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  • 1. Abrahamsson, Thomas R.
    et al.
    Jakobsson, Hedvig E.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Björksten, Bengt
    Engstrand, Lars
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jenmalm, Maria C.
    Gut microbiota diversity and atopic disease: Does breast-feeding play a role? Reply2013In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 131, no 1, 248-249 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Abu Bakar, Siddique
    Stockholm University.
    Immunological and functional properties of a non-repeat region in Plasmodium falciparum antigen Pf155/RESA1998Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is one of the most prevalent of all the great insect-borne diseases causing high morbidity and mortality in humans. As conventional anti-malarial treatment is becoming increasingly inefficient, alternative approaches to combat the parasite, like vaccine development, are of high priority. Among other antigens, Pf155/RESA has been taken into consideration for inclusion in a vaccine against the asexual blood stages of P. falciparum. Repeat sequences of this antigen induce neutralizing antibodies and are potentially involved in protective immune responses. However, the genetic restriction in the immune responses to these epitopes has made it of importance to define additional regions in this antigen which may be suitable for inclusion in a vaccine. The present studies were aimed at investigating potential immunodominant B- and T-cell epitopes in the non-repeat regions of Pf155/RESA suitable for inclusion in subunit vaccine immunogens.

    In order to define immunodominant B- and T-cell epitopes, short overlapping peptides were synthesized, corresponding to three different non-repeat sequences of Pf155/RESA. Sera collected from malaria endemic countries recognized pepetides representing N-terminal sequences of the antigen. Based on high antibody reactivity in ELISA, two peptides were selected for affinity purification of antibodies from Liberian sera. The purified antibodies were shown to be efficient in parasite growth inhibition in vitro. Furthermore, the peptides had the ability to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells from P. falciparum-immune donors to proliferate and to secrete IL-4 and/or IFN-g. Although the frequency of responders was high, the magnitude of the responses was generally low.

    Antibodies were raised in rabbits against synthetic peptides corresponding to different non-repeat sequences in Pf155/RESA. Although all antisera reacted strongly with the corresponding peptide, they reacted only weakly with full-length Pf155/RESA. Antibodies to some of the non-repeat sequences inhibited merozoite invasion in vitro, notably, also the invasion of parasites deficient in Pf155/RESA, indicating the presence of an antigen highly homologous to Pf155/RESA.

    Upon infection with P. falciparum, erythrocytes expose cryptic determinants in band 3, which are thought to mediate cytoadherence to endothelial cells. The N-terminal non-repeat region of Pf155/RESA contains a hexapeptide motif which is highly homologous to the cytoadherence related sequences of erythrocyte band 3. Synthetic peptides containing this hexapeptide motif inhibited the binding of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes to melanoma cells in vitro. Antibodies raised against the largely overlapping sequences displayed highly different specificity patterns. Antibodies to the cytoadherence related motif of Pf155/RESA as well as antibodies raised against the peptides corresponding to the band 3 motif inhibited cytoadherence but not parasite growth. In contrast antibodies to sequences adjacent to the Pf155/RESA cytoadherence motif inhibited parasite growth in vitro but had no effect on cytoadherence.

    In summary, although the target antigens for the anti-parasitic activities displayed by the antibodies in these studies are unclear, sequences in non-repeat regions of Pf155/RESA may induce antibodies with capacity to inhibit parasite growth in vitro or to block the cytoadherence of P. falciparum infected erythrocytes to endothelial cells. The combination of non-repeat sequences with repeat sequences of Pf155/RESA in a subunit vaccine may provide immunogens with an improved capacity to induce parasite neutralizing antibody responses.

  • 3.
    Abuabaid, Hanan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Scherbak, Nikolai
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Olsson, Per-Erik
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Jass, Jana
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus alters inflammatory responses of bladder epithelial and macrophage-like cells in co-cultureManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4. Achidi, E. A.
    et al.
    Apinjoh, T. O.
    Mbunwe, E.
    Besingi, R.
    Yafi, C.
    Awah, N. Wenjighe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Ajua, A.
    Anchang, J. K.
    Febrile status, malarial parasitaemia and gastro-intestinal helminthiases in schoolchildren resident at different altitudes, in south-western Cameroon2008In: Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology, ISSN 0003-4983, Vol. 102, no 2, 103-118 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the many areas where human malaria and helminthiases are co-endemic, schoolchildren often harbour the heaviest infections and suffer much of the associated morbidity, especially when co-infected. In one such area, the Buea district, in south-western Cameroon, two cross-sectional surveys, together covering 263 apparently healthy schoolchildren aged 4-12 years, were recently conducted. The prevalences of fever, malarial parasitaemia and intestinal helminth infections, the seroprevalences of anti-Plasmodium falciparum IgG and IgE and anti-glycosylphosphatidylinositol (anti-GPI) IgG, plasma concentrations of total IgE, and the incidence of anaemia were all investigated. The mean (S.D.) age of the study children was 7.56 (1.82) years. Overall, 156 (59.3%) of the children were found parasitaemic, with a geometric mean parasitaemia of 565 parasites/mu l. Parasitaemia and fever were significantly associated (P=0.042). The children who lived at low altitude, attending schools that lay 400-650 m above sea level, had significantly higher parasitaemias than their high-altitude counterparts (P < 0.01). At low altitude, the children attending government schools had significantly higher parasitaemias than their mission-school counterparts (P=0.010). Of the 31 children (11.9%) found anaemic, 22 (70.4%) had mild anaemia and none had severe anaemia. A significant negative correlation (r=-0.224; P=0.005) was observed between haemoglobin concentration and level of parasitaemia. Infection with Plasmodium appeared to reduce erythrocyte counts (P=0.045), a condition that was exacerbated by co-infection with helminths (P=0.035). Plasma concentrations of total IgE were higher in the children found to be excreting helminth eggs than in those who appeared helminth-free, while levels of anti-P. falciparum IgE were higher in the children with low-grade parasitaemias than in those with more intense parasitaemias. Levels of anti-GPI IgG increased with age and were relatively high in the children who lived at low altitude and in those who were aparasitaemic. The survey results confirm that asymptomatic malarial parasitaemia frequently co-exists with helminth infections in schoolchildren and indicate links with fever, altitude and school type. Immunoglobulin E may play a role in immune protection against helminthiasis whereas anti-GPI antibodies may be important in the development of antimalarial immunity in such children. In Cameroon, as in other areas with endemic malaria, control programmes to reduce the prevalences of infections with intestinal helminths and malarial parasites in schoolchildren, which may effectively reduce the incidence of anaemia, are clearly needed.

  • 5. Aeinehband, Shahin
    et al.
    Brenner, Philip
    Stahl, Sara
    Bhat, Maria
    Fidock, Mark D.
    Khademi, Mohsen
    Olsson, Tomas
    Engberg, Goran
    Jokinen, Jussi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Erhardt, Sophie
    Piehl, Fredrik
    Cerebrospinal fluid kynurenines in multiple sclerosis: relation to disease course and neurocognitive symptoms2016In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 51, 47-55 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system, with a high rate of neurocognitive symptoms for which the molecular background is still uncertain. There is accumulating evidence for dysregulation of the kynurenine pathway (KP) in different psychiatric and neurodegenerative conditions. We here report the first comprehensive analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) kynurenine metabolites in MS patients of different disease stages and in relation to neurocognitive symptoms. Levels of tryptophan (TRP), kynurenine (KYN), kynurenic acid (KYNA) and quinolinic acid (QUIN) were determined with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry in cell-free CSF. At the group level MS patients (cohort 1; n = 71) did not differ in absolute levels of TRP, KYN, KYNA or QUIN as compared to non-inflammatory neurological disease controls (n = 20). Stratification of patients into different disease courses revealed that both absolute QUIN levels and the QUIN/KYN ratio were increased in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) patients in relapse. Interestingly, secondary progressive MS (SPMS) displayed a trend for lower TRP and KYNA, while primary progressive (PPMS) patients displayed increased levels of all metabolites, similar to a group of inflammatory neurological disease controls (n = 13). In the second cohort (n = 48), MS patients with active disease and short disease duration were prospectively evaluated for neuropsychiatric symptoms. In a supervised multivariate analysis using orthogonal projection to latent structures (OPLS-DA) depressed patients displayed higher KYNA/TRP and KYN/TRP ratios, mainly due to low TRP levels. Still, this model had low predictive value and could not completely separate the clinically depressed patients from the non-depressed MS patients. No correlation was evident for other neurocognitive measures. Taken together these results demonstrate that clinical disease activity and differences in disease courses are reflected by changes in KP metabolites. Increased QUIN levels of RRMS patients in relapse and generally decreased levels of TRP in SPMS may relate to neurotoxicity and failure of remyelination, respectively. In contrast, PPMS patients displayed a more divergent pattern more resembling inflammatory conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus. The pattern of KP metabolites in RRMS patients could not predict neurocognitive symptoms.

  • 6.
    Aeinehband, Shahin
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lindblom, Rickard P. F.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Al Nimer, Faiez
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Vijayaraghavan, Swetha
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Sandholm, Kerstin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Khademi, Mohsen
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Olsson, Tomas
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. Uppsala University.
    Darreh-Shori, Taher
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Piehl, Fredrik
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Complement Component C3 and Butyrylcholinesterase Activity Are Associated with Neurodegeneration and Clinical Disability in Multiple Sclerosis2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 4, e0122048Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dysregulation of the complement system is evident in many CNS diseases but mechanisms regulating complement activation in the CNS remain unclear. In a recent large rat genomewide expression profiling and linkage analysis we found co-regulation of complement C3 immediately downstream of butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), an enzyme hydrolyzing acetylcholine (ACh), a classical neurotransmitter with immunoregulatory effects. We here determined levels of neurofilament-light (NFL), a marker for ongoing nerve injury, C3 and activity of the two main ACh hydrolyzing enzymes, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and BuChE, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with MS (n = 48) and non-inflammatory controls (n = 18). C3 levels were elevated in MS patients compared to controls and correlated both to disability and NFL. C3 levels were not induced by relapses, but were increased in patients with >= 9 cerebral lesions on magnetic resonance imaging and in patients with progressive disease. BuChE activity did not differ at the group level, but was correlated to both C3 and NFL levels in individual samples. In conclusion, we show that CSF C3 correlates both to a marker for ongoing nerve injury and degree of disease disability. Moreover, our results also suggest a potential link between intrathecal cholinergic activity and complement activation. These results motivate further efforts directed at elucidating the regulation and effector functions of the complement system in MS, and its relation to cholinergic tone.

