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  • 1.
    Aalipour, Mojgan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Human Factors Approach for Maintenance Improvement2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this research work is to explore and describe human factors affectingmaintenance execution. To achieve the purpose of this study, the influencing factors have been identified using a literature survey. They have been categorized into four main groups namely organizational, workplace, job and individual factors. The Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) method is employed on data questionnaires to rank the priority of the factors. The interrelationships between these factors have been recognized by theInterpretive Structural Modelling (ISM) model. In the present case studies, MICMAC1analysis technique is also implemented for identifying the driving, dependent, linkage and autonomous factors. The data was collected through a questionnaire survey involving the participation of 16 and 25 maintenance staff and 10 mining experts in Swedish and Iranian mines, respectively. Within the study, it has been identified that the temperature, work layout, tools design and tools availability are the most important factors in both mines related to these categories. However, the significant factors in the organizational and individual categories are different in the selected mines. The effect of workplace factors on the maintainability of mining equipment is discussed and thereafter a methodology for maintainability management in the design and operation phases is developed. In the thirdcase study HEART2 is applied to estimate the probability of human error occurring duringmaintenance execution in an Iranian cable company. This research supports maintenance management to gain knowledge of human factors that affect maintenance execution. Further, this understanding could be useful in the development of strategies to improve the execution of maintenance.Keywords: Human Factors, Maintenance Management, Human Reliability, HumanPerformance, AHP, ISM, MICMAC, HEART

  • 2.
    Aalipour, Mojgan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Ayele, Yonas Zewdu
    Department of Engineering and Safety, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø.
    Barabadi, Abbas
    Tromsø University, Department of Engineering and Safety, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø.
    Human reliability assessment (HRA) in maintenance of production process: a case study2016In: International Journal of Systems Assurance Engineering and Management, ISSN 0975-6809, E-ISSN 0976-4348, Vol. 7, no 2, 229-238 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human reliability makes a considerable contribution to the maintenance performance, safety, and cost-efficiency of any production process. To improve human reliability, the causes of human errors should be identified and the probability of human errors should be quantified. Analysis of human error is very case-specific; the context of the field should be taken into account. The aim of this study is to identify the causes of human errors and improve human reliability in maintenance activities in the cable manufacturing industry. The central thrust of this paper is to employ the three most common HRA techniques—human error assessment and reduction technique, standardized plant analysis risk-human reliability, and Bayesian network—for estimating human error probabilities and then to check the consistency of the results obtained. The case study results demonstrated that the main causes of human error during maintenance activities are time pressure, lack of experience, and poor procedure. Moreover, the probabilities of human error, obtained by employing the three techniques, are similar and consistent

  • 3.
    Aalipour, Mojgan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Barabadi, Abbas
    Tromsø University, University of Tromsø - The Arctic University of Norway.
    Work place factors effect on maintainability in challenging operating conditions2015In: 2015 IEEE International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management (IEEM): Singapore, 6-9 Dec. 2015, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Communications Society, 2015, 767-771 p., 7385751Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some industries such as mining industry create complex and challenging work place for maintenance crews. For example in an underground mine, for some machines, heavy maintenance tasks must be performed on site in a limited workspace in a harsh environment, including dust and improper illumination. Such operating conditions can increase the health, safety, and environment (HSE) risk, reduce the availability of the machines and increase the life cycle cost of equipment. A review of current mining equipment design and maintenance procedure confirms that considerable reduction in HSE risk, as well as substantial cost savings, can be achieved by considering human factors. This study discusses the effect of workplace factors on the maintainability of mining equipment. It presents the results from questionnaires on the effect of work place factors on maintainability performance given to maintenance staff at two mines, one in northern Sweden and the other in Iran.

  • 4.
    Aalipour, Mojgan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Barabadi, Abbas
    Tromsø University, University of Tromsø - The Arctic University of Norway.
    Maintainability management of production facilities in complex and challenging operating conditions2015In: 2015 IEEE International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management (IEEM): Singapore, 6-9 Dec. 2015, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Communications Society, 2015, 817-820 p., 7385761Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As equipment becomes more complex, repair process becomes more complicated, costly and time-consuming. Maintainability principles are developed to facilitate the repair process. Maintainability principles are applied in design phase and they are characteristic that affects time, accuracy, ease and safety requirements of the repair process. Considering Maintainability principles in the design phase are critical in challenging operational conditions such as Arctic offshore. To have an effective design for maintainability a systematic management approach is required during the design phase. This paper is developed a systematic guideline for maintainability management as an engineering discipline for challenges operational condition

  • 5.
    Aalipour, Mojgan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Singh, Sarbjeet
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Identification of Factors affecting Human performance in Mining Maintenance tasks2014In: Proceedings of the 3rd international workshop and congress on eMaintenance: June 17-18 Luleå, Sweden : eMaintenance, Trends in technologies & methodologies, challenges, possibilites and applications / [ed] Uday Kumar; Ramin Karim; Aditya Parida; Philip Tretten, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2014, 71-76 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the factors affecting humanperformance in maintenance task in mining sector. Theobjective is identify various factors and to classify them asdriving (strong driving power and weak dependence) anddependent factors (weak driving power and strongdependence). The factors were identified through literaturesurvey and are ranked using mean score of data questionnaire.The reliability of measures is pretested by applyingCronbach’s alpha coefficient to responses to a questionnairegiven to maintenance personnel. The interrelationshipsbetween human factors have been recognized by interpretivestructural modeling (ISM). Further, these factors have beenclassified using matrice d'impacts croises-multiplicationappliqué à un classement (MICMAC) analysing. This casestudy will figure out the factors affecting human performancefor deriving maintenance management insights to improveproductivity in the mining sector. Further, this understandingmay be helpful in framing the policies and strategies formining industry. Temperature, lighting, documentation,communication and fitness are driving factors. Moreover,Work layout, tools availability, complex tasks, time pressure,safety, boss decisions, training, fatigue and motivation havestrong driving power as well as high dependencies and itcomes under the category of linkage factors.

