
    SWEREA IVF AB.
    Långström, Runar
    Swerea SICOMP AB, Box 271, 941 26, Piteå.
    Fernberg, Patrik
    Swerea SICOMP AB, Box 271, 941 26, Piteå.
    Novel reactive bicomponent fibres: Material in composite manufacturing2012In: Journal of Nanostructured Polymers and Nanocomposites, ISSN 1790-4439, Vol. 8, no 1, 5-11 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hypotheses that reactive uncured, thermoset bicomponent fibres can be prepared and mixed with reinforcing fi- bres and ultimately used in preparation o f a composite was tested and is described. I t is thought that such fibres have the two potential advantages: ( 1) to enable manufacturing with pai1icle doped resins e.g. nanocomposites which add functionality to composites and (2) increased efficiency ofstructural composite manufacturing by increasing the level of automation. The structure of the thermoset fibres comprises of a sheath of thermoplastic and a core of uncured the1moset resin. Once manufactured, the fibres were wound with a reinforced fibre onto a plate, consolidated and cured. The resulting composite was examined and compared to other composites made with the same manufacturing method from commercially available materials. The results show that a laminate can be produced using these reactive bicomponent fibres. The resin system successfully impregnates the reinforcing carbon fibres and that the thermoplas- tic separates from the epoxy resin system during consolidation. In comparison to reference material, the bicomponentlaminate shows promising characteristics. However, the processes developed are currently on a lab-scale and consid- erable improvement of various bicomponent fibre properties, such as the strength, are required before the technology can be used on a larger scale

  • 13.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Swerea SICOMP AB, Box 271, SE-941 26 Piteå.
    Hagström, Bengt
    werea IVF AB.
    Långström, Runar
    Swerea SICOMP AB, Box 271, SE-941 26 Piteå.
    Fernberg, Patrik
    Swerea SICOMP AB, Box 271, SE-941 26 Piteå.
    Novel reactive bicomponent fibres: Material in composite manufacturing2012In: Journal of Nanostructured Polymers and Nanocomposites, ISSN 1790-4439, Vol. 8, no 1, 5-11 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hypotheses that reactive uncured, thermoset bicomponent fibres can be prepared and mixed with reinforcing fibres and ultimately used in preparation of a composite was tested and is described. It is thought that such fibres have the two potential advantages: (1) to enable manufacturing with particle doped resins e.g. nanocomposites which add functionality to composites and (2) increased efficiency of structural composite manufacturing by increasing the level of automation. The structure of the thermoset fibres comprises of a sheath of thermoplastic and a core of uncured thermoset resin. Once manufactured, the fibres were wound with a reinforced fibre onto a plate, consolidated and cured. The resulting composite was examined and compared to other composites made with the same manufacturing method from commercially available materials. The results show that a laminate can be produced using these reactive bicomponent fibres. The resin system successfully impregnates the reinforcing carbon fibres and that the thermoplastic separates from the epoxy resin system during consolidation. In comparison to reference material, the bicomponent laminate shows promising characteristics. However, the processes developed are currently on a lab-scale and considerable improvement of various bicomponent fibre properties, such as the strength, are required before the technology can be used on a larger scale.

  • 14.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Jonoobi, Mehdi
    Mathew, Aji P.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Impregnation of cellulose nanofibre networks with a thermoplastic polymer2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The emphasis of this study have been to study if impregnation of cellulose nanofibre networks can be made using a thermoplastic polymer as a matrix and to estimate the reinforcing efficiency of the cellulose nanofibres in this composite. A nanofibre network with higher porosity that water-dried nanofibre network was prepared from a cellulose waste byproduct (sludge). This was impregnated using a diluted solution of cellulose acetate butyrate polymer to produce a 60 wt. % CNF/CAB composite. This composite was characterized using microscopy and mechanical testing. High porosity is seen in the SEM images of the acetone-dried fibre network and SEM and film transparency was used to qualitatively assess the impregnation of the network. A significant improvement in the visible light transmittance was observed for the nanocomposite film compared to the nanofibre network as a result of the impregnation. The reinforcing efficiency was calculated based on a model of the nanocomposite and compared to other nanocomposites in the literature. The efficiency factor takes into account the volume fraction and the stiffness of the matrix. This showed that this CNF/CAB combination is similar in efficiency to CNF/PLA nanocomposites and more efficient that nanocomposites using when using stiffer matrices. It was also more efficient CNF nanocomposites based on Chitosan, which has the same stiffness. It is still however not as efficient as traditional glass polymer composites due to the random orientation of the fibres nor nanocomposites with very soft matrices due to the dominating network effect of the CNF in such composites. In conclusion, CAB impregnated cellulose nanofibre networks are promising biocomposite materials that could be used in applications where transparency and good mechanical properties are of interest. The key elements in the impregnation process of the nanocomposites were the use of a porous networks and a low viscosity thermoplastic resin solution.

  • 15.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Löfqvist, Torbjörn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Delsing, Jerker
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Estimating material properties of solid and hollow fibers in suspension using ultrasonic attenuation2013In: IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control, ISSN 0885-3010, E-ISSN 1525-8955, Vol. 60, no 7, 1424-1434 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Estimates of the material properties of hollow fibers suspended in a fluid using ultrasound measurements and a simple, computationally efficient analytical model are made. The industrial application is to evaluate the properties of wood fibers in paper pulp. The necessity of using a layered cylindrical model (LCM) as opposed to a solid cylindrical model (SCM) for modeling ultrasound attenuation in a suspension of hollow fibers is evaluated. The two models are described and used to solve the inverse problem of estimating material properties from attenuation in suspensions of solid and hollow polyester fibers. The results show that the measured attenuation of hollow fibers differs from that of solid fibers. Elastic properties estimates using LCM with hollow-fiber suspension measurements are similar to those using SCM with solid-fiber suspension measurements and compare well to block polyester values for elastic moduli. However, using the SCM with the hollow-fiber suspension did not produce realistic estimations. In conclusion, the LCM gives reasonable estimations of hollow fiber properties and the SCM is not sufficiently complex to model hollow fibers. The results also indicate that the use of a distributed radius in the model is important in estimating material properties from fiber suspensions.