  • 7. Agianian, Bogos
    et al.
    Lesch, Christine
    Loseva, Olga
    Dushay, Mitchell S.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences. Uppsala University.
    Preliminary characterization of hemolymph coagulation in Anopheles gambiae larvae2007In: Developmental and Comparative Immunology, ISSN 0145-305X, E-ISSN 1879-0089, Vol. 31, no 9, 879-888 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hemolymph coagulation is a first response to injury, impeding infection, and ending bleeding. Little is known about its molecular basis in insects, but clotting factors have been identified in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we have begun to study coagulation in the aquatic larvae of the malaria vector mosquito Anopheles gambiae using methods developed for Drosophila. A delicate clot was seen by light microscopy, and pullout and proteomic analysis identified phenoloxidase and apolipophorin-I as major candidate clotting factors. Electron microscopic analysis confirmed clot formation and revealed it contains fine molecular sheets, most likely a result of lipophorin assembly. Phenoloxidase appears to be more critical in clot formation in Anopheles than in Drosophila. The Anopheles larval clot thus differs in formation, structure, and composition from the clot in Drosophila, confirming the need to study coagulation in different insect species to learn more about its evolution and adaptation to different lifestyles.

  • 8.
    Agliari, Elena
    et al.
    Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita` degli Studi di Parma, viale G. Usberti 7, 43100 Parma, Italy.
    Barra, Adriano
    Del Ferraro, Gino
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Biology, CB.
    Guerra, Francesco
    Tantari, Daniele
    Anergy in self-directed B lymphocytes: A statistical mechanics perspective2013In: Journal of Theoretical Biology, ISSN 0022-5193, E-ISSN 1095-8541, Vol. 375, 21-31 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-directed lymphocytes may evade clonal deletion at ontogenesis but still remain harmless due to a mechanism called clonal anergy. For B-lymphocytes, two major explanations for anergy developed over the last decades: according to Varela theory, anergy stems from a proper orchestration of the whole B-repertoire, such that self-reactive clones, due to intensive feed-back from other clones, display strong inertia when mounting a response. Conversely, according to the model of cognate response, self-reacting cells are not stimulated by helper lymphocytes and the absence of such signaling yields anergy. Through statistical mechanics we show that helpers do not prompt activation of a sub-group of B-cells: remarkably, the latter are just those broadly interacting in the idiotypic network. Hence Varela theory can finally be reabsorbed into the prevailing framework of the cognate response model. Further, we show how the B-repertoire architecture may emerge, where highly connected clones are self-directed as a natural consequence of ontogenetic learning. 

  • 9.
    Ahlgren, Kerstin. M
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Fall, Tove
    Landegren, Nils
    von Euler, Henrik
    Sundberg, Katarina
    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin
    Lobell, Anna
    Hedhammar, Åke
    Andersson, Göran
    Hansson-Hamlin, Helene
    Lernmark, Åke
    Kämpe, Olle
    Diabetes mellitus in dog -: No evidence for a type-1-like phenotypeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims/hypothesis

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most common endocrine disorders in dogs, and is commonly proposed to be of autoimmune origin. Although the clinical symptoms of human type 1 diabetes (T1D) and canine DM are similar, the aetiologies may differ. The aim of this study was to investigate if autoimmune aetiology resembling human T1D is as prevalent in dogs as previously reported.

    Methods

     Sera from 121 diabetic dogs representing 38 different breeds were tested for islet cell antibodies (ICA) and GAD65 autoantibodies (GADA) and compared with sera from 133 healthy dogs from 40 breeds. ICA was detected by indirect immunofluorescence using both canine and human frozen sections. GADA was detected by in vitro transcription and translation (ITT) of human and canine GAD65, followed by immunoprecipitation.

    Results

    None of the canine sera analyzed tested positive for ICA on sections of frozen canine or human ICA pancreas. However, serum from one diabetic dog was weakly positive in the canine GADA assay and serum from one healthy dog was weakly positive in the human GADA assay.

    Conclusions/interpretations

    Based on sera from 121 diabetic dogs from 38 different breeds were tested for humoral autoreactivity using four different assays, contrary to previous observations, we find no support for an autoimmune aetiology  in canine diabetes.

  • 10.
    Ahmad, Fareed
    et al.
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Shankar, Esaki M.
    University of Malaya, Malaysia; University of Malaya, Malaysia; School Basic Appl Science, India.
    Yong, Yean K.
    University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Tan, Hong Y.
    University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Ahrenstorf, Gerrit
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Jacobs, Roland
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schmidt, Reinhold E.
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Kamarulzaman, Adeeba
    University of Malaya, Malaysia; University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Ansari, Abdul W.
    University of Malaya, Malaysia; University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Negative Checkpoint Regulatory Molecule 2B4 (CD244) Upregulation Is Associated with Invariant Natural Killer T Cell Alterations and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease Progression2017In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 8, 338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are implicated in innate immune responses against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, the determinants of cellular dysfunction across the iNKT cells subsets are seldom defined in HIV disease. Herein, we provide evidence for the involvement of the negative checkpoint regulator (NCR) 2B4 in iNKT cell alteration in a well-defined cohort of HIV-seropositive anti-retroviral therapy (ART) naive, ART-treated, and elite controllers (ECs). We report on exaggerated 2B4 expression on iNKT cells of HIV-infected treatment-naive individuals. In sharp contrast to CD4-iNKT cells, 2B4 expression was significantly higher on CD4+ iNKT cell subset. Notably, an increased level of 2B4 on iNKT cells was strongly correlated with parameters associated with HIV disease progression. Further, iNKT cells from ARTnaive individuals were defective in their ability to produce intracellular IFN-gamma Together, our results suggest that the levels of 2B4 expression and the downstream co-inhibitory signaling events may contribute to impaired iNKT cell responses.

  • 11.
    Akula, Srinivas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Biology Education Centre.
    Analysis of the isotype specificity of three platypus immunoglobulin Fc receptors2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The host’s defense against diseases called immunity acts either via innate or adaptive defense mechanisms. Immunoglobulins (Ig’s) are important players in adaptive immunity. They have evolved both structurally and functionally during vertebrate evolution. The Fc region of Igs can interact with specific receptors on the surface of various immune cells; crosslinking of these Fc receptors can trigger a wide array of immune reactions. To trigger such reactions, higher mammals have five different classes of Igs (IgM, IgG, IgA, IgE and IgD) while amphibians, reptiles and birds have four (IgM, IgD, IgA and IgY).  Our recent studies have revealed that the early mammals (Platypus) have eight Ig isotypes (IgM, IgD IgO, IgG1, IgG2, IgA1, IgA2 and IgE) and at least four Fc receptors: FcRA, FcRB, FcRC and FcRD. In this study we investigated the specificity of three of these platypus Fc receptors to get a better picture of their isotype specificity.   

  • 12. Alcocer, M. J. C.
    et al.
    Murtagh, G. J.
    Mirotti, L.
    Brans, A.
    Harnett, W.
    Rundqvist, Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Larsson, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    The allergenicity of 2S plant albumins2011In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 41, no 12, 1827-1827 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Aldén, Anna
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, Sweden.
    Gonzalez, Lorena
    University of Kalmar, Sweden.
    Persson, Anna
    Ellco Food, Sweden.
    Christensson, Kerstin
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Ellco Food, Sweden.
    Holmqvist, Olov
    ProLiff AB, Sweden.
    Ohlson, Sten
    University of Kalmar, Sweden.
    Porcine platelet lysate as a supplement for animal cell culture2007In: Cytotechnology (Dordrecht), ISSN 0920-9069, E-ISSN 1573-0778, Vol. 55, no 1, 3-8 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel supplementation of cell growth media based on a porcine platelet lysate was developed for culture of animal-derived cells. The platelet lysate was produced from porcine blood and contained lysate of platelets and plasma components. It showed satisfactory microbiological integrity and it carried only low amount of endotoxins (<10 EU/mL). The porcine platelet lysate supported well proliferation of Vero (African green monkey transformed kidney epithelial cells), Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and hybridoma cells comparable to fetal bovine serum (FBS). Platelet lysate shows promise as a viable choice over FBS as it can be produced in large quantities, high lot-to-lot consistency and with an attractive price structure. Furthermore it is a strong alternative to FBS for ethical reasons. It is expected that it can be used as a general supplementation for most animal cells for research studies on the proliferation of cells and their expression of products.

  • 14.
    Ali, Magdi Mahmoud
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Wenner-Gren Institute for Experimental Biology.
    Immunologic aspects of the pathogenesis of human onchocerciasis2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Onchocerciasis, or river blindness, is a parasitic disease that affects more than 20 million people globally. The induction of pathology is directly related to the presence and destruction of the microfilarial stages (mf) of this filarial nematode. The disease presents clinically with a wide spectrum of dermal and ocular manifestations, the basis of the variation is believed to involve the immune system. The clinical presentations of infected hosts relate to the intensity of the reactions against the parasite. Anti-microfilarial drugs are also thought to somehow involve the immune system in their pharmacological action. In this study we have investigated some of the factors that might contribute to the pathogenesis, with the aim of gaining a better understanding of the role of immune response in these host inflammatory reactions to Onchocerca volvulus parasite. In the first study we have highlighted the clinically most severe form of dermal onchocerciasis, known as reactive onchocercal dermatitis (ROD), one that is often ignored and has not been properly identified. This form has special characteristics and important biological information that could greatly assist the general understanding of the disease as a whole. Amongst the three major foci of the disease in the study country, Sudan, the prevalence of ROD was found to be associated with different environmental and epidemiological characteristics; strikingly higher in the hypo-endemic areas. Including ROD cases in the prevalence will upgrade the level of endemicity of a locality, and often bring patients much in need of treatment into mass treatment programs that currently only treat localities with medium to high levels of endemicity. In the following research studies, we tried to address the immunological characteristics of the clinically different onchocerciasis patients. Then we also investigated the role of genetic polymorphism in the gene encoding receptor that links innate and adaptive immunity, namely, FcγRIIa.

    Patients with either of two major forms of the clinical spectrum-mild and severe dermatopathology were studied by assaying the antigen-driven proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the ability of patients’ serum antibodies to promote cytoadherence activity to mf in vitro. Immune responses of those with severe skin disease were found to be stronger compared with the mild dermatopathology group. Mectizan® treatment was followed by an increase in immune responsiveness in those with initially poor responses. Thus the degree of dermatopathology is related to the host’s immune response against mf and immunocompetence may be necessary for Mectizan® to clear the infection efficiently.

    The infection has also been associated with increased levels of circulating immune complexes (CIC) containing parasite antigens and a cytokine response that involves both pro-and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Our fourth paper investigated the effect of IC from the O. volvulus infected patients on the production of pro-and anti-inflammatory cytokines. CIC were increased in all patients studied. The precipitate from plasma treated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) were added to peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures, and the levels of IL-10, tumor necrosis factor TNF-α, IL-1β and their endogenous antagonists soluble TNF-Rp75 and IL-1-receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) were measured. A significant induction of all cytokines measured occurred in the onchocerciasis patients compared to healthy controls. However, the IL-1ra level was suppressed. The suppression of the production of IL-1ra suggests that the IC containing antigens may have a selectively suppressive effect on the production of this anti-inflammatory cytokine; thus implicating its possible role in counteracting inflammatory responses associated with the disease, and suggesting a potential therapeutic significance.