  • 6.
    Abbasiverki, Roghayeh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Ansell, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Initial study on seismic analyses of concrete and embankment dams in Sweden2017Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Abdelmajid, Yezeed
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geodesy and Geoinformatics.
    Investigation and Comparison of 3D Laser Scanning Software Packages2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Laser scanning technologies has become an important tool in many engineering projects and applications. The output of laser measuring is the point cloud, which is processed in a way that makes it suitable for different applications. Processing of point cloud data is achieved through laser scanning software packages. Depending on the field of application, these packages have many different kinds of functions and methods that can be used. The main processing tasks used on a laser scanning software package include registration, modelling and texture mapping. Investigation and comparison of two laser scanning processing packages (Leica Cyclone and InnovMetric PolyWorks) are performed in this study. The theoretical and mathematical backgrounds of the above functions are presented and discussed. The available methods and functions used by each of the packages for these tasks are addressed and discussed. By using sample data, these functions are trailed and their results are compared and analyzed.

    The results from registration tests show the same results on both packages for the registration using target methods. Although, the results of cloud-to-cloud registration show some deviation from target registration results, they are more close to each other in both packages than to the target registration results. This indicates the efficiency of cloud-to-cloud methods in averaging the total registration error on all used points, unlike target registration methods.

    The modelling tests show more differences in the accuracy of generated models between the two packages. For both fitting and surface construction methods, PolyWorks showed better results and capabilities for three-dimensional modelling. As a result, the advantages and disadvantages of each package are presented in relation with the used task and methods, and a review of data exchange abilities is presented.

  • 8.
    Abdi, Adel Hirmand
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transportvetenskap, Väg- och banteknik.
    Contract forms and agreements for operation and maintenance of highways and railways during winter2011Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Abdi, Adel Hirmand
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transportvetenskap, Väg- och banteknik.
    Key aspects in winter highway operation and maintenance2010Report (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Abdi, Adel Hirmand
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transportvetenskap, Väg- och banteknik.
    Technical and contractual aspects in winter highway and railway operation and maintenance: a survey of current technical systems and contract forms in Sweden2011Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Abdi, Shorash
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management.
    Stedt, Fredrik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management.
    Utvärdering av Leicas multistations och laserskanners mätosäkerheter2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Presently there is no standard for the evaluation of measurement uncertainties for terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) despite the fact that the instrument has been on the market and used for a long time. Since the manufacturer's specifications do not always correspond with reality, it is important to have knowledge about how well the instrument performs. Numerous studies over the past decade have applied different approaches to estimate the measurement uncertainties on various TLS.

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the measurement uncertainties of the TLS Leica ScanStation C10 with the multi station Leica Nova MS50 under two different weather conditions. The uncertainty was calculated using ISO 17123-5:2012, which is an international standard developed for acquiring measurement uncertainties of total stations, to investigate whether this standard could also be applicable for TLS. The survey, which took place outdoor at the University of Gävle, was carried out by scanning targets that were set up in a triangle formation from three stations. Both spheres and HDS-targets were scanned with the TLS while the MS50 only scanned spheres. The targets were scanned four times from each instrument setup. Cyclone was used to find the coordinates on the center of the targets which were used to calculate the uncertainties according to the ISO-standard. The results showed that the 3D-uncertainty of C10 with HDS-target and spheres were 2.9 mm and 3.5 mm during sunny conditions and 1.1 mm and 1.4 mm during cloudy conditions, respectively. In the case of the MS50, the uncertainty was 3.0 mm during sunny and 3.7 mm during cloudy conditions. MS50 demonstrated a higher 3D-uncertainty in both weather conditions due to high uncertainty in the vertical direction. In addition, a chi-two-test carried out on the TLS showed that the calculated uncertainty in plane and height did not significantly deviate from the manufacturer's specified uncertainty when using HDS-targets during cloudy conditions. Furthermore, it was found in the F-test that there was a significant difference in plane and height between two scans with the same instrument and target type in different weather conditions. MS50 did not show any significant difference at all. The results of this study showed that there will be a significantly lower uncertainty when scanning in cloudy conditions. Our conclusion is that it is possible to apply the standard to calculate the measurement uncertainties on TLS and ISO should consider using the same standard for TLS as the total station.

  • 12.
    Abdul Al, Fatima
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Alla barns lekplats: En studie om tillgängligheten på lekplatser2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is one of the leading countries when it comes to availability in the physical environment. Approximately 7 000 children in Sweden are disabled. Half of these children use a wheelchair. It is every child’s right to play, and it’s thereby interesting to know whether every child is given the opportunity to use a playground. In the county of Helsingborg there are playgrounds appealing to many children, although the question is whether every child is given the chance to play at these playgrounds.

    The aim of this study is to highlight the importance of availability at playgrounds and outline ways to improve the availability. The method used in this thesis is a literature study, focusing on legal framework and literature about availability, usability and playgrounds. The case study provides information about eight playgrounds in Helsingborg. There is also an interview with landscape architect Johanna Elgström.

    Playgrounds where availability has been prioritized are often more available and useable for wheelchair-bound children. Still, the legal framework is in need of a more precise definition of availability and usability to ensure that playgrounds are suitable for children using a wheelchair. The playgrounds that are more available and useable can favor children using a wheelchair and give them the opportunity to socially interact with other children.

  • 13.
    Abdula, Sham
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building Technology.
    Oksman, Dan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building Technology.
    Attefallshus som komplementbostadshus: Drömhus eller mardröm?2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Den 2 juli 2014 blev det enligt lag tillåtet för en- och tvåbostadshusägare att uppföra en bygglovsbefriad komplementbyggnad på max 25 kvadratmeter på den egna fastigheten. Rapporten undersöker vilket genomslag lagändringen har haft i Stor-Stockholm, Stor-Göteborg och Stor-Malmö. Undersökningen visar att lagändringen ännu inte har haft något stort genomslag. I rapporten undersöks även en utvald del av marknadsaktörers utbud av attefallshus avsett som komplementbostadshus. 

    Ett attefallshus utformas med miljövänligt hållbara material och inspireras av Vitruvius tre principer för god arkitektur. Huset konstrueras med avsikt att uppfylla kraven som ställs i PBL, PBF, BBR och EKS. Målet med de framtagna bygghandlingarna är att få startbesked från byggnadsnämnden i Växjö. 