  • 16.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Moreno, Sergio
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Vacuum infusion of cellulose nanofibre network composites: Influence of porosity on permeability and impregnation2016In: Materials & design, ISSN 0264-1275, E-ISSN 1873-4197, Vol. 95, 204-211 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Addressing issues around the processing of cellulose nanofibres (CNF) composites is important in establishing their use as sustainable, renewable polymer reinforcements. Here, CNF networks of different porosity were made with the aim of increasing their permeability and suitability for processing by vacuum infusion (VI). The CNF networks were infused with epoxy using two different strategies. The permeability, morphology and mechanical properties of the dry networks and the resulting nanocomposites were investigated. Calculated fill-times for CNF networks with 50% porosity were the shortest, but are only less than the gel-time of the epoxy if capillary effects are included. In experiments the CNF networks were clearly wetted. However low transparency indicated that impregnation was incomplete. The modulus and strength of the dry CNF networks increased rapidly with decreasing porosity, but their nanocomposites did not follow this trend, showing instead similar mechanical properties to each other. The results demonstrated that increasing the porosity of the CNF networks to ≈ 50% gives better impregnation resulting in a lower ultimate strength, a higher yield strength and no loss in modulus. Better use of the flow channels in the inherently layered CNF networks could potentially reduce void content in these nanocomposites and thus increase their mechanical properties.

  • 17.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Moreno, Sergio
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Vacuum Infusion of Nanocellulose Networks of Different Porosity2015In: 20th International Conference on Composite Materials: Copenhagen, 19-24th July 2015, ICCM , 2015, 4109-1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanofibres (CNF) have shown good potential as sustainable, biobased reinforcing materials in polymer composites. Addressing issues around the processing of these composites is an important part of establishing their use in different applications. Here, CNF networks of different porosity are made from nanofibrillated hardwood kraft pulp with the aim of increasing the impregnation of the CNF networks and to allow vacuum infusion to be used. Two different vacuum infusion strategies: in-plane and out of plane were used to infuse the CNF networks with a low viscosity epoxy. The permeability, morphology and mechanical properties of the dry networks and the resulting nanocomposites were investigated and compared to a micro-fibre based network. Using the out-of-plane permeability measurements and Darcy’s law, the fill-time was calculated and showed that the CNF network with 40% porosity had the lowest fill-time when an out-of-plane impregnation strategy is used. However this exceeded the gel-time of the epoxy system. In experiments, the resin reached the other side of the network but low transparency indicated that wetting was poor. The dry CNF preforms showed a very strong dependence on the porosity with both modulus and strength increasing rapidly at low porosity. Interestingly, the composite based on the 60% porosity network showed good wetting particularly with the in-plane infusion strategy, exhibiting a much more brittle fracture and a high yield strength. This shows that in CNF composites produced by VI, lowering the fibre volume content of the CNF composites gives better impregnation resulting in a lower ultimate strength but higher yield strength and no loss in modulus.

  • 18.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Reinforcing efficiency of nanocellulose in polymers2014In: Reactive & functional polymers, ISSN 1381-5148, E-ISSN 1873-166X, Vol. 85, 151-156 p., 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocellulose extracted from renewable sources, is a promising reinforcement for many polymers and is a material where strong interfibre hydrogen bonds add effects not seen in microfiber composites. Presented is a tool for comparing different nanocellulose composites based on estimating the efficiency of nanocellulose reinforcement. A reinforcing efficiency factor is calculated from reported values of elastic modulus and strength from various nanocellulose composites using established micromechanical models. In addition, for the strength, a network model is derived based on fibre-fibre bond strength within nanocellulose networks. The strength results highlight the importance of the plastic deformation in the nanocellulose composites. Both modulus and strength efficiency show that the network strength and modulus has a greater effect than that of the individual constituents. In the best cases, nanocellulose reinforcement exceeds all model predictions.

  • 19.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Cellulose nanofibril nanocomposites processing2013In: Production and Applications of Cellulose Nanomaterials, Peachtree Corners, GA: TAPPI Press, 2013, 271-274 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Impregnation of a preformed network of nanofibrils leads to high fibre volume fraction nanocomposites and with this good mechanical properties have been achieved. However, comparing nanofibrils composite made with different volume fractions and different matrices is difficult. In order to do this, and in doing so gain insight into the most promising approaches, methods of measuring reinforcing efficiencies are being developed. The results show that for matrices with low stiffness the stiffness reinforcing efficiency is high. However with high fibre volume fraction and high stiffness, this network effect may lead to a lack of exploitation of the properties of the nanofibrils. Alignment of the nanofibrils is also a key in effective reinforcement. In addition, upscaling of the impregnation process requires a good understanding of permeability and adaptation of existing permeability models for cellulose nanofibrils networks as well as experiments on their permeability are ongoing.