    FcgRIIa receptors are involved in many important biological responses, and considered as important mediators of inflammation. A polymorphism in the gene encoding this receptor, that is either arginine (R) or histidine (H) at position 131, affects the binding to the different IgG subclasses. We therefore hypothesized that this polymorphism might be one of the underlying mechanisms to the varied clinical presentations seen in this disease. FcgRIIa genotyping was carried out by gene specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and allele-specific restriction enzyme digestion of DNA from clinically characterized patients. The genotype R/R frequencies were found to be significantly higher among patients with the severe form of the disease (including ROD), and it was particularly associated with one tribe (Masaleet) compared to Fulani. Moreover, the H allele was found to be associated with lower risk of developing the severe form. As no significant difference was seen between onchocerciasis cases and controls, the study also implies that this polymorphism influences protection from developing the severe form rather than being related to protection from the infection.

  • 15. Allerbring, E. B.
    et al.
    Duru, A. D.
    Uchtenhagen, H.
    Madhurantakam, C.
    Tomek, M. B.
    Grimm, Sebastian
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Molecular Biotechnology.
    Mazumdar, P. A.
    Friemann, R.
    Uhlin, M.
    Sandalova, T.
    Nygren, Per-Åke
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Molecular Biotechnology.
    Achour, A.
    Unexpected T-cell recognition of an altered peptide ligand is driven by reversed thermodynamics2012In: European Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0014-2980, E-ISSN 1521-4141, Vol. 42, no 11, 2990-3000 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The molecular basis underlying T-cell recognition of MHC molecules presenting altered peptide ligands is still not well-established. A hierarchy of T-cell activation by MHC class I-restricted altered peptide ligands has been defined using the T-cell receptor P14 specific for H-2D b in complex with the immunodominant lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus peptide gp33 (KAVYNFATM). While substitution of tyrosine to phenylalanine (Y4F) or serine (Y4S) abolished recognition by P14, the TCR unexpectedly recognized H-2D b in complex with the alanine-substituted semiagonist Y4A, which displayed the most significant structural modification. The observed functional hierarchy gp33 &gt; Y4A &gt; Y4S = Y4F was neither due to higher stabilization capacity nor to differences in structural conformation. However, thermodynamic analysis demonstrated that while recognition of the full agonist H-2D b/gp33 was strictly enthalpy driven, recognition of the weak agonist H-2D b/Y4A was instead entropy driven with a large reduction in the favorable enthalpy term. The fourfold larger negative heat capacity derived for the interaction of P14 with H-2D b/gp33 compared with H-2D b/Y4A can possibly be explained by higher water entrapment at the TCR/MHC interface, which is also consistent with the measured opposite entropy contributions for the interactions of P14 with both MHCs. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that P14 makes use of different strategies to adapt to structural modifications in the MHC/peptide complex.

  • 16.
    Almgren, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Characterization of antibodies against mustard and development of immunological methods for the detection and quantification of mustard in foods2007Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT

    Allergy to mustard has been reported for many years, in some cases as severe anaphylactic reactions. Recent studies imply that this allergy is increasing. Three major allergens have been isolated and characterised; Sin a 1 and Sin a 2 in yellow mustard (Sinapis alba), and Bra j 1 in oriental mustard (Brassica juncea). Yellow mustard and black mustard (Brassica nigra) are the most common species in Europe, whereas oriental mustard is more frequent outside Europe. Mustard plants belong to the Brassicaceae/Cruciferae family. Mustard is present as an ingredient in different foods, sauces and spices, often in small amounts. According to the European labelling directives, mustard and products thereof must always be declared. To monitor this regulation, methods need to be developed to detect mustard. Polyclonal antibodies, produced in rabbits, against yellow and black mustard were characterised with immunodiffusion, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) under reducing conditions, and immunoblotting. Rocket-immunoelectrophoresis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were developed for the detection and quantification of mustard protein. With indirect competitive ELISA a concentration of 156ng mustard protein per ml food extract was detected, which is more than enough to cover the lowest reported reactive doses.

  • 17.
    Amoudruz, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Maternal immune characteristics and innate immune responses in the child in relation to allergic disease2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanistic factors responsible for the increase in allergic diseases are still not fully understood, but a reduced microbial stimulation seems to be one of the key issues. Research is now aiming at investigating the relationship between the innate immune system, involving the toll-like receptors, and allergy development. Further, the maternal influence on the child, possibly through in utero effects, but also through the breast milk, has shown to be of great importance. This thesis aimed at understanding how the maternal immune system is influenced by early exposures and allergic disease, but also to investigate the consequences of the maternal phenotype on the innate immune system of the developing child.

    The Th1/Th2 cytokine pattern in allergic diseases has been extensively studied. Here we were interested in comparing the innate cytokines in allergic and non-allergic women, and to see if the allergic status was influencing the effect of pregnancy differently. We demonstrate that IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-12 production in cells from adult women are not influenced by allergic status, neither during pregnancy nor 2 years after. However, pregnancy had an apparent effect on cytokine levels, regardless of allergic status. Also, total IgE levels in allergic women were significantly lower 2 years after pregnancy in comparison with the levels during pregnancy, pointing to the fact that pregnancy indeed has an immunomodulatory role.

    We further wanted to investigate the immune system of mothers who had migrated to Sweden in comparison with indigenous mothers. The reason for our interest here was that children born from immigrated mothers have shown to have an increased risk of developing diseases such as allergy and Crohn’s disease. The results showed that immigrants from a developing country had significantly higher levels of breast milk IL-6, IL-8 and TGF-β1. Further, regardless of maternal country of birth, a larger number of previous pregnancies was associated with down-regulation of several substances, statistically significant for soluble CD14 and IL-8. The results suggest that maternal country of birth may indeed influence adult immune characteristics, potentially relevant to disease risk in offspring.

    The influence of allergic status of the mother on the expression of CD14, TLR2 and TLR4 was further investigated in monocytes from mothers and their newborn babies upon microbial stimulation. We could not find any differences in monocytic TLR levels between the groups. No significant differences regarding cytokine levels between allergic and non-allergic mothers in response to stimuli were found either. However, the cytokine and chemokine release triggered by TLR2 stimulation in CB revealed that CBMC from children with maternal allergic disease released significantly less IL-6, and a trend towards less IL-8.

    As we could not find differences in TLR levels attributed to maternal allergy, but an impaired IL-6 response, we turned our focus on an intracellular event taking place after TLR ligation. The results confirmed our results of decreased IL-6 levels in CB from children to allergic mothers. At 2 years of age, the children of allergic mothers still displayed a diminished IL-6 response. Additionally, they also had a decreased activity of p38 MAPK. p38 has an important role in driving Th1 responses, suggesting that the p38 pathway could be one of the responsible mechanisms behind the impaired responses correlated to allergic heredity found in CB as well as at 2 years of age.

    Infancy is a crucial time period for the developing immune system. Further, the relative composition of the two major monocytic subsets CD14++CD16- and CD14+CD16+ is altered in some allergic diseases. TLR levels are different in the two subsets, proposing a possible link to the reduced responding capacity of monocytes from children with allergic heredity. We followed up our earlier studies of children at birth and at 2 years of age by looking at 5 year old children. There were no differences regarding monocytic subsets, nor in TLR levels in unstimulated cells. However, when stimulating the cells with PGN, both monocytic subsets in allergic subjects were less capable of upregulating TLR2 compared to the age-matched controls.

    Taken together, the work in this thesis suggests that the maternal immune system is affected by the process of pregnancy and childhood exposures. It further suggests that maternal allergy affects the young child, in terms of impaired responses to microbial stimuli, which later in infancy correlates with allergic disease in the child. These impaired innate responses could lead to a diminished Th1 response, or alternatively to a deficiency in regulatory mechanisms, and thereby cause allergic disease.

  • 18. Anchang-Kimbi, Judith K
    et al.
    Achidi, Eric A
    Nkegoum, Blaise
    Sverremark-Ekström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Troye-Blomberg, Marita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Diagnostic comparison of malaria infection in peripheral blood, placental blood and placental biopsies in Cameroonian parturient women.2009In: Malaria Journal, ISSN 1475-2875, Vol. 8, 126- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In sub-Saharan Africa, Plasmodium falciparum malaria in pregnancy presents an enormous diagnostic challenge. The epidemiological and clinical relevance of the different types of malaria diagnosis as well as risk factors associated with malaria infection at delivery were investigated. METHOD: In a cross-sectional survey, 306 women reporting for delivery in the Mutenegene maternity clinic, Fako division, South West province, Cameroon were screened for P. falciparum in peripheral blood, placental blood and placental tissue sections by microscopy. Information relating to the use of intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy with sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine, history of fever attack, infant birth weights and maternal anaemia were recorded. RESULTS: Among these women, P. falciparum infection was detected in 5.6%, 25.5% and 60.5% of the cases in peripheral blood, placental blood and placental histological sections respectively. Placental histology was more sensitive (97.4%) than placental blood film (41.5%) and peripheral blood (8.0%) microscopy. In multivariate analysis, age (< or = 20 years old) (OR = 4.61, 95% CI = 1.47 - 14.70), history of fever attack (OR = 2.98, 95% CI = 1.58 - 5.73) were significant risk factors associated with microscopically detected parasitaemia. The use of > or = 2 SP doses (OR = 0.18, 95% CI = 0.06 - 0.52) was associated with a significant reduction in the prevalence of microscopic parasitaemia at delivery. Age (>20 years) (OR = 0.34, 95% CI = 0.15 - 0.75) was the only significant risk factor associated with parasitaemia diagnosed by histology only in univariate analysis. Microscopic parasitaemia (OR = 2.74, 95% CI = 1.33-5.62) was a significant risk factor for maternal anaemia at delivery, but neither infection detected by histology only, nor past infection were associated with increased risk of anaemia. CONCLUSION: Placenta histological examination was the most sensitive indicator of malaria infection at delivery. Microscopically detected parasitaemia was associated with increased risk of maternal anaemia at delivery, but not low-grade parasitaemia detected by placental histology only.

  • 19.
    Anderl, Ines
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Infection-induced proliferation is a central hallmark of the activation of the cellular immune response in Drosophila larvae.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Blood cells have important roles in immune reactions in all metazoan species. In Drosophila melanogaster larvae, phagocytic plasmatocytes are the main blood cell (hemocyte) type. Lamellocytes participate in encapsulating foreign objects and are formed in response to parasitoid wasps laying their eggs into the hemocoel of the larvae. The immune reaction against wasps requires controlled recruitment and action of hemocytes from the lymph glands, sessile islets and circulation. However, the contribution of these different hematopoietic compartments to the immune-induced hemocyte pool remains unclear. We used eater-GFP and MSNF9MO-mCherry to fluorescently tag plasmatocytes and lamellocytes, respectively, and utilized flow cytometry and in vivo imaging to assess the hemocyte numbers and types in circulation and in sessile compartments after infection by three wasp species of the genus Leptopilina. We detected five different hemocyte types based on fluorescence, and a population of non-fluorescent cells. While non-infected larvae generally had only one, eaterGFP-high plasmatocyte population, early after wasp infection a new, eaterGFP-low cell population appeared in circulation. EaterGFP-high and –low cells both accumulated msnCherry during the immune response, and formed two cell lineages. Whereas the eaterGFP-low cells gradually lost GFP, the eaterGFP-high cells retained it at high levels. We suggest that eaterGFP-low cells represent an immune-induced hemocyte precursor cell pool, which, via a prelamellocyte stage, gives rise to lamellocytes. EaterGFP-high plasmatocytes also differentiated into large, msnCherry-positive hemocytes on wasp eggs, but these cells retain plasmatocyte identity. Importantly, all hemocyte types, except for lamellocytes, were able to divide after wasp infection, contributing to the increased hemocyte numbers after infection. We conclude that orchestrated differentiation and division of different hemocyte types in circulation and in sessile compartment is key to a successful immune response against parasitoid wasps.

