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  • 1. Abbaszadeh, A
    et al.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Effect of extraction conditions on yield and purity of citrus pectin by sulfuric and hydrochloric acids2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2. Abedinifar, Sorahi
    et al.
    Karimi, Keikhosro
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Khanahmadi, Morteza
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Ethanol production by Mucor indicus and Rhizapus oryzae from rice straw by separate hydrolysis and fermentation2009In: Biomass and Bioenergy, ISSN 0961-9534, E-ISSN 1873-2909, Vol. 33, no 5, 828-833 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rice straw was successfully converted to ethanol by separate enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation by Mucor indicus, Rhizopus oryzae, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The hydrolysis temperature and pH of commercial cellulase and beta-glucosidase enzymes were first investigated and their best performance obtained at 45 degrees C and pH 5.0. The pretreatment of the straw with dilute-acid hydrolysis resulted in 0.72 g g (1) sugar yield during 48 h enzymatic hydrolysis, which was higher than steam-pretreated (0.60 g g (1)) and untreated straw (0.46 g g(-1)). Furthermore, increasing the concentration of the dilute-acid pretreated straw from 20 to 50 and 100 g L-1 resulted in 13% and 16% lower sugar yield, respectively. Anaerobic cultivation of the hydrolyzates with M. indicus resulted in 0.36-0.43 g g(-1) ethanol, 0.11-0.17 g g(-1) biomass, and 0.04-0.06 g g(-1) glycerol, which is comparable with the corresponding yields by S. cerevisiae (0.37-0.45 g g(-1) ethanol, 0.04-0.10 g g(-1) biomass and 0.05-0.07 glycerol). These two fungi produced no other major metabolite from the straw and completed the cultivation in less than 25 h. However, R. oryzae produced lactic acid as the major by-product with yield of 0.05-0.09 g g(-1). This fungus had ethanol, biomass and glycerol yields of 0.33-0.41, 0.06-0.12, and 0.03-0.04 g g(-1), respectively. Crown Copyright (C) 2009 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Abrahamsson, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change.
    Improving methane production using hydrodynamic cavitation as pre-treatment2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    To develop anaerobic digestion (AD), innovative solutions to increase methane yields in existing AD processes are needed. In particular, the adoption of low energy pre-treatments to enhance biomass biodegradability is needed to provide efficient digestion processes increasing profitability. To obtain these features, hydrodynamic cavitation has been evaluated as an innovative solutions for AD of waste activated sludge (WAS), food waste (FW), macro algae and grass, in comparison with steam explosion (high energy pre-treatment). The effect of these two pre-treatments on the substrates, e.g. particle size distribution, soluble chemical oxygen demand (sCOD), biochemical methane potential (BMP) and biodegradability rate, have been evaluated. After two minutes of hydrodynamic cavitation (8 bar), the mean fine particle size decreased from 489- 1344 nm to 277- 381 nm (≤77% reduction) depending of the biomasses. Similar impacts were observed after ten minutes of steam explosion (210 °C, 30 bar) with a reduction in particle size between 40% and 70% for all the substrates treated.  In terms of BMP value, hydrodynamic cavitation caused significant increment only within the A. nodosum showing a post treatment increment of 44% compared to the untreated value, while similar values were obtained before and after treatment within the other tested substrates. In contrast, steam explosion allowed an increment for all treated samples, A. nodosum (+86%), grass (14%) and S. latissima (4%). However, greater impacts where observed with hydrodynamic cavitation than steam explosion when comparing the kinetic constant K. Overall, hydrodynamic cavitation appeared an efficient pre-treatment for AD capable to compete with the traditional steam explosion in terms om kinetics and providing a more efficient energy balance (+14%) as well as methane yield for A. nodosum.

  • 4. Abtahi, Zhohreh
    et al.
    Millati, Ria
    Niklasson, Claes
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Ethanol production by Mucor indicus at high glucose and ethanol concentrations2010In: Minerva biotecnologica (Testo stampato), ISSN 1120-4826, E-ISSN 1827-160X, Vol. 22, no 3-4, 83-89 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mucor indicus was cultivated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions to study its tolerance against high concentration of glucose up to 350 g/L and ethanol up to 120 g/L present in the medium. The fungus could grow well even in 350 g/L glucose and produce ethanol, but it was able to assimilate the entire glucose when its concentration was less than 200 g/L. On the other hand, M. indicus produced ethanol as the main product with yield and concentration up to 0.45 g/g and 73 g/L, respectively, while glycerol, its only major byproduct, was produced up to 24 g/L. However, the fungus was not so tolerant against exogenously added ethanol, and it could not grow with more than 40 g/L added ethanol to the culture. Under aerobic conditions, M. indicus displayed different morphology, switching from long filamentous to yeast-like growth forms by increasing initial glucose concentration. This implies that yeast-like growth can be induced by growing M. indicus at high glucose concentration. Under anaerobic conditions, only one yeast-like form was observed.

  • 5.
    Acevedo Gomez, Yasna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Lagergren, Carina
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Reformate from biogas used as fuel in a PEM fuel cell2013In: EFC 2013 - Proceedings of the 5th European Fuel Cell Piero Lunghi Conference, 2013, 163-164 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The performance of a PEM fuel cell can be easily degraded by introducing impurities in the fuel gas. Since reformate of biogas from olive mill wastes will contain at least one third of carbon dioxide, its influence was studied on a PtRu catalyst. A clean reformate gas for the anode (67% H2 and 33% CO2) without any traces of other compounds was used and electrochemical measurements showed that the performance of the fuel cell was hardly affected. However, diluting the hydrogen with higher amounts of CO2 will reduce the performance remarkably.

  • 6.
    Adekunle, Kayode
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Ketzscher, Richard
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    High performance natural fibre hybrid composites based on biobased thermoset resins for use in technical applications2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Health related issues, stringent environmental protection policies, search for cost effective and alternative materials and quest for renewability, sustainability and high performance materials for technical applications has led to an intense research in manufacturing biobased composites which are based on renewable thermosetting resins and natural fibres. The combination of biobased thermosetting resins with two different natural fibre reinforcements could lead to improved mechanical properties of the composite. Biobased thermoset polymers are comparable to the synthetic thermosetting polymers from petrochemicals. In this study, two different biobased resins were used as matrix and both non woven flax fibre and woven flax fabric were combined as reinforcements. The composites were made by compression moulding process. The fibres were hand laid-up and impregnation was done manually. The curing temperature was 170°С and at 40 bar. The stacking sequence of the fibres was in different orientations such as 0º, +45º and 90º. The manufactured hybrid composites have high tensile strength and stiffness and the flexural strength and modulus was also high. These composites can compete favourably with glass fibre reinforced composites in terms of strength and stiffness.1, 2 A tensile strength of about 119 MPa and Young’s modulus of 13.8 GPa was achieved, while the flexural strength and modulus is about 201 MPa and 24 GPa respectively. For the purpose of comparison, composites were made with the combination of woven fabric and e-glass fibre. One ply of an e-glass fibre mat was put in the mid-plane and this increased the tensile strength considerably up to 168 MPa. Some of the composites were made with the resin blended with styrene and the results show a higher modulus.