  • 20.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Reinforcing Efficiency of Nanocelluloses in Polymer Nanocomposites2014In: Handbook of Green Materials: Processing Technologies, Properties and Applications, Singapore: World Scientific and Engineering Academy and Society, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Quantifying reinforcing efficiency of nanocellulose fibres2013In: Processing of fibre composites-challenges for maximum materials performance: Proceedings of 34th Risø International Symposium on Materials Science / [ed] Bo Madsen; Hans Lilholt; Y Kusano; S Fäster; B Ralph, Risö: Dept. of Wind Energy, Technical University of Denmark , 2013, 149-160 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanofibres are found in all plants and have the potential to provide a sustainable biobased material source. These nanofibres can be used for reinforcing polymers and thus as structural materials. Very promising results have been reported for different nanocomposites but to compete with existing materials, it is important to understand what progress has been made towards structural materials using nanocellulose. To do this the reinforcing efficiency of the stiffness and strength of nanocellulose in different nanocomposites has been calculated for a number of reported nanocellulose fibre based composites. For the stiffness this is done by back-calculating a reinforcing efficiency factor from a Halpin-Tsai model and laminate theory. For the strength efficiency, two models are used: a classic short fibre composite model and a network model. The results show that orientation is key to the stiffness efficiency, as shown by the high efficiency of aligned natural fibres. The stiffness efficiency is, as expected, high in soft matrices but in stiff matrices, the network effect of the nanofibres is possibility limiting their reinforcing potential. The strength efficiency results show that in all the nanocomposites evaluated the network model is closer to predicting strength than the short fibre composite model. The correlation between the network strength and the composite strength suggest that much of the stress transfer is from fibre to fibre and strong nanocomposites depend heavily on having a strong network. Also noted is that in composite processing a good impregnation of the nanofibers is also seen as an important factor in the efficiency of both strength and stiffness.

  • 22.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Reinforcing efficiency and the manufacture nanocellulose fibre based composites by vacuum infusion2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocomposites based on cellulose have received a rapidly rising attention over the last 10 years however the method of manufacturing these composites on a scale larger than that in the lab remains challenging. Another challenge is that low fraction nanocomposites, whilst they can show excellent improvement in polymer properties, have difficultly to compete with traditional fibre reinforced composites [1,2]. A commonly used liquid composite moulding method for producing composites is vacuum infusion and the possibility of trading glass fibre for nanocellulose networks sheets in this type of manufacturing could results in a upscale method for producing high volume fraction cellulose nanocomposites. CNF networks are stiff and strong but have high fibre packing and thus difficult to impregnate. This paper evaluates the effectiveness of increasing the porosity to improve their processability by VI.

  • 23.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Westin, Mikael
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Hydrogel state impregnation of cellulose fibre-phenol composites: effects of fibre size distribution2016In: ECCM 2016: Proceeding of the 17th European Conference on Composite Materials, European Conference on Composite Materials , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whilst it has been well established that cellulose nanofibres (CNF) networks produce films that have high stiffness and strength, they are difficult to impregnate. Investigated in this study is whether by controlling the degree of nanofibrillation of cellulose, composites based on micro- and nano-size cellulose fibres can be made that are more easily manufactured and have better impregnation than solely cellulose nano-fibre based composites. To evaluate this, cellulose at different stages of ultrafine grinding, extracted at time intervals of 30, 60 and 290 mins, were used to make composites. To achieve good impregnation a novel strategy was used based on impregnation with phenol resin whilst the fibrillated cellulose is in a hydrogel state. The composites were subsequently dried and consolidated by hot press. The current results show that this method of impregnation is successful and the phenol matrix greatly improves the properties of the cellulose with a low degree of fibrillation. In general, as the degree of fibrillation and the proportion of nanofibres increases, the mechanical properties of the networks and their composites increase. The addition of the matrix appears to restrict the deformation of CNF network, increasing the modulus and yield strength but decreasing the ultimate strength. The method also appears to restrict the consolidation and voids remain in the composite, which reduces the modulus when compared to theoretical maximum values for this material. More work on the consolidation process is necessary to achieve the full potential of these composites.

  • 24.
    Ajaxon, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Maazouz, Yassine
    Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia .
    Ginebra, Maria-Pau
    Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia .
    Öhman, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    A non-drying porosity evaluation method for calcium phosphate cements2014In: 26th Symposium and Annual Meeting of the International Society for Ceramics in Medicine, 2014, 68-68 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Ajaxon, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Compressive fatigue properties of a commercially available acrylic bone cement for vertebroplasty2014In: Biomechanics and Modeling in Mechanobiology, ISSN 1617-7959, E-ISSN 1617-7940, Vol. 13, no 6, 1199-1207 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acrylic bone cements are widely used for fixation of joint prostheses as well as for vertebral body augmentation procedures of vertebroplasty and balloon kyphoplasty, with the cement zone(s) being subjected to repeated mechanical loading in each of these applications. Although, in vertebroplasty and balloon kyphoplasty, the cement zone is exposed to mainly cyclical compressive load, the compressive fatigue properties of acrylic bone cements used in these procedures are yet to be determined. The purposes of the present study were to determine the compressive fatigue properties of a commercially available cement brand used in vertebroplasty, including the effect of frequency on these properties; to identify the cement failure modes under compressive cyclical load; and to introduce a screening method that may be used to shorten the lengthy character of the standardized fatigue tests. Osteopal®V was used as the model cement in this study. The combinations of maximum stress and frequency used were 50.0, 55.0, 60.0, 62.5 and 75.5 MPa at 2 Hz; and of 40.0, 55.0, 60.0, 62.5 or 75.5 MPa at 10 Hz. Through analysis of nominal strain-number of loading cycles results, three cement failure modes were identified. The estimated mean fatigue limit at 2 Hz (55.4 MPa) was significantly higher than that at 10 Hz (41.1 MPa). The estimated fatigue limit at 2 Hz is much higher than stresses commonly found in the spine and also higher than that for other acrylic bone cements tested in a full tension–compression fatigue test, which indicates that tension–compression fatigue testing may substantially underestimate the performance of cements intended for vertebroplasty. A screening method was introduced which may be used to shorten the time spent in performing compressive fatigue tests on specimens of acrylic bone cement for use in vertebral body augmentation procedures. 

