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  • 1.
    A. Wójcik, Natalia
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology. Department of Solid State Physics, Faculty of Applied Physics and Mathematics, Gdańsk University of Technology, Narutowicza Street 11/12, 80–233 Gdańsk, Poland.
    Ali, Sharafat
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building and Energy Technology.
    Möncke, Doris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology. Inamori School of Engineering at the New York State College of Ceramics, Alfred University, 1 Saxon Drive, Alfred, 14802 New York, USA.
    Kamitsos, Efstratios
    Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation, 48 Vassileos Constantinou Avenue, 11635 Athens, Greece.
    Segawa, Hiroyo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology. National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044, Japan.
    Eriksson, Mirva
    Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jonson, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building and Energy Technology.
    The influence of Be addition on the structure and thermal properties of alkali-silicate glasses2019In: Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids, ISSN https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jnoncrysol.2019.119532, Vol. 521, p. 1-10, article id 119532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Be-Na-(Li)-Si oxide glasses containing up to 15 mol% of BeO were prepared. Their structure was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction and Raman as well as infrared spectroscopic techniques, while their chemical compositions were examined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry. All materials were found to be amorphous and contain Al contaminations from minor dissolution of the alumina crucibles. The results of Raman and IR spectroscopies showed that BeO addition to Na-(Li)-Si glass systems resulted in the formation of [BeO4/2]2− tetrahedra which are inserted into the silicate glass network, demonstrating the intermediate glass-forming role of BeO. In parallel, the effective destruction of Si-O-Si bridges was observed by vibrational spectroscopy. The glass transition temperature was studied by Differential Thermal Analysis and found to range from about 431 °C to 551 °C. A significant increase in Tg by 70 °C was found as SiO2 was substituted by up to 15 mol% BeO.

  • 2.
    Adolfsson, Erik
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF, Keramer.
    Zirconia in applications with bone contact2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Afzal, Muhammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Saleemi, Mohsin
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics.
    Wang, Baoyuan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Xia, Chen
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Zhang, Wei
    He, Yunjuan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Jayasuriya, Jeevan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Zhu, Binzhu
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Fabrication of novel electrolyte-layer free fuel cell with semi-ionic conductor (Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-delta- Sm0.2Ce0.8O1.9) and Schottky barrier2016In: Journal of Power Sources, ISSN 0378-7753, E-ISSN 1873-2755, Vol. 328, p. 136-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perovskite Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-delta (BSCF) is synthesized via a chemical co-precipitation technique for a low temperature solid oxide fuel cell (LTSOFC) (300-600 degrees C) and electrolyte-layer free fuel cell (EFFC) in a comprehensive study. The EFFC with a homogeneous mixture of samarium doped ceria (SDC): BSCF (60%:40% by weight) which is rather similar to the cathode (SDC: BSCF in 50%:50% by weight) used for a three layer SOFC demonstrates peak power densities up to 655 mW/cm(2), while a three layer (anode/ electrolyte/cathode) SOFC has reached only 425 mW/cm(2) at 550 degrees C. Chemical phase, crystal structure and morphology of the as-prepared sample are characterized by X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy. The electrochemical performances of 3-layer SOFC and EFFC are studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). As-prepared BSCF has exhibited a maximum conductivity above 300 S/cm at 550 degrees C. High performance of the EFFC device corresponds to a balanced combination between ionic and electronic (holes) conduction characteristic. The Schottky barrier prevents the EFFC from the electronic short circuiting problem which also enhances power output. The results provide a new way to produce highly effective cathode materials for LTSOFC and semiconductor designs for EFFC functions using a semiconducting-ionic material.

  • 4.
    Ajaxon, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Can Bone Void Fillers Carry Load?: Behaviour of Calcium Phosphate Cements Under Different Loading Scenarios2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are used as bone void fillers and as complements to hardware in fracture fixation. The aim of this thesis was to investigate the possibilities and limitations of the CPCs’ mechanical properties, and find out if these ceramic bone cements can carry application-specific loads, alone or as part of a construct. Recently developed experimental brushite and apatite cements were found to have a significantly higher strength in compression, tension and flexion compared to the commercially available CPCs chronOS™ Inject and Norian® SRS®. By using a high-resolution measurement technique the elastic moduli of the CPCs were determined and found to be at least twice as high compared to earlier measurements, and closer to cortical bone than trabecular bone. Using the same method, Poisson's ratio for pure CPCs was determined for the first time. A non-destructive porosity measurement method for wet brushite cements was developed, and subsequently used to study the porosity increase during in vitro degradation. The compressive strength of the experimental brushite cement was still higher than that of trabecular bone after 25 weeks of degradation, showing that the cement can carry high loads over a time span sufficiently long for a fracture to heal. This thesis also presents the first ever fatigue results for acidic CPCs, and confirms the importance of testing the materials under cyclic loading as the cements may fail at stress levels much lower than the material’s quasi-static compressive strength. A decrease in fatigue life was found for brushite cements containing higher amounts of monetite. Increasing porosity and testing in a physiological buffer solution (PBS), rather than air, also decreased the fatigue life. However, the experimental brushite cement had a high probability of surviving loads found in the spine when tested in PBS, which has previously never been accomplished for acidic CPCs. In conclusion, available brushite cements may be able to carry the load alone in scenarios where the cortical shell is intact, the loading is mainly compressive, and the expected maximum stress is below 10 MPa. Under such circumstances this CPC may be the preferred choice over less biocompatible and non-degradable materials.