  • 7.
    Adekunle, Kayode
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Åkesson, Dan
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Synthesis of reactive soybean oils for use as a biobased thermoset resins in structural natural fiber composites2009In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 115, no 6, 3137-3145 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biobased thermosets resins were synthesized by functionalizing the triglycerides of epoxidized soybean oil with methacrylic acid, acetyl anhydride, and methacrylic anhydride. The obtained resins were characterized with FTIR, 1H-NMR, and 13C-NMR spectroscopy to confirm the functionalization reactions and the extent of epoxy conversion. The viscosities of the methacrylated soybean oil resins were also measured for the purpose of being used as a matrix in composite applications. The cross-linking capability was estimated by UV and thermally initiated curing experiments, and by DSC analysis regarding the degree of crosslinking. The modifications were successful because up to 97% conversion of epoxy group were achieved leaving only 2.2% of unreacted epoxy groups, which was confirmed by 1H-NMR. The 13C-NMR confirms the ratio of acetate to methacrylate methyl group to be 1 : 1. The viscosities of the methacrylated soybean oil (MSO) and methacrylic anhydride modified soybean oil (MMSO) were 0.2 and 0.48 Pas, respectively, which indicates that they can be used in resin transfer molding process.

  • 8.
    Agarwal, Parminder
    et al.
    Michigan State University.
    Berglund, Kris
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Effect of polymeric additives on calcium carbonate crystallization as monitored by nephelometry2004In: Crystal Growth & Design, ISSN 1528-7483, E-ISSN 1528-7505, Vol. 4, no 3, 479-483 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of polymaleimide polymers on calcium carbonate crystallization was studied using nephelometry. Induction time and percent growth inhibition were determined for polymeric additives from the nephelometric data. The polymaleimide synthesized by KOH-initiated polymerization exhibited the greatest growth inhibition and longest nucleation time among the polymers investigated. Raman spectroscopy was used to determine the calcium carbonate polymorph formed in the presence of these polymeric additives.

  • 9.
    Agarwal, Parminder
    et al.
    Michigan State University.
    Berglund, Kris
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    In situ monitoring of calcium carbonate polymorphs during batch crystallization in the presence of polymeric additives using Raman spectroscopy2003In: Crystal Growth & Design, ISSN 1528-7483, E-ISSN 1528-7505, Vol. 3, no 6, 941-946 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polycarboxylic acids are well-known to affect calcium carbonate crystallization. Agarwal et al. (Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 2003, in press) reported previously the synthesis of polymaleimide by a variety of techniques and initiators. In the present work, the effect of these polymers on calcium carbonate crystallization was studied by a variety of techniques. Crystallization experiments were carried out in a 1-L LABMAX automated batch reactor, and the concentration of calcium in solution was determined in real time. Raman spectroscopy was used to determine the relative amount of various calcium carbonate polymorphs as the crystallization occurred. However, Raman spectroscopy is a scattering technique, which may make it surface selective, and therefore results from solids may not be representative of bulk of sample. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to compare the results obtained by Raman spectroscopy. Peak intensity ratios were used for both Raman spectroscopy and XRD for calibration and measurement purposes. The results obtained by these two techniques for final percent vaterite for calcium carbonate crystallization in the presence of polymeric additives were in agreement within 2%. Therefore, use of Raman spectroscopy for in situ measurement of polymorph composition during calcium carbonate crystallization appears accurate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) data were useful in understanding the crystal morphology and to determine crystal size.

  • 10.
    Agarwal, Parminder
    et al.
    Michigan State University.
    Yu, Qiuyue
    Michigan State University.
    Harant, Adam
    Michigan State University.
    Berglund, Kris
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Synthesis and characterization of polymaleimide2003In: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, ISSN 0888-5885, E-ISSN 1520-5045, Vol. 42, no 13, 2881-2884 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simplified syntheses of polymaleimide employing anionic polymerization (from the melt and from solution) and metal compound-alcohol initiators such as PbO, SnO, tin bis(2-ethyl hexanoate) in the presence of tert-butyl benzyl alcohol are presented. The resulting polymers contain a combination of C-N- and C-C-connected monomers. Preliminary structures of the polymers were determined using NMR spectroscopy. The ratio of C-N- and C-C-connected monomers was determined, and the percentage of C-N-connected monomer units was found to vary from 40 to 80%, with the higher percentage resulting from anionic polymerization. The molecular weights of the polymers, as determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) with aqueous mobile phase and sodium polyacrylates standards, ranged between 1100 and 4200 for anionic polymerization and were about 11 500 for metal oxide-alcohol initiated polymerization. Solution-phase properties of the polymaleimides were evaluated by calcium chelation and precipitation inhibition studies. On the basis of the measured properties of these polymers, they are proposed as biodegradable, low-impact detergent additives to substitute currently used compounds.

  • 11.
    Agaton, Charlotta
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Falk, Ronny
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Selective enrichment of monospecific polyclonal antibodies for antibody-based proteomics efforts2004In: Journal of Chromatography A, ISSN 0021-9673, E-ISSN 1873-3778, Vol. 1043, 33-40 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A high stringency protocol, suitable for systematic purification of polyclonal antibodies, is described. The procedure is designed to allow the generation of target protein-specific antibodies suitable for functional annotation of proteins. Antibodies were generated by immunization with recombinantly produced affinity-tagged target proteins. To obtain stringent recovery of the antibodies, a two-step affinity chromatography principle was devised to first deplete the affinity tag-specific antibodies followed by a second step for affinity capture of the target protein-specific antibodies. An analytical dot-blot array system was developed to analyze the cross-reactivity of the affinity-purified antibodies. The results suggest that the protocol can be used in a highly parallel and automated manner to generate mono-specific polyclonal antibodies for large-scale, antibody-based proteomics efforts, i.e. affinity proteomics.

  • 12.
    Agaton, Charlotta
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Unneberg, Per
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Sievertzon, Maria
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Holmberg, Anders
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Ehn, Maria
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Larsson, Magnus
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Odeberg, Jacob
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Gene expression analysis by signature pyrosequencing2002In: Gene, ISSN 0378-1119, E-ISSN 1879-0038, Vol. 289, no 1-2, 31-39 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     We describe a novel method for transcript profiling based on high-throughput parallel sequencing of signature tags using a non-gel-based microtiter plate format. The method relies on the identification of cDNA clones by pyrosequencing of the region corresponding to the 3'-end of the mRNA preceding the poly(A) tail. Simultaneously, the method can be used for gene discovery, since tags corresponding to unknown genes can be further characterized by extended sequencing. The protocol was validated using a model system for human atherosclerosis. Two 3'-tagged cDNA libraries, representing macrophages and foam cells, which are key components in the development of atherosclerotic plaques, were constructed using a solid phase approach. The libraries were analyzed by pyrosequencing, giving on average 25 bases. As a control, conventional expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing using slab gel electrophoresis was performed. Homology searches were used to identify the genes corresponding to each tag. Comparisons with EST sequencing showed identical, unique matches in the majority of cases when the pyrosignature was at least 18 bases. A visualization tool was developed to facilitate differential analysis using a virtual chip format. The analysis resulted in identification of genes with possible relevance for development of atherosclerosis. The use of the method for automated massive parallel signature sequencing is discussed.