  • 26.
    Ajaxon, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Compressive fatigue properties of acrylic bone cement for vertebroplasty2013In: The 23rd Interdisciplinary Research Conference on Injectable Osteoarticular Biomaterials in Bone Augmentation Procedures: Proceedings, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Ajaxon, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Öhman, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Long-term in vitro degradation of a high-strength brushite cement in water, PBS, and serum solution2015In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, 575079Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bone loss and fractures may call for the use of bone substituting materials, such as calcium phosphate cements (CPCs). CPCs can be degradable, and, to determine their limitations in terms of applications, their mechanical as well as chemical properties need to be evaluated over longer periods of time, under physiological conditions. However, there is lack of data on how the in vitro degradation affects high-strength brushite CPCs over longer periods of time, that is, longer than it takes for a bone fracture to heal. This study aimed at evaluating the long-term in vitro degradation properties of a high-strength brushite CPC in three different solutions: water, phosphate buffered saline, and a serum solution. Microcomputed tomography was used to evaluate the degradation nondestructively, complemented with gravimetric analysis. The compressive strength, chemical composition, and microstructure were also evaluated. Major changes from 10 weeks onwards were seen, in terms of formation of a porous outer layer of octacalcium phosphate on the specimens with a concomitant change in phase composition, increased porosity, decrease in object volume, and mechanical properties. This study illustrates the importance of long-term evaluation of similar cement compositions to be able to predict the material’s physical changes over a relevant time frame. 

  • 28.
    Ajaxon, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Öhman, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Compressive Fatigue Properties of Acidic Calcium Phosphate Cement2014In: Proceedings of 7th World Congress of Biomechanics, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Ananías, Rubén A.
    et al.
    Department of Wood Engineering, University of Bío-Bío, Concepción.
    Sepúlveda-Villarroel, Victor
    Departamento de Ingenieria en Maderas, Universidad del Bio Bio, Avenida Collao 1202, Casilla 5-C-CP: 4081112, Concepción.
    Perez-Peña, Natalia
    Departamento de Ingenieria en Maderas, Universidad del Bio Bio, Avenida Collao 1202, Casilla 5-C-CP: 4081112, Concepción.
    Leandro-Zuñiga, Laura
    Instituto Costarricense de la Madera, San Pedro, San José.
    Salvo-Sepúlveda, Linette
    Departamento de Ingenieria en Maderas, Universidad del Bio Bio, Avenida Collao 1202, Casilla 5-C-CP: 4081112, Concepción.
    Salinas-Lira, Carlos
    Departamento de Ingenieria en Maderas, Universidad del Bio Bio, Avenida Collao 1202, Casilla 5-C-CP: 4081112, Concepción.
    Cloutier, Alain
    Society of Wood Science & Technology Member, Centre de Recherche sur le Bois, Université Laval, Québec.
    Elustondo, Diego
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Collapse of Eucalyptus nitens Wood after Drying Depending on the Radial Location Within the Stem2014In: Drying Technology, ISSN 0737-3937, E-ISSN 1532-2300, Vol. 32, no 14, 1699-1705 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collapse is almost certain to occur in the industrial drying of Eucalyptus nitens, and as such this prevents the lumber manufacturing industry in Chile from producing commercial solid wood products from this species. This problem is still unsolved, and different studies to reduce collapse are currently underway. In this exploratory study, shrinkage and collapse after drying of Eucalyptus nitens was measured for boards cut from different radial locations within the stem (core, transition and outer wood from pith to bark) and having different annual ring orientation (flat-sawn and quarter-sawn). Even though exploratory, the results appear to confirm that pieces that were cut from the center of the trees were less susceptible to collapse than the pieces cut from the transition zone between the center and the periphery. On average, collapse in transition wood was approximately 50% higher than the collapse observed in wood cut from the central zone of the trees.

  • 30.
    Andersson, Jan-Erik
    et al.
    SP Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Trä.
    Nordman, Roger
    SP Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energiteknik.
    Vikberg, Tommy
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Energy mapping in the sawmill industry with focus on drying kilns2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The forest industry stands for approximately 11 % of Sweden’s total export. However, the forest industry is energy intensive. In 2008, sawmill industry alone consumed almost 8,7 TWh of energy, corresponding to 5 % of the Swedish industries total energy consumption. Out of their total consumption, 2200 GWh was electric power, 194 GWh heating oil , 4229 GWh bio-fuel, 574 GWh district heating, and other fuels such as diesel 1503 GWh [1].The project ”EESI- Energy Efficiency in the Sawmill Industry” was started in the spring of 2010 with the aim of demonstrating the possibilities to reduce the energy consumption in the sawmill industry with 20 % by 2020. 16 sawmill corporations and 14 equipment suppliers has joined the project which is carried out in two phases of which the first phase was carried out during 2010 and 2011. EESI has now reached half time and the first energy-saving implementations have been completed at the participating sawmills.This paper presents the energy-mapping, measurements and modelling performed by the participating sawmills during the first phase of the project [2, 3]. The average energy consumption per sawn cubic metre of boards varied between approximately 300 to 500 kWh/m3. Out of this, the electricity consumption was on average 85 kWh/m3, bio-fuel 290 kWh/m3 and diesel 1.8 l/m3.However, the main concern from sawmills regarding energy consumption was the wood drying process. The striking results from the preliminary measurements were the large variation in energy consumption even with similar drying kilns. This was especially apparent for the heat consumption in kiln dryers which could vary as much as 50 % for the same dimension of spruce planks.The results from the first phase of the project resulted in a large number of actions in order to reduce the energy consumption which are now being implemented or have already been completed. Examples of those actions are: simplified management system adapted to sawmills, weighing of packages for more accurate wood drying, reduced speed or intermittent operation of the air circulating fans in batch kilns and moisture content measurements of bio-fuel.References[1] Statistiska centralbyrån (SCB), 2013, Industrins årliga energianvändning 2011, Slutliga uppgifter, EN23SM1301, ISSN 1654-367X. (In Swedish). [2] Andersson, J-E., Lycken, A., Nordman, R., Olsson, M., Räftegård, O., and Wamming, T. State of the art – Energianvändning i den svenska sågverksindustrin. SP Rapport 2011:42, ISBN 978-91-86622-72-5. (In Swedish).[3] Andersson, J-E., Räftegård, O., Lycken, A., Olsson, M., Wamming, T., and Nordman, R. Sammanställning av energimätningar från EESI fas 1. SP Rapport 2011:41, ISBN 978-91-86622-71-8. (In Swedish).

