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  • 1.
    Aagaard, Sunniva Margrethe Due
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics.
    Reticulate Evolution in Diphasiastrum (Lycopodiaceae)2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis relationships and the occurrence of reticulate evolutionary events in the club moss genus Diphasiastrum are investigated. Diphasiastrum is initially established as a monophyletic group within Lycopodiaceae using non recombinant chloroplast sequence data. Support is obtained for eight distinct parental lineages in Diphasiastrum, and relationships among the putative parent taxa in the hypothesized hybrid complexes; D. alpinum, D. complanatum, D. digitatum, D. multispicatum, D. sitchense, D. tristachyum and D. veitchii are presented.

    Feulgen DNA image densitometry data and sequence data obtained from three nuclear regions, RPB2, LEAFY and LAMB4, were used to infer the origins of three different taxa confirmed to be allopolyploid; D. zanclophyllum from South Africa, D. wightianum from Malaysia and an undescribed taxon from China. The two Asian polyploids have originated from two different hybrid combinations, D. multispicatum x D. veitchii and D. tristachyum x D. veitchii. Diphasiastrum zanclophyllum originates from a cross between D. digitatum and an unidentified diploid taxon.

    The occurrence of three homoploid hybrid combinations commonly recognized in Europe, D. alpinum x D. complanatum, D. alpinum x D. tristachyum and D. complanatum x D. tristachyum, are verified using the same three nuclear regions. Two of the three hybrid combinations are also shown to have originated from reciprocal crosses. Admixture analyses performed on an extended, dataset similarly identified predominately F1 hybrids and backcrosses. The observations and common recognition of hybrid species in the included populations are hence most likely due to frequent observations of neohybrids in hybrid zones. Reticulate patterns are, however, prominent in the presented dataset. Hence future studies addressing evolutionary and ecological questions in Diphasiastrum should emphasize the impact of gene flow between parent lineages rather than speciation as the result of hybridization.

  • 2.
    Aagaard, Sunniva M.D.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics.
    Gyllenstrand, Niclas
    Wikström, Niklas
    Homoploid hybridization in Central European Diphasiastrum (Lycopodiaceae).Manuscript (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Three species of homoploid hybrid origin are commonly recognized among Central European Diphasiastrum, and reticulate evolutionary events have for a long time been acknowledged as an important factor contributing to the species count in the genus. Presented evidence obtained from molecular data has until recently been scarce and inconclusive. Recent studies have, however, documented reticulate phylogenetic patterns involving all putative parental combinations reported from Central Europe. Reciprocal crosses involving the same parental combinations have also been confirmed. In order to further explore these putative reticulate events, admixture analyses using a Bayesian approach as implemented in the program NewHybrids are conducted on an expanded dataset obtained from six Central European populations from where putative hybrid taxa are reported. A majority of the accessions included in the analyses were inferred to represent pure bred D. alpinum, D. complanatum, D. tristachyum, F1 hybrids, F2 hybrids or backcrosses with one of the parent species. Accessions displaying ambiguous classification were found in both allopatric parent populations as well as in Central European hybrid populations. Presented results indicate the presence of frequently occurring hybrid zones with first and second generation hybrids as well as backcrosses.

  • 3. Abalaka, J. L.
    et al.
    Ottosson, Ulf
    Tende, Talatu
    Larson, Keith W.
    Rock Firefinch Lagonosticta sanguinodorsalis in the Mandara Mountains, north-east Nigeria: a new subspecies?2010In: African Bird Club Bulletin, ISSN 1352-481X, Vol. 17, no 2, 210-211 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [fr]

    L’Amarante des rochers Lagonosticta sanguinodorsalis dans les Monts Mandara, Nigeria du sud-est: une nouvelle sous-espèce ? Nous fournissons une description d’un mâle et d’une femelle, ainsi que desphotos d’un mâle, d’un amarante capturé dans les Monts Mandara, au nord-est du Nigeria. Le plumage et le cri de cet amarante sont identiques à ceux de l’Amarante des rochers Lagonosticta sanguinodorsalis, une espèce précédemment rapportée de la zone, excepté que le mâle n’a pas la couronne grise typique de l’espèce. Des travaux supplémentaires sur le terrain sont nécessaires pour déterminer s’il agit d’un individu aberrant ou d’une population de l’Amarante des rochers morphologiquement distincte.

  • 4.
    Ahlberg, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology.
    Clack, Jennifer
    Luksevics, Ervins
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology.
    Zupins, Ivars
    Ventastega curonica and the origin of tetrapod morphology2008In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, Vol. 453, no 7199, 1199-1204 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The gap in our understanding of the evolutionary transition from fish to tetrapod is beginning to close thanks to the discovery of new intermediate forms such as Tiktaalik roseae. Here we narrow it further by presenting the skull, exceptionally preserved braincase, shoulder girdle and partial pelvis of Ventastega curonica from the Late Devonian of Latvia, a transitional intermediate form between the 'elpistostegids' Panderichthys and Tiktaalik and the Devonian tetrapods (limbed vertebrates) Acanthostega and Ichthyostega. Ventastega is the most primitive Devonian tetrapod represented by extensive remains, and casts light on a part of the phylogeny otherwise only represented by fragmentary taxa: it illuminates the origin of principal tetrapod structures and the extent of morphological diversity among the transitional forms

  • 5. Ahti, Teuvo
    et al.
    Mayrhofer, Helmut
    Schultz, Matthias
    Tehler, Anders
    Fryday, Alan M
    First supplement to the lichen checklist of South Africa2016In: Bothalia, African Biodiversity & Conservation Journal, Vol. 46, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Ajawatanawong, Pravech
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Mine the Gaps: Evolution of Eukaryotic Protein Indels and their Application for Testing Deep Phylogeny2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Insertions/deletions (indels) are potentially powerful evolutionary markers, but little is known about their evolution and few tools exist to effectively study them. To address this, I developed SeqFIRE, a tool for automated identification and extraction of indels from protein multiple sequence alignments. The program also extracts conserved alignment blocks, thus covering all major steps in preparing multiple sequence alignments for phylogenetic analysis.