  • 5.
    Ajaxon, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Acciaioli, Alice
    Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Laboratorio di Tecnologia Medica.
    Lionello, Giacomo
    Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Laboratorio di Tecnologia Medica.
    Ginebra, Maria-Pau
    Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC).
    Öhman, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Baleani, Massimilliano
    Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Laboratorio di Tecnologia Medica.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Elastic properties and strain-to-crack-initation of calcium phosphate bone cements: Revelations of a high-resolution measurement technique2017In: Journal of The Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials, ISSN 1751-6161, E-ISSN 1878-0180, Vol. 74, p. 428-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) should ideally have mechanical properties similar to those of the bone tissue the material is used to replace or repair. Usually, the compressive strength of the CPCs is reported and, more rarely, the elastic modulus. Conversely, scarce or no data are available on Poisson's ratio and strain-to-crack-initiation. This is unfortunate, as data on the elastic response is key to, e.g., numerical model accuracy. In this study, the compressive behaviour of brushite, monetite and apatite cements was fully characterised. Measurement of the surface strains was done using a digital image correlation (DIC) technique, and compared to results obtained with the commonly used built-in displacement measurement of the materials testers. The collected data showed that the use of fixed compression platens, as opposed to spherically seated ones, may in some cases underestimate the compressive strength by up to 40%. Also, the built-in measurements may underestimate the elastic modulus by up to 62% as compared to DIC measurements. Using DIC, the brushite cement was found to be much stiffer (24.3 ± 2.3 GPa) than the apatite (13.5 ± 1.6 GPa) and monetite (7.1 ± 1.0 GPa) cements, and elastic moduli were inversely related to the porosity of the materials. Poisson's ratio was determined to be 0.26 ± 0.02 for brushite, 0.21 ± 0.02 for apatite and 0.20 ± 0.03 for monetite. All investigated CPCs showed low strain-to-crack-initiation (0.17–0.19%). In summary, the elastic modulus of CPCs is substantially higher than previously reported and it is concluded that an accurate procedure is a prerequisite in order to properly compare the mechanical properties of different CPC formulations. It is recommended to use spherically seated platens and measuring the strain at a relevant resolution and on the specimen surface.

  • 6.
    Ajaxon, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Acciaioli, Alice
    Lionello, Giacomo
    Ginebra, Maria-Pau
    Öhman, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Baleani, Massimiliano
    Compressive strength increase of calcium phosphate bone cements is accompanied by a stiffness increase2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Ajaxon, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Holmberg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Öhman Mägi, Caroline
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Fatigue life of a brushite cement under cyclic compressive loading2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Ajaxon, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Holmberg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Öhman Mägi, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Long-term degradation of brushite cements in three different liquids2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Ajaxon, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Holmberg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Öhman Mägi, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    The influence of porosity on the fatigue properties of brushite cement2016In: Biomaterials for tissue engineering models, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Ajaxon, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Holmberg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Öhman-Mägi, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Compressive fatigue properties of a high-strength, degradable calcium phosphate bone cement – influence of porosity and environmentManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Ajaxon, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Lionello, Giacomo
    bLaboratorio di Tecnologia Medica, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Italy.
    Ginebra, Maria-Pau
    cBiomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia .
    Öhman, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Baleani, Massimiliano
    bLaboratorio di Tecnologia Medica, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Italy.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Local stiffness measurements in apatite and brushite cements2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Ajaxon, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Maazouz, Yassine
    Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia .
    Ginebra, Maria-Pau
    Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Technical University of Catalonia .
    Öhman, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    A non-drying porosity evaluation method for calcium phosphate cements2014In: 26th Symposium and Annual Meeting of the International Society for Ceramics in Medicine, 2014, p. 68-68Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Ajaxon, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Maazouz, Yassine
    Ginebra, Maria-Pau
    Öhman, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Evaluation of a porosity measurement method for wet calcium phosphate cements2015In: Journal of biomaterials applications, ISSN 0885-3282, E-ISSN 1530-8022, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 526-536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The porosity of a calcium phosphate cement is a key parameter as it affects several important properties of the cement. However, a successful, non-destructive porosity measurement method that does not include drying has not yet been reported for calcium phosphate cements. The aim of this study was to evaluate isopropanol solvent exchange as such a method. Two different types of calcium phosphate cements were used, one basic (hydroxyapatite) and one acidic (brushite). The cements were allowed to set in an aqueous environment and then immersed in isopropanol and stored under three different conditions: at room temperature, at room temperature under vacuum (300 mbar) or at 37􏰀C. The specimen mass was monitored regularly. Solvent exchange took much longer time to reach steady state in hydroxyapatite cements compared to brushite cements, 350 and 18 h, respectively. Furthermore, the immersion affected the quasi-static compressive strength of the hydroxyapatite cements. However, the strength and phase composition of the brushite cements were not affected by isopropanol immersion, suggesting that isopropanol solvent exchange can be used for brushite calcium phosphate cements. The main advantages with this method are that it is non-destructive, fast, easy and the porosity can be evaluated while the cements remain wet, allowing for further analysis on the same specimen. 