  • 13. Agerberth, B
    et al.
    Gunne, H
    Odeberg, Jacob
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Kogner, P
    Boman, H G
    Gudmundsson, G H
    FALL-39, a putative human peptide antibiotic, is cysteine-free and expressed in bone marrow and testis.1995In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 92, no 1, 195-9 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PR-39, a proline/arginine-rich peptide antibiotic, has been purified from pig intestine and later shown to originate in the bone marrow. Intending to isolate a clone for a human counterpart to PR-39, we synthesized a PCR probe derived from the PR-39 gene. However, when this probe was used to screen a human bone marrow cDNA library, eight clones were obtained with information for another putative human peptide antibiotic, designated FALL-39 after the first four residues. FALL-39 is a 39-residue peptide lacking cysteine and tryptophan. All human peptide antibiotics previously isolated (or predicted) belong to the defensin family and contain three disulfide bridges. The clone for prepro-FALL-39 encodes a cathelin-like precursor protein with 170 amino acid residues. We have postulated a dibasic processing site for the mature FALL-39 and chemically synthesized the putative peptide. In basal medium E, synthetic FALL-39 was highly active against Escherichia coli and Bacillus megaterium. Residues 13-34 in FALL-39 can be predicted to form a perfect amphiphatic helix, and CD spectra showed that medium E induced 30% helix formation in FALL-39. RNA blot analyses disclosed that the gene for FALL-39 is expressed mainly in human bone marrow and testis.

  • 14.
    Agnhage, Tove
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Nierstrasz, Vincent
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Perwuelz, A.
    Guan, J.P.
    Chen, G.Q.
    Eco-design innovative methods for fabric finishing2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Ahlström, Peter
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Gebäck, Tobias
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Johansson, Erik
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Bolton, Kim
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Water absorption in polymers2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work two different examples of water absorbtion in polymers are studied by Monte Carlo simulations. Both of them are of large technical and commercial impotance. The first example is the water absorption in polyethylene cables where the water absorption plays a crucial role in the degradation of the cable insulation and thus should be as low as possible. The second example is bio-based superabsorbents made from denatured protein where water absorption capability is the prime desired property. Methods Gibbs Ensemble Monte Carlo simulations [1] were used to study the hydration of polymers. All simulations are performed with two boxes, one of which is filled with water at the start of the simulation, whereas the other contains polymer molecules and possible ions. The polymer molecules are not allowed to swap boxes whereas the water molecules are allowed to do so thus constituting an osmotic Gibbs ensemble [2]. For the polyethylene a connectivity-altering algorithm was used whereas the protein molecules were simulated using a side-chain regrowth model in addition to traditional Monte Carlo moves. For the polyethylene, the TraPPE [3] force field was used and the protein molecules, the Amber force field [4] was used. Water was modelled using simple point charge models [5]. Electrostatic interactions are treated using Ewald summation methods. The protein molecules were of different amino acid compositions and in different conformations, e.g., β-turns and random coils obtained using the amorphous cell method[6]. Studies were made with different degrees of charging on, e.g., lysine side chains mimicking different ionization states. Results The studies of polyethylene revealed the importance of ions left from the polymerisation catalyst for the absorbtion of water and the concomitant degradation of polyethylene cable insulation. Also the absorption properties of the protein molecules is strongly related to the presence of charged groups and fully charged protein molecules absorb large amounts of water. However, neither native nor denatured protein molecules show superabsorbing properties (i.e. absorbing hundreds of times their own mass) as they show in experimental studies and the reasons for this discrepancy will be discussed. References 1. A.Z. Panagiotopoulos, Mol. Phys. 61, 813 (1987). 2. E. Johansson, K. Bolton, D.N. Theodorou, P. Ahlström, J. Chem. Phys., 126, 224902 (2007). 3. M.G. Martin, and J.I. Siepmann, J. Phys. Chem. B, 103, 4508-4517 (1999). 4. W.D. Cornell, P. Cieplak, C.I. Bayly, I.R. Gould, K.M. Merz Jr, D.M. Ferguson, D.C. Spellmeyer, T. Fox, J.W. Caldwell, P.A. Kollman (1995). J. Am. Chem. Soc. 117, 5179–5197. 5. H. J. C. Berendsen, J. P. M. Postma and W. F. van Gunsteren, in Intermolecular Forces, B. Pullman, ed. (Reidel, Dordrecht, 1981) p. 331; H. J. C. Berendsen, J. R. Grigera and T. P. Straatsma, J. Phys. Chem. 91, 6269 (1987). 6. D.N. Theodorou, U.W. Suter, Macromolecules, 18, 1467 (1985).

  • 16.
    Ahlén, Gustaf
    et al.
    Recopharma AB.
    Strindelius, Lena
    Recopharma AB.
    Johansson, Tomas
    Recopharma AB.
    Nilsson, Anki
    Rrecopharma AB.
    Chatzissavidou, Nathalie
    Recopharma AB.
    Sjöblom, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Holsgersson, Jan
    Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy.
    Mannosylated mucin-type immunoglobulin fusion proteins enhance antigen-specific antibody and T lymphocyte responses2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Targeting antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APC) improve their immunogenicity and capacity to induce Th1 responses and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). We have generated a mucin-type immunoglobulin fusion protein (PSGL-1/mIgG2b), which upon expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris became multivalently substituted with O-linked oligomannose structures and bound the macrophage mannose receptor (MMR) and dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) with high affinity in vitro. Here, its effects on the humoral and cellular anti-ovalbumin (OVA) responses in C57BL/6 mice are presented.OVA antibody class and subclass responses were determined by ELISA, the generation of anti-OVA CTLs was assessed in 51Cr release assays using in vitro-stimulated immune spleen cells from the different groups of mice as effector cells and OVA peptide-fed RMA-S cells as targets, and evaluation of the type of Th cell response was done by IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-5 ELISpot assays.Immunizations with the OVA − mannosylated PSGL-1/mIgG2b conjugate, especially when combined with the AbISCO®-100 adjuvant, lead to faster, stronger and broader (with regard to IgG subclass) OVA IgG responses, a stronger OVA-specific CTL response and stronger Th1 and Th2 responses than if OVA was used alone or together with AbISCO®-100. Also non-covalent mixing of mannosylated PSGL-1/mIgG2b, OVA and AbISCO®-100 lead to relatively stronger humoral and cellular responses. The O-glycan oligomannoses were necessary because PSGL-1/mIgG2b with mono- and disialyl core 1 structures did not have this effect.Mannosylated mucin-type fusion proteins can be used as versatile APC-targeting molecules for vaccines and as such enhance both humoral and cellular immune responses.