    I then used SeqFIRE to build an indel database, using 299 single copy proteins from a broad taxonomic sampling of mainly multicellular eukaryotes. A total of 4,707 indels were extracted, of which 901 are simple (one genetic event) and 3,806 are complex (multiple events). The most abundant indels are single amino acid simple indels. Indel frequency decreases exponentially with length and shows a linear relationship with host protein size. Singleton indels reveal a strong bias towards insertions (2.31 x deletions on average). These analyses also identify 43 indels marking major clades in Plantae and Fungi (clade defining indels or CDIs), but none for Metazoa.

    In order to study the 3806 complex indels they were first classified by number of states. Analysis of the 2-state complex and simple indels combined (“bi-state indels”) confirms that insertions are over 2.5 times as frequent as deletions. Three-quarters of the complex indels had three-nine states (“slightly complex indels”). A tree-assisted search method was developed allowing me to identify 1,010 potential CDIs supporting all examined major branches of Plantae and Fungi.

    Forty-two proteins were also found to host complex indel CDIs for the deepest branches of Metazoa. After expanding the taxon set for these proteins, I identified a total of 49 non-bilaterian specific CDIs. Parsimony analysis of these indels places Ctenophora as sister taxon to all other Metazoa including Porifera. Six CDIs were also found placing Placozoa as sister to Bilateria. I conclude that slightly complex indels are a rich source of CDIs, and my tree-assisted search strategy could be automated and implemented in the program SeqFIRE to facilitate their discovery. This will have important implications for mining the phylogenomic content of the vast resource of protist genome data soon to become available.

  • 7.
    Al Jewari, Caesar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Biology Education Centre.
    Examining the Root of the Eukaryotic Tree of Life2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying the evolutionary root of eukaryotic tree of life (eToL) is a central problem in systematic biology that has been receiving growing attention. This task has been aided by the development of advanced phylogenetic methods and the availability of large amounts of genomic data from across the tree. Recently, two studies have tried a novel approach to define the eToL root, using euBacteria (instead of the more distantly related Archaea) as the outgroup. The results of these two recent studies are partially overlapping datasets, which produce contradictory results. One study, using mixed eubacterial data (euBac), makes the case for a neozoan-excavate root, while the other study, using alpha-proteobacterial (aP) data, concluded the traditional unikont-bikont root. These two results suggest different theories of early eukaryote evolution. However, there is also evidence of substantial artefacts in these datasets and traces of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the exchange of DNA between unrelated organisms. This project aims to re-examine the datasets of both publications (61 total protein markers). The work started with updating both datasets with solid new phylogenomic data from the supervisor lab and new publicly available data. I then used these data to systematically investigate the phylogenetic signals of the 61 protein markers across 88 taxa (68 eukaryotes and 20 Bacteria). These were first subjected to preliminary phylogenetic analyses to sort orthologues from paralogues. All orthologues were then combined into a single dataset and subjected to in depth phylogenetic analyses to evaluate the support for various hypotheses. I also investigated potential sources of artefact in the data using traditional and novel methods I devised and developed myself including computer scripts specifically written for this work. I created a pipeline for the data curation process to make it fast and efficient by automating various parts of the workflow, including concatenating the multigene dataset into a super matrix. I estimated the level of incongruence in each dataset, excluded the protein markers that have a strong phylogenetic bias, and reconstructed new datasets. I conclude that the data in hand (protein markers and taxa) contain conflicting and inconsistent phylogenetic signal and that a few proteins can have a very strong effect on the results of the analyses. However, a third possible hypothesis is clearly rejected. This suggests that there are specific artefacts in the data, favouring one or the other of the two remaining hypotheses.

  • 8. Aliabadian, Mansour
    et al.
    Kaboli, Mohammad
    Foerschler, Marc I.
    Nijman, Vincent
    Chamani, Atefeh
    Tillier, Annie
    Prodon, Roger
    Pasquet, Eric
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Zuccon, Dario
    Erratum to: Convergent evolution of morphological and ecological traits in the open-habitat chat complex (Aves, Muscicapidae: Saxicolinae) (vol 65, pg 35, 2012)2012In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 65, no 3, 1017-1019 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Aliabadian, Mansour
    et al.
    Kaboli, Mohammad
    Förschler, Marc I
    Nijman, Vincent
    Chamani, Atefeh
    Tillier, Annie
    Prodon, Roger
    Pasquet, Eric
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Zuccon, Dario
    Convergent evolution of morphological and ecological traits in the open-habitat chat complex (Aves, Muscicapidae: Saxicolinae).2012In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 65, no 1, 35-45 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Open-habitat chats (genera Myrmecocichla, Cercomela, Oenanthe and relative) are a morphologically and ecologically cohesive group of genera with unclear phylogenetic relationships. They are distributed mostly in open, arid and/or rocky habitats of Africa and Eurasia. Here, we present the most comprehensive molecular phylogenetic analysis of this group to date, with a complete taxon sampling at the species level. The analysis, based on a multilocus dataset including three mitochondrial and three nuclear loci, allows us to elucidate the phylogenetic relationships and test the traditional generic limits. All genera are non-monophyletic, suggesting extensive convergence on similar plumage patterns in unrelated species. While the colour pattern appear to be a poor predictor of the phylogenetic relationships, some of the ecological and behavioural traits agree relatively well with the major clades. Following our results, we also propose a revised generic classification for the whole group.

  • 10. Alonso, Marta
    et al.
    Jiménez, Juan A.
    Nylinder, Stephan
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Cano, Maria J.
    Disentangling generic limits in Chionoloma, Oxystegus, Pachyneuropsis and Pseudosymblepharis (Bryophyta: Pottiaceae): An inquiry into their phylogenetic relationships2016In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 65, 3-18 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11. Alstrom, Per
    et al.
    Olsson, Urban
    Rasmussen, Pamela C.
    Yao, Cheng-Te
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Sundberg, Per
    Morphological, vocal and genetic divergence in the Cettia acanthizoides complex (Aves: Cettiidae)2007In: Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4082, E-ISSN 1096-3642, Vol. 149, no 3, 437-452 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Alstrup, Vagn
    et al.
    Grube, Martin
    Motiejunaite, Jurga
    Nordin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Zhurbenko, Mikhail
    Lichenicolous fungi from the Skibotn area, Troms, Norway2008In: Graphis Scripta, ISSN 0901-7593, Vol. 20, no 1, 1-8 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Altogether 93 species of lichenicolous fungi are reported, the majority collected during the Nordic Lichen Society excursion in 2003 to the Skibotn area, Troms, Norway. Cornutispora ciliata, Intralichen cf. lichenum, Opegrapha stereocaulicola and Sphaerulina cf. dubiella are new to Scandinavia, 11 species are new to Norway, and further 42 are new to Troms. Stigmidium aggregata is also reported as new to Greenland. Host lichens, localities, collectors and collection numbers are given.

  • 13. Alström, Per
    et al.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Olsson, Urban
    Sundberg, Per
    Phylogeny and classification of the avian superfamily Sylvioidea.2006In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 38, no 2, 381-97 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sylvioidea is one of the three superfamilies recognized within the largest avian radiation, the parvorder Passerida. In the present study, which is the first taxon-dense analysis of the Sylvioidea based on sequence data (nuclear myoglobin intron II and mitochondrial cytochrome b gene), we investigate the interrelationships among the four "sylvioid" clades found by previous workers, as well as the relationships within the largest of these clades. The nuclear and mitochondrial loci estimate basically the same phylogeny, with minor differences in resolution. The trees based on myoglobin and the combined data identify a strongly supported clade that includes the taxa previously allocated to Sylvioidea, except for Sitta (nuthatches), Certhia (treecreepers), Parus (tits), Remiz (penduline tits), Troglodytes and Campylorhynchus (wrens), Polioptila (gnatcatchers), and Regulus (crests/kinglets); this clade also comprises larks, which have previously been placed in the superfamily Passeroidea. We refer to this clade as Sylvioidea. This clade is further divided into 10 main, well-supported clades, which we suggest form the basis for a revised classification.

  • 14. Alström, Per
    et al.
    Fregin, Silke
    Norman, Janette A
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Christidis, Les
    Olsson, Urban
    Multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset reveal extensive non-monophyly in the avian family Locustellidae.2011In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 58, no 3, 513-26 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phylogeny of most of the species in the avian passerine family Locustellidae is inferred using a Bayesian species tree approach (Bayesian Estimation of Species Trees, BEST), as well as a traditional Bayesian gene tree method (MrBayes), based on a dataset comprising one mitochondrial and four nuclear loci. The trees inferred by the different methods agree fairly well in topology, although in a few cases there are marked differences. Some of these discrepancies might be due to convergence problems for BEST (despite up to 1×10(9) iterations). The phylogeny strongly disagrees with the current taxonomy at the generic level, and we propose a revised classification that recognizes four instead of seven genera. These results emphasize the well known but still often neglected problem of basing classifications on non-cladistic evaluations of morphological characters. An analysis of an extended mitochondrial dataset with multiple individuals from most species, including many subspecies, suggest that several taxa presently treated as subspecies or as monotypic species as well as a few taxa recognized as separate species are in need of further taxonomic work.

  • 15. Alström, Per
    et al.
    Höhna, Sebastian
    Gelang, Magnus
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Olsson, Urban
    Non-monophyly and intricate morphological evolution within the avian family Cettiidae revealed by multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset.2011In: BMC evolutionary biology, ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 11, 352- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The avian family Cettiidae, including the genera Cettia, Urosphena, Tesia, Abroscopus and Tickellia and Orthotomus cucullatus, has recently been proposed based on analysis of a small number of loci and species. The close relationship of most of these taxa was unexpected, and called for a comprehensive study based on multiple loci and dense taxon sampling. In the present study, we infer the relationships of all except one of the species in this family using one mitochondrial and three nuclear loci. We use traditional gene tree methods (Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood bootstrapping, parsimony bootstrapping), as well as a recently developed Bayesian species tree approach (*BEAST) that accounts for lineage sorting processes that might produce discordance between gene trees. We also analyse mitochondrial DNA for a larger sample, comprising multiple individuals and a large number of subspecies of polytypic species.

    RESULTS: There are many topological incongruences among the single-locus trees, although none of these is strongly supported. The multi-locus tree inferred using concatenated sequences and the species tree agree well with each other, and are overall well resolved and well supported by the data. The main discrepancy between these trees concerns the most basal split. Both methods infer the genus Cettia to be highly non-monophyletic, as it is scattered across the entire family tree. Deep intraspecific divergences are revealed, and one or two species and one subspecies are inferred to be non-monophyletic (differences between methods).

    CONCLUSIONS: The molecular phylogeny presented here is strongly inconsistent with the traditional, morphology-based classification. The remarkably high degree of non-monophyly in the genus Cettia is likely to be one of the most extraordinary examples of misconceived relationships in an avian genus. The phylogeny suggests instances of parallel evolution, as well as highly unequal rates of morphological divergence in different lineages. This complex morphological evolution apparently misled earlier taxonomists. These results underscore the well-known but still often neglected problem of basing classifications on overall morphological similarity. Based on the molecular data, a revised taxonomy is proposed. Although the traditional and species tree methods inferred much the same tree in the present study, the assumption by species tree methods that all species are monophyletic is a limitation in these methods, as some currently recognized species might have more complex histories.

  • 16. Alström, Per
    et al.
    Jønsson, Knud A.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Ödeen, Anders
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Dramatic niche shifts and morphological change in two insular bird species2015In: Royal Society Open Science, ISSN 2054-5703, Vol. 2, 140364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colonizations of islands are often associated with rapid morphological divergence. We present two previously unrecognized cases of dramatic morphological change and niche shifts in connection with colonization of tropical forest-covered islands. These evolutionary changes have concealed the fact that the passerine birds madanga, Madanga ruficollis, from Buru, Indonesia, and São Tomé shorttail, Amaurocichla bocagii, from São Tomé, Gulf of Guinea, are forest-adapted members of the family Motacillidae (pipits and wagtails). We show that Madanga has diverged mainly in plumage, which may be the result of selection for improved camouflage in its new arboreal niche, while selection pressures for other morphological changes have probably been weak owing to preadaptations for the novel niche. By contrast, we suggest that Amaurocichla's niche change has led to divergence in both structure and plumage.

  • 17.
    Ament-Velásquez, Sandra Lorena
    et al.
    Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Paleontology and Geobiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universtität München.
    Breedy, Odalisca
    Cortés, Jorge
    Guzman, Hector M.
    Wörheide, Gert
    Vargas, Sergio
    Homoplasious colony morphology and mito-nuclear phylogenetic discordance among Eastern Pacific octocorals2016In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 98, 373-381 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Octocorals are a diverse and ecologically important group of cnidarians. However, the phylogenetic relationships of many octocoral groups are not well understood and are based mostly on mitochondrial sequence data. In addition, the discovery and description of new gorgonian species displaying unusual or intermediate morphologies and uncertain phylogenetic affinities further complicates the study of octocoral systematics and raises questions about the role played by processes such as plasticity, crypsis, and convergence in the evolution of this group of organisms. Here, we use nuclear (i.e. 28S rDNA) and mitochondrial (mtMutS) markers and a sample of Eastern Pacific gorgonians thought to be remarkable from a morphological point of view to shed light on the morphological diversification among these organisms. Our study reveals the loss of the anastomosed colony morphology in two unrelated lineages of the seafan genusPacifigorgia and offers strong evidence for the independent evolution of a whip-like morphology in two lineages of Eastern Pacific Leptogorgia. Additionally, our data revealed one instance of mito-nuclear discordance in the genera Leptogorgia andEugorgia, which may be the results of incomplete lineage sorting or ancient hybridization–introgression events. Our study stresses the importance of comprehensive taxonomic sampling and the use of independent sources of evidence to address the phylogenetic relationships and clarifying the evolution of octocorals.

  • 18.
    Anderberg, A. A.
    et al.
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, Stockholm.
    Ståhl, Bertil
    Gotland University, Department of Biology.
    Källersjö, M.
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, Stockholm.
    Maesaceae, a new primuloid family in the order Ericales s.l.2000In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, Vol. 49, no 2, 183-187 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence from morphology and molecular sequence data from three chloroplast genes, rbcL, ndhF, and atpB, have shown that the genus Maesa constitutes an evolutionary lineage separate from the other three primuloid families, Theophrastaceae, Myrsinaceae, and Primulaceae. The new family Maesaceae is here formally recognised, its taxonomic status being changed from a subfamily of Myrsinaceae. The new family comprises a single genus, Maesa Forssk., with some 100 species of trees or shrubs; it is diagnosed by characters such as flower pedicels with two bracteoles, a semi-inferior ovary, and indehiscent fruits with many seeds. A key to the major groups of primuloid taxa is presented.

  • 19.
    Anderberg, Arne A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
    Eldenäs, Pia
    Laboratory for Molecular Systematics, Swedish Museum of Natural History.
    Bayer, Randall J.
    Australian National Herbarium, Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research.
    Englund, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
    Evolutionary relationships in the Asteraceae tribe Inuleae (incl. Plucheeae) evidenced by DNA sequences of ndhF; with notes on the systematic positions of some aberrant genera2005In: Organisms Diversity & Evolution, ISSN 1439-6092, Vol. 5, no 2, 135-146 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phylogenetic relationships between the tribes Inuleae sensu stricto and Plucheeae are investigated by analysis of sequence data from the cpDNA gene ndhF. The delimitation between the two tribes is elucidated, and the systematic positions of a number of genera associated with these groups, i.e. genera with either aberrant morphological characters or a debated systematic position, are clarified. Together, the Inuleae and Plucheeae form a monophyletic group in which the majority of genera of Inuleae s.str. form one clade, and all the taxa from the Plucheeae together with the genera Antiphiona, Calostephane, Geigeria, Ondetia, Pechuel-loeschea, Pegolettia, and Iphionopsis from Inuleae s.str. form another. Members of the Plucheeae are nested with genera of the Inuleae s.str., and support for the Plucheeae clade is weak. Consequently, the latter cannot be maintained and the two groups are treated as one tribe, Inuleae, with the two subtribes Inulinae and Plucheinae. The genera Asteriscus, Chrysophthalmum, Inula, Laggera, Pentanema, Pluchea, and Pulicaria are demonstrated to be non-monophyletic. Cratystylis and Iphionopsis are found to belong to the same clade as the taxa of the former Plucheeae. Caesulia is shown to be a close relative of Duhaldea and Blumea of the Inuleae-Inulinae. The genera Callilepis and Zoutpansbergia belong to the major clade of the family that includes the tribes Heliantheae sensu lato and Inuleae (incl. Plucheeae), but their exact position remains unresolved. The genus Gymnarrhena is not part of the Inuleae, but is either part of the unresolved basal complex of the paraphyletic Cichorioideae, or sister to the entire Asteroideae.

  • 20.
    Anderberg, Arne A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
    Englund, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
    Beentje, Henk
    On the systematic position of Inula rungwensis2008In: Compositae Newsletter, ISSN 0284-8422, Vol. 46, 83-84 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The systematic position of Inula rungwensis Beentje is discussed. It is concluded that it is conspecific with Gerbera piloselloides (L.) Cass. of the tribe Mutisieae.

  • 21.
    Anderberg, Arne Alfred
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Proposal to conserve the name Adelostigma (Asteraceae: Inuleae)with a conserved type2015In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 64, no 2, 387-388 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Anderberg, Arne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
    Manns, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
    Källersjö, Mari
    Phylogeny and floral evolution of the Lysimachieae (Ericales, Myrsinaceae): evidence from ndhF sequence data.2007In: Willdenowia, ISSN 0511-9618, Vol. 37, 407-421 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier hypotheses of floral evolution in Lysimachia and related genera were tested by phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequences from the plastid gene ndhF. It is concluded that taxa with flowers provided with oil-producing trichomes are not advanced and buzz-polinated species with anther cone are not ancestral as earlier proposed. Instead, species of Lysimachia with buzz-pollinated flowers belong to one derived clade, species with flowers provided with nectar producing trichomes belong to another, both groups have evolved from yellow flowered oil-producing ancestors. We also show that Lysimachia and most of its subgenera as well as the genera Anagallis, Pelletiera and Asterolinon are paraphyletic or polyphyletic as presently circumscribed, and that Trientalis and a few American species of Lysimachia are the closest relatives of the other species of Lysimachia + Anagallis, Asterolinon, Pelleriera and Glaux. The subgeneric classification and the biogeographical patterns are briefly discussed.

  • 23.
    Anderson, Cajsa Lisa
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Systematisk botanik.
    All we need now is fossils; a new phylogenetic dating method (PATHd8) allowing thousands of taxa and multiple fossil constraints.2006In: Ancient life and modern approaches: Abstracts of the second International Paleontological Congress, 2006, 45- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Estimation of divergence times in phylogenetic trees using sequence data

    becomes increasingly popular, but so far dating studies have given widely different results,

    and especially datings of the lower nodes within the angiosperms and metazoans, have given

    much older ages than those obtained from the fossil record. It has been concluded in different

    studies that more taxa, and more fossils are needed for more reliable age estimates. For this

    reason, a dating method that can handle very large data sets with multiple fossil constraints is

    necessary.

    Chronograms obtained by e.g. penalized likelihood and Bayesian methods, often

    adds a large "ghost range" to the fossil record, and produces chronograms with a more or less

    smooth appearance, even if the corresponding phylograms have apparently very

    heterogeneous rates. Compared to the other methods, our recently developed method,

    PATHd8, gives the results with the best agreement with the fossil record, which coincides

    with the least smooth appearance of the chronograms. When other programs often run into

    computational problems when analysing trees with hundreds of leaves, PATHd8 has no

    problems analysing thousands of taxa instantaneously. An arbitrary number of fossil age

    constraints can be specified, either as fixed-, minimum or maximum age.

    With our new method, the biggest problem in dating studies is that we need

    more fossils, and these fossils must be well dated and assigned to the correct branches of the

    phylogeny. Therefore, to accomplish divergence time estimates, which hopefully approximate

    the real ages, biologists now need to cooperate with palaeontologists.

  • 24.
    Anderson, Cajsa Lisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany. Systematisk botanik.
    Bremer, Kåre
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    Friis, Else Marie
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    Dating phylogenetically basal eudicots using rbcL sequences and multiple fossil reference points2005In: American Journal of Botany, Vol. 92, 1737-1748 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A molecular dating of the phylogenetically basal eudicots (Ranunculales, Proteales, Sabiales, Buxales and Trochodendrales sensu

    Angiosperm Phylogeny Group II) has been performed using several fossils as minimum age constraints. All rbcL sequences available

    in GenBank were sampled for the taxa in focus. Dating was performed using penalized likelihood, and results were compared with

    nonparametric rate smoothing. Fourteen eudicot fossils, all with a Cretaceous record, were included in this study for age constraints.

    Nine of these are assigned to basal eudicots and the remaining five taxa represent core eudicots. Our study shows that the choice of

    methods and fossil constraints has a great impact on the age estimates, and that removing one single fossil change the results in the

    magnitude of tens of million years. The use of several fossil constraints increase the probability of approaching the true ages. Our

    results suggest a rapid diversification during the late Early Cretaceous, with all the lineages of basal eudicots emerging during the

    latest part of the Early Cretaceous. The age of Ranunculales was estimated to 120 my, Proteales to 119 my, Sabiales to 118 my,

    Buxales to 117 my, and Trochodendrales to 116 my.

  • 25.
    Anderson, Cajsa Lisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    Bremer, Kåre
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    Friis, Else Marie
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    Divergence times of phylogenetically basal eudicots2005In: XVII International Botanical Congress: Vienna, Austria, Europe 17-23 July 2005, 2005, 728- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A molecular dating of the phylogenetically basal eudicots (Ranunculales, Proteales, Sabiales, Buxales and Trochodendrales sensu APGII) has been performed using several fossils as minimum age constraints. We have sampled all rbcL sequences available in GenBank for the taxa in focus. Dating was done using Penalized Likelihood, and compared with NonParametric Rate Smoothing. We show that choice of method and fossil constraints has a great impact on the age estimates, and that it is important to use several fossil constraints to yield good age estimates. We discuss the 14 fossils we have chosen to include in this study and present a critical review of other fossils potentially useful in dating studies within the basal eudicots. Our results suggest a rapid diversification during the Early-mid Cretaceous, with all the lineages of basal eudicots emerging during the latest part of the Early Cretaceous. The age of Ranunculales was estimated to 120 myr, Proteales to 119 myr, Sabiales to 118 myr, Buxales to 117 myr and Trochodendrales to 116 myr.

  • 26.
    Andreasen, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Eremalche2012In: The Jepson manual: vascular plants of California / [ed] Bruce G. Baldwin, Berkeley: University of California Press , 2012, 2nd ed.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Andreasen, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Potential hybridization in real data sets: complex relationships in young flowering plants2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Andreasen, Katarina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Baldwin, Bruce G.
    Jespon Herbarium, University of California, Berkeley.
    Evolutionary and historical biogeographic perspectives on the genus Arnica (Asteraceae–Madieae): nuclear ribosomal DNA evidence2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29. Antonelli, A
    et al.
    Nylander, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
    Persson, C
    Sanmartín, I
    Tracing the impact of the Andean uplift on Neotropical plant evolution: evidence from the coffee family2009In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 106, no 24, 9749-9754 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent phylogenetic studies have revealed the major role played by the uplift of the Andes in the extraordinary diversification of the Neotropical flora. These studies, however, have typically considered the Andean uplift as a single, time-limited event fostering the evolution of highland elements. This contrasts with geological reconstructions indicating that the uplift occurred in discrete periods from west to east and that it affected different regions at different times. We introduce an approach for integrating Andean tectonics with biogeographic reconstructions of Neotropical plants, using the coffee family (Rubiaceae) as a model group. The distribution of this family spans highland and montane habitats as well as tropical lowlands of Central and South America, thus offering a unique opportunity to study the influence of the Andean uplift on the entire Neotropical flora. Our results suggest that the Rubiaceae originated in the Paleotropics and used the boreotropical connection to reach South America. The biogeographic patterns found corroborate the existence of a long-lasting dispersal barrier between the Northern and Central Andes, the "Western Andean Portal.'' The uplift of the Eastern Cordillera ended this barrier, allowing dispersal of boreotropical lineages to the South, but gave rise to a huge wetland system ("Lake Pebas'') in western Amazonia that prevented in situ speciation and floristic dispersal between the Andes and Amazonia for at least 6 million years. Here, we provide evidence of these events in plants