  • 20.
    Anderl, Ines
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Activation of the Cellular Immune Response in Drosophila melanogaster Larvae2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last 40 years, Drosophila melanogaster has become an invaluable tool in understanding innate immunity. The innate immune system of Drosophila consists of a humoral and a cellular component. While many details are known about the humoral immune system, our knowledge about the cellular immune system is comparatively small. Blood cells or hemocytes constitute the cellular immune system. Three blood types have been described for Drosophila larvae. Plasmatocytes are phagocytes with a plethora of functions. Crystal cells mediate melanization and contribute to wound healing. Plasmatocytes and crystal cells constitute the blood cell repertoire of a healthy larva, whereas lamellocytes are induced in a demand-adapted manner after infection with parasitoid wasp eggs. They are involved in the melanotic encapsulation response against parasites and form melanotic nodules that are also referred to as tumors.

    In my thesis, I focused on unraveling the mechanisms of how the immune system orchestrates the cellular immune response. In particular, I was interested in the hematopoiesis of lamellocytes.

    In Article I, we were able to show that ectopic expression of key components of a number of signaling pathways in blood cells induced the development of lamellocytes, led to a proliferative response of plasmatocytes, or to a combination of lamellocyte activation and plasmatocyte proliferation.

    In Article II, I combined newly developed fluorescent enhancer-reporter constructs specific for plasmatocytes and lamellocytes and developed a “dual reporter system” that was used in live microscopy of fly larvae. In addition, we established flow cytometry as a tool to count total blood cell numbers and to distinguish between different blood cell types. The “dual reporter system” enabled us to differentiate between six blood cell types and established proliferation as a central feature of the cellular immune response. The combination flow cytometry and live imaging increased our understanding of the tempo-spatial events leading to the cellular immune reaction.

    In Article III, I developed a genetic modifier screen to find genes involved in the hematopoiesis of lamellocytes. I took advantage of the gain-of-function phenotype of the Tl10b mutation characterized by an activated cellular immune system, which induced the formation blood cell tumors. We screened the right arm of chromosome 3 for enhancers and suppressors of this mutation and uncovered ird1.

    Finally in Article IV, we showed that the activity of the Toll signaling pathway in the fat body, the homolog of the liver, is necessary to activate the cellular immune system and induce lamellocyte hematopoiesis.

  • 21. Andersen, G. Neumann
    et al.
    Andersen, M.
    Nagaeva, Olga
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Wikberg, J. E. S.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Dermal Melanocortin Receptor Rebound in Diffuse Systemic Sclerosis after Anti-TGF ss 1 Antibody Therapy2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 76, no 5, 478-482 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disturbed transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) signalling leads to enhanced synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM), which is manifested as systemic sclerosis (SSc), but this may be attenuated by the melanocortin system. Here, we report of rebound reaction in the gene expression of melanocortin receptor (MCR) subtypes and of the precursor of these receptors ligands, the pro-opio-melanocortin protein (POMC), in the acute skin lesion of diffuse systemic sclerosis (dSSc) after treatment with a recombinant human anti-TGF beta 1 antibody. Biopsies, taken from the leading edge of the skin lesion, before and after treatment of a patient with recent onset dSSc, were examined. Before treatment, increased levels of TGF beta mRNA and suppressed levels of POMC mRNA and MCR subtypes MC1-3, 5R mRNAs were seen in the lesion, compared with healthy controls. After treatment, there was a rebound expression of POMC, MC2, 3, 5R mRNAs. As the melanocortin system regulates collagen and melanin production, our findings add a new understanding to the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in the acute skin lesion of dSSc, which is characterized by enhanced ECM formation and changes in skin pigmentation.

  • 22.
    Andersson, Josefin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Utvärdering av Malaria Antigen ELISA kit för diagnostik av malaria vid Christian Medical College and Hospital i Vellore, Indien.: en jämförande studie mellan Quantitative buffy coat och enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) metodik.2006Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Malaria är ett globalt hälsoproblem som orsakar många dödsfall runt om i världen varje år och nästan hälften av jordens befolkning ligger i riskzonen att drabbas av sjukdomen. I Indien drabbas mellan 2-3 miljoner människor varje år och det inträffar omkring 900 dödsfall. Malaria orsakas av Plasmodium sp. som är en protozoe, och det finns fyra olika arter som är patogena för människor, P. vivax, P. ovale, P. falciparium samt P. malariae.

    Vanliga metoder för att diagnostisera malaria är genom tunna och tjocka blodutstryk som färgas till exempel med Giemsa, Fields eller Leishmans färgningsteknik och studeras mikroskopiskt, Quantitative Buffy Coat (QBC), PCR tester, acridinorange färgning samt olika immunologiska tester för detektion av antikroppar eller antigen som till exempel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) test och dipstick test.

    Syftet med denna studie är att utvärdera om en användning av SD Bio Line Malaria Antigen ELISA kit ger en mer känslig, tillförlitlig, praktisk samt mindre kostsam diagnostikmetod för malaria hos patienter med misstänkt malariainfektion än den nuvarande guldstandardmetoden, QBC tillsammans med blodutstryk, vid Christian Medical College and Hospital i Vellore.

    Patientproverna har i både ELISA testet samt QBC testet tillsammans med utstryk erhållit samma resultat vilket tyder på att SD Bio Line Malaria Antigen ELISA kitet skulle kunna vara en lika bra diagnostikmetod som QBC testet för diagnos av malaria. ELISA kitet har dock fler nackdelar, i jämförelse med QBC testet, så därför är slutsatsen att SD Bio Line Malaria Antigen ELISA kitet inte är en mer lämplig diagnostisk metod för malaria än den som används vid CMCH. Men då ELISA testet ändå ger en säker diagnos, enligt resultatet i studien, kan den vara ett lämpligt test inom något annat användningsområde.

  • 23.
    Andersson, Måns Sverker
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology. zooekologi.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Glycosylated haemoglobin: a new measure of condition in birds1995In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, no 260, 299-303 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: The influence of condition on time of breeding and reproductive success has been discussed since Darwin first suggested a relation in 1871. We used a novel method to investigate the influence of condition on the timing of breeding and reproductive success by measuring a relatively inert physiological parameter - the amount of glycosylated haemoglobin - in blood samples taken from the collared flycatcher Ficedula albicollis. The percentage of glycosylated haemoglobin (%HbG) was assumed to be proportional to the average blood glucose level, during the 3-5 weeks before the blood sampling. The %HbG was influenced neither by sex nor age. Date of arrival at the breeding ground was negatively correlated with %HbG so that early-arriving birds had significantly higher %HbG than those arriving later. Clutch size, corrected for the effect of laying date, correlated positively with %HbG in females, as did the number of fledged young, corrected for the effect of laying date, for both sexes. We found no correlation between body mass and the %HbG. We suggest that prebreeding condition influences the timing of breeding and subsequent reproductive performance and that %HbG can be used as an indicator of prebreeding-condition in migrating birds.

  • 24.
    Apitanyasai, Kantamas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology. Chulalongkorn Univ, Dept Biochem, Ctr Excellence Mol Biol & Genom Shrimp, Fac Sci, 254 Phayathai Rd, Bangkok 10330, Thailand..
    Noonin, Chadanat
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Tassanakajon, Anchalee
    Chulalongkorn Univ, Dept Biochem, Ctr Excellence Mol Biol & Genom Shrimp, Fac Sci, 254 Phayathai Rd, Bangkok 10330, Thailand..
    Söderhäll, Irene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Söderhäll, Kenneth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Characterization of a hemocyte homeostasis-associated-like protein (HHAP) in the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus2016In: Fish and Shellfish Immunology, ISSN 1050-4648, E-ISSN 1095-9947, Vol. 58, 429-435 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hemocyte homeostasis-associated-like protein (HHAP) in the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus has a distinct role from that of its homolog PmHHAP in the shrimp Penaeus monodon. Knockdown of PIHHAP in vitro using double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) had no effect on the cell morphology of hematopoietic tissue (HPT) cells. The total hemocyte number and caspase activity were unchanged after PIHHAP knockdown in vivo, in contrast to the results found in shrimp. Moreover, suppression of PIHHAP both in vitro and in vivo did not change the mRNA levels of some genes involved in hematopoiesis and hemocyte homeostasis. Interestingly, bacterial count and scanning electron microscope revealed that depletion of PIHHAP in intestine by RNAi resulted in higher number of bacteria in the crayfish intestine. Together, these results suggest that PIHHAP is not involved in hemocyte homeostasis in the crayfish P. leniusculus but appears to affect the bacterial number in the intestine through an unknown mechanism. Since PIHHAP has different functions from PmHHAP, we therefore named it HHAP-like protein.

  • 25.
    Arama, Charles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Novel immunization strategies and interethnic differences in response to malaria infection2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A better understanding of the role of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in host resistance to malaria is essential to unravel the complex interactions between the host and the parasite. This would improve the design of malaria vaccines.

    Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has been utilized as a vector to deliver vaccine candidate antigens. We assessed the immunogenicity of a recombinant BCG-expressing (BCG-CS) circumsporozoite protein (CSp) as a malaria vaccine candidate. Immunization of BALB/c mice with BCG-CS augmented the numbers of dendritic cells (DCs) in draining lymph nodes and in the spleen. The activation markers MHC-class-II, CD40, CD80, and CD86 on DCs were significantly upregulated by BCG-CS as compared to wild-type BCG (wt-BCG). In vitro stimulation of bone marrow-derived DCs and macrophages with BCG-CS induced IL-12 and TNF-α production. BCG-CS induced higher phagocytic activity in macrophages as compared to wt-BCG. Finally, BCG-CS induced CSp-specific antibodies and IFN-γ-producing memory cells. Taken together, we found that BCG-CS is highly efficient in activating innate immune responses and could effectively prime the adaptive immune system.

    Heterologous prime–boost approaches using vectors are optimal strategies to improve a broad and prolonged immunogenicity of malaria vaccines. We have demonstrated in BALB/c mice that priming with a replication-defective human adenovirus serotype 35 (Ad35) vector encoding CSp (Ad35-CS), followed by boosting with BCG-CS, maintained antibody responses and significantly increased levels of long-lived plasma cells (LLPC) and IFN-g-producing cells in response to CSp peptides. The increased number of IFN-g-producing cells induced by the combination of Ad35-CS/BCG-CS and the sustained type 1 antibody profile, together with high levels of LLPCs, may be essential for the development of long-term protective immunity against liver-stage parasites.