  • 14.
    Ajaxon, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Mechanical Properties of Brushite Calcium Phosphate Cements2017In: The World Scientific Encyclopedia of Nanomedicine and Bioengineering II: Bioimplants, Regenerative Medicine, and Nano-Cancer Diagnosis and Phototherapy: Volume 3: Design of Bioactive Materials for Bone Repair and Regeneration / [ed] Shi, D., Singapore: World Scientific Pte Ltd. , 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Ajaxon, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Öhman, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Compressive Fatigue Properties of Acidic Calcium Phosphate Cement2014In: Proceedings of 7th World Congress of Biomechanics, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Ajaxon, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Öhman, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Long-term in vitro degradation of a high-strength brushite cement in water, PBS, and serum solution2015In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, article id 575079Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bone loss and fractures may call for the use of bone substituting materials, such as calcium phosphate cements (CPCs). CPCs can be degradable, and, to determine their limitations in terms of applications, their mechanical as well as chemical properties need to be evaluated over longer periods of time, under physiological conditions. However, there is lack of data on how the in vitro degradation affects high-strength brushite CPCs over longer periods of time, that is, longer than it takes for a bone fracture to heal. This study aimed at evaluating the long-term in vitro degradation properties of a high-strength brushite CPC in three different solutions: water, phosphate buffered saline, and a serum solution. Microcomputed tomography was used to evaluate the degradation nondestructively, complemented with gravimetric analysis. The compressive strength, chemical composition, and microstructure were also evaluated. Major changes from 10 weeks onwards were seen, in terms of formation of a porous outer layer of octacalcium phosphate on the specimens with a concomitant change in phase composition, increased porosity, decrease in object volume, and mechanical properties. This study illustrates the importance of long-term evaluation of similar cement compositions to be able to predict the material’s physical changes over a relevant time frame. 

  • 17.
    Ajaxon, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Öhman Mägi, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Compressive fatigue properties of an acidic calcium phosphate cement—effect of phase composition2017In: Journal of materials science. Materials in medicine, ISSN 0957-4530, E-ISSN 1573-4838, Vol. 28, no 3, article id 41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are synthetic bone grafting materials that can be used in fracture stabilization and to fill bone voids after, e.g., bone tumour excision. Currently there are several calcium phosphate-based formulations available, but their use is partly limited by a lack of knowledge of their mechanical properties, in particular their resistance to mechanical loading over longer periods of time. Furthermore, depending on, e.g., setting conditions, the end product of acidic CPCs may be mainly brushite or monetite, which have been found to behave differently under quasi-static loading. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the compressive fatigue properties of acidic CPCs, as well as the effect of phase composition on these properties. Hence, brushite cements stored for different lengths of time and with different amounts of monetite were investigated under quasi-static and dynamic compression. Both storage and brushite-to-monetite phase transformation was found to have a pronounced effect both on quasi-static compressive strength and fatigue performance of the cements, whereby a substantial phase transformation gave rise to a lower mechanical resistance. The brushite cements investigated in this study had the potential to survive 5 million cycles at a maximum compressive stress of 13 MPa. Given the limited amount of published data on fatigue properties of CPCs, this study provides an important insight into the compressive fatigue behaviour of such materials. 

  • 18.
    Ali, Amjad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering. COMSATS Inst Informat Technol, Dept Phys, Lahore 54000, Pakistan.;Univ Okara, Dept Phys, Okara 56300, Pakistan.
    Raza, Rizwan
    COMSATS Inst Informat Technol, Dept Phys, Lahore 54000, Pakistan.;Royal Inst Technol KTH, Dept Energy Technol, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Khalil, R. M. Arif
    Bahauddin Zakariya Univ, Dept Phys, Multan 60800, Pakistan..
    Ahmad, M. Ashfaq
    COMSATS Inst Informat Technol, Dept Phys, Lahore 54000, Pakistan..
    Rafique, Asia
    COMSATS Inst Informat Technol, Dept Phys, Lahore 54000, Pakistan..
    Ullah, M. Kaleem
    COMSATS Inst Informat Technol, Dept Phys, Lahore 54000, Pakistan..
    Rehman, Amin Ur
    Lahore Univ, Dept Phys, Lahore 54000, Pakistan..
    Mushtaq, M. Naveed
    COMSATS Inst Informat Technol, Dept Phys, Lahore 54000, Pakistan..
    Belova, Lyubov
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    A potential electrolyte (Ce1-x CaxO2-delta) for fuel cells:Theoretical andexperimental study2018In: Ceramics International, ISSN 0272-8842, E-ISSN 1873-3956, Vol. 44, no 11, p. 12676-12683Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    First-principles calculations are performed using density function theory to explore the effects of dopant Ca in ceria (Ce1-x CaxO2-delta). The impact of oxygen vacancy on band gap and density of states is examined in doped ceria using generalized gradient approximations. Vacancy association and vacancy formation energies of the doped ceria are calculated to reveal the effect of dopant on ion conduction. The experimental study of the sample Ce0.875Ca0.125O2-delta) was performed to compare with the theoretical results. The obtained results from theoretical calculation and experimental techniques show that oxygen vacancy increases the volume, lattice constant (5.47315 angstrom) but decrease the band gap (1.72 eV) and bulk modulus. The dopant radius (1.173 angstrom) and lattice constant (5.4718 angstrom) are also calculated by equations which is close to the DFT lattice parameter. The result shows that oxygen vacancy shifts the density of states to lower energy region. Band gap is decreased due to shifting of valence states to conduction band. Vacancy formation shows a significance increase in density of states near the Fermi level. Density of states at Fermi level is proportional to the conductivity, so an increase in density of states near the Fermi level increases the conductivity. The experimental measured ionic conductivity is found to 0.095 S cm(-1) at 600 degrees C. The microstructural studies is also reported in this work.