  • 31.
    Arnau, Laurent
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE).
    Techno-Economic Feasibility Study for the Production of Microalgae Based Plant Biostimulant2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Microalgae are considered as a potential feedstock for many promising applications. Some active substances in microalgae have plant biostimulation effects potentially useful in agriculture. However, to produce such a microalgal biomass, specific microalgae cultivation and post-treatment processes must be designed to preserve active substances. A particular focus is provided on cultivation (tubular photobioreactor) and different plausible post-treatment scenarios for microalgae separation (flocculation and centrifugation) and preservation (sterilization and drying). For each step, yield and energy consumption are modeled using data taken from literature or lab and pilot scale experiments. Industrial equipment for scale-up process is also studied by comparing existing systems. These models enable to make an economic evaluation of the whole process and to study its profitability for each scenario. The breakeven price is calculated as a function of the production rate. Several parameters are suggested to improve system efficiency and profitability at the end of this study. However, a better microalgae characterization and more experiments on potential post-treatment systems are required to improve the accuracy of the model.

  • 32.
    Bajraktari, Agron
    et al.
    Prishtina University, Faculty of Technical Applied Sciences.
    Korkut, Süleyman
    Duzce University, Faculty of Forestry, Department of Forest Industrial Engineering.
    Elustondo, Diego
    Duzce University, Faculty of Forestry, Department of Forest Industrial Engineering.
    Cukaj, Kushtrim
    Prishtina University, Faculty of Technical Applied Sciences.
    Thac, Bashkim
    Prishtina University, Faculty of Technical Applied Sciences.
    Weathering protection for beech wood in Kosovo2013In: International Journal of Current Engineering and Technology, ISSN 2277-4106, Vol. 3, no 2, 331-333 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Beech wood (Fagus sylvatica L.) is one of the most important timber species produced in Kosovo. About 33% of the trees in our country are beech and most of the wood products are from this kind of timber. The color difference between red heart wood and white wood of the beech is significant. Adequate protection against weathering (snow, rain and low temperature) and leaching of preservative components into the environment are the main problems faced by wood companies in Kosovo as coatings defects may become apparent after only one year of outside exposure. The aim of this study was to assess the best way to protect beech wood products from weathering with available types of commercial wood coatings: film forming, non film forming, transparent stain and semi transparent penetrating stain. We concluded that the film forming and semitransparent penetrating stain are the best painting methods for beech woodproducts protection, according to weathering performance and coating properties.

  • 33.
    Bekin, Seda
    et al.
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Istanbul University.
    Sarmad, Shokat
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Istanbul University.
    Gürkan, Koray
    Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Istanbul University.
    Keçeli, Gönül
    Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Istanbul University.
    Gürdağ, Gülten
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Istanbul University.
    Synthesis, characterization and bending behavior of electroresponsive sodium alginate / poly (acrylic acid) interpenetrating network films in an electric stimulus2014In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 202, 878-892 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Bekin, Seda
    et al.
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Istanbul University.
    Sarmad, Shokat
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Istanbul University.
    Gürkan, Koray
    Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Istanbul University.
    Yenici, Gökcen
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Istanbul University, Avcilar.
    Keceli, Gönül
    Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Istanbul University.
    Gürdag, Gülten
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Istanbul University.
    Dielectric, thermal, and swelling properties of calcium ion crosslinked sodium alginate film2014In: Polymer Engineering and Science, ISSN 0032-3888, E-ISSN 1548-2634, Vol. 54, no 6, 1372-1382 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Berglund, Linn
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Anugwom, Ikenna
    Technical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Chemical-Biological Centre, Umeå University .
    Hedenström, Mattias
    Technical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Chemical-Biological Centre, Umeå University .
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka
    Technical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Chemical-Biological Centre, Umeå University.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Fibre and Particle Engineering, University of Oulu.
    Switchable ionic liquids enable efficient nanofibrillation of wood pulp2017In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 24, no 8, 3265-3279 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Use of switchable ionic liquid (SIL) pulp offers an efficient and greener technology to produce nanofibers via ultrafine grinding. In this study, we demonstrate that SIL pulp opens up a mechanically efficient route to the nanofibrillation of wood pulp, thus providing both a low cost and chemically benign route to the production of cellulose nanofibers. The degree of fibrillation during the process was evaluated by viscosity and optical microscopy of SIL treated, bleached SIL treated and a reference pulp. Furthermore, films were prepared from the fibrillated material for characterization and tensile testing. It was observed that substantially improved mechanical properties were attained as a result of the grinding process, thus signifying nanofibrillation. Both SIL treated and bleached SIL treated pulps were fibrillated into nanofibers with fiber diameters below 15 nm thus forming networks of hydrophilic nature with an intact crystalline structure. Notably, it was found that the SIL pulp could be fibrillated more efficiently than traditional pulp since nanofibers could be produced with more than 30% less energy when compared to the reference pulp. Additionally, bleaching reduced the energy demand by further 16%. The study demonstrated that this switchable ionic liquid treatment has considerable potential in the commercial production of nanofibers due to the increased efficiency in fibrillation.