    Fulani and Dogon, two sympatric ethnic groups living in northeastern Mali, are characterized by a marked difference in the susceptibility to P. falciparum malaria. We investigated whether APCs obtained from Fulani and Dogon children exhibited differences in terms of activation status and toll-like receptor (TLR) responses during malaria infection. We observed decreased activation of APCs and markedly suppressed TLR responses in Dogon children as compared to Fulani. These findings suggest that APCs and TLR signaling may be of importance for the protective immunity against malaria observed in the Fulani.

    In conclusion, this thesis provides new insights that could facilitate a rational design of novel vaccines against malaria. Furthermore, the results elicit some immunological bases of the APC activation underlying the differences in host susceptibility to malaria infections.

  • 26.
    Arama, Charles
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Assefaw-Redda, Yohannes
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Rodriguez, Ariane
    Fernández, Carmen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Corradin, Giampietro
    Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.
    Reece, Stephen T.
    Troye-Blomberg, Marita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Heterologous prime-boost regimen adenovector 35-circumsporozoite protein vaccine/recombinant Bacillus Calmette-Guerin expressing the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite induces enhanced long-term memory immunity in BALB/c mice2012In: Vaccine, ISSN 0264-410X, E-ISSN 1873-2518, Vol. 30, no 27, 4040-4045 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sustained antibody levels are a hallmark of immunity against many pathogens, and induction of long-term durable antibody titers is an essential feature of effective vaccines. Heterologous prime-boost approaches with vectors are optimal strategies to improve a broad and prolonged immunogenicity of malaria vaccines. Results: In this study, we demonstrate that the heterologous prime-boost regimen Ad35-CS/BCG-CS induces stronger immune responses by enhancing type 1 cellular producing-cells with high levels of CSp-specific IFN-gamma and cytophilic IgG2a antibodies as compared to a homologous BCG-CS and a heterologous BCG-CS/CSp prime-boost regimen. Moreover, the heterologous prime-boost regimen elicits the highest level of LLPC-mediated immune responses. Conclusion: The increased IFN-gamma-producing cell responses induced by the combination of Ad35-CS/BCG-CS and sustained type 1 antibody profile together with high levels of LLPCs may be essential for the development of long-term protective immunity against liver-stage parasites.

  • 27.
    Arama, Charles
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Immunology.
    Waseem, Shahid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Immunology.
    Fernández, Carmen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Immunology.
    Assefaw-Redda, Yohannes
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Immunology.
    You, Liya
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Immunology.
    Rodriguez, Ariane
    Radošević, Katarina
    Goudsmit, Jaap
    Kaufmann, Stefan H E
    Reece, Stephen T
    Troye-Blomberg, Marita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Immunology.
    A recombinant Bacille Calmette-Guerin construct expressing the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein enhances dendritic cell activation and primes for circumsporozoite-specific memory cells in BALB/c mice2012In: Vaccine, ISSN 0264-410X, E-ISSN 1873-2518, Vol. 30, no 37, 5578-5584 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A protective malaria vaccine may induce both high levels of neutralising antibodies and strong T-cell responses. The Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSp) is a leading pre-erythrocytic vaccine candidate. CSp is a week immunogen per se, but Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has excellent adjuvant activity and has been utilized as a vector to deliver heterologous vaccine candidate antigens. It is safe in immunocompetent individuals and inexpensive to produce. We assessed in vitro and in vivo a recombinant BCG-expressing CSp (BCG-CS) as malaria vaccine candidate. Immunisation of BALB/c mice with BCG-CS augmented numbers of dendritic cells (DCs) in draining lymph nodes and in the spleen. The activation markers MHC-class-II, CD40, CD80 and CD86 on DCs were significantly upregulated by BCG-CS as compared to wild-type BCG (wt-BCG). In vitro stimulation of bone marrow-derived DCs and macrophages with BCG-CS induced IL-12 and TNF-α production. BCG-CS induced higher phagocytic activity in macrophages as compared to wt-BCG. Immunogenicity studies show that BCG-CS induced CS-specific antibodies and IFN-γ-producing memory cells. In conclusion, BCG-CS is highly efficient in activating antigen-presenting cells (APCs) for priming of adaptive immunity. Implications for the rational design of novel vaccines against malaria and TB, the two major devastating poverty-related diseases, are discussed.

  • 28.
    Aravantinou, Meropi
    et al.
    Populat Council, NY 10021 USA.
    Frank, Ines
    Populat Council, NY 10021 USA.
    Hallor, Magnus
    Linköping University. Populat Council, NY 10021 USA.
    Singer, Rachel
    Populat Council, NY 10021 USA.
    Tharinger, Hugo
    Populat Council, NY 10021 USA.
    Kenney, Jessica
    Populat Council, NY 10021 USA.
    Gettie, Agegnehu
    Rockefeller University, NY 10021 USA.
    Grasperge, Brooke
    Tulane University, LA USA.
    Blanchard, James
    Tulane University, LA USA.
    Salazar, Andres
    Oncovir Inc, DC USA.
    Piatak, Michael Jr.
    Leidos Biomed Research Inc, MD USA.
    Lifson, Jeffrey D.
    Leidos Biomed Research Inc, MD USA.
    Robbiani, Melissa
    Populat Council, NY 10021 USA.
    Derby, Nina
    Populat Council, NY 10021 USA.
    PolyICLC Exerts Pro- and Anti-HIV Effects on the DC-T Cell Milieu In Vitro and In Vivo2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 9, e0161730Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) contribute to both HIV pathogenesis and elicitation of antiviral immunity. Understanding how mDC responses to stimuli shape HIV infection outcomes will inform HIV prevention and treatment strategies. The long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viral mimic, polyinosinic polycytidylic acid (polyIC, PIC) potently stimulates DCs to focus Th1 responses, triggers direct antiviral activity in vitro, and boosts anti-HIV responses in vivo. Stabilized polyICLC (PICLC) is being developed for vaccine adjuvant applications in humans, making it critical to understand how mDC sensing of PICLC influences HIV infection. Using the monocyte-derived DC (moDC) model, we sought to describe how PICLC (vs. other dsRNAs) impacts HIV infection within DCs and DC-T cell mixtures. We extended this work to in vivo macaque rectal transmission studies by administering PICLC with or before rectal SIVmac239 (SIVwt) or SIVmac239 Delta Nef (SIV Delta Nef) challenge. Like PIC, PICLC activated DCs and T cells, increased expression of alpha(4)beta(7) and CD169, and induced type IIFN responses in vitro. The type of dsRNA and timing of dsRNA exposure differentially impacted in vitro DC-driven HIV infection. Rectal PICLC treatment similarly induced DC and T cell activation and pro-and anti-HIV factors locally and systemically. Importantly, this did not enhance SIV transmission in vivo. Instead, SIV acquisition was marginally reduced after a single high dose challenge. Interestingly, in the PICLC-treated, SIV Delta Nef-infected animals, SIV Delta Nef viremia was higher, in line with the importance of DC and T cell activation in SIV Delta Nef replication. In the right combination anti-HIV strategy, PICLC has the potential to limit HIV infection and boost HIV immunity.

  • 29.
    Arefin, Badrul
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Kucerova, Lucie
    Dobes, Pavel
    Márkus, Róbert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Strnad, Hynek
    Wang, Zhi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Hyrsl, Pavel
    Zurovec, Michal
    Theopold, Ulrich
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Genome-Wide Transcriptional Analysis of Drosophila Larvae Infected by Entomopathogenic Nematodes Shows Involvement of Complement, Recognition and Extracellular Matrix Proteins2014In: Journal of Innate Immunity, ISSN 1662-811X, E-ISSN 1662-8128, Vol. 6, no 2, 192-204 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heterorhabditis bacteriophora is an entomopathogenic nematode (EPN) which infects its host by accessing the hemolymph where it releases endosymbiotic bacteria of the species Photorhabdus luminescens. We performed a genome-wide transcriptional analysis of the Drosophila response to EPN infection at the time point at which the nematodes reached the hemolymph either via the cuticle or the gut and the bacteria had started to multiply. Many of the most strongly induced genes have been implicated in immune responses in other infection models. Mapping of the complete set of differentially regulated genes showed the hallmarks of a wound response, but also identified a large fraction of EPN-specific transcripts. Several genes identified by transcriptome profiling or their homologues play protective roles during nematode infections. Genes that positively contribute to controlling nematobacterial infections encode: a homolog of thioester-containing complement protein 3, a basement membrane component (glutactin), a recognition protein (GNBP-like 3) and possibly several small peptides. Of note is that several of these genes have not previously been implicated in immune responses.

  • 30.
    Arefin, Md. Badrul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. Stockholm University.
    Molecular characterization of the Drosophila responses towards nematodes2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A sophisticated evolutionary conserved innate immune system has evolved in insects to fight pathogens and to restrict damage in harmful (danger) situations including cancer. A significant amount of knowledge about different infection models in Drosophila has been generated in past decades, which revealed functional resemblances and implications for vertebrate systems. However, how Drosophila responds towards multicellular parasitic nematodes and in danger situations is still little understood. Therefore, the aim of the thesis was to characterize multiple aspects of the host defense in the two important contexts mentioned above.

    We analyzed the transcriptome profiles of nematode-infected Drosophila larvae with uninfected samples. For this we employed the entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis bacteriophora with its symbiont Photorhabdus luminescence to infect Drosophila larvae. We found 642 genes were differentially regulated upon infection. Among them a significant portion belonged to immune categories. Further functional analysis identified a thioester containing protein TEP3, a recognition protein GNBP-like 3, the basement membrane component protein Glutactin and several other small peptides. Upon loss or reduced expression of these genes hosts showed mortality during nematode infections. This study uncovers a novel function for several of the genes in immunity.

    Furthermore, we investigated the cellular response towards nematodes. When we eliminated hemocytes genetically (referred to as hml-apo) in Drosophila, we found hml-apo larvae are resistant to nematodes. Subsequent characterization of hml-apo larvae showed massive lamellocyte differentiation (another blood cell type which is rare in naïve larvae), emergence of melanotic masses, up- and down-regulation of Toll and Imd signaling respectively suggesting a pro-inflammatory response. Moreover, a striking defective leg phenotype in adult escapers from pupal lethality was observed. We identified nitric oxide (NO) as a key regulator of these processes. We also showed that imaginal disc growth factors 3 (IDGF3): (a) protects hosts against nematodes, (b) is a clotting component and (c) negatively regulates Wnt and JAK/STAT signaling. To follow larval behavior in the presence or absence of nematodes we monitored Drosophila larval locomotion behaviors using FIMtrack (a recently devised automated method) to elucidate evasive strategies of hosts. Finally, we characterized host defenses in three Drosophila leukemia models with and without nematode infection. Taken together, these studies shed light on host responses in two crucial circumstances, nematode infections and danger situations.