  • 17.
    Ahmadian, Afshin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    AnderssonSvahn, Helene
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Nano Biotechnology (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Massively parallel sequencing platforms using lab on a chip technologies2011In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 11, no 16, 2653-2655 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Ahmed, Sheikh Ali
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Hansson, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Distribution of preservatives in thermally modified Scots pine and Norway spruce sapwood2013In: Wood Science and Technology, ISSN 0043-7719, E-ISSN 1432-5225, Vol. 47, no 3, 499-513 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studying the impregnation and distribution of oil-based preservative in dried wood is complicated as wood is a nonhomogeneous, hygroscopic and porous material, and especially of anisotropic nature. However, this study is important since it has influence on the durability of wood. To enhance the durability of thermally modified wood, a new method for preservative impregnation is introduced, avoiding the need for external pressure or vacuum. This article presents a study on preservative distribution in thermally treated Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) sapwood using computed tomography scanning, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Secondary treatment of thermally modified wood was performed on a laboratory scale by impregnation with two types of preservatives, viz. Elit Träskydd (Beckers) and pine tar (tar), to evaluate their distribution in the wood cells. Preservative solutions were impregnated in the wood using a simple and effective method. Samples were preheated to 170°C in a drying oven and immediately submerged in preservative solutions for simultaneous impregnation and cooling. Tar penetration was found higher than Beckers, and their distribution decreased with increasing sample length. Owing to some anatomical properties, uptake of preservatives was low in spruce. Besides, dry-induced interstitial spaces, which are proven important flow paths for seasoned wood, were not observed in this species.

  • 19.
    Ahmed, Sheikh Ali
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Moisture properties of heat-treated Scots pine and Norway spruce sapwood impregnated with wood preservatives2012In: Wood and Fiber Science, ISSN 0735-6161, Vol. 44, no 1, 85-93 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An experiment was conducted on commercially heat-treated (HT) Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) sapwood collected from Ht Wood AB, Arvidsjaur, Sweden. Secondary treatment on HT wood was performed in laboratory scale by impregnating with water-repellent preservatives (a commercial one and pine tar) to evaluate their retention and different moisture-related properties. Preservative solutions were impregnated using a simple and effective method. Wood samples were heated at 170°C in a dry oven and were immediately immersed in preservative solutions. Considerable retention was observed in HT wood, particularly in pine. Moisture adsorption properties were measured after conditioning in a high-humidity environmental chamber (4°C and 84% RH). Experimental results showed that secondary treatment enhanced moisture excluding efficiencies by decreasing equilibrium moisture content, suggesting better hydrophobicity. Soaking test in water showed that antiswelling and water repellence efficiencies improved, especially in tar-treated wood. In addition, this type of treatment significantly decreased water absorption. It was also possible to decrease volumetric swellings. Thus, secondary treatment of HT wood with preservative, in particular with tar, improved dimensional stability and water repellency.

  • 20.
    Ahmed, Sheikh Ali
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Hagman, Olle
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Cloutier, Alain
    Wood Research Center (CRB), Department of Wood and Forest Sciences, Faculty of Forestry, Geography and Geomatics, Laval University, Quebec.
    Fang, Chang-Hua
    Wood Research Center (CRB), Department of Wood and Forest Sciences, Faculty of Forestry, Geography and Geomatics, Laval University, Quebec.
    Elustondo, Diego
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Anatomical properties and process parameters affecting blister/blow formation in densified European aspen and downy birch sapwood boards by thermo-hygro-mechanical compression2013In: Journal of Materials Science, ISSN 0022-2461, E-ISSN 1573-4803, Vol. 48, no 24, 8571-8579 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Approximately, 13.5 % of the standing volume of productive forest land in Sweden is covered by birch and aspen, which provides the vast potential to produce value-added products such as densified wood. This study shows whether it is possible to densify those species with a thermo-hygro-mechanical (THM) process using heat, steam, and pressure. In this process, transverse compression on thin European aspen (Populus tremula) and downy birch (Betula pubescens) boards was performed at 200 ºC with a maximum steam pressure of 550 kPa. To obtain a theoretical 50 % compression set, the press’s maximum hydraulic pressure ranged from 1.5 to 7.3 MPa. Preliminary tests showed that ~75 % of the birch boards produced defects (blisters/blows) while only 25 % of the aspen boards did. Mainly, radial delamination associated with internal checks in intrawall and transwall fractures caused small cracks (termed blisters) while blows are characterized by relatively larger areas of delamination visible as a bumpy surface on the panel. Anatomical investigations revealed that birch was more prone to those defects than aspen. However, those defects could be minimized by increasing the pre-treatment time during the THM processing.

  • 21.
    Ahmed, Sheikh Ali
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Hansson, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Evaluation of preservative distribution in thermally modified European aspen and birch boards using computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy2013In: Journal of Wood Science, ISSN 1435-0211, E-ISSN 1611-4663, Vol. 59, no 1, 57-66 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this experiment was to impregnate thermally modified wood using an easy and cost-effective method. Industrially processed thermally modified European aspen (Populus tremula L.) and birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh.) were collected and secondarily treated at the laboratory scale with the preservatives tung oil, pine tar and Elit Träskydd (Beckers) using a simple and effective method. Preservative uptake and distribution in sample boards were evaluated using computed tomography (CT) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. Preservative uptake and treatability in terms of void volume filled were found the highest in Beckers and the lowest in tung oil-treated samples. Thermally modified samples had lower treatability than their counterpart control samples. More structural changes after thermal modification, especially in birch, significantly reduced the preservative uptake and distribution. The differences of preservatives uptake near the end grain were high and then decreased near the mid position of the samples length as compared with similar type of wood sample. Non-destructive evaluation by CT scanning provided a very useful method to locate the preservative gradients throughout the sample length. SEM analysis enabled the visualization of the preservative deposits in wood cells at the microstructural level.

  • 22. Ahmed, Sheikh Ali
    et al.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Karlsson, Olov
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Uneven distribution of preservative in kiln-dried sapwood lumber of Scots pine: Impact of wood structure and resin allocation2012In: Holzforschung, ISSN 0018-3830, E-ISSN 1437-434X, Vol. 66, no 2, 251-258 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) sapwood lumber was collected after kiln drying and preservative treatment with Celcure AC 800 (a copper-amine wood preservative). Distribution of the preservative throughout the lumber was visually examined. Not all, but some samples showed specific localized areas without any preservative distribution throughout their entire length. Those samples were assessed further for anatomical properties, specifically in impregnated and unimpregnated areas. Additional study was conducted on the morphological nature and redistribution of lipophilic extractives using three different histochemical staining methods. Intrinsic wood properties – especially the frequency of axial resin canals and the percentage of canals blocked – were found to be responsible for the irregular distribution of the preservative. Furthermore, the inability to create continuous and frequent interstitial spaces due to the collapse of thin-walled ray cells throughout the lumber resulted in uneven distribution of preservatives. Staining techniques were useful to localize places with more or less abundance of extractives (e.g., fats) in impregnated and unimpregnated wood, which varied considerably. Histochemical observations revealed information pertaining to the kiln dry specific distribution and redistribution of extractives between the areas. Moreover, resin reallocation and modification in ray parenchyma and resin canals induced by kiln drying would be another reason for the impregnation anomalies.

  • 23.
    Ahmed, Sheikh Ali
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Development of a new rapid method for mould testing in a climate chamber: Preliminary tests2013In: European Journal of Wood and Wood Products, ISSN 0018-3768, E-ISSN 1436-736X, Vol. 71, no 4, 451-461 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to develop fast, simple and robust solid wood mould testing methods for the use in small-scale laboratory tests. The objective was to investigate mould susceptibility of different wood materials within the batches. The proposed method is based on natural contamination of non-sterile surfaces in climates conducive to mould growth. For this purpose, a climate chamber with regulated temperature and relative humidity was used. The conditioning chamber was divided into upper and lower chamber by a thin layer of stainless steel placed horizontally above the fan to minimise air circulation to the sample in the upper compartment. Mould-infected samples from outdoor tests were used as a source of mould inocula, and test trials were conducted on Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) sapwood. Samples were suspended from the top of the upper chamber, and the chamber was exposed to different temperature and humidity levels. Severe mould infestation was observed after 12-14 days of incubation. Visual mould rating was then performed. Regardless of some constraints, this test method was very simple, fast, and effective. More importantly, unlike other test methods, it closely models mould infestation as it would occur under natural condition.