  • 36.
    Berglund, Linn
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Noël, Maxime
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Öman, Tommy
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Production potential of cellulose nanofibers from industrial residues: Efficiency and nanofiber characteristics2016In: Industrial crops and products (Print), ISSN 0926-6690, E-ISSN 1872-633X, Vol. 92, 84-92 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the production potential of cellulose nanofibers from two different industrial bio-residues: wastes from the juice industry (carrot) and the beer brewing process (BSG). The mechanical separation of the cellulose nanofibers was by ultrafine grinding. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the materials were mechanically isolated without significantly affecting their crystallinity. The carrot residue was more easily bleached and consumed less energy during grinding, using only 0.9 kWh/kg compared to 21 kWh/kg for the BSG. The carrot residue also had a 10% higher yield than the BSG. Moreover, the dried nanofiber networks showed high mechanical properties, with an average modulus and strength of 12.9 GPa and 210 MPa, respectively, thus indicating a homogeneous nanosize distribution. The study showed that carrot residue has great potential for the industrial production of cellulose nanofibers due to its high quality, processing efficiency, and low raw material cost

  • 37. Bessani, A.
    et al.
    Brandt, J.
    Bux, M.
    Cogo, V.
    Dimitrova, L.
    Dowling, Jim
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Gholami, Ali
    KTH.
    Hakimzadeh, Kamal
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Hummel, M.
    Ismail, Mahmoud
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Laure, Erwin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for High Performance Computing, PDC. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Leser, U.
    Litton, J. -E
    Martinez, R.
    Niazi, Salman
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Reichel, J.
    Zimmermann, K.
    BiobankCloud: A platform for the secure storage, sharing, and processing of large biomedical data sets2016In: 1st International Workshop on Data Management and Analytics for Medicine and Healthcare, DMAH 2015 and Workshop on Big-Graphs Online Querying, Big-O(Q) 2015 held in conjunction with 41st International Conference on Very Large Data Bases, VLDB 2015, Springer, 2016, 89-105 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biobanks store and catalog human biological material that is increasingly being digitized using next-generation sequencing (NGS). There is, however, a computational bottleneck, as existing software systems are not scalable and secure enough to store and process the incoming wave of genomic data from NGS machines. In the BiobankCloud project, we are building a Hadoop-based platform for the secure storage, sharing, and parallel processing of genomic data. We extended Hadoop to include support for multi-tenant studies, reduced storage requirements with erasure coding, and added support for extensible and consistent metadata. On top of Hadoop, we built a scalable scientific workflow engine featuring a proper workflow definition language focusing on simple integration and chaining of existing tools, adaptive scheduling on Apache Yarn, and support for iterative dataflows. Our platform also supports the secure sharing of data across different, distributed Hadoop clusters. The software is easily installed and comes with a user-friendly web interface for running, managing, and accessing data sets behind a secure 2-factor authentication. Initial tests have shown that the engine scales well to dozens of nodes. The entire system is open-source and includes pre-defined workflows for popular tasks in biomedical data analysis, such as variant identification, differential transcriptome analysis using RNA-Seq, and analysis of miRNA-Seq and ChIP-Seq data.

  • 38.
    Bismarck, Alexander
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Bionanocomposites: Processing Methods, Characterization, and Properties2014In: Handbook of Green Materials: Processing Technologies, Properties and Applications, Singapore: World Scientific and Engineering Academy and Society, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 39. Björn, Lars Olof
    et al.
    Bengtson, Sven-Axel
    Shaoshan, Li
    Hecker, Christoph
    Ullah, Saleem
    Roos, Arne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Nilsson, Annica M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Thermal emissivity of avian eggshells2016In: Journal of Thermal Biology, ISSN 0306-4565, E-ISSN 1879-0992, Vol. 57, 1-5 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hypothesis has been tested that evolution has resulted in lower thermal emissivity of eggs of birds breeding openly in cold climates than of eggs of birds that nest under protective covering or in warmer climates. Directional thermal emissivity has been estimated from directional-hemispherical reflectance spectra. Due to several methodological difficulties the absolute emissivity is not accurately determined, but differences between species are obvious. Most notably, small waders of the genus Calidris, breeding in cold climates on the tundra, and in most cases with uniparental nest attendance, have low directional emissivity of their eggshells, about 0.92 when integration is carried out for wavelengths up to 16 mu m. Species belonging to Galloanserinae have the highest directional emissivity, about 0.96, of their eggs. No differences due to climate or breeding conditions were found within this group. Eggs of most other birds tested possess intermediate emissivity, but the values for Pica pica and Corvus corone cornix are as low as for Calidris. Large species-dependent differences in spectral reflectance were found at specific wavelengths. For instance, at 4.259 mu m the directional-hemispherical reflectance for galliforms range from 0.05 to 0.09, while for Fratercula arctica and Fulmarus glacialis it is about 0.3. The reflection peaks at 6.5 and 11.3 mu m due to calcite are differentially attenuated in different species. In conclusion, the hypothesis that evolution has resulted in lower thermal emissivity of bird eggs being exposed in cold climates is not supported by our results. The emissivity is not clearly related to nesting habits or climate, and it is unlikely that the small differences observed are ecologically important. The spectral differences between eggs that nevertheless exist should be taken into account when using infrared thermometers for estimating the surface temperature of avian eggs.

  • 40.
    Bondeson, Daniel
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim.
    Mathew, Aji P.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim.
    Optimization of the Isolation of Nanocrystals from Microcrystalline Cellulose by Acid Hydrolysis2006In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 13, no 2, 171-180 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this work was to find a rapid, high-yield process to obtain an aqueous stable colloid suspension of cellulose nanocrystals/whiskers. Large quantities are required since these whiskers are designed to be extruded into polymers in the production of nano-biocomposites. Microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), derived from Norway spruce (Picea abies), was used as the starting material. The processing parameters have been optimized by using response surface methodology. The factors that varied during the process were the concentration of MCC and sulfuric acid, the hydrolysis time and temperature, and the ultrasonic treatment time. Responses measured were the median size of the cellulose particles/whiskers and yield. The surface charge as calculated from conductometric titration, microscopic examinations (optical and transmission electron microscopy), and observation of birefringence were also investigated in order to determine the outcome (efficiency) of the process. With a sulfuric acid concentration of 63.5% (w/w), it was possible to obtain cellulose nanocrystals/whiskers with a length between 200 and 400 nm and a width less than 10 nm in approximately 2 h with a yield of 30% (of initial weight).