  • 31. Arestrom, Irene
    et al.
    Zuber, Bartek
    Bengtsson, Theresa
    Ahlborg, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Measurement of human latent transforming growth factor beta 1 using a latency associated protein reactive elisa2012In: JIM - Journal of Immunological Methods, ISSN 0022-1759, E-ISSN 1872-7905, Vol. 379, no 1-2, 23-29 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-beta 1, one of three TGF-beta isoforms, is a pleotropic cytokine critical for many physiological and immunological processes. TGF-beta 1 is secreted in a latent form, linked to Latency Associated Protein (LAP). Analysis of Latent TGF-beta 1 by TGF-ELISA requires dissociation of TGF-beta 1 from LAP, e.g. by acidification of samples. The ELISA then measures total TGF-beta 1, equivalent to dissociated Latent TGF-beta 1 plus any free TGF-beta 1 present prior to acidification. Evolutionary conservation of TGF-beta 1 across mammals also renders TGF-beta 1 ELISAs reactive with TGF-beta 1 in bovine serum often used in human cell cultures. To enable a direct analysis of Latent TGF-beta 1, monoclonal antibodies were made against LAP from human latent TGF-beta 1 and used to develop a LAP ELISA detecting Latent TGF-beta 1. The ELISA did not react with LAP from human Latent TGF-beta 2 or 3, respectively, nor with Latent TGF-beta in bovine serum. EDTA-containing plasma from healthy subjects (n = 20) was analyzed by conventional TGF-beta 1 ELISA and LAP ELISA. By TGF-beta 1 ELISA, total TGF-beta 1 were detected in all samples (median 133 pM, range 34-348 pM); low levels of free TGF-beta 1 found in 8/20 non-addified samples showed that >98.5% of the total TGF-beta 1 derived from Latent TGF-beta 1. Latent TGF-beta 1 found in non-acidified samples by LAP ELISA (median 154 pM, range 48-403 pM) was comparable in molar levels to, and correlated with, total TGF-beta 1 (r(s) 0.96, p<0.0001). A similar agreement between the total TGF-beta 1 and the LAP ELISA was found with citrate- and heparin-containing plasma. The LAP ELISA facilitates analysis of Latent TGF-beta 1 without sample acidification and is not compromised by the presence of bovine serum in human cell supernatants.

  • 32. Arkestål, Kurt
    et al.
    Sibanda, Elopy
    Thors, Cecilia
    Troye-Blomberg, Marita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Mduluza, Takafira
    Valenta, Rudolf
    Grönlund, Hans
    van Hage, Marianne
    Impaired allergy diagnostics among parasite-infected patients caused by IgE antibodies to the carbohydrate epitope galactose-alpha 1,3-galactose2011In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 127, no 4, 1024-1028 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The carbohydrate epitope galactose-alpha 1,3galactose (a-Gal) is abundantly expressed on nonprimate mammalian proteins. We have recently shown that alpha-Gal is responsible for the IgE binding to cat IgA, a newly identified cat allergen (Fel d 5). Objective: We sought to investigate the diagnostic relevance of IgE antibodies to Fel d 5 and a-Gal among parasite-infected patients from central Africa without cat allergy compared with patients with cat allergy from the same region. Methods: Sera from 47 parasite-infected patients and 31 patients with cat allergy were analyzed for total IgE and IgE antibodies against cat dander extract (CDE) by using the ImmunoCAP system. Inhibition assay was performed with a-Gal on solid phase-bound CDE. The presence of IgE specific for the major cat allergen Fel d 1, Fel d 5, and alpha-Gal was analyzed by means of ELISA. Results: Among the 47 parasite-infected patients, 85% had IgE antibodies against alpha-Gal (OD; median, 0.175; range, 0.1021.466) and 66% against Fel d 5 (OD; median, 0.13; range, 0.1031.285). Twenty-four of the parasite-infected patients were sensitized to CDE, and 21 of them had IgE antibodies to Fel d 5 and a-Gal. There was no correlation between IgE levels to CDE and rFel d 1 among the parasite-infected patients but a strong correlation between CDE and Fel d 5 and alpha-Gal (P <. 001). Among the group with cat allergy, only 5 patients had IgE to alpha-Gal, and nearly 75% (n 5 23) had IgE to rFel d 1 (median, 7.07 kU(A)/L; range, 0.51-148.5 kUA/ L). In contrast, among the patients with cat allergy, there was a correlation between IgE levels to CDE and rFel d 1 (P <.05) but no correlation between CDE and Fel d 5 and alpha-Gal. Conclusion: IgE to alpha-Gal causes impaired allergy diagnostics in parasite-infected patients. Screening for IgE to rFel d 1 and other allergens without carbohydrates might identify patients with true cat sensitization/ allergy in parasite-infested areas.

  • 33.
    Arko-Mensah, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Rahman, Muhammad J
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Dégano, Irene R
    Chuquimia, Olga D
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Fotio, Agathe L
    Garcia, Irene
    Fernández, Carmen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Resistance to mycobacterial infection: a pattern of early immune responses leads to a better control of pulmonary infection in C57BL/6 compared with BALB/c mice.2009In: Vaccine, ISSN 0264-410X, E-ISSN 1873-2518, Vol. 27, no 52, 7418-27 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we have compared the immunological responses associated with early pulmonary mycobacterial infection in two mouse strains, BALB/c and C57BL/6 known to exhibit distinct differences in susceptibility to infection with several pathogens. We infected mice via the intranasal route. We have demonstrated that BALB/c was less able to control mycobacterial growth in the lungs during the early phase of pulmonary infection. Our results showed that during the early phase (day 3 to week 1), BALB/c mice exhibited a delay in the production of TNF and IFN-gamma in the lungs compared to C57BL/6 mice. Levels of IL-12 and soluble TNF receptors (sTNFR) were comparable between the mouse strains. The cellular subset distribution in these mice before and after infection showed a higher increase in CD11b+ cells in the lungs of C57BL/6, compared to BALB/c as early as day 3 postinfection. At early time points, higher levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and macrophage inflammatory protein 1 (MIP)-alpha were detected in C57BL/6 than BALB/c mice. In vitro, BCG-infected bone marrow derived macrophages (BMM) from both mouse strains displayed similar capacities to either phagocytose bacteria or produce soluble mediators such as TNF, IL-12 and nitric oxide (NO). Although IFN-gamma stimulation of infected BMM in both mouse strains resulted in the induction of antimycobacterial activity, BALB/c mice had a reduced capacity to kill ingested bacteria. The above observations indicate that the chain of early, possibly innate immunological events occurring during pulmonary mycobacterial infection may directly impact on increased susceptibility or resistance to infection.

  • 34.
    Asif, Sana
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. Uppsala University.
    Fromell, Karin
    Uppsala University.
    Gustafson, Elisabet
    Uppsala University Hospital.
    Barbu, Andreea
    Uppsala University.
    Le Blanc, Katarina
    Karolinska Institutet ; Karolinska University Hospital.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University.
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University ; The University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Heparinization of cell surfaces with short peptide-conjugated PEG-lipid regulates thromboinflammation in transplantation of human MSCs and hepatocytes2016In: Acta Biomaterialia, ISSN 1742-7061, E-ISSN 1878-7568, Vol. 35, 194-205 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Infusion of therapeutic cells into humans is associated with immune responses, including thromboinflammation, which result in a large loss of transplanted cells\ To address these problems, heparinization of the cell surfaces was achieved by a cell-surface modification technique using polyethylene glycol conjugated phospholipid (PEG-lipid) derivatives. A short heparin-binding peptide was conjugated to the PEG-lipid for immobilization of heparin conjugates on the surface of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and human hepatocytes. Here three kinds of heparin-binding peptides were used for immobilizing heparin conjugates and examined for the antithrombogenic effects on the cell surface. The heparinized cells were incubated in human whole blood to evaluate their hemocompatibility by measuring blood parameters such as platelet count, coagulation markers, complement markers, and Factor Xa activity. We found that one of the heparin-binding peptides did not show cytotoxicity after the immobilization with heparin conjugates. The degree of binding of the heparin conjugates on the cell surface (analyzed by flow cytometer) depended on the ratio of the active peptide to control peptide. For both human MSCs and hepatocytes in whole-blood experiments, no platelet aggregation was seen in the heparin conjugate-immobilized cell group vs. the controls (non-coated cells or control peptide). Also, the levels of thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT), C3a, and sC5b-9 were significantly lower than those of the controls, indicating a lower activation of coagulation and complement. Factor Xa analysis indicated that the heparin conjugate was still active on the cell surface at 24 h post-coating. It is possible to immobilize heparin conjugates onto hMSC and human hepatocyte surfaces and thereby protect the cell surfaces from damaging thromboinflammation. Statement of Signigficance We present a promising approach to enhance the biocompatibility of therapeutic cells. Here we used short peptide-conjugated PEG-lipid for cell surface modification and heparin conjugates for the coating of human hepatocytes and MSCs. We screened the short peptides to find higher affinity for heparinization of cell surface and performed hemocompatibility assay of heparinized human hepatocytes and human MSCs in human whole blood. Using heparin-binding peptide with higher affinity, not only coagulation activation but also complement activation was significantly suppressed. Thus, it was possible to protect human hepatocytes and human MSCs from the attack of thromboinflammatory activation, which can contribute to the improvement graft survival. (C) 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 35.
    Avican, Ummehan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Doruk, Tugrul
    Östberg, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Fahlgren, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Forsberg, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    The Tat substrate SufI is critical for the ability of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis to cause systemic infectionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Awah, Nancy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Malarial anaemia: the potential involvement of Plasmodium falciparum rhoptry proteins2009Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Malaria remains a challenging health problem in malaria endemic regions. Infection with malaria invariably leads to anaemia. The groups at risk of developing malarial anaemia include children below the age of five years and pregnant women, especially primigravidae. Several factors have been suggested to be responsible for its aetiology, including increased destruction of infected and normal red blood cells together with bone marrow suppression. However, until recently, the molecular mechanisms involved have remained elusive. The aim of the work presented herein was to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the destruction of normal red blood cells in anaemia, and more specifically to define the role of the ring surface protein (RSP/RAP) -2 and other members of the low molecular weight rhoptry associated protein (RAP) complex, RAP-1 and -3.

    In the first study we showed that antibodies to the RAP complex could mediate the destruction of RSP-2 tagged erythroid cells by phagocytosis or by complement activation and then lysis. In addition, antibodies to RAP-1 and RAP-2 could induce the death of RSP-2/RAP-2 tagged erythroblasts. We further investigated the frequency and functionality of naturally occurring RSP-2/RAP-2 antibodies in the sera of anaemic and non-anaemic Cameroonian children. We found that all sera investigated contained RSP-2/RAP-2 reactive antibodies by both immunoflorescence and flow cytometry. The anaemic group of children had significantly higher levels of antibodies of the IgG isotype than the non-anaemic individuals, while the levels of IgM were similar in both groups. With respect to IgG subclasses, low levels of IgG1 and -3 antibodies were detected. Higher levels of IgG3 were seen in the non-anaemic individuals as compared to anaemic subjects. With regards to antibody functionality, the non-anaemic individuals recognised a greater proportion of RSP-2/RAP-2 tagged erythrocytes and activated complement to a greater extent than the anaemic individuals.

    From our findings, we can conclude that antibodies to the RAP complex are potentially involved in erythroid cell destruction during malaria which may result in anaemia, and that high levels of such antibodies may be detrimental to the host.