  • 24.
    Ahmed, Sheikh Ali
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Mould susceptibility of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) sapwood: Impact of drying, thermal modification, and copper-based preservative2013In: International Biodeterioration & Biodegradation, ISSN 0964-8305, E-ISSN 1879-0208, Vol. 85, 284-288 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of mould on wood surfaces depends on several factors. Although mould does not affect the mechanical properties of wood, it greatly reduces the aesthetic value of wood like the sapwood of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), which is very prone to mould. In addition, adverse health effects of mould on humans are also a great concern. Different types of dried and treated wood were used to observe whether they had enhanced durability against mould following an accelerated laboratory test method in a climate chamber. Samples were green, air-dried, industrially thermally-modified, treated with copper-based preservative, and kiln-dried wood, which were tested within a single test run. The test produced the following main results: the thermal modification increased the durability of the wood, and the protective effectiveness of alternative treatments was comparable to that of commercially available copper-based treatment. However, the initial moisture content of the samples during mould exposure had a great influence on the onset of mould growth. The risk of mould susceptibility of industrial kiln-dried lumber can be reduced by drying using the double-layering technique which likely forced the nutrients to deposit near the evaporation surfaces followed by planing off the nutrient enriched edges.

  • 25.
    Ahmed, Sheikh Ali
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Yang, Qian
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Accelerated mold test on dried pine sapwood boards: Impact of contact heat treatment2013In: Journal of wood chemistry and technology, ISSN 0277-3813, E-ISSN 1532-2319, Vol. 33, no 3, 174-187 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We test the hypothesis that the combination of kiln drying of double-stacked boards and contact heat treatment will reduce the susceptibility of treated boards to colonization by mold fungi. Winter-felled Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) sapwood boards were double-stacked in an industrial kiln in ‘‘sapwood out’’ and ‘‘sapwood in’’ positions. Dried samples were then contact heat-treated using a hot press at three different temperatures (140°C, 170°C, and 200°C) for three different periods (1, 3, and 10 min). Accelerated mold test was performed in a climate chamber where naturally mold infected samples were used as a source of mold inocula. Contact heat treatment degraded the saccharides which accumulated at dried surfaces, and reduced the mold growth. The threshold temperature and time for inhibiting mold growth was 170°C for 10 min. But, for industrial application, the most feasible combination of temperature and time would be 200°C for 3 min. We concluded that double stacking/contact heat treatment used is an environmentally friendly alternative to chemicals for reducing mold on Scots pine sapwood boards.

  • 26.
    Aid, Graham
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Brandt, Nils
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Bygg- och rivningsavfall: Action Research vid KTH2010In: Återvinnare För Industrin / [ed] Kjell-Arne Larsson, Stockholm: Rekord Media och Produktion AB , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27. Aimi, H.
    et al.
    Matsumoto, Y.
    Department of Biomaterial Sciences, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo.
    Meshitsuka, G,
    Department of Biomaterial Sciences, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo.
    Endwise type lignin present as small lignin fragments linked to carbohydrate2005In: Chemistry and performance of composites containing wood and natural plant fibres: pre-symposium [of] 59th APPITA annual conference and exhibition, incorporating 13th ISWFPC, International Symposium on Wood, Fibre and Pulping Chemistry : Rotorua, New Zealand, 12 - 13 May 2005 ; proceedings, Carlton, VIC: Appita , 2005, 427-430 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The content of glyceraldehyde-2-aryl ether type structure in water soluble LCC fractions, which was obtained from Japanese cedar and birch residual wood meal after MWL isolation, was determined by the use of ozonation method. Quite high amount of glyceraldehyde-2-aryl ether type structure was found in water soluble LCC fractions of both species, which was about 3-5 times higher than that of other fractions. This result as well as the high content of β-1 structure in these fractions shown in our previous papers suggest that lignin in these fractions has characteristics as endwise type lignin, because abundance of both of these structures are typical for this type of lignin. These results are in good accordance with the generally accepted hypothesis that glyceraldehyde-2-aryl ether type structure and β-1 structure are generated at the same time by radical coupling reaction. It was also indicated that these two structures are present very close to each other in lignin

  • 28.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Allard, Christina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Lin, Janet
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Sandström, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    LTU Teaching guide to e-learning: how to clear the mist of teaching through the cloud2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Berglund, Linn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Noël, Maxime
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Linder, Tomas
    Löfqvist, Torbjörn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Light scattering in cellulose nanofibre suspensions: Model and experiments2016In: Computers in Chemistry Proceeding from ACS National Meeting San Diego: Proceeding from ACS National Meeting San Diego, American Chemical Society (ACS), 2016, 122- p., CELL 235Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Here light scattering theory is used to assess the size distribution in a suspension of cellulose as it is fibrillated from micro-scaled to nano-scaled fibres. A model based on Monte carlo simulations of the scattering of photons by different sizes of cellulose fibres was used to predict the UV-IF spectrum of the suspensions. Bleached cellulose hardwood pulp was tested and compared to the visually transparent tempo-oxidised hardwood cellulose nanofibres (CNF) suspension. The theoretical results show that different diameter size classes exhibit very different scattering patterns. These classes could be identified in the experimental results and used to establish the size class dominating the suspension. A comparison to AFM/microscope size distribution was made and the results indicated that using the UV-IF light scattering spectrum maybe more reliable that size distribution measurement using AFM and microscopy on dried CNF samples. The UV-IF spectrum measurement combined with the theoretical prediction can be used even at this initial stage of development of this model to assess the degree of fibrillation when processing CNF.

  • 30.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Swerea SICOMP AB, Box 271, 941 26, Piteå.
    Hagström, Bengt
    SWEREA IVF AB.
    Långström, Runar
    Swerea SICOMP AB, Box 271, 941 26, Piteå.
    Fernberg, Patrik
    Swerea SICOMP AB, Box 271, 941 26, Piteå.
    Novel reactive bicomponent fibres: Material in composite manufacturing2012In: Journal of Nanostructured Polymers and Nanocomposites, ISSN 1790-4439, Vol. 8, no 1, 5-11 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hypotheses that reactive uncured, thermoset bicomponent fibres can be prepared and mixed with reinforcing fi- bres and ultimately used in preparation o f a composite was tested and is described. I t is thought that such fibres have the two potential advantages: ( 1) to enable manufacturing with pai1icle doped resins e.g. nanocomposites which add functionality to composites and (2) increased efficiency ofstructural composite manufacturing by increasing the level of automation. The structure of the thermoset fibres comprises of a sheath of thermoplastic and a core of uncured the1moset resin. Once manufactured, the fibres were wound with a reinforced fibre onto a plate, consolidated and cured. The resulting composite was examined and compared to other composites made with the same manufacturing method from commercially available materials. The results show that a laminate can be produced using these reactive bicomponent fibres. The resin system successfully impregnates the reinforcing carbon fibres and that the thermoplas- tic separates from the epoxy resin system during consolidation. In comparison to reference material, the bicomponentlaminate shows promising characteristics. However, the processes developed are currently on a lab-scale and consid- erable improvement of various bicomponent fibre properties, such as the strength, are required before the technology can be used on a larger scale