  • 19.
    Ali, Sharafat
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Hard and Transparent Thin Films2018In: 4th Nanotechnology Congress and Expo  (GNCE-18), Dubai, UAE (16-18 Apr 2018), 2018, p. 14-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Ali, Sharafat
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    High temeperature synthesis of nitrogen rich glasses in alkaline-earth silicon oxynitride systems2018In: Presented at XVI International IUPAC Conference on High Temperature Materials Chemistry, Ekaterinaburg, Russia, 2018, p. 24-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Ali, Sharafat
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    New Oxynitride Glasses and Thin Films2017In: 15th International Symposium on Advanced Materials (ISAM), Islamabad, Pakistan, 16-20 Oct 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Ali, Sharafat
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Nitrogen in Materials2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Ali, Sharafat
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Primary Challenges in the Development of Nitrogen Rich Oxynitride Glasses2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Ali, Sharafat
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Bogdonoff, Toni
    Jönköping University.
    Seifeddine, Salem
    Jönköping University.
    Jonson, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Hardness, elastic modulus and refractive index of oxynitride glasses prepared from woody biofuel ashes2017In: Physics and Chemistry of Glasses - European Journal of Glass Science and Technology Part B, ISSN 1753-3562, Vol. 58, no 6, p. 231-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports the hardness, elastic modulus and refractive index values of the oxynitride glasses prepared from woody biofuel ashes. The glasses were prepared in nitrogen atmosphere at 1350–1500°C with addition of Ca metal as a precursor to the extra addition of this modifier. The glasses were homogenous, but appeared translucent grey to black. They contained up to 23 eq% of Ca and 5 eq% of N. The glass densities vary slightly between 2.76 to 2.92 g/cm3. The molar volume and compactness values vary between 8.01 cm3/mol to 8.31 cm3/mol and 0.446 to 0.462 respectively. Mechanical properties like hardness and reduced elastic modulus show values, up to 10 and 105 GPa, respectively. These properties are strongly correlated with the amount of N in the glass. The refractive index (1.54–1.75) increases with increasing N and Ca contents.

  • 25.
    Ali, Sharafat
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Grins, J.
    Stockholm University.
    Jonson, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Raman spectra of Ca-Si-O-N glasses2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Ali, Sharafat
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building and Energy Technology.
    Jonson, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building and Energy Technology.
    Effect of compactness on oxynitride glasses properties2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Ali, Sharafat
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Jonson, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Formation of oxynitride glasses from fly ashes2010In: Abstracts - 10th ESG conference together with 84th annual meeting of the DGG : Glass Trend Seminar "Glass Furnaces and Refractory Materials": Plansee Session "Refractory Methals for the Glass Industry ; Magdeburg, Germany, 30 May - 2 June 2010, 2010, p. 89-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Ali, Sharafat
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design.
    Jonson, Bo
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design.
    Nitrogen rich Ca/Sr-Si-O-N glasses crystallization2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Ali, Sharafat
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Jonson, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Oxidation behavior of nitrogen rich AE-Si-O-N glasses (AE = Ca, Sr, Ba)2011In: Journal of the Australian Ceramic Society, ISSN 0004-881X, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 8-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AE-based silicon oxynitride glasses (AE = Ca, Sr, Ba) with high nitrogen content have been synthesized using AE hydrides as primary precursors. The oxidation behavior of AE-Si-O-N glasses in ordinary atmosphere at different temperature has been investigated. These glasses react with air oxygen when heated just above the glass transition temperatures. The oxidation starts with bubble formation on the surface and continued oxidation leads to formation of a white layer on the surface. The oxidation of AE-Si-O-N glasses involves concurrently ongoing inward diffusion of oxygen and outward diffusion of AE elements and nitrogen, resulting in compositional gradient. EDX analysis showed substantial enrichment in AE content at the surfaces of the oxidized layer.

  • 30.
    Ali, Sharafat
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Jonson, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Oxynitride glasses2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Ali, Sharafat
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Jonson, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Preparation and properties of high nitrogen content mixed alkaline-earth oxynitride glasses2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Ali, Sharafat
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Jonson, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Thermal properties of calcium silicon oxynitride glasses2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oxynitride glasses are a branch of high performance glasses, obtained by incorporation of nitrogen atoms into oxide glass network. [1-3]Oxynitride glasses have superior mechanical, rheological and optical properties as compared to their oxide glass counter partner [2-5]. Properties of these glasses can be tailored by changes in nitrogen content and additions of various alkaline-earth and or rare-earth elements. Ca- Si-O-N glasses containing high amount of nitrogen and modifiers have been prepared by melting the mixture of CaH2, SiO2 and Si3N4 powder in nitrogen atmosphere. The glasses were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, differential thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The obtained glasses were found to be homogenous, and having colour opaque black[3]. These glasses show high values of glass transition temperature (1050°C), and crystallization temperatures (1150°C) measured by differential thermal analysis.  Generally the Ca-Si-O-N glasses thermal properties evolve approximately linearly with the nitrogen content. The viscosity increases significantly with the nitrogen content and reaches viscosity values close to reported values for rare-earth silica oxynitride glasses. The apparent viscosity activation energies are very high, ranging from 855 to 2170 kJ/mole. These nitrogen rich glasses can accordingly be classified as being both very refractory and very fragile.

     

  • 33.
    Ali, Sharafat
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Jonson, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Mauro, Jan
    Penn State University, USA.
    Properties of nitrogen rich Mg-Ca-Si-O-N glasses2017In: 12th  Pacific Rim Conference on Cermics and Glass Technology including Glass & Optical Materials Meeting, Hawii, USA 21-27 May 2017, 2017, p. 180-180, article id GOMD-S1-061-2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mg-Ca-Si-O-N glasses containing high amount of nitrogen have been prepared by melting the mixture of Mg metal, Ca metal, SiO2 and Si3N4 powders in nitrogen atmosphere using a radio frequency furnace. Chemical composition, surface morphology, glass transition temperature, hardness, reduced elastic modulus and refractive index of the glasses were investigated using X-ray (EDX) point analysis, scanning electron microscopy, differential thermal analysis, nanoindentation, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Mg was substituted for Ca in these glasses. The obtained glasses were found to be homogenous, and most of them were not transparent in the visible region. These glasses show high values of glass transition temperature (1020°C), and crystallization temperatures (1150°C). The hardness and reduced elastic modulus increases upon substitution by Mg, up to 13 GPa and 150 GPa respectively. The refractive index of the glasses was found to decrease upon increasing substitution by Mg.