  • 14.
    Abdulameer, Hasanain
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering.
    Chamoun, Kristian
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering.
    BIM i små och medelstora anläggningsföretag.2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this bachelor thesis is to improve the usage of BIM in facility projects.

    Method: The methods used for this bachelor thesis are qualitative interviews and literature studies.

    Findings: Free programs will be available for usage where models can be opened, viewed, examined and studied. The small and medium-sized facility companies will not be forced to use resources to cope with the requirements of Trafikverket.

    Implications: Consequences are that the small and medium-sized civil engineering companies understand and follow the requirements.

    • Using more 3D models to gain more experience and skills in the subject.

    • Attend the Trafikverkets industry days when opportunities arise, the authors believe that it was very instructive.

    • Engage in more BIM projects.

    • Older projects where the drawings are in 2D is converted into 3D.

     

    Limitations: How BIM is used during the management process will not be covered.

    Keywords: Productivity, resource, competence, experience, BIM.

  • 15.
    Abeysekera, John
    et al.
    ndustrial Ergonomics, Work Science Academy (WSA), Linköping.
    Illankoon, Prasanna
    Work Science Academy (WSA), Kandana, Sri Lanka.
    The demands and benefits of ergonomics in Sri Lankan apparel industry2016In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 55, no 2, 255-261 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apparel exports bring in sizeable foreign income to Sri Lanka. To protect and promote this industry is a paramount need. This can be carried out by applying Human Factors/Ergonomics (HFE) which has proved to control negative effects at work places. This paper reports a case study which describes the demands and benefits of HFE in MAS Holdings which owns a large share of the apparel industry in Sri Lanka.The study consisted of walk through observation survey, a questionnaire survey and ergonomic work place analysis followed by a training programme to selected employees in three companies.Positive responses to questionnaires revealed good ergonomic practices in the work places surveyed. Ergonomically unfit chairs and potential hazards e.g. exposure to noise and hot environment were detected. It is seen that MAS have introduced strategies originated by Toyota Production System viz. 5S, Kaizen, six sigma etc., which are in fact ergonomic methods. A progressive project MAS boast of viz. ‘MAS Operating System’ (MOS) empowers training and development to employees.MAS Holdings has adequately realized the benefits of applying HFE as evident by the number of awards received. Relevant companies were advised to take appropriate corrective measures to control the potential hazards.

  • 16.
    Abrahamsson, Evelina
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Spatial Planning.
    Översvämningsrisker i kustnära städer: Sölvesborg, Karlshamn, Ronneby, Karlskrona2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 17.
    Ackemo, Sandra
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Construction.
    Hästanpassade vägar: I Leksands Kommun2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Approximately 13 000 persons get injured every year in Sweden while riding or handling a horse. Due to regulations, a horse is not allowed on to the walk- and cycle path or the sidewalks. Since some places don’t have paths developed for the horse, the equipage is forced out in trafficked roads. The horse is a prey animal, they run first and then they stop to see what the potential threat was. This, in combination with car driver´s general lack of knowledge about horses, could increase the possibility of an accident.The purpose of this project is to evaluate if the equestrian practitioners find it difficult to be in traffic environment with the horse and how commonly practitioners use public roads with the horse. The purpose is also to provide a review of how well the equestrian practitioners are aware of the traffic rules regarding horses in traffic. The main purpose of this thesis is, however, to offer suggestions on how road design should be improved with regard to road safety, security and accessibility for equestrian practitioners.

    The study was carried out with a questionnaire and studying literature. The questionnaire was handed out to 38 members of the riding club of Leksand. The results show that the knowledge of traffic rules could be increased among the ones who answered the questionnaire. They also think that the horse needs to be a part of the community and infrastructure planning and that all road-users need to learn more about horses in traffic, to better understand its behavior. Other proposals are lowered speed limits for motorized traffic at

  • 18.
    Acuña, José
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Distributed thermal response tests: New insights on U-pipe and Coaxial heat exchangers in groundwater-filled boreholes2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    U-pipe Borehole Heat Exchangers (BHE) are widely used today in ground source heating and cooling systems in spite of their less than optimal performance. This thesis provides a better understanding on the function of U-pipe BHEs and Investigates alternative methods to reduce the temperature difference between the circulating fluid and the borehole wall, including one thermosyphon and three different types of coaxial BHEs.

    Field tests are performed using distributed temperature measurements along U-pipe and coaxial heat exchangers installed in groundwater filled boreholes. The measurements are carried out during heat injection thermal response tests and during short heat extraction periods using heat pumps. Temperatures are measured inside the secondary fluid path, in the groundwater, and at the borehole wall. These type of temperature measurements were until now missing.

    A new method for testing borehole heat exchangers, Distributed Thermal Response Test (DTRT), has been proposed and demonstrated in U-pipe, pipe-in-pipe, and multi-pipe BHE designs. The method allows the quantification of the BHE performance at a local level.

    The operation of a U-pipe thermosyphon BHE consisting of an insulated down-comer and a larger riser pipe using CO2 as a secondary fluid has been demonstrated in a groundwater filled borehole, 70 m deep. It was found that the CO2 may be sub-cooled at the bottom and that it flows upwards through the riser in liquid state until about 30 m depth, where it starts to evaporate.

    Various power levels and different volumetric flow rates have been imposed to the tested BHEs and used to calculate local ground thermal conductivities and thermal resistances. The local ground thermal conductivities, preferably evaluated at thermal recovery conditions during DTRTs, were found to vary with depth. Local and effective borehole thermal resistances in most heat exchangers have been calculated, and their differences have been discussed in an effort to suggest better methods for interpretation of data from field tests.

    Large thermal shunt flow between down- and up-going flow channels was identified in all heat exchanger types, particularly at low volumetric flow rates, except in a multi-pipe BHE having an insulated central pipe where the thermal contact between down- and up-coming fluid was almost eliminated.

    At relatively high volumetric flow rates, U-pipe BHEs show a nearly even distribution of the heat transfer between the ground and the secondary fluid along the depth. The same applies to all coaxial BHEs as long as the flow travels downwards through the central pipe. In the opposite flow direction, an uneven power distribution was measured in multi-chamber and multi-pipe BHEs.

