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  • 1. Aabloo, A
    et al.
    Klintenberg, M
    Thomas, John Oswald
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry. strukturkemi.
    Molecular dynamics simulation of a polymer-inorganic interface.2000In: Electrochim.Acta, Vol. 45, 1425- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Aabloo, A
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry. strukturkemi.
    Thomas, John Oswald
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry. strukturkemi.
    Molecular dynamics simulation of Nd3+ ions in a crystalline PEO surface1998In: ELECTROCHIMICA ACTA, ISSN 0013-4686, Vol. 43, no 10-11, 1361-1364 p.Article in journal (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Poly(ethylene oxide) based electrolytes are systems in which ionic salts are dissolved into an amorphous EO matrix. Potentials developed earlier to model crystalline and amorphous bulk PEO systems are here used for the MD simulation at 400 K of the behavi

  • 3.
    Aabloo, A
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry. strukturkemi.
    Thomas, John Oswald
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry. strukturkemi.
    Molecular dynamics simulations of a poly(ethylene oxide) surface1997In: POLYMER, ISSN 0032-3861, Vol. 38, no 18, A47-A51 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Potentials developed earlier for crystalline and amorphous bulk PEO systems have been used for the MD simulation of a PEO surface model. The surface comprises the outer region of a 122 Angstrom-thick sheet of PEO in which the PEO, -(CH2-CH2-O)(n)- chains

  • 4. Aabloo, A.
    et al.
    Thomas, John Oswald
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry. strukturkemi.
    Molecular dynamics simulation of lithium ion mobility in a PEO surface.2001In: Solid State Ionics, Vol. 143, 83- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Aaldering, L. J.
    et al.
    Poongavanam, V.
    Langkjær, N.
    Natarajan Arul, Murugan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Jørgensen, P. T.
    Wengel, J.
    Veedu, R. N.
    Development of an Efficient G-Quadruplex-Stabilised Thrombin-Binding Aptamer Containing a Three-Carbon Spacer Molecule2017In: ChemBioChem (Print), ISSN 1439-4227, E-ISSN 1439-7633, Vol. 18, no 8, 755-763 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA), which shows anticoagulant properties, is one of the most studied G-quadruplex-forming aptamers. In this study, we investigated the impact of different chemical modifications such as a three-carbon spacer (spacer-C3), unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) and 3′-amino-modified UNA (amino-UNA) on the structural dynamics and stability of TBA. All three modifications were incorporated at three different loop positions (T3, T7, T12) of the TBA G-quadruplex structure to result in a series of TBA variants and their stability was studied by thermal denaturation; folding was studied by circular dichroism spectroscopy and thrombin clotting time. The results showed that spacer-C3 introduction at the T7 loop position (TBA-SP7) significantly improved stability and thrombin clotting time while maintaining a similar binding affinity as TBA to thrombin. Detailed molecular modelling experiments provided novel insights into the experimental observations, further supporting the efficacy of TBA-SP7. The results of this study could provide valuable information for future designs of TBA analogues with superior thrombin inhibition properties. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  • 6.
    Aarik, J.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. oorganisk kemi.
    Aidla, A.
    Mändar, H.
    Uustare, T.
    Schuisky, M.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. oorganisk kemi.
    Hårsta, A.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. oorganisk kemi.
    Atomic layer growth of epitaxial TiO2 thin films from TiCl4 and H2O on a-Al2O3 substrates2002In: J. Cryst. Growth, no 242, 189-198 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Aarik, J.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. oorganisk kemi.
    Sundqvist, J.
    Aidla, A.
    Lu, J.
    Sajavaara, T.
    Kukli, K.
    Hårsta, Anders
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. oorganisk kemi.
    Hafnium tetraiodide and oxygen as precursors for atomic layer deposition of hafnium oxide thin films2002In: Thin Solid Films, Vol. 418, 69-72 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Aarseth Larsson, Kim
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Chemical Characterisation of Nitrocellulose2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Nitrocellulose is the main component in many types of ammunition, propellants and explosives. The principles of production for nitrocellulose have not changed much since the 19th century when it started being industrially produced for this purpose. The character of the nitrocellulose has a large effect on the end products abilities. The aim of this study was to develop a method that would be able to characterise and distinguish between nitrocellulose from different manufacturers to be able to relate the character of the nitrocellulose to the properties of ammunition, propellants and explosives. Samples were dissolved in acetone and analysed by GC/MS and data were then analysed by multivariable statistics. FTIR was also used to characterise the nitrocellulose. Results from both methods showed very small differences when chromatograms and spectra were analysed. This study shows that GC/MS and FTIR are not suitable for this type of characterisation. The differences between the data were not sufficient to be able to separate the samples from each other.

  • 9. Abalos, M.
    et al.
    Abad, E.
    van Leeuwen, S. P. J.
    Lindström, Gunilla
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Fiedler, Heidelore
    UNEP Chemicals, CH-1219 Châtelaine (GE), Switzerland.
    de Boer, J.
    van Bavel, Bert
    Results for PCDD/PCDF and dl-PCBs in the first round of UNEPs biennial global interlaboratory assessment on persistent organic pollutants2013In: TrAC. Trends in analytical chemistry, ISSN 0165-9936, E-ISSN 1879-3142, Vol. 46, 98-109 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first worldwide interlaboratory assesment on persistent organic pollutants (POPs) under the Stockholm Convention was organized in the Asian/Pacific, Latin American and African regions during 2009-11.

    A relatively large number of laboratories reported data for the PCDDs/PCDFs and dioxin-like PCBs, especially in the Asian region. Within the Asian region, several participants used high-resolution GC/high-resolution MS systems optimized for dioxin analysis. The availibility of High-resolution mass spectrometer instrumentation is limited in the Latin America and African regions, although recently several new laboratories for dioxins have started in the Latin American region.