  • 31.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Swerea SICOMP AB, Box 271, SE-941 26 Piteå.
    Hagström, Bengt
    werea IVF AB.
    Långström, Runar
    Swerea SICOMP AB, Box 271, SE-941 26 Piteå.
    Fernberg, Patrik
    Swerea SICOMP AB, Box 271, SE-941 26 Piteå.
    Novel reactive bicomponent fibres: Material in composite manufacturing2012In: Journal of Nanostructured Polymers and Nanocomposites, ISSN 1790-4439, Vol. 8, no 1, 5-11 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hypotheses that reactive uncured, thermoset bicomponent fibres can be prepared and mixed with reinforcing fibres and ultimately used in preparation of a composite was tested and is described. It is thought that such fibres have the two potential advantages: (1) to enable manufacturing with particle doped resins e.g. nanocomposites which add functionality to composites and (2) increased efficiency of structural composite manufacturing by increasing the level of automation. The structure of the thermoset fibres comprises of a sheath of thermoplastic and a core of uncured thermoset resin. Once manufactured, the fibres were wound with a reinforced fibre onto a plate, consolidated and cured. The resulting composite was examined and compared to other composites made with the same manufacturing method from commercially available materials. The results show that a laminate can be produced using these reactive bicomponent fibres. The resin system successfully impregnates the reinforcing carbon fibres and that the thermoplastic separates from the epoxy resin system during consolidation. In comparison to reference material, the bicomponent laminate shows promising characteristics. However, the processes developed are currently on a lab-scale and considerable improvement of various bicomponent fibre properties, such as the strength, are required before the technology can be used on a larger scale.

  • 32.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Jonoobi, Mehdi
    Mathew, Aji P.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Impregnation of cellulose nanofibre networks with a thermoplastic polymer2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The emphasis of this study have been to study if impregnation of cellulose nanofibre networks can be made using a thermoplastic polymer as a matrix and to estimate the reinforcing efficiency of the cellulose nanofibres in this composite. A nanofibre network with higher porosity that water-dried nanofibre network was prepared from a cellulose waste byproduct (sludge). This was impregnated using a diluted solution of cellulose acetate butyrate polymer to produce a 60 wt. % CNF/CAB composite. This composite was characterized using microscopy and mechanical testing. High porosity is seen in the SEM images of the acetone-dried fibre network and SEM and film transparency was used to qualitatively assess the impregnation of the network. A significant improvement in the visible light transmittance was observed for the nanocomposite film compared to the nanofibre network as a result of the impregnation. The reinforcing efficiency was calculated based on a model of the nanocomposite and compared to other nanocomposites in the literature. The efficiency factor takes into account the volume fraction and the stiffness of the matrix. This showed that this CNF/CAB combination is similar in efficiency to CNF/PLA nanocomposites and more efficient that nanocomposites using when using stiffer matrices. It was also more efficient CNF nanocomposites based on Chitosan, which has the same stiffness. It is still however not as efficient as traditional glass polymer composites due to the random orientation of the fibres nor nanocomposites with very soft matrices due to the dominating network effect of the CNF in such composites. In conclusion, CAB impregnated cellulose nanofibre networks are promising biocomposite materials that could be used in applications where transparency and good mechanical properties are of interest. The key elements in the impregnation process of the nanocomposites were the use of a porous networks and a low viscosity thermoplastic resin solution.

  • 33.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Löfqvist, Torbjörn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Sounding Out Paper Pulp: Ultrasound Spectroscopy of Dilute Viscoelastic Fibre Suspensions Acoustics and Ultrasonics2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A model of attenuation of ultrasound in fibre suspensions is compared to a model of backscattering pressure from submersed cylinders subjected to a sound wave. This analysis is carried out in the region where the wavelength is of the same order as that of the diameter of the fibre. In addition we assume the cylinder scatterer to have no intrinsic attenuation and the longitudinal axis of the scatterer is assumed to be perpendicular to the direction of propagation of the incident wave. Peaks in the frequency response of both the backscattering pressure, expressed in the form of a form function, and the attenuation are shown to correspond. Similarities between the models are discussed. Since the peaks in the form function are due to resonance of the cylinder, we infer that the peaks in the attenuation are also due to resonance. The exact nature of the waves causing the resonance are still unclear however the first resonance peaks are related to the shear wave and hence the shear modulus of the material. The aim is to use the attenuation model for solving the inverse problem of calculating paper pulp material properties from attenuation measurements. The implications of these findings for paper pulp property estimation is that the supporting fluid could, if possible, be matched to density of that of pulp fibres and that the estimation of material properties should be improved by selecting a frequency range that in the region of the first resonance peaks.

  • 34.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Löfqvist, Torbjörn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Delsing, Jerker
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Estimating material properties of solid and hollow fibers in suspension using ultrasonic attenuation2013In: IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control, ISSN 0885-3010, E-ISSN 1525-8955, Vol. 60, no 7, 1424-1434 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Estimates of the material properties of hollow fibers suspended in a fluid using ultrasound measurements and a simple, computationally efficient analytical model are made. The industrial application is to evaluate the properties of wood fibers in paper pulp. The necessity of using a layered cylindrical model (LCM) as opposed to a solid cylindrical model (SCM) for modeling ultrasound attenuation in a suspension of hollow fibers is evaluated. The two models are described and used to solve the inverse problem of estimating material properties from attenuation in suspensions of solid and hollow polyester fibers. The results show that the measured attenuation of hollow fibers differs from that of solid fibers. Elastic properties estimates using LCM with hollow-fiber suspension measurements are similar to those using SCM with solid-fiber suspension measurements and compare well to block polyester values for elastic moduli. However, using the SCM with the hollow-fiber suspension did not produce realistic estimations. In conclusion, the LCM gives reasonable estimations of hollow fiber properties and the SCM is not sufficiently complex to model hollow fibers. The results also indicate that the use of a distributed radius in the model is important in estimating material properties from fiber suspensions.

  • 35.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Moreno, Sergio
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Vacuum infusion of cellulose nanofibre network composites: Influence of porosity on permeability and impregnation2016In: Materials & design, ISSN 0264-1275, E-ISSN 1873-4197, Vol. 95, 204-211 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Addressing issues around the processing of cellulose nanofibres (CNF) composites is important in establishing their use as sustainable, renewable polymer reinforcements. Here, CNF networks of different porosity were made with the aim of increasing their permeability and suitability for processing by vacuum infusion (VI). The CNF networks were infused with epoxy using two different strategies. The permeability, morphology and mechanical properties of the dry networks and the resulting nanocomposites were investigated. Calculated fill-times for CNF networks with 50% porosity were the shortest, but are only less than the gel-time of the epoxy if capillary effects are included. In experiments the CNF networks were clearly wetted. However low transparency indicated that impregnation was incomplete. The modulus and strength of the dry CNF networks increased rapidly with decreasing porosity, but their nanocomposites did not follow this trend, showing instead similar mechanical properties to each other. The results demonstrated that increasing the porosity of the CNF networks to ≈ 50% gives better impregnation resulting in a lower ultimate strength, a higher yield strength and no loss in modulus. Better use of the flow channels in the inherently layered CNF networks could potentially reduce void content in these nanocomposites and thus increase their mechanical properties.