    Pipe-in-pipe and multi-pipe coaxial heat exchangers show significantly lower local borehole resistances than U-pipes, ranging in average between 0.015 and 0.040 Km/W. These heat exchangers can significantly decrease the temperature difference between the secondary fluid and the ground and may allow the use of plain water as secondary fluid, an alternative to typical antifreeze aqueous solutions. The latter was demonstrated in a pipe-in-pipe BHE having an effective resistance of about 0.030 Km/W.

    Forced convection in the groundwater achieved by injecting nitrogen bubbles was found to reduce the local thermal resistance in U-pipe BHEs by about 30% during heat injection conditions. The temperatures inside the groundwater are homogenized while injecting the N2, and no radial temperature gradients are then identified. The fluid to groundwater thermal resistance during forced convection was measured to be 0.036 Km/W. This resistance varied between this value and 0.072 Km/W during natural convection conditions in the groundwater, being highest during heat pump operation at temperatures close to the water density maximum.

  • 19.
    Adanko, Carina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Built Environment.
    Küller, Marianne
    Lunds universitet, LTH, Inst arkitektur och byggd miljö, Miljöpsykologi.
    LED-belysning och brukaren2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lighting research is diversified and includes theory and methodology from disciplines as different as technology, medicine and social sciences. There is also an expectation on research results to be directly applicable in real environments. The introduction of LED has furthermore made previous research on incandescent lamps, fluorescent lamps and other light sources, outdated.    New knowledge – and new research – is needed.

    An inventory of current LED-research was made during 2013. The result of this inventory is the basis of the research review here presented. The presentation includes more than 400 articles, reported under the headings: The biological clock; Flicker and dimming of LED: Energy efficiency: daylight and lighting control; Colour rendering; Glare, and finally; Perceived lighting qualities.

    Underlying theoretical considerations as well as actual knowledge are presented in the text of the different sections, and references are given to relevant research publications. All publications have been provided with two or more keywords in Swedish, describing the content of the publication. After the text given under each heading the references supporting this text are presented. In the final section all LED-publications are given in alphabetical order according to author and with keywords. 

  • 20.
    Agnefeldt, Anton
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Spatial Planning.
    Idrottsarenor & Allmänt Intresse: En Fallstudie Över Kalmar Arena2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 21.
    Agriam, Pia
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering.
    Socialt hållbart boende2016Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    We need more research about what gives man good conditions for quality of life in a home environment. Social sustainability is a topic that is cherished more than ever in the world of architectures. The goal is to develop a knowledge base based on the experiences of users, architects and clients that can be used for the design of residential areas with apartment buildings.

    To achieve the goal there are questions to be answered as: "How is socially sustainable housing valued, according to architects and clients, when residential areas with apartment buildings are designed?" and "How are the values of social sustainability perceived, in residential areas with newly constructed apartment buildings, of the residents?" The questions are answered by means of an survey and several of interviews which together constitute a qualitative research.

    The results show that social sustainability can be seen from different angles. It is common to observe social sustainability from a community perspective and from an urban perspective according to scientific references. As an overall summary it is the beautiful shape and appearance of a building and its functionality weighed in with a reasonable cost that creates a socially sustainable housing according to interviews with architects and clients. It is about balance between beauty, functionality and economy, which together create a housing that lasts over time and confirms the human social dignity. According to those living in the area of Nysäter in Mölnlycke as the studied phenomenon, socially sustainable housing stands for comfort, security, privacy and community. Access to nature and outdoor activities, fresh air and good neighbourship are other factors that are highly valued. Socially sustainable housing has therefore connections to both physical parameters as well as non-physical qualities that needs to be linked with each other.

    The summarized results highlight the essential aspects that should be included in the planning of a new residential complex for it to be socially sustainable for residents. The knowledge base has a logical order from analyzing an unspoilt area with its qualities to analyze how the private residence must meet human needs for well-being.

    The Report is wide in its choice of subject tough it is limited to man's relationship to the dwelling and residential area in social contexts, how individuals perceive their environment both in and outside their home. With additional constraints had a deeper research been able to implement on a specific theme.

  • 22.
    Ahlbäck, Ida
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering.
    Detaljplanering: Förslag till exploatering  Del av Sävast 17:42017Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 23.
    Ahlroth, Sofia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Convergent validity test of structural benefit transfer: the case of water qualityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Ahlroth, Sofia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategic Analysis.
    Costs and benefits of climate change : a bottom-up analysisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Ahlroth, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategic Analysis.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategic Analysis.
    Ecovalue08-a new valuation method for environmental systems analysis toolsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Ahlroth, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategic Analysis.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Sustainable energy prices and growth: Comparing macroeconomic and backcasting scenarios2007In: Ecological Economics, ISSN 0921-8009, E-ISSN 1873-6106, Vol. 63, no 4, 722-731 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do results from the sustainability research world of backcasting relate to the macroeconomic scenarios used for policy evaluation and planning? The answer is that they don't, mostly - they come from different scientific traditions and are not used in the same contexts. Yet they often deal with the same issues. We believe that much can be gained by bringing the two systems of thinking together. This paper is a first attempt to do so, by making qualitative comparisons between different scenarios and highlighting benefits and limitations to each of them. Why are the pictures we get of the energy future so different if we use a macroeconomic model from when using a backcasting approach based on sustainable energy use? It is evident that the methods for producing those two kinds of scenarios differ a lot, but the main reason behind the different results are found in the starting points rather than in the methods. Baseline assumptions are quite different, as well as the interpretations and importance attached to signals about the future. in this paper, it is discussed how those two types of scenarios differ and how they approach issues such as energy prices and growth. The discussion is based on a comparison between Swedish economic and sustainability scenarios. The economic scenarios aim at being forecasts of the future and are used as decision support for long-term policies. But are the assumptions in the economic scenarios reasonable? The sustainability scenarios are explicitly normative backcasting scenarios. They do not take the issue of growth and consumption fully into account. Could they be developed in this respect? The comparison between the scenarios is also used to look closer at the issue of energy prices in a society with sustainable energy use. One of the questions raised is if a low energy society calls for high energy prices. Moreover, the effects of tradable permits versus energy taxes is analysed in the context of how energy use could be kept low in a growing economy.