  • 37.
    Awah, Nancy W.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Troye-Blomberg, Marita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Berzins, Klavs
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Gysin, Jürg
    Unité de Parasitologie Expérimentale, URA Institut Pasteur/Univ-Med.
    Mechanisms of malarial anaemia: potential involvement of the Plasmodium falciparum low molecular weight rhoptry-associated proteins.2009In: Acta Tropica, ISSN 0001-706X, E-ISSN 1873-6254, Vol. 112, no 3, 295-302 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the tropics. Anaemia is a constant feature of the disease. Pregnant women mostly primigravidae and children below the age of 5 years are the most afflicted. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial and incompletely understood. Among several factors, the destruction of erythrocytes (RBCs) is the most frequently observed cause of severe malarial anaemia and the removal of non-parasitized RBCs (nEs) is thought to be the most important, accounting for approximately 90% of the reduction in haematocrit in acute malaria. Previous studies demonstrated that the tagging of nEs with the parasite antigen RAP-2 (rhoptry-associated protein-2; also designated RSP-2) due to either failed or aborted invasion by merozoites resulted in the destruction of these cells. In this study we further investigated the mechanisms mediating the destruction of nEs in the development of severe malarial anaemia and the possible involvement of RAP-2/RSP-2 and other members of the low molecular weight rhoptry complex (RAP-1: rhoptry-associated protein-1 and RAP-3: rhoptry-associated protein-3). Antibodies to the rhoptry-associated proteins were found to recognise the surface of nEs in a parasitaemia-dependent manner after merozoite release in P. falciparumin vitro cultures. These cells, as well as erythroblasts co-cultured with infected RBCs (IEs), could then be destroyed by either phagocytosis or lysis after complement activation. The ability of anti-rhoptry antibodies to mediate the destruction of RAP-2/RSP-2-tagged erythroblasts in the presence of effector cells was also investigated. Data obtained suggest that mouse monoclonal antibodies to the low molecular weight RAP proteins mediate the death of RAP-2/RSP-2-tagged erythroblasts on interaction with adherent monocytes. The mechanism of cell death is not yet fully known, but seems to involve primarily apoptosis. The above observations suggest that the antibody response against RAP-2/RSP-2 and other members of the complex could trigger the destruction of RAP-2/RSP-2-tagged host cells. Taken together it appears that during severe anaemia a defective bone marrow or dyserythropoiesis possibly due to erythroblast cell death, may overlap with the accelerated destruction of normal erythroid cells, either by opsonisation or complement activation further aggravating the anaemia which may become fatal. These observations could therefore have implications in the design, development and deployment of future therapeutic interventions against malaria.

  • 38.
    Bachmayer, Nora
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Wenner-Gren Institute for Experimental Biology.
    The role of natural killer cells and inflammatory mediators in preeclamptic pregnancies2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The maternal immune system must be able to adjust during pregnancy and accept the foetus that expresses paternal antigens. These changes are found both in placenta and circulation, including a mild inflammatory response. NK cells are abundant during the early part of pregnancy in placenta and are thought to be important for placental development. During preeclampsia the placenta is poorly developed, together with an escalated pro-inflammatory profile noticed in both placenta and circulation. We wanted to study NK cells in placenta and circulation from preeclamptic cases as well as levels of cytokines. HMGB1, an alarmin involved in inflammation, was also measured in preeclamptic placentae.

    When studying preeclamptic placentae in third trimester we found higher numbers of NK cells as well as a higher expression of CD94+ NK cells. We also found slightly elevated levels of HMGB1 together with significantly lower expression of IL-12 in preeclamptic placentae. Further, the NK cell activating cytokines IL-12/IL-23p40 and IL-15 in sera from preeclamptic women were increased compared to healthy pregnancies. The elevated levels of NK cell activating IL-12/IL-23p40 and IL-15 found in preeclamptic sera, made us investigate the circulating NK cells in preeclampsia. However, no differences were seen between healthy and preeclamptic pregnancies.

    The main immunological alterations in third trimester preeclamptic pregnancies with regard to NK cells were found in placenta. Altered maternal cytokine levels in placenta could influence decidual NK cells in preeclampsia, noticed by their higher numbers and altered receptor expression. If these alterations also exist during early pregnancy it could result in a poorly developed and dysfunctional placenta.

  • 39. Backhed, F
    et al.
    Normark, S
    Schweda, Elke K H
    Södertörn University, Avdelning Naturvetenskap.
    Oscarson, S
    Richter-Dahlfors, A
    Structural requirements for TLR4-mediated LPS signalling: a biological role for LPS modifications2003In: Microbes and infection, ISSN 1286-4579, E-ISSN 1769-714X, Vol. 5, no 12, 1057-1063 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cells of the mucosal lining are the first to encounter invading bacteria during infection, and as such, they have developed numerous ways of detecting microbial intruders. Recently, we showed that epithelial cells recognize lipopolysaccharide (LPS) through the CD14-Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 complex. Here, we identify the substructures of LPS that are recognized by the TLR4 receptor complex. In contrast to lipid A, the O-antigen does not mediate an inflammatory response; rather it interferes with the lipid A recognition. An Escherichia coli strain genetically modified to express penta-acylated lipid A not only showed reduced immunogenicity, but was also found to inhibit proinflammatory signalling induced by wild-type E. coli (hexa-acylated lipid A) as well as LPS from other bacteria of the Enterobacteriaceae family. Furthermore, penta-acylated LPS from Pseudomonas aeruginosa acted as an antagonist to hexa-acylated E. coli LPS, as did E. coli, as shown by its inhibitory effect on IL-8 production in stimulated cells. Hypo-acylated lipidA, such as that of P. aeruginosa, is found in several species within the gut microflora as well as in several bacteria causing chronic infections. Thus, our results suggest that the composition of the microflora may be important in modulating pro-inflammatory signalling in epithelial cells under normal as well as pathologic conditions.

  • 40.
    Backteman, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    T Cells and NK Cells in Coronary Artery Disease: Longitudinal and methodological studies in humans2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death worldwide and most often due to atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory process that involves the arteries, inclouding those that supply blood to the heart muscle. Although inflammation is an important contributing factor to atherosclerosis, the mechanisms are not fully understood. One mechanism contributing to atherogenesis may involve some infectious microorganisms such as cytomegalovirus (CMV). In atherosclerosis, the arterial wall becomes infiltrated with lipids followed by different types of leukocytes and inflammatory mediators (atherogenesis). Leukocytes recirculate continuously between the blood and lymphoid organs, such as lymph nodes, where the adaptive immune response is started and regulated.

    The general aim of this thesis was to increase the understanding of associations between lymphocyte populations and different conditions of CAD (unstable and stable). To assess changes over time, a longitudinal follow up design was mostly used. Therefore, also perspectives of longitudinal variation were included in the thesis.

    Paper I showed that flow cytometric evaluation of lymphocyte populations is a robust technique that can be used in longitudinal studies, both in clinical and research settings. It was also shown that the time of sampling over the year did not have a major impact on the findings.

    In paper II, thoracic lymph nodes were investigated to assess whether CAD-associated changes were more prominent in comparison with blood. As expected, there were several major differences in lymphocyte composition between lymph nodes and blood. However, the analysis of thoracic lymph nodes did not reveal any further changes that were not detected in blood. Thus, blood is still the most reliable compartment for studies of lymphocyte populations in CAD since it is not possible to examine the local findings in the artery wall.

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes with both regulatory and effector functions. In paper II and III we confirmed previous findings that CAD patients have lower proportions of NK cells in blood. However, the NK subtype and cytokine profile (paper III, measured by subtype markers and intra-cellular cytokine staining) did not differ between patients and controls. During a 12-month follow-up, the proportions of NK cells increased, although not in all patients. Failure to reconstitute NK cell levels was associated with several components of the metabolic syndrome and with a persistent low-grade inflammation as measured by plasma IL-6 levels. The findings support the notion of a protective role for NK cells in inflammation.

    CD4+ but not CD8+ T cells were significantly increased in patients with both unstable and stable conditions compared with healthy individuals (paper IV). Subpopulations of CD4+ T cells (CD4+CD28null) have previously been associated with CAD. However, we show that CD28null and CD28null57+ cells within the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell populations were similar in CAD patients and healthy controls. Instead, CMV seropositivity was the major determinant of expanded CD28null and CD57+ T cell fractions in both patients and healthy individuals. During the 1 year follow up the proportion of CD4+CD28null and CD8+CD28null cells increased in patients, which may reflect an accelerated immunological ageing occurring after the cardiac event.

  • 41.
    Backteman, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Cytomegalovirus seropositivity is a major determinant of CD28null T cell expansion in patients with coronary artery disease2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Accumulation of CD4+28null cells, with a proinflammatory and senescent phenotype, has been associated with unstable conditions of coronary artery disease (CAD). Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is known to exert profound effects on T cells, including loss of CD28. Here, we longitudinally assessed the proportions of CD28null and CD28nullCD57+ cells in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell populations of patients with CAD and related the findings to HCMV seropositivity.

    Methods: HCMV antibody levels and expression of CD28 and CD57 on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were analysed in 31 patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), 34 patients with stable angina (SA) and 37 healthy controls. Samples were taken prior to 34 coronary angiography and after 3 and 12 months. In a subsample, HCMV-specific IFN-γ and  TNF production was assessed ex vivo.

    Results: Increased proportions of CD4+CD28null, but not CD8+CD28null cells, were significantly associated with presence of CAD. Significant increases in CD28null 37 and CD28nullCD57+ cells occurred within CD4+ and CD8+ T cell compartments in both ACS and SA patients during 12-month follow-up. HCMV was the major determinant of CD28null and CD28nullCD57+ T cell levels in both patients and controls (p <0.001). There were no obvious signs of CMV reactivation in patients.

    Conclusion: HCMV was a major determinant of the presence of CD28null and CD28nullCD57+ T cells in patients with CAD, independent of clinical stage. Findings also indicate that HCMV might have a large impact on the T cell aging process that occurred in patients after a cardiac event.

  • 42. Balogun, H. A.
    et al.
    Vasconcelos, N. -M
    Lindberg, Robert
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Haeggström, M.
    Moll, K.
    Chen, Q.
    Wahlgren, M.
    Berzins, K.
    Immunogenicity and antigenic properties of Pf332-C231, a fragment of a non-repeat region of the Plasmodium falciparum antigen Pf3322009In: Vaccine, ISSN 0264-410X, E-ISSN 1873-2518, Vol. 28, no 1, 90-97 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antigen Pf332, a megadalton protein has been shown to be associated with the membrane of infected erythrocytes Detailed functional studies on the antigen have remained hampered by the cross-reactive nature of antibodies generated to Pf332 PB32-C231, identified in the C-terminal region of Pf332 was cloned and antibodies against the C231 fragment were shown to react with intact Pf332 antigen by both immunofluorescence and immunoblotting analyses Antibodies to C231 inhibited in vitro Plasmodium falciparum growth efficiently In addition. human sera from malaria-exposed individuals reacted with recombinant C231 We show that Pf332-C231 represents a functional domain and is expected to facilitate further studies on Pf332 as a potential target for protective immune responses and the function of the antigen.