  • 10.
    Abbas, Alaa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Palladium-Catalysed Carbonylative Synthesis of Acylamidines2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 11. Abbas, Sk Jahir
    et al.
    Ramacharyulu, P. V. R. K.
    Lo, Hsin-Hsi
    Ali, Sk Imran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Ke, Shyue-Chu
    A catalytic approach to synthesis of PLP analogs and other environmental protocols in a single handed CaO/TiO2 green nanoparticle2017In: Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, ISSN 0926-3373, E-ISSN 1873-3883, Vol. 210, 276-289 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As our precursory stage we have focus straight forward on clean catalytic approach for the production of C3 substituted pyridoxal-5 '-phosphate analogues of vitamin B6, and other environmental protocols like photocatalytic activity, green fossil fuels and c-c coupling using efficient biocompatible eggshell related unrivalled materials which show versatility of the catalytic effect on different inorganic support. The eggshell immobilized nanoparticles have encouraging relevance in creation of new molecules and can advantageously be studied by various spectroscopic, thermal and elemental analyses like powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, UV-vis, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis. The elucidate nature of nanoparticles offer: more active site acts as lewis acid, vacancies on the catalyst surface and good to better yield of C3 substituted deoxy and 2-nor deoxy coenzyme pyridoxine (PN), coupling products propargylamines (PA), photo degrading enhancement of MB and nucleophilic substituted fatty acid (BD). This enzyme cofactor explore molecular synthons to synthetic equivalent: 3-deoxy and 2-nor-3-deoxy pyridoxal (PL), pyridoxal oxime (P0), pyridoxamine (PM) and mono phosphate derivative of 3-deoxyPM, 3-deoxyPL respectively and chemistry of selective oxidation and schiff base mechanism was studied and complemented through combined experimental and theoretical molecular orbital calculation consequently. The heterogeneous catalyst has strong selective ability towards selective reducing pyridine diester, bioactive intermediates substances and holds vast potential towards separation for the photogenerated electron-hole pairs and renewable, nontoxic, biodegradable green fossil fuels. The catalyst including environmental concern is reapplicable and strong impressive that can unfold the space of worthy metal component widely and facilitate the scope to take a vital role in different fileds like catalysis, biochemistry, nanoscience, energy and materials science.

  • 12.
    Abbasi, Alireza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Structural and Spectroscopic Studies of Solvated Metal Ions2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Crystallographic and spectroscopic studies have been performed of structures, coordination and chemical bonding for series of trivalent metal ions solvated by two oxygen-coordinating solvents, water and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The hydrated scandium(III) and lanthanoid(III) ions, La to Lu, are surrounded by tricapped trigonal prisms of aqua ligands in the isomorphous series of trifluoromethanesulfonates, [M(H2O)n](CF3SO3)3. For the smallest ions, M = Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Sc, the hydration numbers decrease, n = 8.96(5), 8.8(1), 8.7(1), 8.5(1), 8.0(1), respectively, with decreasing size of the ion. The crystal structures at ambient temperature indicate randomly distributed vacancies of the capping oxygen atoms, and 2H solid-state NMR of the diamagnetic [M(H2O)n](CF3SO3)3, M = Sc, Lu, Y and La compounds revealed increasing mobility of the water ligands in the coordination sphere with increasing temperature, also for the fully nonahydrated LaIII and YIII ions. The stretching force constants of the Ln-O bonds, evaluated from vibrational spectroscopy, increased from 0.81 to 1.16 N cm-1 for the Ln-6O trigonal prism in a smooth correlation with the bond distances from La to Lu. For the capping Ln-3O bonds the increase from 0.49 to 0.65 N cm-1 reflects the increased ligand-ligand repulsion with decreasing ion size. This is also the reason for the water deficiency of the Er, Tm, Yb, Lu and Sc salts, and for [Sc(H2O)8.0](CF3SO3)3 the repulsion induced a phase transition at about 185 K that, by low temperature crystallography, was found to distort the coordination of water molecules toward a monocapped trigonal prism around the scandium(III) ion.

    All crystal structures of the octakis(dimethyl sulfoxide)lanthanoid(III) iodides comprise discrete [Ln(dmso)8]3+ complexes surrounded by iodide ions. The lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) compounds crystallize in the orthorhombic space group Pbca with more efficient packing than for the heavier and smaller ions in the lanthanoid series, which crystallize in the monoclinic space group P21/n. The group 13 metal ions, aluminium(III), gallium(III), indium(III), thallium(III), and also scandium(III) of group 3, form crystalline hexakis(dimethyl sulfoxide) solvates in the space group R 3, with octahedral MO6 coordination entities, which are increasingly compressed along one threefold axis for increasing ionic size. EXAFS measurements on the solvated ions display similar M-O bond distances in dimethyl sulfoxide solution as in the solid solvates. For all the solid dimethyl sulfoxide solvates the strength and nature of the metal-oxygen bond has been evaluated by normal coordinate analysis of vibrational spectra, and correlated with the S-O stretching vibrational mode.

    Distortions from regular octahedral six coordination are discussed for the hydrated isoelectronic soft mercury(II) and thallium(III) ions in the solid bisaquamercury(II) and trisaquatallium(III) trifluoromethanesulfonates, in terms of pseudo Jahn-Teller effects (PJTE). Mercury(II), generally more strongly influenced by PJTE distortions, displays a 2 + 4 Hg-O coordination forming chains that are held together in sheets by hydrogen bonds and in layers by van der Waals interactions, which explain the fragile structure of the crystals.