  • 27.
    Ahlroth, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Nilsson, Måns
    SEI.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Hjelm, Olof
    Linköpings universitet.
    Hochschorner, Elisabeth
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Weightning and valuation in environmental systems analysis toolsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Ahmadi, Alireza
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Block, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Garmabaki, Amir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Project: Efficient Performance Based Air Vehicle Maintenance, Supported by VINNOVA (NFFP-6), Luleå University of Technology, Saab Support and Services, SAAB Aeronautics2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Ahmadi, Alireza
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Block, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Garmabaki, Amir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Project: Enhanced Life Cycle Assessment for Performance-Based Logistics, Supported by Vinnova (NFFP-5), Saab Support Service and Luleå University of Technology2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Ahmadi, Alireza
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Block, Jan
    Kumar, Uday
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Risk based maintenance deferral for components subject to hidden failure2012In: 2012 proceedings: Annual Reliability and Maintainability Symposium (RAMS 2012) : Reno, Nevada 23-26 Jan. 2012, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Communications Society, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the aviation industry, it may be necessary to employ a combination of Failure Finding Inspection (FFI) and a scheduled discard task at a specific threshold, when a component is aging and its failures are hidden and exert a “safety effect”. This is to ensure an adequate level of availability of hidden functions, and to reduce the risk of multiple failures to an acceptable level. However, in some situations, operators prefer to extend the discard life of components beyond their recommended life limit, due to operational needs or logistic issues. This necessitates the definition of an optimal Failure Finding Inspection interval for the extended life period. The main purpose of this paper is to develop analytical and graphical methodologies to identify the optimal FFI interval for extension of the discard life of aircraft components. The paper considers repairable components which are periodically tested. The methodology assumes that the inspection and repair actions lead to as-bad-as-old (ABAO) reliability characteristics.The graphical approach proposed in this paper considers inspection and repair times, as well as the costs associated with accidents, inspection, and repair, and it takes into account the opportunity losses due to the maintenance downtime. The analytical approach for calculating the unavailability of the hidden function is based on the Mean Fractional Dead Time (MFDT).

  • 31.
    Ahmadi, Alireza
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Garmabaki, Amir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Ghodrati, Behzad
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Kumar, Uday
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Optimum inspection interval for hidden functions during extended life2015In: International Journal of COMADEM, ISSN 1363-7681, Vol. 18, no 3, 45-49 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Ahmadi, Alireza
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Ghodrati, Behzad
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Garmabaki, Amir Soleimani
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Kumar, Uday
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Optimum inspection interval for hidden functions during extended life2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Ahmadi, Alireza
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Ghodrati, Behzad
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Rantatalo, Matti
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Optimum Failure Finding Inspection During Extended Operation Life2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a complex system such as railway and aviation equipment’s, it may be necessary to employ a combination of Failure Finding Inspection (FFI) and a scheduled discard task, as suggested by Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM). This strategy ensures an adequate level of availability of hidden functions, as well as the reduction of the risk of multiple failures to an acceptable level. However, in some situations, operators prefer to extend the discard life of components beyond their recommended life limit, due to the operational restrictions. This necessitates the definition of an optimal Failure Finding Inspection interval for the extended life period. This paper aims to provide a mathematical model for defining optimal FFI interval, during the extended period of the replacement life. A cost function (CF) is developed to identify the cost per unit of time associated with different FFI intervals, for the proposed extended period of life, i.e. postponement period. The proposed method concerns as-bad-as-old (ABAO) inspection and repairs (due to failures found by inspection). It considers inspection and repair times, and takes into account the costs associated with inspection and repair, the opportunity cost of lost production due to maintenance downtime created by inspection and repair actions, and also the cost of accidents due to the occurrence of multiple failure

  • 34.
    Ahmadi, Alireza
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Gupta, Suprakash
    Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi.
    Ghodrati, Behzad
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Galar, Diego
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Estimation of economic consequences of aircraft system failures2012In: Communications in Dependability and Quality Management, ISSN 1450-7196, Vol. 15, no 1, 39-49 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A large portion of the direct and indirect aircraft operational costs stems from the consequences of decisions made during the maintenance program development. Decision on maintenance task selection for non-safety category of failures, is based on the cost effectiveness, in which the cost of preventive maintenance should be less than the costs associated with the corrective action and failure consequence. Although the assessment of the direct cost for preventive and corrective maintenance is quiet straightforward, however quantification and estimation of the cost associated with the consequence of failure is a great challenge. This is due to a long list of contributory factors and lack of adequate data regarding the cost headings. This study attempts to estimate the economic consequences of aircraft system failures which lead to a technical delay. The paper considers financial losses, mostly due to the additional unexpected costs related to the flight crew, passengers, aircraft itself, ramp and airport, when one of the cost headings, e.g. the pre-fixed crew cost is known. The experience of the field experts has been used following a pairwise comparison technique to compare the cost headings, and to estimate the contribution of each one to the total cost of a delay. The study shows that the proposed model can be a tool to assess the cost of failure consequences in aircraft operation, when there is a limited data and information regarding the cost headings.

  • 35.
    Ahmadi, Alireza
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Soleimanmeigouni, Iman
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Block, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Letot, Christophe
    University of Mons.
    Optimum failure management strategy for periodically inspected units with imperfect maintenance2016In: IFAC PAPERSONLINE, ISSN 2405-8963, Vol. 49, no 12, 799-804 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to develop a reliability-based cost model for periodically inspected units subject to hidden functions, with imperfect restoration (overhaul) action after a certain number of inspections. In the model, effectiveness of the consecutive restoration actions is considered, and possible alternative maintenance strategies are identified and compared. The method is based on the Total Cost and identifies the optimum interval and frequency of inspections, as well as restoration that minimize the total life cycle cost. In the proposed model, repair due to failures found by inspection is considered as minimal repair, and restoration/overhaul action is considered as normal repair. The result also shows that for a specific value of restoration effectiveness (θ0), when θ> θ0, the behavior of alternatives tends to as-bad-as-old and for θ< θ0 tends to an as-good-as-new. It is also observed that when the cost of accident is high it is needed to perform inspections at smaller intervals.