  • 34.
    Ali, Sharafat
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Paul, Biplab
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Roger
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Erik, Ekström
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Pallier, Camille
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Jonson, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Optical and mechanical properties of amorphous Mg-Si-O-N thin films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering2019In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 372, no 25, p. 9-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, amorphous thin films in Mg-Si-O-N system typically containing >15 at.% Mg and 35 at.% N were prepared in order to investigate especially the dependence of optical and mechanical properties on Mg composition. Reactive RF magnetron co-sputtering from magnesium and silicon targets were used for the deposition of Mg-Si-O-N thin films. Films were deposited on float glass, silica wafers and sapphire substrates in an Ar, N2 and O2 gas mixture. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and nanoindentation were employed to characterize the composition, surface morphology, and properties of the films. The films consist of N and Mg contents up to 40 at.% and 28 at.%, respectively and have good adhesion to substrates and are chemically inert. The thickness and roughness of the films increased with increasing content of Mg. Both hardness (16–21 GPa) and reduced elastic modulus (120–176 GPa) are strongly correlated with the amount of Mg content. The refractive index up to 2.01 and extinction coefficient up to 0.18 were found to increase with Mg content. The optical band gap (3.1–4.3) decreases with increasing the Mg content. Thin film deposited at substrate temperature of 100 °C shows a lower value of hardness (10 GPa), refractive index (1.75), and higher values of reduced elastic modulus (124 GPa) as compared to the thin film deposited at 310 °C and 510 °C respectively, under identical synthesis parameters.

  • 35.
    Ali, Sharafat
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Paul, Biplab
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Roger
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Broitman, Esteban
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Jonson, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Thin films in M-Si-O-N thin systems2017In: 44th International Conference on Metallurgical Coating and Thin Films (ICMCTF), San Diego, CA, USA, 24-28 Apr 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Ali, Sharafat
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Paul, Biplab
    Magnusson, Roger
    Jonson, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Eklund, Per
    Birch, Jens
    Study of SiN, SiON and Mg-Si-O-N thin films by spec-troscopic elipsometry2016In: Optics and photonics conference, 2-3 November, 2016, Linköping, Sweden, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Altskog, Frida
    Gotland University, School of the Humanities and Social Science.
    Keramisk List: produktutveckling för Askersunds Kakelmakeri2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this report presents a thesis by Frida Altskog performed in collaboration with Askersunds Kakelmakeri. The project’s goal has been to produce a ceramic ledge after the company’s specifications. The company’s desire and production facilities have been in focus.  This report includes a collection of facts and gives an overview of the ceramic material, production of ceramic products and how production of hand-made tiles and clinker is made. A analysis of target group and market have been a guide line through the projects ideas and realizations.  The final product is a ceramic ledge that can combine with three different patterns. Classic, modern and oriental. It can be combined and adjustable on different surfaces. The form of the ledge is effective to produce and it can be made in Askersund kakelmakeris pottery.

  • 38.
    Andersson, David A.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Korzhavyi, Pavel A.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Johansson, Börje
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Material Physics.
    First-principles based calculation of binary and multicomponent phase diagrams for titanium carbonitride2008In: Calphad, ISSN 0364-5916, E-ISSN 1873-2984, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 543-565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we have used a combined first principles and Calphad approach to calculate phase diagrams in the titanium-carbon-nitrogen system, with particular focus on the vacancy-induced ordering of the substoichiometric carbonitride phase, TiCxNy (x + y <= 1). Results from earlier Monte Carlo simulations of the low-temperature binary phase diagrams are used in order to formulate sublattice models for TiCxNy within the compound energy formalism (CEF) that are capable of describing both the low temperature ordered and the high-temperature disordered state. We parameterize these models using first-principles calculations and then we demonstrate how they can be merged with thermodynamic descriptions of the remaining Ti-C-N phases that are derived within the Calphad method by fitting model parameters to experimental data. We also discuss structural and electronic properties of the ordered end-member compounds, as well as short range order effects in the TiCxNy phase.

  • 39.
    Andersson, David A.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Material Physics.
    Korzhavyi, Pavel A.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Material Physics.
    Johansson, Börje
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Material Physics.
    Thermodynamics of structural vacancies in titanium monoxide from first principles calculations2005In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 71, no 14, p. 144101-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structure, stability and electronic properties of the low oxygen oxides of titanium, TiOx with 1/3 <= x <= 3/2, have been studied by means of accurate first-principles calculations. In both stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric TiO there are large fractions of vacant lattice sites. These so-called structural vacancies are essential for understanding the properties and phase stability of titanium oxides. Structures with an ordered arrangement of vacancies were treated with a plane wave pseudo-potential method, while calculations for structures with disordered vacancies were performed within the framework of the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green's function technique. The relaxed structural parameters in general compare well with experimental data, though some discrepancies exist for stoichiometric TiO in the ideal B1 structure, i.e., without any vacancies. The equation of state as well as the elastic properties are also derived. A monoclinic, vacancy-containing, structure of stoichiometric TiO is confirmed to be stable at low temperature and pressure. Experimentally a transition from a stoichiometric cubic structure with disordered vacancies to the ideal B1 structure without any vacancies has been observed at high pressure. It is discussed how this experimental observation relates to the present theoretical results for defect-containing and defect-free TiO.