  • 13. Abbasi, Alireza
    et al.
    Damian Risberg, Emiliana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Mink, Janos
    Persson, Ingmar
    Sandström, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Sidorov, Yurii V.
    Skripkin, Mikhail Yu.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Ullström, Ann-Sofi
    Crystallographic and Vibrational Spectroscopic Studies of Octakis(dimethyl sulfoxide)lanthanoid(III) Iodides2007In: Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0020-1669, E-ISSN 1520-510X, Vol. 46, no 19, 7731-7741 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The octakis(DMSO) (DMSO = dimethylsulfoxide) neodymium(III), samarium(III), gadolinium(III), dysprosium(III), erbium(III), and lutetium(III) iodides crystallize in the monoclinic space group P21/n (No. 14) with Z = 4, while the octakis(DMSO) iodides of the larger lanthanum(III), cerium(III), and praseodymium(III) ions crystallize in the orthorhombic space group Pbca (No. 61), Z = 8. In all [Ln(OS(Me2)8]I3 compounds the lanthanoid(III) ions coordinate eight DMSO oxygen atoms in a distorted square antiprism. Up to three of the DMSO ligands were found to be disordered and were described by two alternative configurations related by a twist around the metal−oxygen (Ln−O) bond. To resolve the atomic positions and achieve reliable Ln−O bond distances, complete semirigid DMSO molecules with restrained geometry and partial occupancy were refined for the alternative sites. This disorder model was also applied on previously collected data for the monoclinic octakis(DMSO)yttrium(III) iodide. At ambient temperature, the eight Ln−O bond distances are distributed over a range of about 0.1 Å. The average value increases from Ln−O 2.30, 2.34, 2.34, 2.36, 2.38, 2.40 to 2.43 Å (Ln = Lu, Er, Y, Dy, Gd, Sm, and Nd) for the monoclinic [Ln(OSMe2)8]I3 structures, and from 2.44, 2.47 to 2.49 Å (Ln = Pr, Ce, and La) for the orthorhombic structures, respectively. The average of the La−O and Nd−O bond distances remained unchanged at 100 K, 2.49 and 2.43 Å, respectively. Despite longer bond distances and larger Ln−O−S angles, the cell volumes are smaller for the orthorhombic structures (Ln = Pr, Ce, and La) than for the monoclinic structure with Ln = Nd, showing a more efficient packing arrangement. Raman and IR absorption spectra for the [Ln(OS(CH3)2)8]I3 (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Gd, Tb, Dy, Er, Lu, and Y) compounds, also deuterated for La and Y, have been recorded and analyzed by means of normal coordinate methods. The force constants for the Ln−O and S−O stretching modes in the complexes increase with decreasing Ln−O bond distance and show increasing polarization of the bonds for the smaller and heavier lanthanoid(III) ions.

  • 14. Abbasi, Alireza
    et al.
    Geranmayeh, Shokoofeh
    Skripkin, Mikhail Y.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Potassium ion-mediated non-covalent bonded coordination polymers2012In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 41, no 3, 850-859 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crystal structures and vibrational spectra of three related network-forming coordination complexes have been studied. Two novel thermodynamically stable pseudo-polymorphic solvated rhodium chloro compounds, [cis-RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)K](n), 1, and [cis-RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)K center dot 3H(2)O](n), 2, and one metastable compound [trans-RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)K center dot 0.25H(2)O](n), 3, crystallize at ambient temperature in the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) for 1, and the monoclinic space groups P2(1)/n and P2(1)/c for 2 and 3, respectively. All three structures contain [RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)]-complexes in which the rhodium(III) ions bind to two dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) sulfur atoms and four chloride ions in distorted octahedral coordination geometries. The complexes are connected in networks via potassium ions interacting with the Cl- and the DMSO oxygen atoms. As the sum of Shannon ionic radii of K+ and Cl- exceeds the K-Cl distances in compounds under study, these compounds can be described as Rh-Cl-K coordination polymers with non-covalent bonding, which is not common in these systems, forming 1- and 2-D networks for 1/2 and 3, respectively. The 2-D network with nano-layered sheets for compound 3 was also confirmed by TEM images. Further evaluation of the bonding in the cis- and trans-[RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)](-) entities was obtained by recording Raman and FT-IR absorption spectra and assigning the vibrational frequencies with the support of force-field calculations. The force field study of complexes reveals the strong domination of trans-effect (DMSO-kappa S > Cl) over the effect of non-covalent bonding in coordination polymeric structures. The comparison of calculated RhCl, RhS and SO stretching force constants showed evidence of K+-ligand interactions whereas direct experimental evidences of K+-Cl- interaction were not obtained because of strong overlap of the corresponding spectral region with that where lattice modes and Rh-ligand bendings appear.

  • 15. Abbasi, Alireza
    et al.
    Skripkin, Mikhail Yu.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Torapava, Natallia
    Ambidentate coordination of dimethyl sulfoxide in rhodium(III) complexes2011In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 40, no 5, 1111-1118 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The two dimethyl sulfoxide solvated rhodium(III) compounds, [Rh(dmso-kappa O)(5)(dmso-kappa S)](CF(3)SO(3))(3) (1 & 1* at 298 K and 100 K, respectively) and [Rh(dmso-kappa O)(3)(dmso-kappa S)(2)Cl](CF(3)SO(3))(2) (2), crystallize with orthorhombic unit cells in the space group Pna2(1) (No. 33), Z = 4. In the [Rh(dmso)(6)](3+) complex with slightly distorted octahedral coordination geometry, the Rh-O bond distance is significantly longer with O trans to S, 2.143(6) angstrom (1) and 2.100(6) angstrom (1*), than the mean Rh-O bond distance with O trans to O, 2.019 angstrom (1) and 2.043 angstrom (1*). In the [RhCl(dmso)(5)](3+) complex, the mean Rh-O bond distance with O trans to S, 2.083 angstrom, is slightly longer than that for O trans to Cl, 2.067(4) angstrom, which is consistent with the trans influence DMSO-kappa S > Cl > DMSO-kappa O of the opposite ligands. Raman and IR absorption spectra were recorded and analyzed and a complete assignment of the vibrational bands was achieved with support by force field calculations. An increase in the Rh-O stretching vibrational frequency corresponded to a decreasing trans-influence from the opposite ligand. The Rh-O force constants obtained were correlated with the Rh-O bond lengths, also including previously obtained values for other M(dmso)(6)(3+) complexes with trivalent metal ions. An almost linear correlation was obtained for the MO stretching force constants vs. the reciprocal square of the MO bond lengths. The results show that the metal ion-oxygen bonding of dimethyl sulfoxide ligands is electrostatically dominated in those complexes and that the stretching force constants provide a useful measure of the relative trans-influence of the opposite ligands in hexa-coordinated Rh(III)-complexes.