  • 36.
    Ahmadi, Alireza
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Soleimanmeigouni, Iman
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Letot, Christopher
    Machine Design and Production Engineering Unit, Research Institute for the Science and Manage ment of Risks, University of Mons.
    Block, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Inspection Optimization under imperfect maintenance performance2017In: Proceedings of MPMM 2016: 6th International Conference on Maintenance Performance Measurement and Management, 28 November 2016, Luleå, Sweden / [ed] Diego Galar, Dammika Seneviratne, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2017, 139- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scheduled maintenance and inspection development is one of the main requirements for emergency equipment and safety devices. These types of devices have hidden functions which are used intermittently or infrequently, so their failure will not be evident to the operating crew. The analytical model presented in this paper deals with the periodically tested units with overhauls (preventive maintenance) after certain number of inspections and a renewal after a series of overhauls. The cost based optimization method presented in this paper identifies the optimum interval and frequency of Failure Finding Inspection (FFI) and restoration. In the proposed model, repair due to failures found by inspection makes the unit As Bad As Old, and restoration/overhaul action rejuvenates the unit to any condition between As Good As New and As Bad As Old. As Good As New effectiveness also is considered for renewal action. It considers inspection and repair times, and takes into account the costs associated with inspection, repair, restoration, and also the cost of accidents due to the occurrence of multiple failure. The results show that when the unit is not under aging process, the optimal alternative for each inspection interval is the one with highest possible number of inspection without restoration. Finally, it is observed that when the cost of accident is quite high it is needed to perform inspections at smaller intervals to control the risk of accident.

  • 37.
    Ahmadi, Mahdieh
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Engineering, Mazandaran University of Science and Technology, Babol.
    Mahdavi, Iraj
    Department of Industrial Engineering, Mazandaran University of Science and Technology, Babol.
    Garmabaki, Amir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Multi up-gradation Software Reliability for Open Source Software2016In: Current Trends in Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Safety: An Industry Perspective / [ed] Uday Kumar; Alireza Ahmadi; Ajit Kumar Verma; Prabhakar Varde, Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2016, 691-702 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays, software companies have to continuously do up-gradation or add-ons in their software to survive in the market. This paper presents an effective reliability model for multi release open source software (OSS), which derived based on software lifecycle development process (SDLC) proposed by Jørgensen [1]. Most of OSS reliability models proposed in the literature are based on closed-form methodology and do not consider the properties of OSS in the model structure. The proposed model, incorporate bugs removed from two different phases, namely a pre-commit test and parallel debugging test. Furthermore, the proposed model is based on the assumptions that the overall fault removal of the new release depends on the reported faults from the previous release of the software and on the faults generated due to adding some new functionalities to the existing software system. The parameters of model have been estimated on real software failure dataset with three releases and goodness of fit of values have been calculated. Results show that the proposed model fits the data reasonably well and present better accuracy in comparison with other methods.

  • 38.
    Ahmadi, Mahdieh
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Engineering, Mazandaran University of Science and Technology, Babol.
    Seneviratne, Dammika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Garmabaki, Amir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    An approach to Symbolic Modelling: a Railway Case study for Maintenance Recovery Level Identification2017In: Proceedings of MPMM 2016: 6th International Conference on Maintenance Performance Measurement and Management, 28 November 2016, Luleå, Sweden / [ed] Diego Galar, Dammika Seneviratne, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2017, 187- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing demand for quality and reliability of the asset is progressively seen as a motivation for improved maintenance procedure and management. Always the role of qualitative maintenance data is neglected in the maintenance recovery level identification. Human factor parameter in the maintenance and qualitative technical data, for instance, maintenance experience, maintenance knowledge, training, quality before maintenance, number of previous maintenance, maintenance documentation and environmental condition can be collected and evaluated to increase the accuracy of maintenance recovery estimation. This information always expressed linguistically and considering their effect in the recovery model is challenging. The aim of this study is to propose a symbolic model to capture the effect of above qualitative factor on maintenance recovery level. Fuzzy inference systems are applied to qualitative expert knowledge to extract the percentage effect which can be incorporated in the recovery level model. The tamping railway case study is considered to validate the model. The results show that the maintenance experience and environmental condition are playing main role in maintenance quality. The application of above method can be extended to asset condition assessment in combination with data driven and physical model

  • 39.
    Ahmadzadeh, Farzaneh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Ghodrati, Behzad
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Kumar, Uday
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Mean Residual Life Estimation Considering Operating Environment2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cost of maintenance of mechanized and automated mining systems is too high necessitating efforts to enhance the effectiveness of maintenance systems and organization. For effective maintenance planning, it is important to have a good understanding of the reliability and availability characteristics of the systems. This is essential for determining the Mean Residual Life (MRL) of systems so that maintenance tasks could be planned effectively. In this paper we used the statistical approach to estimate MRL. A Weibull proportional hazard model (PHM) with time-independent covariates was considered for modelling of the hazard function so that operating environment could be integrated in the reliability analysis. Methods are presented for calculating the conditional reliability function and computing the MRL as a function of the current conditions to guarantee the desired output. The model is verified and validated using data from the Hydraulic system of an LHD fleet from a Swedish mine. The results obtained from the analysis is useful to estimate the remaining useful life of such system which can be subsequently used for effective maintenance planning and help controlling unplanned stoppages of highly mechanized and automated systems.

  • 40.
    Ahmadzadeh, Farzaneh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Lundberg, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Application of multi regressive linear model and neural network for wear prediction of grinding mill liners2013In: International Journal of Advanced Computer Sciences and Applications, ISSN 2158-107X, E-ISSN 2156-5570, Vol. 4, no 5, 53-58 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The liner of an ore grinding mill is a critical component in the grinding process, necessary for both high metal recovery and shell protection. From an economic point of view, it is important to keep mill liners in operation as long as possible, minimising the downtime for maintenance or repair. Therefore, predicting their wear is crucial. This paper tests different methods of predicting wear in the context of remaining height and remaining life of the liners. The key concern is to make decisions on replacement and maintenance without stopping the mill for extra inspection as this leads to financial savings. The paper applies linear multiple regression and artificial neural networks (ANN) techniques to determine the most suitable methodology for predicting wear. The advantages of the ANN model over the traditional approach of multiple regression analysis include its high accuracy.