  • 40. Andersson, L.
    et al.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Bergström, Lennart
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University.
    Evaluating pore space in macroporous ceramics with water-based porosimetry2013In: Journal of The American Ceramic Society, ISSN 0002-7820, E-ISSN 1551-2916, Vol. 96, no 6, p. 1916-1922Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We show that water-based porosimetry (WBP), a facile, simple, and nondestructive porosimetry technique, accurately evaluates both the pore size distribution and throat size distribution of sacrificially templated macroporous alumina. The pore size distribution and throat size distribution derived from the WBP evaluation in uptake (imbibition) and release (drainage) mode, respectively, were corroborated by mercury porosimetry and X-ray micro-computed tomography (μ-CT). In contrast with mercury porosimetry, the WBP also provided information on the presence of "dead-end pores" in the macroporous alumina.

  • 41. Andersson, L.
    et al.
    Larsson, P.T.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Wågberg, L.
    Bergström, L.
    Evaluating pore space in macroporous ceramics with water-based porosimetry2013In: Journal of The American Ceramic Society, ISSN 0002-7820, E-ISSN 1551-2916, no 6, p. 1916-1922Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Andersson, Linnéa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    Department of Fibre and Polymer Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    Department of Fibre and Polymer Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology.
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Stockholm.
    Evaluating pore space in macroporous ceramics with water-based porosimetry2013In: Journal of The American Ceramic Society, ISSN 0002-7820, E-ISSN 1551-2916, Vol. 96, no 6, p. 1916-1922Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We show that water-based porosimetry (WBP), a facile, simple, and nondestructive porosimetry technique, accurately evaluates both the pore size distribution and throat size distribution of sacrificially templated macroporous alumina. The pore size distribution and throat size distribution derived from the WBP evaluation in uptake (imbibition) and release (drainage) mode, respectively, were corroborated by mercury porosimetry and X-ray micro-computed tomography (μ-CT). In contrast with mercury porosimetry, the WBP also provided information on the presence of “dead-end pores” in the macroporous alumina.

  • 43.
    Andersson, Patrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Arvhult, Carl-Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Metallic residues after hydriding of zirconium2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As a part of the production of nitride nuclear fuel for use in fast nuclear reactors, zirconium is hydrided followed by nitriding and mixing with uranium nitride. This work concludes a study of unwanted metallic particles present in a powder that is supposed to be a zirconium hydride. Sponge zirconium was hydrided at different temperatures and different time intervals, and the resulting hydride was milled into a powder. The powders were analyzed using SEM and XRD after which the powders were pressed into pellets for light optical microscopic study. The primary goals were determination of the structure of the particles and thereafter elimination of them. It was seen that hydriding at 500 C results in less metal particles but more experiments need to be conducted to confirm this.

  • 44.
    Anderud, Jonas
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden; Region Halland, Sweden.
    Abrahamsson, Peter
    Region Halland, Sweden.
    Jimbo, Ryo
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Sten
    Region Halland, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Erik
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Malmström, Johan
    Region Halland, Sweden.
    Naito, Yoshihito
    University of Tokushima, Japan.
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Guided bone augmentation using ceramic space-maintaining devices: The impact of chemistry2015In: Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dentistry, ISSN 1179-1357, E-ISSN 1179-1357, Vol. 7, p. 45-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate histologically, whether vertical bone augmentation can be achieved using a hollow ceramic space maintaining device in a rabbit calvaria model. Furthermore, the chemistry of microporous hydroxyapatite and zirconia were tested to determine which of these two ceramics are most suitable for guided bone generation. 24 hollow domes in two different ceramic materials were placed subperiosteal on rabbit skull bone. The rabbits were sacrificed after 12 weeks and the histology results were analyzed regarding bone-to-material contact and volume of newly formed bone. The results suggest that the effect of the microporous structure of hydroxyapatite seems to facilitate for the bone cells to adhere to the material and that zirconia enhance a slightly larger volume of newly formed bone. In conclusion, the results of the current study demonstrated that ceramic space maintaining devices permits new bone formation and osteoconduction within the dome.

  • 45. Archana, M. S.
    et al.
    Srikanth, Vvss
    Joshi, Shrikant. V.
    Joardar, J.
    Influence of applied pressure during field-assisted sintering of Ti(C,N)-WC-FeAl based nanocomposite2015In: Ceramics International, ISSN 0272-8842, E-ISSN 1873-3956, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 1986-1993Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ti(C,N)-WC-FeAl based nanocomposites are processed by field-assisted sintering at 1500 degrees C. The phase and microstructural evolution during the process under the influence of different applied pressures of 30, 50 and 100 MPa are studied using x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Lattice parameters of (Ti,W)(C,N) solid solution and binder phases after sintering are found to vary with applied pressure. The nanocomposite grains are observed to possess a core-rim microstructure. Microstructural variations in terms of type, size and fraction of "corerim" structure as a function of applied pressure are investigated. The hardness and indentation fracture toughness values are in the range of 17.6-18.4 GPa and 5.9-6.8 MPa root m, respectively. These values are comparable with those reported for Ti(C,N)-based composites with metal binder. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd and Techna Group S.r.l. All rights reserved.

  • 46.
    Armakavicius, Nerijus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bouhafs, Chamseddine
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Stanishev, Vallery
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kühne, Philipp
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Knight, Sean
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA.
    Hofmann, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA / Department of Physics and Optical Science, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA.
    Schubert, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA.
    Darakchieva, Vanya
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cavity-enhanced optical Hall effect in epitaxial graphene detected at terahertz frequencies2017In: Applied Surface Science, ISSN 0169-4332, E-ISSN 1873-5584, Vol. 421, p. 357-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cavity-enhanced optical Hall effect at terahertz (THz) frequencies is employed to determine the free charge carrier properties in epitaxial graphene (EG) with different number of layers grown by high-temperature sublimation on 4H-SiC(0001). We find that one monolayer (ML) EG possesses p-type conductivity with a free hole concentration in the low 1012 cmᅵᅵᅵ2 range and a free hole mobility parameter as high as 1550 cm2/Vs. We also find that 6 ML EG shows n-type doping behavior with a much lower free electron mobility parameter of 470 cm2/Vs and an order of magnitude higher free electron density in the low 1013 cmᅵᅵᅵ2 range. The observed differences are discussed. The cavity-enhanced THz optical Hall effect is demonstrated to be an excellent tool for contactless access to the type of free charge carriers and their properties in two-dimensional materials such as EG.