  • 16. Abbrent, S
    et al.
    Plestil, J
    Hlavata, D
    Lindgren, Jan
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry. strukturkemi.
    Tegenfeldt, Jörgen
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry. strukturkemi.
    Wendsjö, Å
    Crystallinity and morphology of PVdF-HFP based gel electrolytes.2001In: Polymer, Vol. 42, 1407- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Abbrent, Sabina
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry.
    Lithium ion interactions in polymer gel electrolytes: Effect on structure, dynamics and morphology2000Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymer electrolytes are an essential part of the modern all-solid lithium battery. Several properties, such as mechanical and thermal stability, good ionic conductivity and compatibility with other materials used in the battery are necessary for a successful material.

    This thesis is focused on the ionic interactions in two electrolyte systems, based on a cross-linked polyethylene oxide (nona(ethylene oxide)dimethacrylate) or a fluorinated copolymer (polyvinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene). Changes of thermal properties and morphology of and coordination in the electrolyte on addition of a lithium salt (LiTFSI) and different types and concentrations of solvents are studied. These properties are shown to control the ionic conductivity of the resulting material, influencing the conductivity mechanism.

    The presumably inert polyvinylidene fluoride is shown to undergo large structural changes, where polar conformations of the polymer backbone appear on salt addition, inducing a different crystalline phase. The lithium cation in the polyethylene oxide based electrolyte can coordinate either to the polymer chain or to the solvent. In for example systems containing propylene carbonate, the lithium ion binds more strongly to the polymer than to the solvent. This is in contrast to the systems with dimethyl sulphoxide where the ion prefers the solvent. This variation in coordination also strongly affects the mobility of the cation, reflected both in diffusion constants and in conductivity data.

    A combination of techniques was necessary to use for a deeper understanding of these complex materials. Coordination has been studied by FTIR and high resolution NMR, dynamics by NMR diffusion measurements and impedance spectroscopy, and morphology by diffraction techniques and DSC.

  • 18. Abdala, Paula M
    et al.
    Safonova, Olga V
    Wiker, Geir
    van Beek, Wouter
    Emerich, Herman
    van Bokhoven, Jeroen A
    Sá, Jacinto
    Szlachetko, Jakub
    Nachtegaal, Maarten
    Scientific opportunities for heterogeneous catalysis research at the SuperXAS and SNBL beam lines.2012In: Chimia (Basel), ISSN 0009-4293, Vol. 66, no 9, 699-705 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this short review, we describe the complementary experimental capabilities for catalysis research at two beam lines available to the Swiss community, SuperXAS at SLS (Swiss Light Source, Villigen) and SNBL (Swiss Norwegian Beam lines) at ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble). Over the years, these two facilities have been developed to provide powerful techniques for structural studies under in situ and operando conditions. These techniques, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) in combination with Raman or infrared spectroscopy provide new avenues for structure-performance studies of catalysts. Several exemplary studies are used to demonstrate the capability of these facilities.

  • 19.
    Abdel Rehim, Abbi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Abdel Rehim, Mohamed
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Screening and determination of drugs in human saliva utilizing microextraction by packed sorbent and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry2013In: BMC Biomedical chromotography, ISSN 0269-3879, E-ISSN 1099-0801, Vol. 27, no 9, 1188-1191 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents a new method for collecting and handling saliva samples using an automated analytical microsyringe and microextraction by packed syringe (MEPS). The screening and determination of lidocaine in human saliva samples utilizing MEPS and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) were carried out. An exact volume of saliva could be collected. The MEPS C-8-cartridge could be used for 50 extractions before it was discarded. The extraction recovery was about 60%. The pharmacokinetic curve of lidocaine in saliva using MEPS-LC-MS/MS is reported.

  • 20. Abdel-Hamid, Mohammed K
    et al.
    Macgregor, Kylie A
    Odell, Luke R
    Chau, Ngoc
    Mariana, Anna
    Whiting, Ainslie
    Robinson, Phillip J
    McCluskey, Adam
    1,8-Naphthalimide derivatives: new leads against dynamin I GTPase activity.2015In: Organic and biomolecular chemistry, ISSN 1477-0520, E-ISSN 1477-0539, Vol. 13, no 29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fragment-based in silico screening against dynamin I (dynI) GTPase activity identified the 1,8-naphthalimide framework as a potential scaffold for the design of new inhibitors targeting the GTP binding pocket of dynI. Structure-based design, synthesis and subsequent optimization resulted in the development of a library of 1,8-naphthalimide derivatives, called the Naphthaladyn™ series, with compounds 23 and 29 being the most active (IC50 of 19.1 ± 0.3 and 18.5 ± 1.7 μM respectively). Compound 29 showed effective inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis (IC50(CME) 66 μM). The results introduce 29 as an optimised GTP-competitive lead Naphthaladyn™ compound for the further development of naphthalimide-based dynI GTPase inhibitors.