  • 36.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Moreno, Sergio
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Vacuum Infusion of Nanocellulose Networks of Different Porosity2015In: 20th International Conference on Composite Materials: Copenhagen, 19-24th July 2015, ICCM , 2015, 4109-1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanofibres (CNF) have shown good potential as sustainable, biobased reinforcing materials in polymer composites. Addressing issues around the processing of these composites is an important part of establishing their use in different applications. Here, CNF networks of different porosity are made from nanofibrillated hardwood kraft pulp with the aim of increasing the impregnation of the CNF networks and to allow vacuum infusion to be used. Two different vacuum infusion strategies: in-plane and out of plane were used to infuse the CNF networks with a low viscosity epoxy. The permeability, morphology and mechanical properties of the dry networks and the resulting nanocomposites were investigated and compared to a micro-fibre based network. Using the out-of-plane permeability measurements and Darcy’s law, the fill-time was calculated and showed that the CNF network with 40% porosity had the lowest fill-time when an out-of-plane impregnation strategy is used. However this exceeded the gel-time of the epoxy system. In experiments, the resin reached the other side of the network but low transparency indicated that wetting was poor. The dry CNF preforms showed a very strong dependence on the porosity with both modulus and strength increasing rapidly at low porosity. Interestingly, the composite based on the 60% porosity network showed good wetting particularly with the in-plane infusion strategy, exhibiting a much more brittle fracture and a high yield strength. This shows that in CNF composites produced by VI, lowering the fibre volume content of the CNF composites gives better impregnation resulting in a lower ultimate strength but higher yield strength and no loss in modulus.

  • 37.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Cellulose nanofibril nanocomposites processing2013In: Production and Applications of Cellulose Nanomaterials, Peachtree Corners, GA: TAPPI Press, 2013, 271-274 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Impregnation of a preformed network of nanofibrils leads to high fibre volume fraction nanocomposites and with this good mechanical properties have been achieved. However, comparing nanofibrils composite made with different volume fractions and different matrices is difficult. In order to do this, and in doing so gain insight into the most promising approaches, methods of measuring reinforcing efficiencies are being developed. The results show that for matrices with low stiffness the stiffness reinforcing efficiency is high. However with high fibre volume fraction and high stiffness, this network effect may lead to a lack of exploitation of the properties of the nanofibrils. Alignment of the nanofibrils is also a key in effective reinforcement. In addition, upscaling of the impregnation process requires a good understanding of permeability and adaptation of existing permeability models for cellulose nanofibrils networks as well as experiments on their permeability are ongoing.

  • 38.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Quantifying reinforcing efficiency of nanocellulose fibres2013In: Processing of fibre composites-challenges for maximum materials performance: Proceedings of 34th Risø International Symposium on Materials Science / [ed] Bo Madsen; Hans Lilholt; Y Kusano; S Fäster; B Ralph, Risö: Dept. of Wind Energy, Technical University of Denmark , 2013, 149-160 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanofibres are found in all plants and have the potential to provide a sustainable biobased material source. These nanofibres can be used for reinforcing polymers and thus as structural materials. Very promising results have been reported for different nanocomposites but to compete with existing materials, it is important to understand what progress has been made towards structural materials using nanocellulose. To do this the reinforcing efficiency of the stiffness and strength of nanocellulose in different nanocomposites has been calculated for a number of reported nanocellulose fibre based composites. For the stiffness this is done by back-calculating a reinforcing efficiency factor from a Halpin-Tsai model and laminate theory. For the strength efficiency, two models are used: a classic short fibre composite model and a network model. The results show that orientation is key to the stiffness efficiency, as shown by the high efficiency of aligned natural fibres. The stiffness efficiency is, as expected, high in soft matrices but in stiff matrices, the network effect of the nanofibres is possibility limiting their reinforcing potential. The strength efficiency results show that in all the nanocomposites evaluated the network model is closer to predicting strength than the short fibre composite model. The correlation between the network strength and the composite strength suggest that much of the stress transfer is from fibre to fibre and strong nanocomposites depend heavily on having a strong network. Also noted is that in composite processing a good impregnation of the nanofibers is also seen as an important factor in the efficiency of both strength and stiffness.

  • 39.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Reinforcing efficiency and the manufacture nanocellulose fibre based composites by vacuum infusion2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocomposites based on cellulose have received a rapidly rising attention over the last 10 years however the method of manufacturing these composites on a scale larger than that in the lab remains challenging. Another challenge is that low fraction nanocomposites, whilst they can show excellent improvement in polymer properties, have difficultly to compete with traditional fibre reinforced composites [1,2]. A commonly used liquid composite moulding method for producing composites is vacuum infusion and the possibility of trading glass fibre for nanocellulose networks sheets in this type of manufacturing could results in a upscale method for producing high volume fraction cellulose nanocomposites. CNF networks are stiff and strong but have high fibre packing and thus difficult to impregnate. This paper evaluates the effectiveness of increasing the porosity to improve their processability by VI.

  • 40.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Reinforcing efficiency of nanocellulose in polymers2014In: Reactive & functional polymers, ISSN 1381-5148, E-ISSN 1873-166X, Vol. 85, 151-156 p., 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocellulose extracted from renewable sources, is a promising reinforcement for many polymers and is a material where strong interfibre hydrogen bonds add effects not seen in microfiber composites. Presented is a tool for comparing different nanocellulose composites based on estimating the efficiency of nanocellulose reinforcement. A reinforcing efficiency factor is calculated from reported values of elastic modulus and strength from various nanocellulose composites using established micromechanical models. In addition, for the strength, a network model is derived based on fibre-fibre bond strength within nanocellulose networks. The strength results highlight the importance of the plastic deformation in the nanocellulose composites. Both modulus and strength efficiency show that the network strength and modulus has a greater effect than that of the individual constituents. In the best cases, nanocellulose reinforcement exceeds all model predictions.

  • 41.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Reinforcing Efficiency of Nanocelluloses in Polymer Nanocomposites2014In: Handbook of Green Materials: Processing Technologies, Properties and Applications, Singapore: World Scientific and Engineering Academy and Society, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Westin, Mikael
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Hydrogel state impregnation of cellulose fibre-phenol composites: effects of fibre size distribution2016In: ECCM 2016: Proceeding of the 17th European Conference on Composite Materials, European Conference on Composite Materials , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whilst it has been well established that cellulose nanofibres (CNF) networks produce films that have high stiffness and strength, they are difficult to impregnate. Investigated in this study is whether by controlling the degree of nanofibrillation of cellulose, composites based on micro- and nano-size cellulose fibres can be made that are more easily manufactured and have better impregnation than solely cellulose nano-fibre based composites. To evaluate this, cellulose at different stages of ultrafine grinding, extracted at time intervals of 30, 60 and 290 mins, were used to make composites. To achieve good impregnation a novel strategy was used based on impregnation with phenol resin whilst the fibrillated cellulose is in a hydrogel state. The composites were subsequently dried and consolidated by hot press. The current results show that this method of impregnation is successful and the phenol matrix greatly improves the properties of the cellulose with a low degree of fibrillation. In general, as the degree of fibrillation and the proportion of nanofibres increases, the mechanical properties of the networks and their composites increase. The addition of the matrix appears to restrict the deformation of CNF network, increasing the modulus and yield strength but decreasing the ultimate strength. The method also appears to restrict the consolidation and voids remain in the composite, which reduces the modulus when compared to theoretical maximum values for this material. More work on the consolidation process is necessary to achieve the full potential of these composites.