  • 47.
    Atakan, Aylin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mesoporous material systems for catalysis and drug delivery2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hybrid material systems possess multi-functional properties which make them intriguing for the materials science community since very early dates. However, it is not straightforward to produce such material systems. A smart and efficient approach is necessary to extract the desired properties of each component under the desired conditions. This study evolved to its last form primarily around this notion, where the development of a hybrid material is the core of the work. This hybrid material is then further explored for two different applications in the catalysis and drug delivery fields.

    A nanoassembly was established around a mesoporous silica support. SBA-15 was picked as this support among the other mesoporous silica due to its well-defined pore structure and accessible pore volume. The silica framework was doped with Zr atoms and the pores were partly infiltrated with Cu nanoparticles resulting in a hybrid material with tunable properties. SBA-15 was synthesized by a sol-gel method where a micellar solution was employed as a template for the silica framework. To achieve the doped version, a Zr precursor was added to the synthesis solution. The effects of different synthesis conditions, such as the synthesis catalyst (F-or a Cl-salt) and the Si source (tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) or sodium metasilicate (SMS)) on the characteristics of the final material were investigated. It was observed that these changes in the synthesis conditions yielded different particle morphology, pore size (11-15 nm), and specific surface area (400-700 m2/g). Cu nanoparticles (NPs) were grown in the (Zr-)SBA-15 support using infiltration (Inf) or evaporation induced wetness impregnation (EIWI) methods. The infiltration method is based on functionalizing the (Zr-)SBA-15 support surfaces before the Cu ion attachment whereas EIWI is based on slow evaporation of the liquid from the (Zr-)SBA-15 - Cu aqueous suspension. Both methods are designed to yield preferential growth of Cu NPs in the pores with a diameter smaller than 10 nm and in oxidized form. However, depending on the loading method used, different chemical states of the final material were achieved, i.e. Zr content and porous network properties are different. 

    Cu-Zr-SBA-15 nanoassemblies produced under various synthesis conditions were used for the catalytic conversion of CO2into valuable fuels such as methanol and dimethyl ether (DME). The effect of different chemical states of the catalyst arising from variations in the synthesis parameters was investigated. It was found that the Si precursor (TEOS or SMS) had a considerable impact on the overall performance of the catalyst whereas the Cu loading method (Inf or EIWI) changed the catalytic selectivity between DME and methanol. The activity of the catalyst was further investigated in a time-evolution study where the accumulation of each product in the gas phase and the molecular groups attached to the catalyst surface were recorded over time. Accordingly, thermodynamic equilibrium was achieved on the 14th day of the reaction under 250°C and 33 bar. The resulting total CO2conversion was 24%, which is the thermodynamically highest possible conversion, according to theoretical calculations. It was also concluded from the experimental results that, DME is formed by a combination of two methoxy surface groups. Additionally, the formation of DME boosts the total CO2conversion to fuels, which otherwise is limited to 9.5%.

    The design of Cu-Zr-SBA-15 was also investigated for drug delivery applications, due to its potential as a biomaterial, e.g., a filler in dental composites, and the antibacterial properties of Cu. Also, the bioactivity of SiO2and ZrO2was considered to be an advantage. With this aim, Cu infiltrated Zr doped SBA-15 material was prepared by using TEOS as the silica precursor and the Inf-method to grow Cu NPs. The performance of the final material as a drug delivery vehicle was tested by an in-vitro delivery study with chlorhexidine digluconate.The nanoassemblies show a drug loading capacity of 25-40% [mg drug / mg (drug+carrier)]. The drug release was determined to be composed of two steps. First, a burst release of the drug molecules that are loosely held in the voids of the mesoporous carrier followed by the diffusion of the drug molecules that are attached to the carrier surface. The presence of Zr and Cu limits the burst release and beneficially slows down the drug release process. 

    The effect of pore properties of SBA-15 was explored in a study where the antibiotic doxycycline hyclate was loaded in SBA-15 materials with different pore sizes. It was observed that the pore size is directly proportional to the drug loading capacity [mg drug / mg (drug+carrier)] and the released drug percentage (the released drug amount/total amount of loaded drug). The drug release was fast due to its weak interactions with the SBA-15 materials. 

    In summary, this work demonstrates the multifunctional character of a smart-tailored nanoassembly which gives valuable insights for two distinct applications in catalysis and drug delivery.