  • 21. Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed A.
    et al.
    Ali, M. M.
    Ashour, Radwa
    Abdel-Magied, A. F.
    Chemical Studies on Uranium Extraction from Concentrated Phosphoric Acid by Using PC88A and DBBP Mixture.2011In: Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry, ISSN 0236-5731, E-ISSN 1588-2780, Vol. 290, 353-359 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Liquid–liquid extraction of U (VI) from concentrated phosphoric acid by using (2-ethyl hexyl) phosphonic acid, mono (2-ethyl hexyl) ester (PC88A) and di-butyl butyl phosphonate (DBBP) has been investigated. The effect of different factors affecting the extraction process (PC88A concentration, DBBP concentration, shaking time, aqueous/organic phase ratio, phosphoric acid concentration and effect of diluents) have been investigated. The obtained data of temperature on the extraction showed that the enthalpy change is −17.15 kJ mol−1. Uranium was extracted from the strip liquor by using di (2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid and tri-octyl phosphine oxide mixture and finally converted to a high purity UO3 product using precipitation with hydrogen peroxide and heat treatment at 365 °C.

  • 22.
    Abdellah, Mohamed
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström. South Valley Univ, Qena Fac Sci, Dept Chem, Qena 83523, Egypt..
    El-Zohry, Ahmed M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström.
    Antila, Liisa J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Windle, Christopher D.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Chem, Christian Doppler Lab Sustainable SynGas Chem, Lensfield Rd, Cambridge CB2 1EW, England..
    Reisner, Erwin
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Chem, Christian Doppler Lab Sustainable SynGas Chem, Lensfield Rd, Cambridge CB2 1EW, England..
    Hammarström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Time-Resolved IR Spectroscopy Reveals a. Mechanism with TiO2 as a Reversible Electron Acceptor in a TiO2-Re Catalyst System for CO2 Photoreduction2017In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 139, no 3, 1226-1232 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Attaching the phosphonated molecular catalyst [(ReBr)-Br-I(bpy)-(CO)(3)](0) to the wide-bandgap semiconductor TiO2 strongly enhances the rate of visible-light-driven reduction of CO2 to CO in dimethylformamide with triethanolamine (TEOA) as sacrificial electron donor. Herein, we show by transient mid-IR spectroscopy that the mechanism of catalyst photoreduction is initiated by ultrafast electron injection into TiO2, followed by rapid (ps-ns) and sequential two-electron oxidation of TEOA that is coordinated to the Re center. The injected electrons can be stored in the conduction band of TiO2 on an ms-s time scale, and we propose that they lead to further reduction of the Re catalyst and completion of the catalytic cycle. Thus, the excited Re catalyst gives away one electron and would eventually get three electrons back. The function of an electron reservoir would represent a role for TiO2 in photocatalytic CO2 reduction that has previously not been considered. We propose that the increase in photocatalytic activity upon heterogenization of the catalyst to TiO2 is due to the slow charge recombination and the high oxidative power of the Re-II species after electron injection as compared to the excited MLCT state of the unbound Re catalyst or when immobilized on ZrO2, which results in a more efficient reaction with TEOA.

  • 23.
    Abdel-Magied, Ahmed F.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Arafa, Wael A. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Laine, Tanja M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Shatskiy, Andrey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Kärkäs, Markus D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Åkermark, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Johnston, Eric V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Substituent Effects in Molecular Ruthenium Water Oxidation Catalysts Based on Amide Ligands2017In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 9, no 9, 1583-1587 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The production of clean and sustainable energy is considered as one of the most urgent issues for our society. Mastering the oxidation of water to dioxygen is essential for the production of solar fuels. A study of the influence of the substituents on the catalytic activity of a series of mononuclear Ru complexes (2a-e) based on a tetradentate ligand framework is presented. At neutral pH, using [Ru(bpy)(3)](PF6)(3) (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) as the terminal oxidant, a good correlation between the turnover frequency (TOF) and the Hammett sigma(meta) parameters was obtained. Additionally, a general pathway for the deactivation of Ru-based catalysts 2a-e during the catalytic oxidation of water through poisoning by carbon monoxide was demonstrated. These results highlight the importance of ligand design for fine-tuning the catalytic activity of water oxidation catalysts.

  • 24.
    Abdel-Magied, Ahmed F.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Shatskiy, Andrey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Liao, Rong-Zhen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Laine, Tanja M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Arafa, Wael A. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. University Fayoum, Egypt.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Kärkäs, Markus D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Åkermark, Bjorn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Johnston, Eric V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Chemical and Photochemical Water Oxidation Mediated by an Efficient Single-Site Ruthenium Catalyst2016In: ChemSusChem, ISSN 1864-5631, E-ISSN 1864-564X, Vol. 9, no 24, 3448-3456 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water oxidation is a fundamental step in artificial photosynthesis for solar fuels production. In this study, we report a single-site Ru-based water oxidation catalyst, housing a dicarboxylate-benzimidazole ligand, that mediates both chemical and light-driven oxidation of water efficiently under neutral conditions. The importance of the incorporation of the negatively charged ligand framework is manifested in the low redox potentials of the developed complex, which allows water oxidation to be driven by the mild one-electron oxidant [Ru(bpy)(3)](3+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine). Furthermore, combined experimental and DFT studies provide insight into the mechanistic details of the catalytic cycle.