  • 41.
    Bozic, Mojca
    et al.
    Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Institute for Engineering Materials and Design, University of Maribor.
    Liu, Peng
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Mathew, Aji P.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Kokol, Vanja
    Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Institute for Engineering Materials and Design, University of Maribor.
    Enzymatic phosphorylation of cellulose nanofibers to new highly-ions adsorbing, flame-retardant and hydroxyapatite-growth induced natural nanoparticles2014In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 21, no 4, 2713-2726 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study confirms the enzyme-mediated phosphorylation of cellulose nanofibers (CNF) by using hexokinase and adenosine-5’-triphosphate (ATP) in the presence of Mg-ions, resulting in a phosphate group’s creation predominantly at C-6-O positioned hydroxyl groups of cellulose monomer rings. A proof-of-concept is provided using 12C CPMAS, 31P MAS NMR, ATR-FTIR and XPS analyzing methods. The degree of substitution is determined for the first time by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy being in a correlation with XPS and potentiometric titration results. From the thermal degradation measurements using TGA, the C-6-O phosphorylation was found to noticeably prevent the CNF derivatives from weight loss in the pyrolysis process, thus, providing them flame-resistance functionality. Furthermore, phosphorylation significantly enhanced adsorption capacity of Fe3+ ions making them interesting for fabrication of biobased filters and membranes. Finally, the biomimetic growth of Ca-P crystals (hydroxyapatite) in simulated body fluid was characterized by SEM and showing further practicability for biomedical materials.

  • 42.
    Butylina, Svetlana
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Geng, Shiyu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Properties of as-prepared and freeze-dried hydrogels made from poly(vinyl alcohol) and cellulose nanocrystals using freeze-thaw technique2016In: European Polymer Journal, ISSN 0014-3057, E-ISSN 1873-1945, Vol. 81, 386-396 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA hydrogels are potential materials for biomedical and biotechnogical applications. However, their low mechanical properties restrict their use. In this study, the effect of PVA concentration, addition of nanocrystalline cellulose, CNC, number of freeze-thaw cycles and freeze-drying stage on properties of resulting hydrogels were investigated. The results showed that increase in PVA concentration and the addition of CNC improved the compressive properties of the hydrogels. Overall, increase in number of freeze-thaw cycles from 3 to 5 did not show any improvements in properties of hydrogels. Concentration of PVA had great effect on morphology of freeze-dried hydrogels. The CNC reduced crystallinity of PVA/CNC hydrogels as compared to PVA hydrogels. Rehydrated PVA and PVA/CNC hydrogels had higher compressive characteristics than their as-prepared analogues. In general, an improvement of compressive properties of hydrogels was achieved via reduction of their water content. In case of 5% PVA hydrogel, an addition of CNC was found to be beneficial because it increased degree of swelling and water content on rehydration.

  • 43.
    Cai, Bing
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Xia, Wei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Bredenberg, Susanne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Engqvist, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Self-setting bioceramic microscopic protrusions for transdermal drug delivery2014In: Journal of materials chemistry. B, ISSN 2050-750X, E-ISSN 2050-7518, Vol. 2, no 36, 5992-5998 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microneedle (MN) technology offers both an efficient and a minimally invasive transdermal drug delivery strategy. The current MNs, made of silicon and metal, have poor biocompatibility and low drug loading, while the polymer MNs have some constraints related to mechanical strength and storage conditions. In this study, self-setting bioceramics were explored as substitutes for the current MN materials for the first time. Self-setting bioceramic microneedles were fabricated using a master mold by a procedure under mild conditions, which could minimize the drug degradation during fabrication and also facilitates a higher drug loading capability than the other current ceramic microneedles. The drug release and mechanical strength were correlated with the microstructure and porosity of the needles. As observed by SEM and microCT, the ceramic paste could fully fill the geometry of the mould and was cured into an array of micro-sized needles. The drug release study showed that the release rate from this type of MN array could be controlled by the bulk surface area, porosity and resorption rate of the ceramic needles. Applying the MNs to porcine skin indicated that the needles were able to pierce the stratum corneum of the skin. We successfully prepared the bioceramic needles that have high mechanical strength and are resorbable, which can promote safe, efficient and successful transdermal drug delivery.

  • 44.
    Carlsson, Daniel O.
    et al.
    Nanotechnology and Functional Materials, Department of Engineering Sciences, Box 534, Uppsala University, Uppsala University, Department of Engineering Science.
    Lindh, Jonas
    Nanotechnology and Functional Materials, Department of Engineering Sciences, Box 534, Uppsala University.
    Nyholm, Leif
    Uppsala University, Department of Chemistry, Angstrom Lab.
    Mattsson, Maria Stromme
    Uppsala University, Department of Engineering Science.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Cooxidant-free TEMPO-mediated oxidation of highly crystalline nanocellulose in water2014In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 4, no 94, 52289-52298 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Selective oxidation of C6 hydroxyls to carboxyls through 2,2,6,6,-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediated oxidation, where the oxidizing species (TEMPO+) is generated by cooxidants, such as NaBrO, NaClO or NaClO2, has become a popular way to modify the surfaces of nanocellulose fibrils in aqueous solutions. Employing highly crystalline nanocellulose from Cladophora sp. algae we demonstrate that the same degree of oxidation (D.O.) can be achieved within approximately the same time by replacing the cooxidants with electrogeneration of TEMPO+ in a bulk electrolysis setup. The D.O. is controlled by the oxidation time and the maximum D.O. achieved (D.O. 9.8%, 0.60 mmol g-1 of carboxylic acids and 0 mmol g-1 aldehydes) corresponds to complete oxidation of the surface-confined C6. This shows that TEMPO+ is not sterically hindered from completely oxidizing the fibril surface of Cladophora nanocellulose, in contrast to earlier hypotheses that were based on results with wood-derived nanocellulose. The oxidation does not significantly affect the morphology, the specific surface area (>115 m2 g-1) or the pore characteristics of the water-insoluble fibrous particles that were obtained after drying, but depolymerization corresponding to ∼20% was observed. For extensive oxidation times, the product recovery of water-insoluble fibrils decreased significantly while significant amounts of charge passed through the system. This could indicate that the oxidation proceeds beyond the fibril surface, in contrast to the current view that TEMPO-mediated oxidation is confined only to the surface.