  • 41.
    Ahmadzadeh, Farzaneh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Lundberg, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Remaining useful life estimation: Review2014In: International Journal of Systems Assurance Engineering and Management, ISSN 0975-6809, E-ISSN 0976-4348, Vol. 5, no 4, 461-474 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reviews the recent modelling developments in estimating the remaining useful life (RUL) of industrial systems. The RUL estimation models are categorized into experimental, data driven, physics based and hybrid approaches. The paper reviews some typical approaches and discusses their advantages and disadvantages. According to the literature, the selection of the best model depends on the level of accuracy and availability of data. In cases of quick estimations which are less accurate, the data driven method is preferred, while the physics based approach is applied when the accuracy of estimation is important.

  • 42.
    Ahmadzadeh, Farzaneh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Lundberg, Jan
    Remaining useful life prediction of grinding mill liners using an artificial neural network2013In: Minerals Engineering, ISSN 0892-6875, E-ISSN 1872-9444, Vol. 53, 1-8 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowing the remaining useful life of grinding mill liners would greatly facilitate maintenance decisions. Now, a mill must be stopped periodically so that the maintenance engineer can enter, measure the liners’ wear, and make the appropriate maintenance decision. As mill stoppage leads to heavy production losses, the main aim of this study is to develop a method which predicts the remaining useful life of the liners, without needing to stop the mill. Because of the proven ability of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to recognize complex relationships between input and output variables, as well as its adaptive and parallel information-processing structure, an ANN has been designed based on the various process parameters which influence wear of the liners. The process parameters were considered as inputs while remaining height and remaining life of the liners were outputs. The results show remarkably high degree of correlation between the input and output variables. The performance of the neural network model is very consistent for data used for training (seen) and testing (unseen).

  • 43.
    Ahmadzadeh, Farzaneh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Lundberg, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Strömberg, Thomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mathematical Science.
    Multivariate process parameter change identification by neural network2013In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 69, no 9-12, 2261-2268 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whenever there is an out-of-control signal in process parameter control charts, maintenance engineers try to diagnose the cause near the time of the signal which is not always lead to prompt identification of the source(s) of the out-of-control condition and this in some cases yields to extremely high monetary loses for manufacture owner. This paper applies multivariate exponentially weighted moving average (MEWMA) control charts and neural networks to make the signal identification more effective. The simulation of this procedure shows that this new control chart can be very effective in detecting the actual change point for all process dimension and all shift magnitudes considered. This methodology can be used in manufacturing and process industries to predict change points and expedite the search for failure causing parameters, resulting in improved quality at reduced overall cost. This research shows development of MEWMA by usage of neural network for identifying the step change point and the variable responsible for the change in the process mean vector.

  • 44.
    Ahmed, Abubeker W.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Erlingsson, Sigurdur
    Evaluation of permanent deformation models for unbound granular materials using accelerated pavement tests2013In: International Journal on Road Materials and Pavement Design, ISSN 1468-0629, Vol. 14, no 1, 178-195 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mechanistic-empirical (M-E) pavement design methods have become the focus of modern pavement design procedure. One of the main distresses that M-E design methods attempt to control is permanent deformation (rutting). The objective of this paper is to evaluate three M-E permanent deformation models for unbound granular materials, one from the US M-E pavement design guide and two other relatively new models. Two series of heavy vehicle simulator (HVS) tests with three different types of base material were used for this purpose. The permanent deformation, wheel loading, pavement temperature, and other material properties were continuously controlled during the HVS tests. Asphalt concrete layers were considered as linear elastic where stress-dependent behaviour of unbound materials was considered when computing responses for the M-E permanent deformation models with a nonlinear elastic response model. Traffic wandering was also accounted for in modelling the traffic by assuming it was normally distributed and a time-hardening approach was applied to add together the permanent deformation contributions from different stress levels. The measured and predicted permanent deformations are in general in good agreement with only small discrepancies between the models. Model parameters were also estimated for three different types of material.

  • 45.
    Ahnlén, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geodesy and Satellite Positioning.
    MAP DESIGN: A development of background map visualisation in Digpro dpPower application2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    What is good map design and how should information best be visualised for a human reader? This is a general question relevant for all types of design and especially for digital maps and various Geographic Information Systems (GIS), due to the rapid development of our digital world. This general question is answered in this thesis by presenting a number of principles and tips for design of maps and specifically interactive digital visualisation systems, such as a GIS.

    Furthermore, this knowledge is applied to the application dpPower, by Digpro, which present the tools to help customers manage, visualise, design and perform calculations on their electrical networks. The visualisation and design of the network was analysed together with the usage of two common background maps, GSD-Fastighetskartan by Lantmäteriet and Primärkartan by the municipalities, whose default appearances are defined by Digpro. The aim was to answer whether there is a more suitable design of the background maps and network to better complement the usage of dpPower and if so, what is the better design?

    When designing interactive systems that will later have various end-users, a user-centred design is important. Therefore, the initial step was to collect user inputs and feedback on the current design via customer interviews. This gave a set of user criteria for good map design of dpPower specifically.

    A study of existing relevant literature and previous work was also performed where several general key principles for good design could be identified.

    Finally, a comparison between the dpPower design and other existing map products, such as e.g. Google Maps and Eniro, was made where key similarities and dissimilarities were identified and discussed.

    These user criteria and design principles could be combined, both to present an answer to the general question “What is good design?” and to present a suggestion of new map appearance in dpPower. Key considerations in the new design suggestions were e.g. to have a toned down background map with all features in the same hue family. However, for GSD-Fastighetskartan the important convention of land classes, blue = water, green = vegetation \& yellow = open land, should be kept. Colour combinations and contrast is the most important design element and since a design cannot be optimally adapted for all types of colour vision deficiencies, the suggestion is to separate the designs to specifically target user groups of different colour vision abilities. Important map information such as e.g. detailed road data should be kept while unnecessary features such as contour lines and polygon borderlines should be hidden. Text positions should also be considered.

    The results were evaluated both via a survey, distributed to users of dpPower, GIT-students and users with no previous experience of GIT or dpPower, and a seminar with employees at Digpro.