  • 43.
    Balogun, Halima A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Vasconcelos, N.-M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Lindberg, R.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Haeggström, M.
    Moll, K.
    Chen, Q.
    Wahlgren, M.
    Berzins, Klavs
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Immunogenicity and antigenic properties of Pf332-C231, a fragment of a non-repeat region of the Plasmodium falciparum antigen Pf332 2009In: Vaccine, ISSN 0264-410X, E-ISSN 1873-2518, Vol. 28, no 1, 90-97 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antigen Pf332, a megadalton protein has been shown to be associated with the membrane of infected erythrocytes. Detailed functional studies on the antigen have remained hampered by the cross-reactive nature of antibodies generated to Pf332. Pf332-C231, identified in the C-terminal region of Pf332 was cloned and antibodies against the C231 fragment were shown to react with intact Pf332 antigen by both immunofluorescence and immunoblotting analyses. Antibodies to C231 inhibited in vitro Plasmodium falciparum growth efficiently. In addition, human sera from malaria-exposed individuals reacted with recombinant C231. We show that Pf332-C231 represents a functional domain and is expected to facilitate further studies on Pf332 as a potential target for protective immune responses and the function of the antigen.

  • 44.
    Balogun, Halima Aramide
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Immunological characteristics of a C-terminal fragment of the Plasmodium falciparum blood-stage antigen Pf3322006Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Till date, there are no effective control strategies against the deadly disease of malaria, and millions of children across Africa, Oceania, Asia, and Latin America are at the mercy of this long term enemy of man every second that passes by. Other control measures combined with vaccination might help improve control strategy against malaria, but the development of vaccines face various challenges as well, due to the complexity of the parasites’ life cycle and other host factors. The asexual blood stage antigen Pf332 of Plasmodium falciparum, is expressed during the trophozoite stage, and transported from the parasitophorous membrane to the outer erythrocyte membrane during schizogony.

    Previous studies have suggested this antigen as a potential vaccine candidate, because Pf332-reactive human monoclonal antibody (mAb 33G2) inhibits parasite growth and cytoadherence in vitro. Elucidating and understanding the immunological capabilities of antigen Pf332, as a vaccine candidate was the aim of the studies presented in this thesis.

    In our first study we identified and characterized the immunogenicity of a non-repeat fragment of antigen Pf332, termed Pf332-C231, a 231 amino acids long fragment corresponding to 13 percent of the total protein. Various analyses carried out with this fragment reveal that recombinant C231 was immunogenic in rabbits. In addition, anti- C231 antibodies have in vitro inhibitory capabilities. In immunoflourescence and immunoblot assays, rabbit anti-C231 antibodies were able to recognize the native protein.

    In the other study, we examined the distribution of antibodies regarding recombinant C231 and crude P. falciparum extract in a malaria endemic area of Senegal. IgG antibody reactivity with crude P. falciparum antigen was detected in the sera of all the  donors while many of the children lacked or had low levels of such antibodies against C231. The distribution of the anti-C231 antibodies in the different IgG subclasses differed from that shown by crude P. falciparum antigen. The crude P. falciparum antigen gives a higher IgG3 response than IgG2 for all age-groups, while C231 gave similar levels of IgG2 and IgG3. Correlation studies showed that the levels of anti-C231antibodies were associated with protection from clinical malaria, but this only reached significance with IgE. These findings further emphasize the inclusion of antigen Pf332 as a subunit vaccine candidate against P. falciparum malaria.

  • 45.
    Balogun, Halima
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Awah, Nancy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Farouk, S.
    Berzins, Klavs
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Pf332-C231- reactive antibodies affect growth and development of intraerythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum parasitesArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Balogun, Halima
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Awah, Nancy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Nilsson, S.
    Rousillhon, C.
    Rogier, C.
    Trape, J. F.
    Chen, Q.
    Berzins, Klavs
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Pattern of antibodies to the Duffy binding-like domain of Plasmodium falciparum antigen Pf332 in Senegalese individualsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 47. Bambou, Jean-Christophe
    et al.
    Giraud, Antoine
    Menard, Sandrine
    Begue, Bernadette
    Rakotobe, Sabine
    Heyman, Martine
    Taddei, François
    Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine
    Gaboriau-Routhiau, Valérie
    In vitro and ex vivo activation of the TLR5 signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells by a commensal Escherichia coli strain.2004In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 279, no 41, 42984-92 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The capacity of non-pathogenic enteric bacteria to induce a pro-inflammatory response is under debate in terms of its effect on the symbiosis between the mammalian host and its commensal gut microflora. Activation of NF-kappaB and induction of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and CCL-20 by the commensal Escherichia coli strain MG1655 were first studied in vitro in the human intestinal epithelial cell (IECs) lines HT29-19A and Caco-2, transfected or not with plasmids encoding dominant negative Toll-like receptor (TLR) 5 and myeloid differentiation factor-88 (MyD88) adaptor protein. The response of enterocytes in situ was then assessed using murine ileal biopsies mounted in Ussing chambers. Commensal E. coli induced NF-kappaB DNA binding, NF-kappaB transcriptional activity, CCL-20 expression, and IL-8 secretion in the human IEC lines. E. coli MG1655 flagellin was necessary and sufficient to trigger this pro-inflammatory pathway via its interaction with TLR5 and the subsequent recruitment of the adaptor protein MyD88. Following epithelial cell polarization, signaling could be induced by live E. coli and flagellin on the apical side of HT29-19A. The in vivo relevance of our findings was confirmed, because immunohistochemical staining of murine ileum demonstrated expression of TLR5 in the apical part of enterocytes in situ. Furthermore, flagellin added on the mucosal side of murine ileal biopsies mounted in Ussing chambers induced a basolateral production of KC, a functional murine homolog of human IL-8. These findings provide strong evidence that flagellin released by flagellated commensal bacteria in the intestinal lumen can induce a pro-inflammatory response in enterocytes in vivo.

  • 48.
    Banday, Viqar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Metab-Immune analysis of the non-obese diabetic mouse2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Type 1A diabetes mellitus or T1D is a chronic disease characterized by T cell mediated destruction of the insulin producing β cells in the islets of Langerhans. The classical symptoms include high glucose levels in urine and blood, polyuria, and polydipsia. Complications associated with T1D include blindness, amputations, and end-stage renal disease, and premature death. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse, first described in 1980, is widely used as a model organism for T1D. T1D disease in the NOD mouse shares a number of similarities to human T1D including dependence on genetic and environmental factors. More than 30 disease associated gene regions or loci (termed insulin dependent diabetes, or Idd, loci) have been associated with T1D development in NOD. For some of these Idds, the corresponding region in human has been linked to the development of T1D in human.

    T1D, both in humans and mice, is recognized as a T cell mediated disease. However, many studies have shown the importance of both the metabolome and the immune system in the pathogenesis of the disease. Appearance of autoantibodies in the serum of patients is the first sign of pathogenesis. However, molecular and cellular events precede the immune attack on the β-cell immunity. It has been shown that patients who developed T1D have an altered metabolome prior to the appearance of autoantibodies. Although much is known about the pathogenesis of T1D, the contribution of the environment/immune factors triggering the disease is still to be revealed. 

    In the present study both metabolic and immune deviations observed in the NOD mouse was analyzed. Serum metabolome analysis of the NOD mouse revealed striking resemblance to the human metabolic profile, with many metabolites in the TCA cycle significantly different from the non-diabetic control B6 mice. In addition, an increased level of glutamic acid was of the most distinguishing metabolite. A detailed bioinformatics analysis revealed various genes/enzymes to be present in the Idd regions. Compared to B6 mice, many of the genes correlated to the metabolic pathways, showed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), which can eventually affect the functionality of the protein. A genetic analysis of the increased glutamic acid revealed several Idd regions to be involved in this phenotype. The regions mapped in the genetic analysis harbor important enzymes and transporters related to glutamic acid. In-vitro islet culture with glutamic acid led to increased beta cell death indicating a toxic role of glutamic acid specifically towards insulin producing beta cells.

    In the analysis of the immune system, B cells from NOD mice, which are known to express high levels of TACI, were stimulated with APRIL, a TACI ligand. This resulted in enhanced plasma cell differentiation accompanied with increased class switching and IgG production. NOD mice have previously been shown to react vigorously to T-dependent antigens upon immunization. In this study we confirmed this as NOD mice showed an enhanced and prolonged immune response to hen egg lysozyme. Thus, serum IgG levels were significantly increased in the NOD mice and were predominantly of the IgG1 subtype. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed increased number of germinal centers in the NOD mice. Transfer of purified B and T cells from NOD to an immune deficient mouse could reproduce the original phenotype as seen in the NOD mice.    

    Collectively, this thesis has analyzed the metabolomics and immune deviations observed in the NOD mice.

  • 49.
    Baranov, Vladimir
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Hammarström, Sten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and CEA-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1), apically expressed on human colonic M cells, are potential receptors for microbial adhesion.2004In: Histochemistry and Cell Biology, ISSN 0948-6143, E-ISSN 1432-119X, Vol. 121, no 2, 83-9 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the human gut mucosa, specialized M cells deliver intact foreign macromolecules and commensal bacteria from the lumen to organized mucosal lymphoid tissues triggering immune responses. M cells are also major sites of adhesion and invasion for enteric pathogens. The molecular features of M cell apical surfaces that promote microbial normal attachment are still largely unknown. We have demonstrated previously that in the human colonic epithelium, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and CEA-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) are integral components of the apical glycocalyx which participate in epithelial-microbial interactions. In this study, based on the reactivity of specific monoclonal antibodies and on immunoelectron microscopy, we show that M cells of human colonic solitary lymphoid follicles express CEA and CEACAM1 on the apical surface. Recently these highly glycosylated molecules have been characterized as protein receptors for different bacteria. This leads us to propose a role for CEA and CEACAM1 in the adherence of enteric bacteria to the apical membrane of colonic M cells. We also hypothesize that, unlike colonic enterocytes, M cells lack the defense mechanism that eliminates CEA and CEACAM1 upon microbial binding and which is based on vesiculation of microvillus plasma membrane.

  • 50.
    Barbu, Andreea
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Hamad, Osama
    Uppsala University.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    Uppsala University.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University.
    The role of complement factor C3 in lipid metabolism2015In: Molecular Immunology, ISSN 0161-5890, E-ISSN 1872-9142, Vol. 67, no 1, 101-107 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abundant reports have shown that there is a strong relationship between C3 and C3a-desArg levels, adipose tissue, and risk factors for cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome and diabetes. The data indicate that complement components, particularly C3, are involved in lipid metabolism. The C3 fragment, C3a-desArg, functions as a hormone that has insulin-like effects and facilitates triglyceride metabolism. Adipose tissue produces and regulates the levels of complement components, which promotes generation of inflammatory initiators such as the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. The anaphylatoxins trigger a cyto/chemokine response in proportion to the amount of adipose tissue present, and induce inflammation and mediate metabolic effects such as insulin resistance. These observations support the concept that complement is an important participant in lipid metabolism and in obesity, contributing to the metabolic syndrome and to the low-grade inflammation associated with obesity.

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