  • 25.
    Abdel-Rehim, Abbi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Evaluation of microextraction by packed sorbent and micro-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry as a green approach in bioanalysis2013In: BMC Biomedical chromotography, ISSN 0269-3879, E-ISSN 1099-0801, Vol. 27, no 10, 1225-1233 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study the use of micro-liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was investigated in routine bioanalysis application for separation and quantification of pro-drug AZD6319 (developed for aldezheimer treatment). Microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS) was used as sample clean-up method. The focus of this study was put on the evaluation of the usability of smaller column diameters such as 1.0 and 0.3mm instead of 2.1mm in bioanalysis application to reduce solvent consumption and sample volumes. Solvent consumption was reduced by 80% when a 1.0mm column was used compared with 2.1mm column. Robustness of the micro-columns in terms of accuracy and precision was investigated. The application of LC-MS/MS for the quantitative analysis of AZD6319 in plasma samples showed good selectivity, accuracy and precision. The coefficients of determination (R-2) were >0.998 for all runs using plasma samples on the studied micro-columns. The inter-day accuracy values for quality control samples ranged from 99 to 103% and from 96 to 105% for 0.3x50mm and 1.0x50mm columns, respectively. The inter-day precision values ranged from 4.0 to 9.0% and from 4.0 to 8.0% for 0.3x50 and 1.0x50mm columns, respectively. In addition the sensitivity was increased by three times using a 1.0mm column compared with 2.1mm. Furthermore, robustness of the micro-columns from different manufacturers was investigated.

  • 26. Abdel-Rehim, Abbi
    et al.
    Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Advantages of Saliva Sampling in Bioanalysis Using Microextraction by Packed Sorbent and Dried Saliva Spot with LC-MS-MS2014In: LC GC Europe, ISSN 1471-6577, Vol. 27, no 10, 529-531 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Saliva offers a fast and non-invasive sampling matrix for determining drug concentration levels, making it a suitable alternative to plasma and blood. During the analysis of biological samples attention is focused on sample pre-treatment. In addition, liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) is often the method of choice in bioanalysis because of the good selectivity and good sensitivity of the technique. In this article, two sample handling and sample preparation methods for saliva samples are presented and discussed. The first method is microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS), and the second method is dried saliva spot (DSS). Both methods were applied for determining the presence of lidocaine in saliva.

  • 27. Abdel-Rehim, Abbi
    et al.
    Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Dried saliva spot as a sampling technique for saliva samples2014In: BMC Biomedical chromotography, ISSN 0269-3879, E-ISSN 1099-0801, Vol. 28, no 6, 875-877 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the first time, dried saliva spot (DSS) was used as a sampling technique for saliva samples. In the DSS technique 50 L of saliva was collected on filter paper and the saliva was then extracted with an organic solvent. The local anesthetic lidocaine was used as a model compound, which was determined in the DSS using liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. The results obtained for the determination of lidocaine in saliva using DSS were compared with those from a previous study using a microextraction by packed sorbent syringe as the sampling method for saliva. This study shows that DSS can be used for the analysis of saliva samples. The method is promising and very easy in terms of sampling and extraction procedures. The results from this study are in good agreement with those from our previous work on the determination of lidocaine in saliva. DSS can open a new dimension in the saliva handling process in terms of sampling, storing and transport.

  • 28. Abdel-Rehim, M.
    et al.
    Altun, Zeki
    Blomberg, Lars G
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    New trend in sample preparation: On-line microextraction in packed syringe (MEPS) for LC and GC applications, Part II, Determination of ropivacaine and its metabolites in human plasma samples using MEPS-LC-MS-MS2004In: J. Mass Spectr., 39 (2004) 1488-1493Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29. Abdel-Rehim, M.
    et al.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Paper Surface Centre. Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Materials Science.
    Bielenstein, M.
    Arvidsson, T.
    Blomberg, Lars G
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Evaluation of Solid-Phase microextraction (SPME) for Study of the protein Binding in Human Plasma Samples,2000In: J. Chromatogr. Sci., 38 (2000) 458-464Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30. Abdel-Rehim, M.
    et al.
    Hassan, Z.
    Blomberg, Lars G
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Hassan, M.
    Determination of Busulphan in plasma samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using on-line derivatization utilizing solid-phase microextraction (SPME)2003In: J. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring, 25 (2003) 400-406Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31. Abdel-Rehim, M.
    et al.
    Skansen, P.
    Vita, M.
    Hassan, Z.
    Blomberg, Lars G
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Hassan, M.
    Microextraction in packed syringe / liquid chromatography /electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (MEPS/LC/MS/MS) for quantification of olomoucine in human plasma samples2005In: Anal.Chim. Acta., 539 (2005) 35-39Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed
    et al.
    AstraZeneca R&D Södertälje, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Andersson, L.I.
    AstraZeneca R&D Södertälje, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Altun, Zeki
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Blomberg, Lars G
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Microextraction in Packed Syringe Online with Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Molecularly imprinted polymer as packing material for MEPS in selective extraction of ropivacaine from plasma2006In: Journal of Liquid Chromatography & Related Technologies, ISSN 1082-6076, E-ISSN 1520-572X, Vol. 29, no 12, 1725-1736 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The excellent performance of a new sample preparation method, microextraction in packed syringe (MEPS), was recently illustrated by online LC‐MS and GS‐MS assays of local anaesthetics in plasma samples. In the method, approximately 1 mg of solid packing material was inserted into a syringe (100–250 µL) as a plug. Sample preparation took place on the packed bed. The new method was easy to use, fully automated, of low cost, and rapid in comparison with previously used methods. This paper presents the use of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) as packing material for higher extraction selectivity. Development and validation of a method for MIP‐MEPS online with LC‐MS‐MS using ropivacaine in plasma as model compound were investigated. A bupivacaine imprinted polymer was used. The method was validated and the standard curves were evaluated by means of quadratic regression and weighted by inverse of the concentration: 1/x for the calibration range 2–2000 nM. The applied polymer could be used more than 100 times before the syringe was discarded. The extraction recovery was 60%. The results showed high correlation coefficients (R 2 >0.999) for all runs. The accuracy, given as a percentage deviation from the nominal concentration values, ranged from -6% to 3%. The precision, given as the relative standard deviation, at three different concentrations (QC samples) was consistently about 3% to 10%. The limit of quantification was 2 nM.

  • 33. Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed
    et al.
    Dahlgren, Marie
    Blomberg, Lars G
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Quantification of ropivacaine and its major metabolites in human urine samples utilizing microextraction in packed syringe automated with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (MEPS-LC-MS-MS)2006In: J. Sep. Sci., 29 (2006) 1658-1661Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34. Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed
    et al.
    Dahlgren, Marie
    Claude, Saturnin
    Tabacchi, Raphael
    Blomberg, Lars G
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Microextraction in packed syringe (MEPS) utilizing methylcyanopropyl silarylene as coating polymer for extraction of drugs in biological samples,2006In: J. Liq. Chromatogr. & Relat. Technol., 29 (2006) No. 17, 2537-2544Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Abdi, Adel Hirmand
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transportvetenskap, Väg- och banteknik.
    Key aspects in winter highway operation and maintenance2010Report (Other academic)
  • 36. Abdullah, Muhammad Imran
    et al.
    Janjua, Muhammad Ramzan Saeed Ashraf
    Mahmood, Asif
    Ali, Sajid
    Ali, Muhammad
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Quantum Chemical Designing of Efficient Sensitizers for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells2013In: Bulletin of the Korean Chemical Society (Print), ISSN 0253-2964, E-ISSN 1229-5949, Vol. 34, no 7, 2093-2098 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Density functional theory (DFT) was used to determine the ground state geometries of indigo and new design dyes (IM-Dye-1 IM-Dye-2 and IM-Dye-3). The time dependant density functional theory (TDDFT) was used to calculate the excitation energies. All the calculations were performed in both gas and solvent phase. The LUMO energies of all the dyes were above the conduction band of TiO2, while the HOMOs were below the redox couple (except IM-Dye-3). The HOMO-LUMO energy gaps of new design dyes were smaller as compared to indigo. All new design dyes were strongly red shifted as compared to indigo. The improved light harvesting efficiency (LHE) and free energy change of electron injection Delta G(inject) of new designed sensitizers revealed that these materials would be excellent sensitizers. The broken coplanarity between the benzene near anchoring group having LUMO and the last benzene attached to TPA unit in all new design dyes consequently would hamper the recombination reaction. This theoretical designing will the pave way for experimentalists to synthesize the efficient sensitizers for solar cells.

  • 37. Abdurahman, Samir
    et al.
    Youssefi, Masoud
    Höglund, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry.
    Vahlne, Anders
    Characterization of the invariable residue 51 mutations of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 capsid protein on in vitro CA assembly and infectivity2007In: Retrovirology, ISSN 1742-4690, Vol. 4, 69- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The mature HIV-1 conical core formation proceeds through highly regulated protease cleavage of the Gag precursor, which ultimately leads to substantial rearrangements of the capsid (CAp24) molecule involving both inter- and intra-molecular contacts of the CAp24 molecules. In this aspect, Asp51 which is located in the N-terminal domain of HIV-1 CAp24 plays an important role by forming a salt-bridge with the free imino terminus Pro1 following proteolytic cleavage and liberation of the CAp24 protein from the Pr55Gag precursor. Thus, previous substitution mutation of Asp51 to alanine (D51A) has shown to be lethal and that this invariable residue was found essential for tube formation in vitro, virus replication and virus capsid formation. RESULTS: We extended the above investigation by introducing three different D51 substitution mutations (D51N, D51E, and D51Q) into both prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression systems and studied their effects on in vitro capsid assembly and virus infectivity. Two substitution mutations (D51E and D51N) had no substantial effect on in vitro capsid assembly, yet they impaired viral infectivity and particle production. In contrast, the D51Q mutant was defective both for in vitro capsid assembly and for virus replication in cell culture. CONCLUSION: These results show that substitutions of D51 with glutamate, glutamine, or asparagine, three amino acid residues that are structurally related to aspartate, could partially rescue both in vitro capsid assembly and intra-cellular CAp24 production but not replication of the virus in cultured cells.

  • 38.
    Abebe, Mihret
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bacsik, Zoltan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Spherical and Porous Particles of Calcium Carbonate Synthesized with Food Friendly Polymer Additives2015In: Crystal Growth & Design, ISSN 1528-7483, E-ISSN 1528-7505, Vol. 15, no 8, 3609-3616 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Porous calcium carbonate particles were synthesized by adding solutions of Ca2+ to solutions of CO32- containing polymeric additives. Under optimized conditions well-defined aggregates of the anhydrous polymorph vaterite formed. A typical sample of these micrometer-sized aggregates had: a pore volume of 0.1 cm(3)/g, a pore width of similar to 10 nm, and a specific surface area of similar to 25-30 m(2)/ g. Only one mixing Order (calcium to carbonate) allowed the formation of vaterite, which was ascribed to the buffering capacity and relatively high pH of the CO32- solution. Rapid addition of the calcium chloride solution and rapid stirring promoted the formation of vaterite, due to the high supersaturation levels achieved. With xanthan gum, porous and micrometer-sized vaterite aggregates could be synthesized over a wide range of synthetic conditions. For the Other food grade polymers, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), methylcellulose (MC), and sodium carboxyl methylcellulose, several intensive and extensive synthetic parameters had to be optimized to obtain pure vaterite and porous aggregates. HPMC and MC allowed well-defined spherical micrometer-sited particles to form. We expect that these spherical and porous particles of vaterite could be relevant to model studies as well as a controlled delivery of particularly large molecules.