  • 45.
    Carlsson, Daniel O.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Department of Engineering Science.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Stromme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Department of Engineering Science.
    Nyholm, Leif
    Uppsala University, Department of Chemistry, Angstrom Lab.
    Tailoring porosities and electrochemical properties of composites composed of microfibrillated cellulose and polypyrrole2014In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 4, no 17, 8489-8497 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Composites of polypyrrole and nanocellulose (PPy/nanocellulose) have a high potential as electrodes in energy-storage devices and as membranes for electrochemically controlled ion-exchange systems. In the present work, it is demonstrated that such composites with 42-72% porosity can be produced by using microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) prepared through enzymatic pretreatment or carboxymethylation, or by using different amounts of MFC in the composite synthesis. Together with previous work, this shows that the porosity of PPy/nanocellulose composites can be tailored from 30 to 98% with increments of similar to 10%. Employing the full porosity range of the composites, it is demonstrated that the electrochemical oxidation rate of the materials depends on their porosity due to limitations in the counter ion diffusion process. By tailoring the porosities of PPy/nanocellulose composites, the electrochemical properties can consequently be controlled. The latter provides new possibilities for the manufacturing of electrochemically controlled ion-extraction

  • 46. Carville, N. Craig
    et al.
    Neumayer, Sabine M.
    Manzo, Michele
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Gallo, Katia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Quantum Electronics and Quantum Optics, QEO.
    Rodriguez, Brian J.
    Biocompatible Gold Nanoparticle Arrays Photodeposited on Periodically Proton Exchanged Lithium Niobate2016In: ACS BIOMATERIALS SCIENCE & ENGINEERING, ISSN 2373-9878, Vol. 2, no 8, 1351-1356 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photodeposition of silver nanoparticles onto chemically patterned lithium niobate having alternating lithium niobate and proton exchanged regions has been previously investigated. Here, the spatially defined photodeposition of gold nanoparticles onto periodically proton exchanged lithium niobate is demonstrated. It is shown that the location where the gold nanoparticles form can be tailored by altering the concentration of HAuCl4. This enables the possibility to sequentially deposit gold and silver in different locations to create bimetallic arrays. The cytocompatibility of photodeposited gold, silver, and bimetallic ferroelectric templates to osteoblast-like cells is also investigated. Gold samples provide significantly greater cell biocompatibility than silver samples. These results highlight a potential route for using photodeposited gold on lithium niobate as a template for applications in cellular biosensing.

  • 47.
    Celma, Gunta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Biology Education Centre.
    Nanocellulose hydrogels for topical wound-care applications: a study on human skin interactions2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    The full text will be freely available from 2018-06-20 15:10
  • 48.
    Chen, Song
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Grandfield, Kathryn
    McMaster University.
    Yu, Shun
    KTH.
    Engqvist, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Xia, Wei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Synthesis of calcium phosphate crystals with thin nacreous structure2016In: CrystEngComm, ISSN 1466-8033, E-ISSN 1466-8033, Vol. 18, no 6, 1064-1069 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nacre-like structures have attracted great interest in recent years due to their outstanding toughness, stiffness and impact resistance. However, there is a challenge associated with engineering nacre-like calcium phosphate crystals. In this study, thin nacreous-like monetite sheets were synthesized in solutions guided by a surfactant. The influence of temperature, initial pH, Ca/P ratio, stirring time and the concentration of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) on the nacre-like structure has been studied. Findings showed that a nacre-like structure could only be formed at a high temperature (90 degrees C), high initial pH (11), sufficient stirring time (3 h), and under the presence of CTAB. A small-angle X-ray scattering experiment carried out at a synchrotron radiation facility showed that the distance between nanolayers was around 2.6 nm and TEM confirmed the fine sheet-like structure. The mechanism of the formation the nacre-like structure and its characterization were discussed.

  • 49.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Syverud, Kristin
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Pretreatment-dependent surface chemistry of wood nanocellulose for pH-sensitive hydrogels2014In: Journal of biomaterials applications, ISSN 0885-3282, E-ISSN 1530-8022, Vol. 3, no 29, 423-432 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Chudinova, Ekaterina
    et al.
    Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia.
    Surmeneva, Maria
    Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia.
    Koptioug, Andrei
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Skoglund, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Surmenev, Roman
    Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia.
    Additive manufactured Ti6Al4V scaffolds with the RF-magnetron sputter deposited hydroxyapatite coating2016In: Journal of Physics: Conference Series, Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP), 2016, Vol. 669, 012004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Present paper reports on the results of surface modification of the additively manufactured porous Ti6Al4V scaffolds. Radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering was used to modify the surface of the alloy via deposition of the biocompatible hydroxyapatite (HA) coating. The surface morphology, chemical and phase composition of the HA-coated alloy were studied. It was revealed that RF magnetron sputtering allows preparing a homogeneous HA coating onto the entire surface of scaffolds.

1234567 1 - 50 of 337
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf