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  • 1.
    Aalberg Haugen, Inger M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Berger, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Gotthard, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    The evolution of alternative developmental pathways: footprints of selection on life-history traits in a butterfly2012In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 25, no 7, 1377-1388 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developmental pathways may evolve to optimize alternative phenotypes across environments. However, the maintenance of such adaptive plasticity under relaxed selection has received little study. We compare the expression of life-history traits across two developmental pathways in two populations of the butterfly Pararge aegeria where both populations express a diapause pathway but one never expresses direct development in nature. In the population with ongoing selection on both pathways, the difference between pathways in development time and growth rate was larger, whereas the difference in body size was smaller compared with the population experiencing relaxed selection on one pathway. This indicates that relaxed selection on the direct pathway has allowed life-history traits to drift towards values associated with lower fitness when following this pathway. Relaxed selection on direct development was also associated with a higher degree of genetic variation for protandry expressed as within-family sexual dimorphism in growth rate. Genetic correlations for larval growth rate across sexes and pathways were generally positive, with the notable exception of correlation estimates that involved directly developing males of the population that experienced relaxed selection on this pathway. We conclude that relaxed selection on one developmental pathway appears to have partly disrupted the developmental regulation of life-history trait expression. This in turn suggests that ongoing selection may be responsible for maintaining adaptive developmental regulation along alternative developmental pathways in these populations.

  • 2. Aarrestad, P. A.
    et al.
    Hytteborn, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Masunga, G.
    Skarpe, C.
    Vegetation: Between Soils and Herbivores2014In: Elephants and Savanna Woodland Ecosystems: A Study from Chobe National Park, Botswana / [ed] Christina Skarpe, Johan T. du Toit and Stein R. Moe, Wiley-Blackwell, 2014, 61-88 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The vegetation of the study area in Chobe National Park is influenced by a range of factors, including inundation by the Chobe River, soil moisture and fertility, and the impacts of different-size grazers and browsers. This chapter focuses on how the structure and species composition of the present vegetation in northern Chobe National Park is related to recent herbivory by elephants, as agents shaping the vegetation, and by mesoherbivores acting as controllers or responders, along with abiotic controllers such as soil type and distance to the river. In the study, a two-way indicator species analysis classified the vegetation data into four more or less distinct plant community groups (i) Baikiaea plurijuga-Combretum apiculatum woodland, (ii) Combretum mossambicense-Friesodielsia obovata wooded shrubland, (iii) Capparis tomentosa-Flueggea virosa shrubland and (iv) Cynodon dactylon-Heliotropium ovalifolium floodplain, named after the TWINSPAN indicator or preferential species with high cover, and the relative amount of shrubs and trees.

  • 3.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Machine Design, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jansson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Machine Design, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Machine Design, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Particle Emissions From Rail Traffic: A Literature Review2013In: Critical reviews in environmental science and technology, ISSN 1064-3389, E-ISSN 1547-6537, Vol. 43, no 23, 2511-2544 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Particle emissions are a drawback of rail transport. This work is a comprehensive presentation of recent research into particle emissions from rail vehicles. Both exhaust and nonexhaust particle emissions are considered when examining particle characteristics such as PM10, and PM2.5 concentration levels, size, morphology, composition, and adverse health effects, current legislation, and available and proposed solutions for reducing such emissions. High concentration levels in enclosed rail traffic environments are reported and some toxic effects of the particles. The authors find that only a few limited studies have examined the adverse health effects of nonexhaust particle emissions and that no relevant legislation exists. Thus further research in this area is warranted.

  • 4. Abeli, Thomas
    et al.
    Orsenigo, Simone
    Guzzon, Filippo
    Fae, Matteo
    Balestrazzi, Alma
    Carlsson-Graner, Ulla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Mueller, Jonas V.
    Mondoni, Andrea
    Geographical pattern in the response of the arctic-alpine Silene suecica (Cariophyllaceae) to the interaction between water availability and photoperiod2015In: Ecological research, ISSN 0912-3814, E-ISSN 1440-1703, Vol. 30, no 2, 327-335 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We hypothesized a geographical pattern of the plant performance (seedling development, biomass production, relative water content and chlorophyll content) as a result of response to the interaction between photoperiod and water availability in populations of the arctic-alpine Silene suecica from different latitudes, thus experiencing different photoperiods during the growing season. Particularly, we expected a lower drought sensitivity in northern compared to southern populations as a consequence of harsher conditions experienced by the northern populations in terms of water availability. The experiment was carried out under common garden conditions, manipulating the water availability (wet and dry) and the photoperiod (21 and 16 h). We found an interaction between photoperiod and water availability on plant height, leaves, growth, biomass and total chlorophyll. However, the photoperiod neither counteracted nor intensified the effect of drought. Plants exposed to drought compensated for decreasing water availability by reducing their shoot growth. Changes in the chlorophyll content and chlorophyll a/b ratio were observed. Northern populations showed a higher basal growth performance and a greater response to the changed water regime (from wet to dry) than the southern populations. Southern populations showed a reduced ability to respond to drought, but their low basal performance may be advantageous under low water availability, avoiding water loss. In contrast, northern populations showed a stronger plastic response that limited the negative effects of reduced water availability. This study highlights the possibility that the plant response to environmental constraints (specifically water availability) may follow a geographical pattern.

  • 5. Abunge, Caroline
    et al.
    Coulthard, Sarah
    Daw, Tim M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Connecting Marine Ecosystem Services to Human Well-being: Insights from Participatory Well-being Assessment in Kenya2013In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, Vol. 42, no 8, 1010-1021 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The linkage between ecosystems and human well-being is a focus of the conceptualization of ecosystem services as promoted by the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. However, the actual nature of connections between ecosystems and the well-being of individuals remains complex and poorly understood. We conducted a series of qualitative focus groups with five different stakeholder groups connected to a small-scale Kenyan coastal fishery to understand (1) how well-being is understood within the community, and what is important for well-being, (2) how people's well-being has been affected by changes over the recent past, and (3) people's hopes and aspirations for their future fishery. Our results show that people conceive well-being in a diversity of ways, but that these can clearly map onto the MA framework. In particular, our research unpacks the freedoms and choices element of the framework and argues for greater recognition of these aspects of well-being in fisheries management in Kenya through, for example, more participatory governance processes.

  • 6.
    Ackefors, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology.
    Global fisheries - threats and opportunities2009In: Fisheries, sustainablity and development: fifty-two authors on coexistence and development of fisheries and aquaculture in developing and developed countries / [ed] Per Wramner, Hans Ackefors et al, Stockholm: Kungl. Skogs- och lantbruksakademien , 2009, 35-68- p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Ackefors, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology.
    Är det politikerna eller fiskenäringen som styr fisket?2008In: Kungl. Skogs- och Lantbruksakademiens Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-5350, Vol. 147, no 2, 36-43 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8. Adam, B.
    et al.
    Klawonn, I.
    Svedén, J.
    Bergkvist, J.
    Nahar, N.
    Walve, J.
    Littmann, S.
    Whitehouse, Martin J.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Lavik, G.
    Kuypers, M.M.M.
    Ploug, H.
    N2-fixation, ammonium release, and N-transfer to the microbial and classical food web within a plankton community.2016In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 19, 450-459 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the role of N2-fixation by the colony-forming cyanobacterium, Aphanizomenon spp., for the plankton community and N-budget of the N-limited Baltic Sea during summer by using stable isotope tracers combined with novel secondary ion mass spectrometry, conventional mass spectrometry and nutrient analysis. When incubated with 15N2, Aphanizomenon spp. showed a strong 15N-enrichment implying substantial 15N2-fixation. Intriguingly, Aphanizomenon did not assimilate tracers of 15NH4+ from the surrounding water. These findings are in line with model calculations that confirmed a negligible N-source by diffusion-limited NH4+ fluxes to Aphanizomenon colonies at low bulk concentrations (<250 nm) as compared with N2-fixation within colonies. No N2-fixation was detected in autotrophic microorganisms <5 μm, which relied on NH4+ uptake from the surrounding water. Aphanizomenon released about 50% of its newly fixed N2 as NH4+. However, NH4+ did not accumulate in the water but was transferred to heterotrophic and autotrophic microorganisms as well as to diatoms (Chaetoceros sp.) and copepods with a turnover time of ~5 h. We provide direct quantitative evidence that colony-forming Aphanizomenon releases about half of its recently fixed N2 as NH4+, which is transferred to the prokaryotic and eukaryotic plankton forming the basis of the food web in the plankton community. Transfer of newly fixed nitrogen to diatoms and copepods furthermore implies a fast export to shallow sediments via fast-sinking fecal pellets and aggregates. Hence, N2-fixing colony-forming cyanobacteria can have profound impact on ecosystem productivity and biogeochemical processes at shorter time scales (hours to days) than previously thought.

  • 9.
    Adams, David A.
    et al.
    Department of Biology, Middle Tennessee State University, USA.
    Walck, Jeffery L.
    Department of Biology, Middle Tennessee State University, USA.
    Howard, R. Stephen
    Department of Biology, Middle Tennessee State University, USA.
    Milberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Ecology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Forest Composition and Structure onGlade-forming Limestones in Middle Tennessee2012In: Castanea, ISSN 0008-7475, Vol. 77, no 4, 335-347 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within a successional context, the vegetation associated with the cedar gladeecosystem in middle Tennessee develops from bare limestone bedrock to subclimax redcedar,preclimax oak-hickory, and climax mixed hardwood forests. Studies on the composition andstructure of forests associated with cedar glade–forming limestones (Lebanon, Ridley) are rare.We sampled the canopy and understory of six forest stands in middle Tennessee on theselimestones. Observed number of canopy species was 14–24 across stands; estimated richnesswas greater by 1–3 species (bootstrap) or 3–6 species (first-order jackknife) than observedrichness. With the exception of Ailanthus altissima in one stand, all other canopy species werenative. Juniperus virginiana, Fraxinus americana, Carya ovata, and Quercus muehlenbergii wereprimary canopy components in 4 or 6 stands, and C. glabra, Q. shumardii, Ulmus alata, F.quadrangulata, Q. alba, and Q. velutina in 2–3 stands. When we included stands from apreviously published study (most on the non-glade Carters Limestone) with our data, aprincipal components analysis identified three groups with the axes approximating a moisturebedrockgradient and a time-successional gradient. An examination of regeneration in ourstands predicts that (1) mesophytes and/or fire-sensitive species (Acer saccharum, Fraxinus spp.,Celtis spp.) will increase and (2) xerophytes and/or fire-adapted species (Quercus spp., Caryaspp.) will decrease. Altogether, our results strongly suggest that the oak-hickory stage shown insuccessional outlines of vegetation development associated with the cedar glade ecosystem maynot occur in its current state in the future.

  • 10.
    Aeppli, Christoph
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Bastviken, David
    Andersson, Per
    Gustafsson, Örjan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Chlorine Isotope Effects and Composition of Naturally Produced Organochlorines from Chloroperoxidases, Flavin-Dependent Halogenases, and in Forest Soil2013In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 47, no 13, 6864-6871 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of stable chlorine isotopic signatures (delta Cl-37) of organochlorine compounds has been suggested as a tool to determine both their origins and transformations in the environment. Here we investigated the delta Cl-37 fractionation of two important pathways for enzymatic natural halogenation: chlorination by chloroperoxidase (CPO) and flavin-dependent halogenases (FDH). Phenolic products of CPO were highly Cl-37 depleted (delta Cl-37 = -12.6 +/- 0.9 parts per thousand); significantly more depleted than all known industrially produced organochlorine compounds (delta Cl-37 = -7 to +6 parts per thousand). In contrast, four FDH products did not exhibit any observable isotopic shifts (delta Cl-37 = -0.3 +/- 0.6 parts per thousand). We attributed the different isotopic effect to the distinctly different chlorination mechanisms employed by the two enzymes. Furthermore, the delta Cl-37 in bulk organochlorines extracted from boreal forest soils were only slightly depleted in Cl-37 relative to inorganic Cl. In contrast to previous suggestions that CPO plays a key role in production of soil organochlorines, this observation points to the additional involvement of either other chlorination pathways, or that dechlorination of naturally produced organochlorines can neutralize delta Cl-37 shifts caused by CPO chlorination. Overall, this study demonstrates that chlorine isotopic signatures are highly useful to understand sources and cycling of organochlorines in nature. Furthermore, this study presents delta Cl-37 values of FDH products as well of bulk organochlorines extracted from pristine forest soil for the first time.

  • 11.
    Aeppli, Christoph
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Tysklind, Mats
    Holmstrand, Henry
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Gustafsson, Örjan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Use of Cl and C Isotopic Fractionation to Identify Degradation and Sources of Polychlorinated Phenols: Mechanistic Study and Field Application2013In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 47, no 2, 790-797 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The widespread use of chlorinated phenols (CPs) as a wood preservative has led to numerous contaminated sawmill sites. However, it remains challenging to assess the extent of in situ degradation of CPs. We evaluated the use of compound-specific chlorine and carbon isotope analysis (Cl- and C-CSLA) to assess CP biotransformation. In a laboratory system, we measured isotopic fractionation during oxidative 2,4,6-trichlorophenol dechlorination by representative soil enzymes (C. fumago chloroperoxidase, horseradish peroxidase, and laccase from T. versicolor). Using a mathematical model, the validity of the Rayleigh approach to evaluate apparent kinetic isotope effects (AKIE) was confirmed. A small but significant Cl-AKIE of 1.0022 +/- 0.0006 was observed for all three enzymes, consistent with a reaction pathway via a cationic radical species. For carbon, a slight inverse isotope effect was observed (C-AKIE = 0.9945 +/- 0.0019). This fractionation behavior is clearly distinguishable from reported reductive dechlorination mechanisms. Based on these results we then assessed degradation and apportioned different types of technical CP mixtures used at two former sawmill sites. To our knowledge, this is the first study that makes use of two-element CSIA to study sources and transformation of CPs in the environment.

  • 12.
    Agerstrand, Marlene
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Kuester, A.
    Bachmann, J.
    Breitholtz, M.
    Ebert, I.
    Rechenberg, B.
    Ruden, Christina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Reporting and evaluation criteria as means towards a transparent use of ecotoxicity data for environmental risk assessment of pharmaceuticals2011In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 159, no 10, 2487-2492 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecotoxicity data with high reliability and relevance are needed to guarantee the scientific quality of environmental risk assessments of pharmaceuticals. The main advantages of a more structured approach to data evaluation include increased transparency and predictability of the risk assessment process, and the possibility to use non-standard data. In this collaboration, between the research project MistraPharma and the German Federal Environment Agency, a new set of reporting and evaluation criteria is presented and discussed. The new criteria are based on the approaches in the literature and the OECD reporting requirements, and have been further developed to include both reliability and relevance of test data. Intended users are risk assessors and researchers performing ecotoxicological experiments, but the criteria can also be used for education purposes and in the peer-review process for scientific papers. This approach intends to bridge the gap between the regulator and the scientist's needs and way of work.

  • 13.
    Agić, Heda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    A new species of small acritarch with porous wall structure from the early Cambrian of Estonia, andimplications for the fossil record of eukaryotic picoplankton2015In: Palynology, ISSN 0191-6122, E-ISSN 1558-9188, Vol. 40, no 3, 343-356 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Proterozoic-Phanerozoic transition records a general trend of decrease in phytoplankton cell size, in contrast tothe earlier and much larger Ediacaran acritarchs. Particularly minute, unornamented but sculptured organic-walledmicrofossils have been recovered from the lower Cambrian Lükati Formation in northern Estonia. The lack of anysignificant thermal alteration in the formation allowed for excellent preservation of fine microstructures on thesemicrofossils. Among the rich palynomorph assemblage in Lükati, a new species of tiny, spheroidal eukaryoticmicrofossil is recorded: Reticella corrugata gen. et sp. nov. It is characterised by a corrugated and flexible vesicle wallthat is densely perforated by nano-scale pores. Despite its unique morphology, the new species shares diagnosticcharacters with fossil and extant prasinophyte algae. R. corrugata is among the smallest microfossils with typicaleukaryotic morphology (conspicuous wall sculpture) and contributes to the diversity of the size class of smallacritarchs. Size, abundance, inferred prasinophyte affinity and eukaryotic wall sculpture make this new taxon alikely member of the early eukaryotic picoplankton.

  • 14.
    Agnas, Axel Jönses Bernard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Biology Education Centre.
    Non-Independent Mate Choice in Female Humans (Homo sapiens): Progression to the Field 2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There is much evidence that mate-choice decisions made by humans are affected by social/contextual information. Women seem to rate men portrayed in a relationship as more desirable than the same men when portrayed as single. Laboratory studies have found evidence suggesting that human mate choice, as in other species, is dependent on the mate choice decisions made by same-sex rivals. Even though non-independent mate choice is an established and well-studied area of mate choice, very few field studies have been performed. This project aims to test whether women’s evaluation of potential mates desirability is dependent/non-independent of same-sex rivals giving the potential mates sexual interest. This is the first field study performed in a modern human’s natural habitat aiming to test for non- independent mate choice in humans.

    No desirability enhancement effect was found. The possibilities that earlier studies have found an effect that is only present in laboratory environments or have measured effects other than non-independent mate choice are discussed. I find differences in experimental design to be the most likely reason why the present study failed to detect the effect found in previous studies. This field study, the first of its sort, has generated important knowledge for future experimenters, where the most important conclusion is that major limitations in humans ability to register and remember there surrounding should be taken in consideration when designing any field study investigating human mate choice. 

  • 15.
    Ah-King, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Flexible mate choice2010In: Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior / [ed] Janice Moore & Michael D. Breed, Elsevier , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16. Ah-King, Malin
    et al.
    Elofsson, Helena
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    Rosenqvist, Gunilla
    Berglund, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology.
    Why is there no sperm competition in a pipefish with externally brooding males? Insights from sperm activitation and morphology2006In: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 68, no 3, 958-962 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nerophis ophidion sperm activation and morphology were investigated with the aim of explaining the apparent lack of sperm competition in this syngnathid with externally brooding males. Nerophis ophidion sperm were activated by a mixture of ovarian fluid and sea water, but not by sea water alone. This indicated that sperm were not shed into the water but needed to be released near the eggs, which probably restrained sperm competition.

  • 17.
    Ah-King, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research. Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, 621 Charles E Young Dr S, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Ethnol Hist Relig & Gender Studies, Univ Vagen 10 E, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gowaty, Patricia Adair
    Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, 621 Charles E Young Dr S, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.;Smithsonian Trop Res Inst, DPO, Box 0948,AA 34002-9998, Washington, DC USA.;Univ Calif Los Angeles, Inst Environm & Sustainabil, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA..
    A conceptual review of mate choice: stochastic demography, within-sex phenotypic plasticity, and individual flexibility2016In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 6, no 14, 4607-4642 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mate choice hypotheses usually focus on trait variation of chosen individuals. Recently, mate choice studies have increasingly attended to the environmental circumstances affecting variation in choosers' behavior and choosers' traits. We reviewed the literature on phenotypic plasticity in mate choice with the goal of exploring whether phenotypic plasticity can be interpreted as individual flexibility in the context of the switch point theorem, SPT (Gowaty and Hubbell ). We found >3000 studies; 198 were empirical studies of within-sex phenotypic plasticity, and sixteen showed no evidence of mate choice plasticity. Most studies reported changes from choosy to indiscriminate behavior of subjects. Investigators attributed changes to one or more causes including operational sex ratio, adult sex ratio, potential reproductive rate, predation risk, disease risk, chooser's mating experience, chooser's age, chooser's condition, or chooser's resources. The studies together indicate that choosiness of potential mates is environmentally and socially labile, that is, induced - not fixed - in the choosy sex with results consistent with choosers' intrinsic characteristics or their ecological circumstances mattering more to mate choice than the traits of potential mates. We show that plasticity-associated variables factor into the simpler SPT variables. We propose that it is time to complete the move from questions about within-sex plasticity in the choosy sex to between- and within-individual flexibility in reproductive decision-making of both sexes simultaneously. Currently, unanswered empirical questions are about the force of alternative constraints and opportunities as inducers of individual flexibility in reproductive decision-making, and the ecological, social, and developmental sources of similarities and differences between individuals. To make progress, we need studies (1) of simultaneous and symmetric attention to individual mate preferences and subsequent behavior in both sexes, (2) controlled for within-individual variation in choice behavior as demography changes, and which (3) report effects on fitness from movement of individual's switch points.

  • 18.
    Ah-King, Malin
    et al.
    Zoologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    Zoologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Tullberg, Birgitta S.
    Zoologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    The influence of territoriality and mating system for the evolution of male care, a phylogenetic study on fish2005In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evolution of male care is still poorly understood. Using phylogeneticallymatched-pairs comparisons we tested for effects of territoriality and matingsystem on male care evolution in fish. All origins of male care were found inpair-spawning species (with or without additional males such as sneakers) andnone were found in group-spawning species. However, excluding groupspawners, male care originated equally often in pair-spawning species withadditional males as in strict pair-spawning species. Evolution of male care wasalso significantly related to territoriality. Yet, most pair-spawning taxa withmale care are also territorial, making their relative influence difficult toseparate. Furthermore, territoriality also occurs in group-spawning species.Hence, territoriality is not sufficient for male care to evolve. Rather, we arguethat it is the combination of territoriality and pair spawning with sequentialpolygyny that favours the evolution of male care, and we discuss our results inrelation to paternity assurance and sexual selection.

  • 19.
    Ah-King, Malin
    et al.
    Zoologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Tullberg, Birgitta S.
    Zoologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Phylogenetic analysis of twinning in Callitrichinae2000In: American Journal of Primatology, ISSN 0275-2565, E-ISSN 1098-2345, Vol. 51, no 2, 135-146 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The callitrichines are known for twinning and for a communal rearingsystem in which all or most group members help care for the offspring.The origin of twinning has been the subject of much speculation. In thisstudy predictions from earlier hypotheses are tested on the basis of twoalternative phylogenetic trees. From this analysis we infer that helpingbehavior and male care preceded the origin of twinning, and that thesetraits did not coevolve with, but might have been important prerequisitesfor twinning in callitrichines. Small body size does not necessarilyresult in twinning, although it might still have been a prerequisite forits evolution. Gum feeding was an ecological change which evolved alongwith twinning. If nutrition was a limiting factor in the number of offspringproduced, then the use of a new feeding resource could have beencrucial for the origin of twinning in callitrichines. According to one of thetwo alternative solutions inferred by the total evidence tree, and in accordancewith the morphological tree, semi-annual breeding appears inthe marmosets together with specialization in gum feeding. The fact thatgums are available for these monkeys all year may have facilitated semiannualbreeding. We suggest that the exploitation of gums as a feedingresource could have been the decisive factor in the increase of the reproductiverate by twinning and by semi-annual breeding.

  • 20.
    Ahlbeck, Ida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Living in a predation matrix: Studies on fish and their prey in a Baltic Sea coastal area2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis was written within the framework of a biomanipulation project where young-of-the-year (YOY) pikeperch (Sander lucioperca) were stocked to a Baltic Sea bay to improve water quality through a top-down trophic cascade. The aim of my doctorial studies was however focused on a broader ecological question, namely predation (the main driving force in a biomanipulation). Hence, this thesis consists of four papers where we study the interactions between predator and prey using fish and zooplankton and how these interactions can be measured.

    In paper I we evaluated the performance of different diet analysis methods by individual based modelling and found that when having a nutritional gain perspective, mass based methods described diets best. Paper II investigated how the explorative, foraging and anti-predator behaviour of the YOY pikeperch used for stocking were affected by their rearing environment (pond vs. tank rearing). The more complex and varied environment in the semi-natural ponds seemed to promote a more flexible and active behaviour, better equipping young fish for survival in the wild. For paper III we studied the diel vertical migration in the six copepodite stages of the zooplankton Acartia spp. and Eurytemora affinis in relation to fish biomass, phytoplankton abundance and temperature. Both species migrated and in addition showed increased migration range with size within species, indicating evasion from visual predators. Paper IV addressed the movement of littoral Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) via stable isotope signatures (13C and 15N) and body condition. We found clear indications of sedentarity and intra-habitat dietary differences. Interactions between predators and prey are complex and affected by both physiological and environmental characteristics as well as behavioural traits. The results in this thesis suggest that different species and even different life stages pursue different strategies to survive.

  • 21.
    Ahlbeck, Ida
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Hansson, Sture
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Hjerne, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Evaluation of diet analysis methods by individual based modellingIn: Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, ISSN 0706-652X, E-ISSN 1205-7533Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Ahlbeck, Ida
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Hansson, Sture
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Karlöf, Oliver
    Sedentarity in Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) in a coastal Baltic Sea areaIn: Ecology of Freshwater Fish, ISSN 0906-6691, E-ISSN 1600-0633Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Ahlbeck, Ida
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Holliland, Per B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Rearing environment affect important life skills in pikeperch (Sander lucioperca)2012In: Boreal environment research, ISSN 1239-6095, Vol. 17, no 3-4, 291-304 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of rearing environment on the behaviour of young-of-the-year pikeperch (Sander lucioperca) bred at three different production facilities was investigated. Two groups were reared in semi-natural ponds and one group in indoor tanks. Exploratory, foraging and anti-predator behaviours were studied in aquarium experiments. There were no significant differences between pond- and tank-reared fish in reluctance to explore their new environment, but pond-reared fish spent significantly more time in macro-vegetation. Pond-reared fish were significantly faster to start foraging on live prey (Neomysis integer) that they had not encountered before. As compared with tank-reared fish, pond-reared fish were also significantly more active in their anti-predator response. Rearing environment obviously influences the development of important life skills. These differences may impact the success rate when stocking young-of-the-year pikeperch into natural waters.

  • 24.
    Ahlgren, Gunnel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology. Limnologi.
    Hyenstrand, Per
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology. Limnologi.
    Nitrogen limitation effects of different nitrogen sources on nutritional quality of two freshwater organisms, Scenedesmus Quadricauda (Clorophyceae) and Synechococcus sp. (Cyanophyceae)2003In: J. Phycol., Vol. 39, 906-917 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Ahlgren, Gunnel
    et al.
    Department of Ecology and Evolution (Limnology), Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Vrede, Tobias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Goedkoop, Willem
    Department of Environmental Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fatty Acid Ratios in Freshwater Fish, Zooplankton and Zoobenthos - Are There Specific Optima?2009In: Lipids in Aquatic Ecosystems / [ed] Martin Kainz, Michael T. Brett, Michael T. Arts, New York: Springer-Verlag New York, 2009, 147-178 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Two groups of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), termed omega-3 and omega-6 in food (or here as n-3 and n-6 PUFA, respectively), are essential for all vertebrates and probably also for nearly all invertebrates. The absolute concentrations of the different PUFA are important, as is an appropriate balance between the two. The optimal ratio of n-3/n-6 is not known for most organisms but is anticipated to be more or less species-specific (Sargent et al. 1995). The three most important PUFA in vertebrates are eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) and arachidonic acid (ARA, 20:4n-6). Both EPA and ARA are precursors for biologically active eicosanoids that are vital components of cell membranes and play many dynamic roles in mediating and controlling a wide array of cellular activities (Crawford et al. 1989; Harrison 1990; Henderson et al. 1996; see Chap. 9). Since n-3 and n-6 PUFA cannot be synthesized de novo by most metazoans, they must be included in the diet, either as EPA, DHA and ARA, or as their precursors, such as α-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3, precursor of EPA and DHA) and linoleic acid (LIN, 18:2n-6, precursor of ARA) (Bell et al. 1986; Sargent et al. 1995). Both ALA and LIN are produced in the thylacoid membranes of algae and plants with chlorophyll (Sargent at al. 1987).

  • 26.
    Ahlgren, Ingemar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology. Limnologi.
    Eriksson, R
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology. Limnologi.
    Moreno, L
    Pacheco, L
    Montenegro-Guillén, S
    Vammen, K
    Pelagic food web interactions in Lake Cocibolca, Nicaragua2001In: Verh. Internat. Verein. Limnol., Vol. 27, no 4, 1740-1746 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Ahlgren, Joakim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry.
    Tranvik, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Gogoll, Adolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry I.
    Waldebäck, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry.
    Markides, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry.
    Rydin, Emil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Sediment Depth Attenuation of Biogenic Phosphorus Compounds Measured by 31P NMR2005In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 39, no 3, 867-872 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Being a major cause of eutrophication and subsequent loss of water quality, the turnover of phosphorus (P) in lake sediments is in need of deeper understanding. A major part of the flux of P to eutrophic lake sediments is organically bound or of biogenic origin. This P is incorporated in a poorly described mixture of autochthonous and allochthonous sediment and forms the primary storage of P available for recycling to the water column, thus regulating lake trophic status. To identify and quantify biogenic sediment P and assess its lability, we analyzed sediment cores from Lake Erken, Sweden, using traditional P fractionation, and in parallel, NaOH extracts were analyzed using 31P NMR. The surface sediments contain orthophosphates (ortho-P) and pyrophosphates (pyro-P), as well as phosphate mono- and diesters. The first group of compounds to disappear with increased sediment depth is pyrophosphate, followed by a steady decline of the different ester compounds. Estimated half-life times of these compound groups are about 10 yr for pyrophosphate and 2 decades for mono- and diesters. Probably, these compounds will be mineralized to ortho-P and is thus potentially available for recycling to the water column, supporting further growth of phytoplankton. In conclusion, 31P NMR is a useful tool to asses the bioavailability of certain P compound groups, and the combination with traditional fractionation techniques makes quantification possible.

  • 28.
    Ahlinder, Jon
    et al.
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, FOI, Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    Mathisen, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Sjödin, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Division of CBRN Defence and Security, FOI, Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Elin
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, FOI, Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    Forsman, Mats
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, FOI, Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Thelaus, Johanna
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, FOI, Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    Oligotyping reveals divergent responses of predation resistant bacteria to aquatic productivity and plankton compositionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Predation-resistance has been suggested to be a key for persistence of pathogenic bacteria in aquatic environments. Little is known about driving factors for different types of protozoa resistant bacteria (PRB). We studied if presence of PRB is linked to specific plankton taxa, the aquatic nutrient state, or predation pressure on bacteria. Nineteen freshwater systems were sampled and analyzed for PRB, plankton composition and physicochemical variables. Three PRB genera were identified; Pseudomonas, Mycobacterium and Rickettsia. Use of minimum entropy decomposition algorithm and phylogenetic analysis showed that different nodes (representing OTUs of high taxonomic resolution) matched to environmental isolates of the three genera. Links between the PRB genera and specific plankton taxa were found, but showed different relationships depending on if 18S rRNA OTU or microscopy data were used in the analysis. Mycobacterium spp. was negatively correlated to aquatic nutrient state, while Pseudomonas showed the opposite pattern. Rickettsia spp. was positively related to predation pressure on bacteria. Both Mycobacterium and Rickettsia were more abundant in systems with high eukaryotic diversity, while Pseudomonas occurred abundantly in waters with low prokaryotic diversity. The different drivers may be explained by varying ecological strategies, where Mycobacterium and Rickettsia are slow growing and have an intracellular life style, while Pseudomonas is fast growing and opportunistic. Here we give an insight to the possibilities of newly advanced methods such as sequencing and oligotyping to link potential pathogens with biomarkers. This as a tool to assist predictions of the occurrence and persistence of environmental pathogens.

  • 29.
    Ahlm, Kristoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Prey specialization and diet of frogs in Borneo2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier studies of the diet of frogs indicate that most adult frogs are mainly insectivorous. Overall, frogs are viewed more as generalists than specialists in terms of their diet. However, despite earlier studies, there are still gaps in our knowledge regarding what frogs tend to eat and the degree of specialization. The aim of this study was to investigate the diet choice of frogs in a tropical ecosystem. The present study was conducted in a well-known hotspot for frogs with 66 of the 156 known frog species in Borneo found in a protected area comprising of primary rainforest.

     

    Frogs were caught in the field and their stomachs were flushed. The stomach content was retrieved, sorted to prey categories, and the diet analysed. In addition, the frogs were identified to species level. The frogs belonged to five families: Bufonidae, Dicroglossidae, Megophryidae, Microhylidae and Ranidae. My results show that the most common food source was ants, which constituted 63.7 % of the total food for all studied frog families. Termites, beetles and spiders made up 11.7 %, 4.2 % and 2.8 % of the total prey, respectively. The results from the analysis of Shannon’s diversity index supported two diet specialist families, the Bufonidae and Megophridae, which had a significantly lower mean diversity index compared to the generalist Dicroglossidae. To better reveal differences in frog’s diet in this ecosystem, further studies using larger sample size are needed.

     

     

     

  • 30. Ahmed, S.E.
    et al.
    Lees, A.C.
    Moura, N.G.
    Gardner, Toby A.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Road networks predict human influence on Amazonian bird communities2014In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 281, no 1795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Road building can lead to significant deleterious impacts on biodiversity, varying from direct road-kill mortality and direct habitat loss associated with road construction, to more subtle indirect impacts from edge effects and fragmentation. However, little work has been done to evaluate the specific effects of road networks and biodiversity loss beyond the more generalized effects of habitat loss. Here, we compared forest bird species richness and composition in the municipalities of Santarém and Belterra in Pará state, eastern Brazilian Amazon, with a road network metric called ‘roadless volume (RV)’ at the scale of small hydrological catchments (averaging 3721 ha). We found a significant positive relationship between RV and both forest bird richness and the average number of unique species (species represented by a single record) recorded at each site. Forest bird community composition was also significantly affected by RV. Moreover, there was no significant correlation between RV and forest cover, suggesting that road networks may impact biodiversity independently of changes in forest cover. However, variance partitioning analysis indicated that RV has partially independent and therefore additive effects, suggesting that RV and forest cover are best used in a complementary manner to investigate changes in biodiversity. Road impacts on avian species richness and composition independent of habitat loss may result from road-dependent habitat disturbance and fragmentation effects that are not captured by total percentage habitat cover, such as selective logging, fire, hunting, traffic disturbance, edge effects and road-induced fragmentation

  • 31.
    Ahnesjo, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Kvarnemo, C
    Merilaita, S
    Using potential reproductive rates to predict mating competition among individuals qualified to mate2001In: BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY, ISSN 1045-2249, Vol. 12, no 4, 397-401 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential reproductive rate (PRR), which is the offspring production per unit time each sex would achieve if unconstrained by mate availability, often differs between the sexes. An increasing sexual difference in PRR predicts an intensified mating com

  • 32.
    Ahrné, Karin
    et al.
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Jan
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Bumble Bees (Bombus spp) along a Gradient of Increasing Urbanization2009In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 4, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Ajaikumar, Samikannu
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Ahlkvist, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Larsson, William
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Shchukarev, Andrey
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Kordas, K
    Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering, Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Piispankatu 8, FIN-20500, Turku/Åbo, Finland.
    Oxidation of α-pinene over gold containing bimetallic nanoparticles supported on reducible TiO2 by DPU method2011In: Applied Catalysis A: General, ISSN 0926-860X, E-ISSN 1873-3875, Vol. 392, no 1-2, 11-18 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of bimetallic catalysts Au–M (where M = Cu, Co and Ru) were supported on a reducible TiO2 oxide via deposition-precipitation (DP) method with a slow decomposition of urea as the precipitating agent. The characteristic structural features of the prepared materials were characterized by various physico-chemical techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XPS results indicated the formation of alloyed bimetallic particles on the TiO2 support. TEM results confirmed the fine dispersion of metal nanoparticles on the support with an average particle size in the range of 3–5 nm. An industrially important process, oxy-functionalization of α-pinene was carried out over the prepared bimetallic heterogeneous catalysts under liquid phase conditions. Reaction parameters such as the reaction time, temperature, and the effect of solvent were studied for optimal conversion of α-pinene into verbenone. The major products obtained were verbenone, verbenol, α-pinene oxide and alkyl-pinene peroxide. The activity of the catalysts followed the order; AuCu/TiO2 > AuCo/TiO2 > Cu/TiO2 > Au/TiO2 > AuRu/TiO2. Upon comparison of the various catalysts, AuCu/TiO2 was found to be an active and selective catalyst towards the formation of verbenone. The temperature, nature of the catalysts and the choice of solvents greatly influenced the reaction rate.

  • 34.
    Akiyama, Reiko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Life History and Tolerance and Resistance against Herbivores in Natural Populations of Arabidopsis thaliana2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis, I combined observational studies with field and greenhouse experiments to examine selection on life history traits and variation in tolerance and resistance against herbivores in natural populations of the annual herb Arabidopsis thaliana in its native range. I investigated (1) phenotypic selection on flowering time and plant size, (2) the effects of timing of germination on plant fitness, (3) the effect of leaf damage on seed production, and (4) correlations between resistance against a specialist and a generalist insect herbivore.

    In all three study populations, flowering time was negatively related to plant fitness, but in only one of the populations, significant selection on flowering time was detected when controlling for size prior to the flowering season. The results show that correlations between flowering time and plant fecundity may be confounded by variation in plant size prior to the reproductive season.

    A field experiment detected conflicting selection on germination time: Early germination was associated with low seedling survival, but also with large leaf rosette before winter and high survival and fecundity among established plants. The results suggest that low survival among early germinating seeds is the main force opposing the evolution of earlier germination, and that the optimal timing of germination should vary in space and time as a function of the relative strength of selection acting during different life-history stages.

    Experimental leaf damage demonstrated that tolerance to damage was lowest among vegetative plants early in the season, and highest among flowering plants later in the season. Given similar damage levels, leaf herbivores feeding on plants before flowering should thus exert stronger selection on defence traits than those feeding on plants during flowering.

    Resistance against larval feeding by the specialist Plutella xylostella was negatively correlated with resistance against larval feeding by the generalist Mamestra brassicae and with resistance against oviposition by P. xylostella when variation in resistance was examined within and among two Swedish and two Italian A. thaliana populations. The results suggest that negative correlations between resistance against different herbivores and different life-history stages of herbivores may contribute to the maintenance of genetic variation in resistance.

  • 35.
    Akiyama, Reiko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Noack, Sibylle
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University.
    Ågren, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Genetic variation in leaf morphology and resistance against specialist and generalist insect herbivores in natural populations of Arabidopsis thalianaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Akiyama, Reiko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Ågren, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Selection on flowering time in three natural populations of Arabidopsis thalianaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Akiyama, Reiko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Ågren, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Conflicting selection on the timing of germination in a natural population of Arabidopsis thaliana2014In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 27, no 1, 193-199 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The timing of germination is a key life-history trait that may strongly influence plant fitness and that sets the stage for selection on traits expressed later in the life cycle. In seasonal environments, the period favourable for germination and the total length of the growing season are limited. The optimal timing of germination may therefore be governed by conflicting selection through survival and fecundity. We conducted a field experiment to examine the effects of timing of germination on survival, fecundity and overall fitness in a natural population of the annual herb Arabidopsis thaliana in north-central Sweden. Seedlings were transplanted at three different times in late summer and in autumn covering the period of seed germination in the study population. Early germination was associated with low seedling survival, but also with high survival and fecundity among established plants. The advantages of germinating early more than balanced the disadvantage and selection favoured early germination. The results suggest that low survival among early germinating seeds is the main force opposing the evolution of earlier germination and that the optimal timing of germination should vary in space and time as a function of the direction and strength of selection acting during different life-history stages.

  • 38.
    Akiyama, Reiko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Ågren, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Magnitude and timing of leaf damage affect seed production in a natural population of Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae)2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 1, e30015- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The effect of herbivory on plant fitness varies widely. Understanding the causes of this variation is of considerable interest because of its implications for plant population dynamics and trait evolution. We experimentally defoliated the annual herb Arabidopsis thaliana in a natural population in Sweden to test the hypotheses that (a) plant fitness decreases with increasing damage, (b) tolerance to defoliation is lower before flowering than during flowering, and (c) defoliation before flowering reduces number of seeds more strongly than defoliation during flowering, but the opposite is true for effects on seed size.

    Methodology/Principal Findings: In a first experiment, between 0 and 75% of the leaf area was removed in May from plants that flowered or were about to start flowering. In a second experiment, 0, 25%, or 50% of the leaf area was removed from plants on one of two occasions, in mid April when plants were either in the vegetative rosette or bolting stage, or in mid May when plants were flowering. In the first experiment, seed production was negatively related to leaf area removed, and at the highest damage level, also mean seed size was reduced. In the second experiment, removal of 50% of the leaf area reduced seed production by 60% among plants defoliated early in the season at the vegetative rosettes, and by 22% among plants defoliated early in the season at the bolting stage, but did not reduce seed output of plants defoliated one month later. No seasonal shift in the effect of defoliation on seed size was detected.

    Conclusions/Significance: The results show that leaf damage may reduce the fitness of A. thaliana, and suggest that in this population leaf herbivores feeding on plants before flowering should exert stronger selection on defence traits than those feeding on plants during flowering, given similar damage levels.

  • 39.
    Akoto, Brenda
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Is spring burning a viable management tool for species-rich grasslands?2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Semi- natural grasslands are species-rich and also one of the most threatened biotopes in Europe. The area of these grasslands has declined and grassland vegetation is threatened as a result of lack of management and land use change. Appropriate management is therefore required to maintain the conservation values and high species richness of semi- natural grasslands. Traditional management, that is, grazing or annual mowing is expensive, which motivates evaluation of alternative cheaper methods of management. Burning is less costly and therefore I evaluated burning along with the conventional methods. The study addressed the main question: is burning an option to mowing and grazing? I searched the literature for available studies suitable for metaanalysis, but located only detailed reports from a series of eleven Swedish long-term field trials. In addition, I collected data in the only one of these trials still running. To facilitate metaanalysis, l used different indicator systems of classification of grassland plants then calculating the odds for a random record being an indicator after one, eight, fourteen, twenty-eight and thirty-nine spring burns. The results show an increasing proportion of grassland indicators of good management in the mowed and grazed plots compared with the burnt plots, indicating a general negative effect of burning on grassland plants compared with mowing and grazing. Hence, burning is not an appropriate long-term management method if the aim is to maintain vegetation diversity in semi-natural grassland.

  • 40.
    Akram, Neelam
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Palovaara, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Forsberg, Jeremy
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Lindh, Markus V.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Milton, Debra L.
    Luo, Haiwei
    Gonzalez, Jose M.
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Regulation of proteorhodopsin gene expression by nutrient limitation in the marine bacterium Vibrio sp AND42013In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 15, no 5, 1400-1415 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Proteorhodopsin (PR), a ubiquitous membrane photoprotein in marine environments, acts as a light-driven proton pump and can provide energy for bacterial cellular metabolism. However, knowledge of factors that regulate PR gene expression in different bacteria remains strongly limited. Here, experiments with Vibrio sp. AND4 showed that PR phototrophy promoted survival only in cells from stationary phase and not in actively growing cells. PR gene expression was tightly regulated, with very low values in exponential phase, a pronounced peak at the exponential/stationary phase intersection, and a marked decline in stationary phase. Thus, PR gene expression at the entry into stationary phase preceded, and could therefore largely explain, the stationary phase light-induced survival response in AND4. Further experiments revealed nutrient limitation, not light exposure, regulated this differential PR expression. Screening of available marine vibrios showed that the PR gene, and thus the potential for PR phototrophy, is found in at least three different clusters in the genus Vibrio. In an ecological context, our findings suggest that some PR-containing bacteria adapted to the exploitation of nutrient-rich micro-environments rely on a phase of relatively slowly declining resources to mount a cellular response preparing them for adverse conditions dispersed in the water column.

  • 41.
    Al Jawaheri, Raad
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Negative impact of lake liming programmes on the species richness of dragonflies (Odonata): a study from southern Sweden2017In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 788, no 1, 99-113 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Liming programmes aiming to restore fish populations are being implemented in many acidified aquatic systems in northern Europe. We studied Odonata communities in 47 forest lakes in SW Sweden, 13 that are currently being limed, and 8 that have previously been limed. Thirty-one species were recorded, with the highest mean number in untreated lakes, followed by previously treated lakes and currently treated lakes. Species communities differed between untreated and limed lakes, but only few rare species found in the untreated lakes were absent in the treated lakes. Likewise, species known to thrive in acid environments were either rare or showed no preferences. Comparing the number of records of odonate species within a large regional area to the proportion of lakes inhabited in our study, we found that seven of the most commonly observed species occurred less frequently in limed lakes than in the untreated ones, including two of the three most common taxa. Reduced species numbers in limed lakes might be due to conditions on other trophic levels, including fish predation. We argue that Odonata should be considered when developing new biological indices of water quality, although the causes of the observed occurrence patterns need to be studied further. © 2016 Springer International Publishing Switzerland

  • 42.
    al Rawaf, Rawaf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Social-Ecological Urbanism: Lessons in Design from the Albano Resilient Campus2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Currently there is a demand for practical ways to integrate ecological insights into practices of design, which previously have lacked a substantive empirical basis. In the process of developing the Albano Resilient Campus, a transdisciplinary group of ecologists, design scholars, and architects pioneered a conceptual innovation, and a new paradigm of urban sustainability and development: Social-Ecological Urbanism.  Social-Ecological Urbanism is based on the frameworks of Ecosystem Services and Resilience thinking. This approach has created novel ideas with interesting repercussions for the international debate on sustainable urban development. From a discourse point of view, the concept of SEU can be seen as a next evolutionary step for sustainable urbanism paradigms, since it develops synergies between ecological and socio-technical systems. This case study collects ‘best practices’ that can lay a foundational platform for learning, innovation, partnership and trust building within the field of urban sustainability. It also bridges gaps in existing design approaches, such as Projective Ecologies and Design Thinking, with respect to a design methodology with its basis firmly rooted in Ecology.

  • 43.
    Alatalo, Juha M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Jaegerbrand, Annika K.
    Molau, Ulf
    Climate change and climatic events: community-, functional- and species-level responses of bryophytes and lichens to constant, stepwise, and pulse experimental warming in an alpine tundra2014In: Alpine Botany, ISSN 1664-2201, E-ISSN 1664-221X, Vol. 124, no 2, 81-91 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We experimentally imposed three different kinds of warming scenarios over 3 years on an alpine meadow community to identify the differential effects of climate warming and extreme climatic events on the abundance and biomass of bryophytes and lichens. Treatments consisted of (a) a constant level of warming with open top chambers (an average temperature increase of 1.87 A degrees C), (b) a yearly stepwise increase of warming (average temperature increases of 1.0; 1.87 and 3.54 A degrees C, consecutively), and (c) a pulse warming, i.e., a single first year pulse event of warming (average temperature increase of 3.54 A degrees C only during the first year). To our knowledge, this is the first climate change study that attempts to distinguish between the effects of constant, stepwise and pulse warming on bryophyte and lichen communities. We hypothesised that pulse warming would have a significant short-term effect compared to the other warming treatments, and that stepwise warming would have a significant mid-term effect compared to the other warming treatments. Acrocarpous bryophytes as a group increased in abundance and biomass to the short-term effect of pulse warming. We found no significant effects of mid-term (third-year) stepwise warming. However, one pleurocarpous bryophyte species, Tomentypnum nitens, generally increased in abundance during the warm year 1997 but decreased in control plots and in response to the stepwise warming treatment. Three years of experimental warming (all treatments as a group) did have a significant impact at the community level, yet changes in abundance did not translate into significant changes in the dominance hierarchies at the functional level (for acrocarpous bryophytes, pleurocarpous bryophytes, Sphagnum or lichens), or in significant changes in other bryophyte or lichen species. The results suggest that bryophytes and lichens, both at the functional group and species level, to a large extent are resistant to the different climate change warming simulations that were applied.

  • 44.
    Alatalo, Juha M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Jagerbrand, Annika K.
    VTI, Swedish Natl Rd & Transport Res Inst, S-10215 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Molau, Ulf
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Testing reliability of short-term responses to predict longer-term responses of bryophytes and lichens to environmental change2015In: Ecological Indicators, ISSN 1470-160X, E-ISSN 1872-7034, Vol. 58, 77-85 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental changes are predicted to have severe and rapid impacts on polar and alpine regions. At high latitudes/altitudes, cryptogams such as bryophytes and lichens are of great importance in terms of biomass, carbon/nutrient cycling, cover and ecosystem functioning. This seven-year factorial experiment examined the effects of fertilizing and experimental warming on bryophyte and lichen abundance in an alpine meadow and a heath community in subarctic Sweden. The aim was to determine whether shortterm responses (five years) are good predictors of longer-term responses (seven years). Fertilizing and warming had significant negative effects on total and relative abundance of bryophytes and lichens, with the largest and most rapid decline caused by fertilizing and combined fertilizing and warming. Bryophytes decreased most in the alpine meadow community, which was bryophyte-dominated, and lichens decreased most in the heath community, which was lichen-dominated. This was surprising, as the most diverse group in each community was expected to be most resistant to perturbation. Warming alone had a delayed negative impact. Of the 16 species included in statistical analyses, seven were significantly negatively affected. Overall, the impacts of simulated warming on bryophytes and lichens as a whole and on individual species differed in time and magnitude between treatments and plant communities (meadow and heath). This will likely cause changes in the dominance structures over time. These results underscore the importance of longer-term studies to improve the quality of data used in climate change models, as models based on short-term data are poor predictors of long-term responses of bryophytes and lichens.

  • 45.
    Alatalo, Juha M
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet, Campus Gotland.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Environment.
    Molau, Ulf
    Göteborg Universitet.
    Climate change and climatic events: Community-, functional- and species-level responses of bryophytes and lichens to constant, stepwise, and pulse experimental warming in an alpine tundra2014In: Alpine Botany, ISSN 1664-2201, Vol. 124, no 2, 81-91 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We experimentally imposed three different kinds of warming scenarios over 3 years on an alpine meadow community to identify the differential effects of climate warming and extreme climatic events on the abundance and biomass of bryophytes and lichens. Treatments consisted of (a) a constant level of warming with open top chambers (an average temperature increase of 1.87 °C), (b) a yearly stepwise increase of warming (average temperature increases of 1.0; 1.87 and 3.54 °C, consecutively), and (c) a pulse warming, i.e., a single first year pulse event of warming (average temperature increase of 3.54 °C only during the first year). To our knowledge, this is the first climate change study that attempts to distinguish between the effects of constant, stepwise and pulse warming on bryophyte and lichen communities. We hypothesised that pulse warming would have a significant short-term effect compared to the other warming treatments, and that stepwise warming would have a significant mid-term effect compared to the other warming treatments. Acrocarpous bryophytes as a group increased in abundance and biomass to the short-term effect of pulse warming. We found no significant effects of mid-term (third-year) stepwise warming. However, one pleurocarpous bryophyte species, Tomentypnum nitens, generally increased in abundance during the warm year 1997 but decreased in control plots and in response to the stepwise warming treatment. Three years of experimental warming (all treatments as a group) did have a significant impact at the community level, yet changes in abundance did not translate into significant changes in the dominance hierarchies at the functional level (for acrocarpous bryophytes, pleurocarpous bryophytes, Sphagnum or lichens), or in significant changes in other bryophyte or lichen species. The results suggest that bryophytes and lichens, both at the functional group and species level, to a large extent are resistant to the different climate change warming simulations that were applied.

  • 46.
    Alatalo, Juha, M.
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Jägerbrand, Annika
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Environment.
    Molau, Ulf
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Testing reliability of short-term responses to predict longer-term responses of bryophytes and lichens to environmental change2015In: Ecological Indicators, ISSN 1470-160X, E-ISSN 1872-7034, Vol. 58, 77-85 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental changes are predicted to have severe and rapid impacts on polar and alpine regions. At high latitudes/altitudes, cryptogams such as bryophytes and lichens are of great importance in terms of biomass, carbon/nutrient cycling, cover and ecosystem functioning. This seven-year factorial experiment examined the effects of fertilizing and experimental warming on bryophyte and lichen abundance in an alpine meadow and a heath community in subarctic Sweden. The aim was to determine whether short-term responses (five years) are good predictors of longer-term responses (seven years). Fertilizing and warming had significant negative effects on total and relative abundance of bryophytes and lichens, with the largest and most rapid decline caused by fertilizing and combined fertilizing and warming. Bryophytes decreased most in the alpine meadow community, which was bryophyte-dominated, and lichens decreased most in the heath community, which was lichen-dominated. This was surprising, as the most diverse group in each community was expected to be most resistant to perturbation. Warming alone had a delayed negative impact. Of the 16 species included in statistical analyses, seven were significantly negatively affected. Overall, the impacts of simulated warming on bryophytes and lichens as a whole and on individual species differed in time and magnitude between treatments and plant communities (meadow and heath). This will likely cause changes in the dominance structures over time. These results underscore the importance of longer-term studies to improve the quality of data used in climate change models, as models based on short-term data are poor predictors of long-term responses of bryophytes and lichens.

  • 47.
    Alatalo, Juha M
    et al.
    Qatar University.
    Jägerbrand, Annika
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Environment.
    Čuchta, Peter
    Academy of Science of the Czech Republic.
    Collembola at three alpine subarctic sites resistant to twenty years of experimental warming2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, 18161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the effects of micro-scale, site and 19 and 21 years of experimental warming on Collembola in three contrasting alpine subarctic plant communities (poor heath, rich meadow, wet meadow). Unexpectedly, experimental long-term warming had no significant effect on species richness, effective number of species, total abundance or abundance of any Collembola species. There were micro-scale effects on species richness, total abundance, and abundance of 10 of 35 species identified. Site had significant effect on effective number of species, and abundance of six species, with abundance patterns differing between sites. Site and long-term warming gave non-significant trends in species richness.

    The highest species richness was observed in poor heath, but mean species richness tended to be highest in rich meadow and lowest in wet meadow. Warming showed a tendency for a negative impact on species richness. This long-term warming experiment across three contrasting sites revealed that Collembola is capable of high resistance to climate change. We demonstrated that micro-scale and site effects are the main controlling factors for Collembola abundance in high alpine subarctic environments. Thus local heterogeneity is likely important for soil fauna composition and may play a crucial role in buffering Collembola against future climate change.

  • 48.
    Alatalo, Juha M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Little, Chelsea J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Simulated global change: contrasting short and medium term growth and reproductive responses of a common alpine/Arctic cushion plant to experimental warming and nutrient enhancement2014In: SpringerPlus, E-ISSN 2193-1801, Vol. 3, 157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cushion plants are important components of alpine and Arctic plant communities around the world. They fulfill important roles as facilitators, nurse plants and foundation species across trophic levels for vascular plants, arthropods and soil microorganisms, the importance of these functions increasing with the relative severity of the environment. Here we report results from one of the few experimental studies simulating global change impacts on cushion plants; a factorial experiment with warming and nutrient enhancement that was applied to an alpine population of the common nurse plant, Silene acaulis, in sub-arctic Sweden. Experimental perturbations had significant short-term impacts on both stem elongation and leaf length. S. acaulis responded quickly by increasing stem elongation and (to a lesser extent) leaf length in the warming, nutrient, and the combined warming and nutrient enhancements. Cover and biomass also initially increased in response to the perturbations. However, after the initial positive short-term responses, S. acaulis cover declined in the manipulations, with the nutrient and combined warming and nutrient treatments having largest negative impact. No clear patterns were found for fruit production. Our results show that S. acaulis living in harsh environments has potential to react quickly when experiencing years with favorable conditions, and is more responsive to nutrient enhancement than to warming in terms of vegetative growth. While these conditions have an initial positive impact, populations experiencing longer-term increased nutrient levels will likely be negatively affected.

  • 49.
    Alatalo, Juha M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Little, Chelsea J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Jagerbrand, Annika K.
    Molau, Ulf
    Dominance hierarchies, diversity and species richness of vascular plants in an alpine meadow: contrasting short and medium term responses to simulated global change2014In: PeerJ, ISSN 2167-8359, Vol. 2, e406- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the impact of simulated global change on a high alpine meadow plant community. Specifically, we examined whether short-term (5 years) responses are good predictors for medium-term (7 years) changes in the system by applying a factorial warming and nutrient manipulation to 20 plots in Latnjajaure, subarctic Sweden. Seven years of experimental warming and nutrient enhancement caused dramatic shifts in dominance hierarchies in response to the nutrient and the combined warming and nutrient enhancement treatments. Dominance hierarchies in the meadow moved from a community being dominated by cushion plants, deciduous, and evergreen shrubs to a community being dominated by grasses, sedges, and forbs. Short-termresponses were shown to be inconsistent in their ability to predict medium-term responses for most functional groups, however, grasses showed a consistent and very substantial increase in response to nutrient addition over the seven years. The non-linear responses over time point out the importance of longer-term studies with repeated measurements to be able to better predict future changes. Forecasted changes to temperature and nutrient availability have implications for trophic interactions, and may ultimately influence the access to and palatability of the forage for grazers. Depending on what anthropogenic change will be most pronounced in the future (increase in nutrient deposits, warming, or a combination of them both), different shifts in community dominance hierarchies may occur. Generally, this study supports the productivity-diversity relationship found across arctic habitats, with community diversity peaking in mid-productivity systems and degrading as nutrient availability increases further. This is likely due the increasing competition in plant-plant interactions and the shifting dominance structure with grasses taking over the experimental plots, suggesting that global change could have high costs to biodiversity in the Arctic.

  • 50.
    Alatalo, Juha M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Little, Chelsea J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Jagerbrand, Annika K.
    Molau, Ulf
    Vascular plant abundance and diversity in an alpine heath under observed and simulated global change2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, 10197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global change is predicted to cause shifts in species distributions and biodiversity in arctic tundra. We applied factorial warming and nutrient manipulation to a nutrient and species poor alpine/arctic heath community for seven years. Vascular plant abundance in control plots increased by 31%. There were also notable changes in cover in the nutrient and combined nutrient and warming treatments, with deciduous and evergreen shrubs declining, grasses overgrowing these plots. Sedge abundance initially increased significantly with nutrient amendment and then declined, going below initial values in the combined nutrient and warming treatment. Nutrient addition resulted in a change in dominance hierarchy from deciduous shrubs to grasses. We found significant declines in vascular plant diversity and evenness in the warming treatment and a decline in diversity in the combined warming and nutrient addition treatment, while nutrient addition caused a decline in species richness. The results give some experimental support that species poor plant communities with low diversity may be more vulnerable to loss of species diversity than communities with higher initial diversity. The projected increase in nutrient deposition and warming may therefore have negative impacts on ecosystem processes, functioning and services due to loss of species diversity in an already impoverished environment.

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