  • 43.
    Ajaxon, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Maazouz, Yassine
    Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia .
    Ginebra, Maria-Pau
    Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia .
    Öhman, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    A non-drying porosity evaluation method for calcium phosphate cements2014In: 26th Symposium and Annual Meeting of the International Society for Ceramics in Medicine, 2014, 68-68 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Ajaxon, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Compressive fatigue properties of a commercially available acrylic bone cement for vertebroplasty2014In: Biomechanics and Modeling in Mechanobiology, ISSN 1617-7959, E-ISSN 1617-7940, Vol. 13, no 6, 1199-1207 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acrylic bone cements are widely used for fixation of joint prostheses as well as for vertebral body augmentation procedures of vertebroplasty and balloon kyphoplasty, with the cement zone(s) being subjected to repeated mechanical loading in each of these applications. Although, in vertebroplasty and balloon kyphoplasty, the cement zone is exposed to mainly cyclical compressive load, the compressive fatigue properties of acrylic bone cements used in these procedures are yet to be determined. The purposes of the present study were to determine the compressive fatigue properties of a commercially available cement brand used in vertebroplasty, including the effect of frequency on these properties; to identify the cement failure modes under compressive cyclical load; and to introduce a screening method that may be used to shorten the lengthy character of the standardized fatigue tests. Osteopal®V was used as the model cement in this study. The combinations of maximum stress and frequency used were 50.0, 55.0, 60.0, 62.5 and 75.5 MPa at 2 Hz; and of 40.0, 55.0, 60.0, 62.5 or 75.5 MPa at 10 Hz. Through analysis of nominal strain-number of loading cycles results, three cement failure modes were identified. The estimated mean fatigue limit at 2 Hz (55.4 MPa) was significantly higher than that at 10 Hz (41.1 MPa). The estimated fatigue limit at 2 Hz is much higher than stresses commonly found in the spine and also higher than that for other acrylic bone cements tested in a full tension–compression fatigue test, which indicates that tension–compression fatigue testing may substantially underestimate the performance of cements intended for vertebroplasty. A screening method was introduced which may be used to shorten the time spent in performing compressive fatigue tests on specimens of acrylic bone cement for use in vertebral body augmentation procedures. 

  • 45.
    Ajaxon, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Compressive fatigue properties of acrylic bone cement for vertebroplasty2013In: The 23rd Interdisciplinary Research Conference on Injectable Osteoarticular Biomaterials in Bone Augmentation Procedures: Proceedings, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Ajaxon, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Öhman, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Compressive Fatigue Properties of Acidic Calcium Phosphate Cement2014In: Proceedings of 7th World Congress of Biomechanics, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Ajaxon, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Öhman, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Long-term in vitro degradation of a high-strength brushite cement in water, PBS, and serum solution2015In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, 575079Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bone loss and fractures may call for the use of bone substituting materials, such as calcium phosphate cements (CPCs). CPCs can be degradable, and, to determine their limitations in terms of applications, their mechanical as well as chemical properties need to be evaluated over longer periods of time, under physiological conditions. However, there is lack of data on how the in vitro degradation affects high-strength brushite CPCs over longer periods of time, that is, longer than it takes for a bone fracture to heal. This study aimed at evaluating the long-term in vitro degradation properties of a high-strength brushite CPC in three different solutions: water, phosphate buffered saline, and a serum solution. Microcomputed tomography was used to evaluate the degradation nondestructively, complemented with gravimetric analysis. The compressive strength, chemical composition, and microstructure were also evaluated. Major changes from 10 weeks onwards were seen, in terms of formation of a porous outer layer of octacalcium phosphate on the specimens with a concomitant change in phase composition, increased porosity, decrease in object volume, and mechanical properties. This study illustrates the importance of long-term evaluation of similar cement compositions to be able to predict the material’s physical changes over a relevant time frame. 

  • 48.
    Akan, Pelin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Alexeyenko, Andrey
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Costea, Paul Igor
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hedberg, Lilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Werne Solnestam, Beata
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hallman, Jimmie
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Comprehensive analysis of the genome transcriptome and proteome landscapes of three tumor cell lines2012In: Genome Medicine, ISSN 1756-994X, Vol. 4, 86- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We here present a comparative genome, transcriptome and functional network analysis of three human cancer cell lines (A431, U251MG and U2OS), and investigate their relation to protein expression. Gene copy numbers significantly influenced corresponding transcript levels; their effect on protein levels was less pronounced. We focused on genes with altered mRNA and/or protein levels to identify those active in tumor maintenance. We provide comprehensive information for the three genomes and demonstrate the advantage of integrative analysis for identifying tumor-related genes amidst numerous background mutations by relating genomic variation to expression/protein abundance data and use gene networks to reveal implicated pathways.

  • 49.
    Akan, Pelin
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Stranneheim, Henrik
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Lexow, Preben
    LingVitae, Oslo.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Design and assessment of binary DNA for nanopore sequencing2010In: Genome biology, ISSN 1474-760X, Vol. 11, P4- p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 50. Akbari, H.
    et al.
    Karimi, K
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Lundin, M
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Optimization of baker's yeast drying in industrial continuous fluidized-bed dryer2012In: Food and Bioproducts Processing, ISSN 0960-3085, E-ISSN 1744-3571, Vol. 90, no 1, 52-57 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Instant active dry baker's yeast is a well-known product widely used for leavening of bread, produced by fermentation, and usually dried by hot air to 94–96% dry matter content. Multi-stage fluidized bed drying process is a commercial effective method for yeast drying. In this work, optimum operating parameters of an industrial continuous fluidized bed dryer for the production of instant active dry yeast were investigated. The dryer contained four zones separated with moving weirs. The operating conditions such as temperature, loading rate of compressed yeast granules, and hot air humidity had direct effects on both yeast activity and viability. The most important factors that affected the quality of the product were loading rate and the operational temperature in each zone on the bed. Optimization was performed for three loading rates of the feed to the dryer, using response surface methodology for the experimental design. The most significant factor was shown to be the loading rate with mean fermentation activity values of 620, 652, and 646 cm3 CO2/h for 300, 350, and 400 kg/h loading rates, respectively. The data analysis resulted in an optimal operating point at a loading rate of 350 kg/h and temperatures of zones 1, 2, 3, and 4 controlled at 33, 31, 31, and 29 °C, respectively. The best activity value was predicted as 668 ± 18 cm3 CO2/h, and confirmation experiments resulted in 660 ± 10 cm3 CO2/h. At the same operating point, the average viability of the cells was predicted as 74.8 ± 3.7% and confirmed as 76.4 ± 0.6%. Compared with the normal operating conditions at the plant, the optimization resulted in more than 12% and 27% improvement in the yeast activity and viability, respectively.

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