  • 48.
    Barba, Albert
    et al.
    Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya.
    Maazouz, Yassine
    Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya.
    Diez-Escudero, Anna
    Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya.
    Rappe, Katrin
    Bone Healing Group, Small Animal Surgery Department, Veterinary School, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona.
    Espanol, Montserrat
    Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya.
    Montufar, Edgar
    Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya.
    Öhman, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Fontecha, Pedro
    Bone Healing Group, Small Animal Surgery Department, Veterinary School, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona.
    Manzanares, Maria-Cristina
    Human Anatomy and Embryology Unit, Department of Pathology and Experimental Therapeutics, Universitat de Barcelona.
    Franch, Jordi
    Bone Healing Group, Small Animal Surgery Department, Veterinary School, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona.
    Ginebra, Maria-Pau
    Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya.
    Osteogenesis by foamed and 3D-printed nanostructured calcium phosphate scaffolds: Effect of pore architecture2018In: Acta Biomaterialia, ISSN 1742-7061, E-ISSN 1878-7568, Vol. 79, p. 135-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an urgent need of synthetic bone grafts with enhanced osteogenic capacity. This can be achieved by combining biomaterials with exogenous growth factors, which however can have numerous undesired side effects, but also by tuning the intrinsic biomaterial properties. In a previous study, we showed the synergistic effect of nanostructure and pore architecture of biomimetic calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) scaffolds in enhancing osteoinduction, i.e. fostering the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to bone forming cells. This was demonstrated by assessing bone formation after implanting the scaffolds intramuscularly. The present study goes one step forward, since it analyzes the effect of the geometrical features of the same CDHA scaffolds, obtained either by 3D-printing or by foaming, on the osteogenic potential and resorption behaviour in a bony environment. After 6 and 12 weeks of intraosseous implantation, both bone formation and material degradation had been drastically affected by the macropore architecture of the scaffolds. Whereas nanostructured CDHA was shown to be highly osteoconductive both in the robocast and foamed scaffolds, a superior osteogenic capacity was observed in the foamed scaffolds, which was associated with their higher intrinsic osteoinductive potential. Moreover, they showed a significantly higher cell-mediated degradation than the robocast constructs, with a simultaneous and progressive replacement of the scaffold by new bone. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that the control of macropore architecture is a crucial parameter in the design of synthetic bone grafts, which allows fostering both material degradation and new bone formation. Statement of Significance 3D-printing technologies open new perspectives for the design of patient-specific bone grafts, since they allow customizing the external shape together with the internal architecture of implants. In this respect, it is important to design the appropriate pore geometry to maximize the bone healing capacity of these implants. The present study analyses the effect of pore architecture of nanostructured hydroxyapatite scaffolds, obtained either by 3D-printing or foaming, on the osteogenic potential and scaffold resorption in an in vivo model. While nanostructured hydroxyapatite showed excellent osteoconductive properties irrespective of pore geometry, we demonstrated that the spherical, concave macropores of foamed scaffolds significantly promoted both material resorption and bone regeneration compared to the 3D-printed scaffolds with orthogonal-patterned struts and therefore prismatic, convex macropores.

  • 49. Barick, P.
    et al.
    Prasad Saha, B.
    Mitra, R.
    Joshi, Shrikant V.
    Effect of concentration and molecular weight of polyethylenimine on zeta potential, isoelectric point of nanocrystalline silicon carbide in aqueous and ethanol medium2015In: Ceramics International, ISSN 0272-8842, E-ISSN 1873-3956, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 4289-4293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of dispersant concentration and its molecular weight on zeta potential of nanocrystalline silicon carbide in an aqueous medium was investigated. An increase in the concentration of the dispersant, such as polyethylenimine (PEI), in slurry prepared from nanosized silicon carbide, was found to augment the iso-electric point and zeta potential. However, the zeta potential was observed to decline as the pH of the slurry shifts towards the basic region. This aforementioned behavior is attributed to the enhanced mutual repulsion between the polymer chains of the dispersant adsorbed on the surfaces of SiC particles and those approaching the surfaces. The higher ionization potential of polymers in the acidic region compared to the basic region increases the adsorption. The relationship between zeta potential and pH is however, noted to remain virtually unchanged with molecular weight of PEI. Further, it is observed that zeta potential of SiC decreases with the increase in solid content of the slurry. Rheology study reveals that the ethanol based slurry has a lower viscosity than the water based slurry, making ethanol the preferred dispersing medium for colloidal processing of nanometric SiC powder. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and Techna Group S.r.l.

  • 50.
    Barick, Prasenjit
    et al.
    International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Balapur Post, Hyderabad, 500005 Telangana, India.
    Chakravarty, Dibyendu
    International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Balapur Post, Hyderabad, 500005 Telangana, India.
    Saha, Bhaskar Prasad
    International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Balapur Post, Hyderabad, 500005 Telangana, India.
    Nitra, Rahul
    Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur, 721302 West Bengal, India.
    Joshi, Shrikant
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Balapur Post, Hyderabad, 500005 Telangana, India.
    Effect of pressure and temperature on densification, microstructure and mechanical properties of spark plasma sintered silicon carbide processed with β-silicon carbide nanopowder and sintering additives2016In: Ceramics International, ISSN 0272-8842, E-ISSN 1873-3956, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 3836-3848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of applied pressure and temperature during spark plasma sintering (SPS) of additive-containing nanocrystalline silicon carbide on its densification, microstructure, and mechanical properties have been investigated. Both relative density and grain size are found to increase with temperature. Furthermore, with increase in pressure at constant temperature, the relative density improves significantly, whereas the grain size decreases. Reasonably high relative density (~96%) is achieved on carrying out SPS at 1300 °C under applied pressure of 75 MPa for 5 min, with a maximum of ~97.7% at 1500 °C under 50 MPa for 5 min. TEM studies have shown the presence of an amorphous phase at grain boundaries and triple points, which confirms the formation of liquid phase during sintering and its significant contribution to densification of SiC at relatively lower temperatures (≤1400 °C). The relative density decreases on raising the SPS temperature beyond 1500 °C, probably due to pores caused by vaporization of the liquid phase. Whereas β-SiC is observed in the microstructures for SPS carried out at temperatures ≤1500 °C, α-SiC evolves and its volume fraction increases with further increase in SPS temperatures. Both hardness and Young׳s modulus increase with increase in relative density, whereas indentation fracture toughness appears to be higher in case of two-phase microstructure containing α and β-SiC.

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