    The conclusions drawn from the evaluation was that the presented design suggestions and principles are good, but adjustments should be made. E.g. a use of yellow for low voltage cables, as suggested for Red-Green impaired, is perhaps not the best solution. The results present a good foundation for design of dpPower but more adjustments should be made based on the evaluation and then another evaluation can be performed. It would give an even better result.

  • 46.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Allard, Christina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Lin, Janet
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Sandström, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    LTU Teaching guide to e-learning: how to clear the mist of teaching through the cloud2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Al-Douri, Yamur K.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Information assurance for maintenance of railway track2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Railway traffic is steadily increasing, having a negative impact on maintenance and resulting in decreased track availability, comfort, and safety. Swedish railway track maintenance mostly focuses on the actual track condition via a nationwide condition-based maintenance (CBM) strategy. For maintenance to be conducted in an appropriate way, data on the actual track condition must be accurate; furthermore, those data need to be converted into accurate information for maintenance decisions. An information assurance (IA) framework has the potential to deal with the system risks from a technical perspective. The framework is a guideline that can be implemented within CBM to understand both condition monitoring data behaviour and the information processing used to reach maintenance decisions.This research investigates ways of an information assurance (IA) framework can be implemented in the following CBM steps: data collecting, data processing and making maintenance decisions on Swedish railway. The framework can be used to understand data behaviour, information processing and the communication between information layers for decisions at organisation, infrastructure and data/information levels. The research uses both qualitative and quantitative methods to investigate critical information data, parameters, and problems and to suggest which areas need improvement. Quantitative analysis of the Swedish track geometry database reveals specific information about the behaviour of the railway data and their processing to make maintenance decisions.A case study shows how certain sections of a railway track are monitored and evaluates maintenance practices on those sections. The study finds several different types of measurements are taken using several different measurement systems. It is difficult to integrate these data for proper processing. In addition, there are problems of incomplete or irregular data; this affects the derivation of information and the use of models to understand track irregularities.Given the problems of data processing and subsequent decision making, the study suggests implementing an IA framework with CBM. The study checks the achievement of three IA principles in the existing data: authenticity, integrity and availability. The results show data have problems of authenticity and integrity, something also mentioned by the stakeholders in interviews. In particular years and on certain track sections, CM data are more than 5 percent incomplete, significantly affecting analysis. Incomplete track measurement data reach as high as 63 percent for the parameters of standard deviation (STD), longitudinal level and STD cooperation. Inaccurate measured values for alignment long wavelength within certain speed limits reach as high as 71 percent. These indicators are important for calculating track quality but are either incomplete or incorrect, negatively affecting the calculation of the Q-value and estimations of the track quality. This, in turn, negatively affects the maintenance decisions. Using information assurance will increase the system performance by permitting stakeholders to make accurate decisions.The suggested information assurance framework can discover technical problems but it needs to be improved using technologies, techniques and services to ensure complete and accurate data are available to be processed for maintenance decisions.

  • 48.
    Al-Douri, Yamur K.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Al-Jumaili, Mustafa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Karim, Ramin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Information security in e-maintenance: a study of Scada security2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    eMaintenance solutions are spreading increasingly due to the continuous evolution in the different Information and Communication Technology (ICT) tools. In general, most of the available eMaintenance solutions are depending on Internet infrastructure what makes them vulnerable to all security threats that affect the Internet. One of the important eMaintenance solutions is Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system as it has been used in most of the industrial processes. SCADA systems were designed without security considerations as they were mainly installed into isolated networks. Nowadays, SCADA systems are mainly connected to Internet and other networks. Therefore, SCADA systems have been exposed to wide range of network security threats. Hence, SCADA security has become an important aspect that needs to be investigated. In this paper, a study of SCADA security issues will be done. The main contribution of this paper is to address SCADA security issues and challenges related to eMaintenance.

  • 49.
    Al-Douri, Yamur K.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Karim, Ramin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Parida, Aditya
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Kumar, Uday
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Model-based security system for data acquisition in e-maintenance using artificial immune system and cloud computing2012In: International Journal of COMADEM, ISSN 1363-7681, Vol. 15, no 4, 26-37 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    eMaintenance solutions are extensively used by the industry today. eMaintenance is an emerging technology aimed to support the industry to achieve effectiveness and efficiency in their maintenance process through enhanced use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) . One of the essential components is an eMaintenance solution is data acquisition. Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) has been used to manage data acquisition is many industrial systems. Nowadays, modern SCADA systems are available through internet and other networks via IP protocol. An increased use of internet–based solution requires appropriate management approaches to improve the safety and security aspects of a system. Hence, this paper suggests a new security model based security for SCADA systems through Cloud computing and Artificial Immune System (AIS). Furthermore, the paper provides AIS, which is based on Decision Tree (C4.5 algorithm) using clustered feature set. The features set are selected from NSL-KDD cup. It is a new version of KDD dataset. As a result, two Antibodies are generated (that could recognize Normal and Antigen). After applying the resulted antibodies on the testing data set, the outputs are Normal, Antigen, and Unknown. Finally it is treated with Unknown as Antigen. As a result, high accuracy of the suggested model reaches 96.3%.

  • 50.
    Al-Douri, Yamur K.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Pangracious, Vinod
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, American University in Dubai,.
    Al-Doori, Mulhim
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, American University in Dubai.
    Artifical Immune System Using Genetic Algorithm And Decision Tree2016In: International Conference on Bio-engineering for Smart Technologies (BioSMART) 2016, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE, 2016, 1-4 p., 7835603Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Artificial immune system (AIS) is considered as an adaptive computational intelligence method that could be used for detecting and preventing current computer network threats. AIS generates Antibodies (self) competent in recognizing Antigen (non-self), which is considered as an anomaly technique. This paper aims to develop artificial immune system (AIS) that consists of two levels. Level one is developed using Genetic Algorithm, while level two is developed using C4.5 decision tree algorithm. The proposed system trained with clustered features that are selected from NSL-KDD cup data-set. Each level produces two antibodies (that could recognize Normal and Antigen access-records). The recognition accuracy of the developed system reaches 96%. The behavior of each level is studied. The best feature-set that suits each level is specified.

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