  • 30. Arcadia, Linda in
    et al.
    Knudsen, Kerry
    Czech University of Life Sciences.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    (2341) Proposal to conserve the name Lichen fuscatus Scgrad. (Acarospora fuscata) against L. fuscatus Lam. with a conserved type (lichenised Ascomycota: Acarosporaceae)2015In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 64, no 1, 168-169 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31. Ariyawansa, H.A
    et al.
    Hyde, K.D.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Erratum to: Fungal Diversity Notes 111–252 - taxonomic and phylogenetic contributions to fungal taxa.2015In: Fungal diversity, ISSN 1560-2745, E-ISSN 1878-9129, Vol. 75, 275-277 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32. Ariyawansa, H.A.
    et al.
    Hyde, K.D.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Fungal Diversity Notes 111–252 - taxonomic and phylogenetic contributions to fungal taxa2015In: Fungal diversity, ISSN 1560-2745, E-ISSN 1878-9129, Vol. 75, 27-274 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33. Armstrong, Kate E.
    et al.
    Stone, G. H.
    Nicholls, J. A.
    Valderama, E.
    Anderberg, Arne A.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Smedmark, Jenny
    Gautier, L.
    Naciri, Y
    Milne, R.
    Richardson, James E.
    Patterns of diversification amongst tropical regions compared: a case study in Sapotaceae.2014In: Frontiers in Genetics, ISSN 1664-8021, E-ISSN 1664-8021, Vol. 5, no 362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Species diversity is unequally distributed across the globe,with the greatest concentration occurring in the tropics. Even within the tropics, there are significant differences in the numbers of taxa found in each continental region. Manilkara is a pantropical genus of trees in the Sapotaceae comprising c.78 species. Its distribution allows for biogeographic investigation and testing of whether rates of diversification differ amongst tropical regions. The age and geographical origin of Manilkara are inferred to determine whether Gondwanan break-up, boreotropical migration or long distance dispersal have shaped its current disjunct distribution. Diversification rates through time are also analyzed to determine whether the timing and tempo of speciation on each continent coincides with geoclimatic events. Bayesian analyses of nuclear (ITS) and plastid (rpl32-trnL,rps16-trnK,and trnS-trnFM) sequences were used to reconstruct a species level phylogeny of Manilkara and related genera in the tribe Mimusopeae. Analyses of the nuclear data using a fossil-calibrated relaxed molecular clock indicate that Manilkara evolved 32–29 million years ago (Mya) in Africa. Lineages within the genus dispersed to the Neotropics 26–18 Mya and to Asia 28–15 Mya. Higher speciation rates are found in the Neotropical Manilkara clade than in either African or Asian clades. Dating of regional diversification correlates with known palaeoclimatic events. In South America, the divergence between Atlantic coastal forest and Amazonian clades coincides with the formation of drier Cerrado and Caatinga habitats between them. In Africa diversification coincides with Tertiary cycles of aridification an duplif tof the east African plateaux. In South east Asia dispersal may have been limited by the relatively recent emergence of land in New Guinea and islands further east c.10 Mya.

  • 34.
    Articus, Kristina
    et al.
    Belgian Biodiversity Platform, Université Libre de Bruxelles.
    Wedin, Mats
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, Stockholm.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörn University, Avdelning Naturvetenskap, Biology.
    Tibell, Leif
    Uppsala universitet.
    Grube, Martin
    Institute of plan sciences, University of Graz, Austria.
    Phylogenetic studies in Usnea.2000In: The Fourth IAL Symposium Progress and Problems in Lichenology at the Turn of the Millenium, Abstracts: 100. Barcelona., 2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Arup, Ulf
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Fröberg, Lars
    Lund University.
    Frödén, Patrik
    Lund University.
    Knutsson, Tommy
    Lättman, Håkan
    Linköpings universitet.
    Lindblom, Louise
    University of Bergen.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörns högskola.
    Thell, Arne
    Lund University.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History.
    Professor Ingvar Kärnefelt - a birthday tribute2009In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 41, 453-456 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36. Arup, Ulf
    et al.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Grube, Martin
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Wedin, Mats
    The sister group relation of Parmeliaceae2007In: Mycologia, Vol. 99, 42-49 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Arup, Ulf
    et al.
    University of Lund.
    Ekman, Stefan
    University of Lund.
    Lindblom, Louise
    University of Lund.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    University of Lund.
    High performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC), an improved technique for screening lichen substances.1993In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 25, 61-71 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Atkinson, Gemma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organism Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Baldauf, Sandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organism Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Evolution of elongation factor G and the origins of mitochondrial and chloroplast forms2011In: Molecular biology and evolution, ISSN 0737-4038, E-ISSN 1537-1719, Vol. 28, no 3, 1281-1292 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein synthesis elongation factor G (EF-G) is an essential protein with central roles in both the elongation and ribosome recycling phases of protein synthesis. Although EF-G evolution is predicted to be conservative, recent reports suggest otherwise. We have characterized EF-G in terms of its molecular phylogeny, genomic context and patterns of amino acid substitution. We find that most bacteria carry a single "canonical" EF-G, which is phylogenetically conservative and encoded in an str operon. However, we also find a number of EF-G paralogs. These include a pair of EF-Gs that are mostly found together and in an eclectic subset of bacteria, specifically delta-proteobacteria, spirochaetes and planctomycetes (the "spd" bacteria). These spdEFGs have also given rise to the mitochondrial factors mtEFG1 and mtEFG2, which probably arrived in eukaryotes before the eukaryotic last common ancestor. Meanwhile, chloroplasts apparently use an α-proteobacterial derived EF-G, rather than the expected cyanobacterial form. The long-term co-maintenance of the spd/mtEFGs may be related to their subfunctionalization for translocation and ribosome recycling. Consistent with this, patterns of sequence conservation and site-specific evolutionary rate shifts suggest that the faster evolving spd/mtEFG2 has lost translocation function, but, surprisingly, the protein also shows little conservation of sites related to recycling activity. On the other hand, spd/mtEFG1, although more slowly evolving, shows signs of substantial remodeling. This is particularly extensive in the GTPase domain, including a highly conserved three amino acid insertion in switch I. We suggest that sub-functionalization of the spd/mtEFGs is not a simple case of specialization for subsets of original activities. Rather the duplication allows the release of one paralog from the selective constraints imposed by dual functionality thus allowing it to become more highly specialized. Thus the potential for fine-tuning afforded by subfunctionalization may explain the maintenance of EF-G paralogs.

  • 39. Backlund, Anders
    et al.
    Hunde, Asfaw
    Långström, Elisabeth
    A revision of Cycniopsis (Scrophulariaceae)1993In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 13, 185-194 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Balke, Michael
    et al.
    Zoologische Staatssammlung München.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Hendrich, Lars
    Zoologische Staatssammlung München.
    A new genus and two new species of Southeast Asian Bidessini as well as new synonyms for Oceanian species (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae)2017In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, Vol. 647, 137-151 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rompindessus jenisi Balke, Bergsten & Hendrich, gen. n. et sp. n. is described from near Rompin village in West Malaysia. The new genus is characterized by the presence of an occipital line and basal pronotal striae, the presence of a thick anterior bead on clypeus and two-segmented parameres as well as by the absence of basal elytral striae, the absence of sutural line on elytron, the absence of basal epipleural transverse carina, and the absence of longitudinal elytral carina. Moreover, male pro- and mesotarsus appear stout, and distinctly dilated laterally; the pronotum is comparably long and parallel-sided and the colour of beetle conspicuous dark orange. Leiodytes kualalipis Balke, Wang, Bergsten & Hendrich, sp. n. is described from West Malaysia (Pahang) and South Vietnam (Cat Tien). It is well characterized by its large size, elongate body and the form of the median lobe. Limbodessus fijiensis (J. Balfour-Browne, 1944), comb. n. described from Fiji is a new synonym of Limbodessus curviplicatus (Zimmermann, 1927) described from Samoa.

  • 41. Baloch, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Gilenstam, Gunnar
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    The relationships of Odontotrema (Odontotremataceae) and the resurrected Sphaeropezia (Stictidaceae) - new combinations and three new Sphaeropezia species.2013In: Mycologia, ISSN 0027-5514, E-ISSN 1557-2536, Vol. 105, no 2, 384-397 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42. Baloch, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Lumbsch, H. Thorsten
    Lücking, Robert
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    New combinations and names in Gyalecta for former Belonia and Pachyphiale (Ascomycota, Ostropales) species2013In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 45, no 6, 723-727 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43. Barrio-Amorós, César L.
    et al.
    Castroviejo-Fisher, Santiago
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    The taxonomic status of Rhaebo anderssoni (Melin, 1941)(Anura:Bufonidae)2008In: Salamandra, ISSN 0036-3375, Vol. 44, no 1, 59-62 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44. Batalha-Filho, Henrique
    et al.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Silveira, Luis F
    Miyaki, Cristina Y
    Molecular systematics and evolution of the Synallaxis ruficapilla complex (Aves: Furnariidae) in the Atlantic Forest.2013In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 67, no 1, 86-94 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Neotropical Synallaxis ruficapilla complex is endemic to the Atlantic Forest and is comprised of three species: S. ruficapilla, S. whitneyi, and S. infuscata. This group is closely related to the Synallaxis moesta complex that occurs in the Andes, Tepuis, and Guianan shield. Here we used mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequences to infer the phylogeny and the time of diversification of the S. ruficapilla and S. moesta complexes. We also included samples of an undescribed population of Synallaxis that resembles other populations of the S. ruficapilla complex. Our results showed that different geographical lineages within the S. ruficapilla complex are reciprocally monophyletic, but the northern form (S. infuscata) grouped with an Andean taxon. This suggests that at least two lineages of this group independently colonized the Atlantic Forest. Specimens of the undescribed population formed a monophyletic clade with deep divergence. Estimated diversification dates were within the late Pliocene to Pleistocene (2.75-0.16 million of years ago). This suggests that at this time there was a higher connectivity between habitats in the rugged landscapes of the circum-Amazonian bioregions. The observed Pleistocene diversification within the Atlantic Forest is congruent in space and time with studies of other co-distributed organisms, and may be associated with climate changes and tectonic activity during this period.

  • 45. Batalha-Filho, Henrique
    et al.
    Pessoa, Rodrigo O
    Fabre, Pierre-Henri
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Silveira, Luís F
    Miyaki, Cristina Y
    Phylogeny and historical biogeography of gnateaters (Passeriformes, Conopophagidae) in the South America forests.2014In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 79, 422-432 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We inferred the phylogenetic relationships, divergence time and biogeography of Conopophagidae (gnateaters) based on sequence data of mitochondrial genes (ND2, ND3 and cytb) and nuclear introns (TGFB2 and G3PDH) from 45 tissue samples (43 Conopophaga and 2 Pittasoma) representing all currently recognized species of the family and the majority of subspecies. Phylogenetic relationships were estimated by maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference. Divergence time estimates were obtained based on a Bayesian relaxed clock model. These chronograms were used to calculate diversification rates and reconstruct ancestral areas of the genus Conopophaga. The phylogenetic analyses support the reciprocal monophyly of the two genera, Conopophaga and Pittasoma. All species were monophyletic with the exception of C. lineata, as C. lineata cearae did not cluster with the other two C. lineata subspecies. Divergence time estimates for Conopophagidae suggested that diversification took place during the Neogene, and that the diversification rate within Conopophaga clade was highest in the late Miocene, followed by a slower diversification rate, suggesting a diversity-dependent pattern. Our analyses of the diversification of family Conopophagidae provided a scenario for evolution in Terra Firme forest across tropical South America. The spatio-temporal pattern suggests that Conopophaga originated in the Brazilian Shield and that a complex sequence of events possibly related to the Andean uplift and infilling of former sedimentation basins and erosion cycles shaped the current distribution and diversity of this genus.

  • 46. Becker, N D
    et al.
    Petric, MZgomba, CBoase, CMadoon, MDahl, ChristineUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Systematic Zoology.Kaiser, A
    Mosquitoes and their control2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Beimforde, Christina
    et al.
    Courant Research Centre Geobiology, University of Göttingen, Goldschmidtstraße 3, 37077 Göttingen, Germany.
    Feldberg, Kathrin
    Systematic Botany and Mycology, Faculty of Biology, University of Munich (LMU), Menzinger Str. 67, 80638 Munich, Germany.
    Nylinder, Nylinder
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Rikkinen, Jouko
    Department of Biosciences, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 65, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Tuovila, Hanna
    Department of Biosciences, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 65, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Dörfelt, Heinrich
    Microbial Communication, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Neugasse 25, 07743 Jena, Germany.
    Gube, Matthias
    Microbial Communication, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Neugasse 25, 07743 Jena, Germany.
    Jackson, Daniel
    Courant Research Centre Geobiology, University of Göttingen, Goldschmidtstraße 3, 37077 Göttingen, Germany.
    Reitner, Joachim
    Courant Research Centre Geobiology, University of Göttingen, Goldschmidtstraße 3, 37077 Göttingen, Germany.
    Seyfullah, Leyla
    Courant Research Centre Geobiology, University of Göttingen, Goldschmidtstraße 3, 37077 Göttingen, Germany.
    Schmidt, Alexander
    Courant Research Centre Geobiology, University of Göttingen, Goldschmidtstraße 3, 37077 Göttingen, Germany.
    Estimating the Phanerozoic history of the Ascomycota lineages: Combining fossil and molecular data2014In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, no 78, 386-398 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phylum Ascomycota is by far the largest group in the fungal kingdom. Ecologically important mutualisticassociations such as mycorrhizae and lichens have evolved in this group, which are regarded as keyinnovations that supported the evolution of land plants. Only a few attempts have been made to date theorigin of Ascomycota lineages by using molecular clock methods, which is primarily due to the lack ofsatisfactory fossil calibration data. For this reason we have evaluated all of the oldest available ascomycetefossils from amber (Albian to Miocene) and chert (Devonian and Maastrichtian). The fossils representfive major ascomycete classes (Coniocybomycetes, Dothideomycetes, Eurotiomycetes, Laboulbeniomycetes,and Lecanoromycetes). We have assembled a multi-gene data set (18SrDNA, 28SrDNA, RPB1 andRPB2) from a total of 145 taxa representing most groups of the Ascomycota and utilized fossil calibrationpoints solely from within the ascomycetes to estimate divergence times of Ascomycota lineages with aBayesian approach. Our results suggest an initial diversification of the Pezizomycotina in the Ordovician,followed by repeated splits of lineages throughout the Phanerozoic, and indicate that this continuousdiversification was unaffected by mass extinctions. We suggest that the ecological diversity within eachlineage ensured that at least some taxa of each group were able to survive global crises and rapidlyrecovered.

  • 48. Bengtson, Annika
    et al.
    Englund, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Pruski, John F.
    Anderberg, Arne A.
    Phylogeny of the Athroismeae (Asteraceae), with a new circumscription of the tribe2017In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 66, no 2, 408-420 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Athroismeae is a small tribe of the Asteraceae-Asteroideae, the members of which show considerable variation in morphology. A molecular phylogenetic study of the tribe is presented for the first time, based on plastid (ndhF, trnH-psbA, trnL-trnF) and nuclear data (ETS, ITS). The phylogenetic relationships between the different genera within Athroismeae are discussed, and in addition, three unispecific genera: Anisochaeta, Artemisiopsis and Symphyllocarpus as well as Duhaldea (Inula) stuhlmannii, all earlier placed in other tribes, are here shown to belong within Athroismeae. Symphyllocarpus is sister to Centipeda and the earlier Symphyllocarpinae includes Centipedinae in synonymy. Furthermore, Cardosoa and Philyrophyllum are found to be integrated within Anisopappus and their generic status cannot be maintained. An outline of an amended circumscription of the Athroismeae is presented, with three new combinations and a description of the new subtribe Lowryanthinae.

  • 49.
    Bengtson, Annika
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Englund, Markus
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Pruski, John F.
    Anderberg, Arne Alfred
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Phylogeny of the Athroismeae (Asteraceae), with a new circumscription of the tribe2017In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 66, no 2, 408-420 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Athroismeae is a small tribe of the Asteraceae-Asteroideae, the members of which show considerable variation in morphology. A molecular phylogenetic study of the tribe is presented for the first time, based on plastid (ndhF, trnH-psbA, trnL-trnF) and nuclear data (ETS, ITS). The phylogenetic relationships between the different genera within Athroismeae are discussed, and in addition, three unispecific genera: Anisochaeta, Artemisiopsis and Symphyllocarpus as well as Duhaldea (Inula) stuhlmannii, all earlier placed in other tribes, are here shown to belong within Athroismeae. Symphyllocarpus is sister to Centipeda and the earlier Symphyllocarpinae includes Centipedinae in synonymy. Furthermore, Cardosoa and Philyrophyllum are found to be integrated within Anisopappus and their generic status cannot be maintained. An outline of an amended circumscription of the Athroismeae is presented, with three new combinations and a description of the new subtribe Lowryanthinae.

  • 50. Bengtson, Annika
    et al.
    Nylinder, Stephan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Karis, Per Ola
    Anderberg, Arne A.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Evolution and diversification related to rainfall regimes: diversification patterns in the South African genus Metalasia (Asteraceae-Gnaphalieae).2015In: Journal of Biogeography, ISSN 0305-0270, E-ISSN 1365-2699, Vol. 42, no 1, 121-131 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. The Cape region is known for its exceptional species richness, although much remains unknown regarding the appearance of the modern Cape flora. One explanation is that floral diversification was influenced by the establishment of winter rainfall/summer arid conditions hypothesized to have occurred towards the end of the Miocene. We studied the evolution and diversification of the plant genus Metalasia (Asteraceae–Gnaphalieae), with the aim of testing whether radiation patterns may have been influenced by the climatic changes.

    Location. South Africa, with emphasis on the south-west.

    Methods. The radiation of Metalasia was investigated using two approaches: a species diffusion approach, which estimated the ancestral areas by means of a relaxed random walk while sampling from extant distributions; and a discrete approach, in which distributions were defined according to the phytogeographical centres of the Cape region. Secondarily derived clock rates from an earlier Gnaphalieae study were used for calibration purposes.

    Results. Our analyses date Metalasia to approximately 6.9 Ma, after the Miocene–Pliocene boundary and the establishment of the winter rainfall/summer arid conditions. Metalasia consists of two sister clades: Clade A and Clade B. Clade B, which is endemic to the winter rainfall area, is estimated to have diversified c. 6.4 Ma, whereas Clade A, with a main distribution in the all-year rainfall area, is considerably younger, with a crown group age estimated to 3.3 Ma. Diversification rates suggest an early rapid speciation, with rates decreasing through time both for Metalasia and for clades A and B separately. Ancestral area estimations show a possible scenario for the radiation of Metalasia to its current diversity and distribution, with no conflict between results inferred from diffusion or discrete methods.

    Main conclusions. The diversification of Metalasia is estimated to have begun after the establishment of the winter rainfall/summer arid conditions, consistent with its radiation having been influenced by changes in the climatic regime.

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