  • 39.
    Abelein, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Jarvet, Jüri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. The National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Estonia.
    Barth, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Danielsson, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ionic Strength Modulation of the Free Energy Landscape of A beta(40) Peptide Fibril Formation2016In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 138, no 21, 6893-6902 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein misfolding and formation of cross-beta structured amyloid fibrils are linked to, many neurodegenerative disorders. Although recently developed,quantitative approaches have started to reveal the molecular nature of self-assembly and fibril formation of proteins and peptides, it is yet unclear how these self-organization events are precisely modulated by microenvironmental factors, which are known to strongly affect the macroscopic aggregation properties. Here, we characterize the explicit effect of ionic strength on the microscopic aggregation rates of amyloid beta peptide (A beta 40) self-association, implicated in Alzheimer's disease. We found that physiological ionic strength accelerates A beta 40 aggregation kinetics by promoting surface-catalyzed secondary nucleation reactions. This promoted catalytic effect can be assigned to shielding of electrostatic repulsion between Monomers on the fibril surface or between the fibril surface itself and monomeric peptides. Furthermore, we observe the formation of two different beta-structured states with =similar but distinct spectroscopic features, which can be assigned to an off-pathway immature state (F-beta*) and a mature stable State (F-beta), where salt favors formation of the F-beta fibril morphology. Addition of salt to preformed F-beta* accelerates transition to F-beta, underlining the dynamic nature of A beta 40 fibrils in solution. On the basis of,these results we suggest a model where salt decreases the free-energy barrier for A beta 40 folding to the F-beta state, favoring the buildup of the mature fibril morphology while omitting competing, energetically less favorable structural states.

  • 40.
    Abghoui, Younes
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Computational design, synthesis, and characterization of oseltamivir molecularly imprinted polymers2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 41.
    Abili Nejad, Maryam
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemistry.
    Kinetics for oxidation of CRUD model compounds2004Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of CRUD (Chalk River Unidentified Deposit) inwater-cooled nuclear reactors constitute a severe problem. Thestability of CRUD under reactor conditions (high flux ofionizing radition, high temperature and pressure) must be knownin order to minimize the problem. The kinetics for CRUDoxidation by H2O2 and the two more potent oxidants IrCl62-and MnO4- has been studied using aqueous suspensions ofthree metal oxide powders, Fe3O4, Fe2CoO4 and Fe2NiO4. The metal oxides were used as model compounds forCRUD. The latter two oxidants were employed to study therelationship between kinetics and the reduction potential ofthe oxidant. In addition, the activation energies for thereaction between H2O2and the three metal oxides of CRUD model weredetermined. The mechanism of the reaction is discussedindicating that the final solid product in all three cases isFe2O3. Our experimental results show that the reactivityof the metal oxides towards oxidants is in the order Fe2CoO4>Fe3O4>Fe2NiO4. The relative reactivities of Fe2CoO4 and Fe3O4are in contrast with that expected from the studyof the ionization potentials of the divalent metals in theoxides. In addition to the experimental studies, thetheoretical grounds for kinetics of reactions in particlesolutions are discussed. The theoretical discussion is alsoused to explain the somewhat unexpected trends in reactivityobserved experimentally. The same reaction trend is alsoobserved in the reaction of the metal oxides with IrCl62-and MnO4-.

    We found experimentally that the logarithm of second orderrate constants of the reaction of metal oxides with oxidantsagainst the one electron potential of the oxidants follows aparabolic behavior in agreement with the Marcus theory forelectron transfer reactions. This work constitutes a good basisfor the design of further model studies aiming at resolving thestability of CRUD under reactor conditions.

    Keywords:Reactor Chemistry, Radiolysis, Oxidation,Kinetics, CRUD, Metal oxide

  • 42.
    Aboye, Teshome L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Burman, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Göransson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Synthesis, Cyclization and Oxidative folding of backbone engineered Cyclotides2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Aboye, Teshome Leta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Clark, Richard J.
    University of Queensland, Institute for Molecular Bioscience.
    Burman, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Craik, David J.
    University of Queensland, Institute for Molecular Bioscience.
    Göransson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Synthesis and Oxidative Folding of Cyclic Cystine Knot Peptides: Towards Backbone Engineering2010In: Peptides 2010: Tales of Peptides Proceedings of the Thirty-First European Peptide Symposium / [ed] Michal Lebl, Morten Meldal, Knud J. Jensen, Thomas Høeg-Jensen, European Peptide Society , 2010, 142-143 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Aboye, Teshome Leta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Clark, Richard J.
    University of Queensland, Institute for Molecular Bioscience.
    Craik, David J.
    University of Queensland, Institute for Molecular Bioscience.
    Göransson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Synthesis and folding of the circular cystine knotted cyclotide cycloviolacin O22008In: Peptides 2008: Chemistry of Peptides in Life Science Technology and MedicineProceedings of The Thirtieth European Peptide Symposium / [ed] Hilkka Lankinen, The Finnish Peptide Society and The European Peptide Society , 2008, 280-281 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Abraham, Mark J
    Computational Proteomics Group, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Australia.
    Performance enhancements for GROMACS nonbonded interactions on BlueGene.2011In: Journal of Computational Chemistry, ISSN 0192-8651, E-ISSN 1096-987X, Vol. 32, no 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several improvements to the previously optimized GROMACS BlueGene inner loops that evaluate nonbonded interactions in molecular dynamics simulations are presented. The new improvements yielded an 11% decrease in running time for both PME and other kinds of GROMACS simulations that use nonbonded table look-ups. Some other GROMACS simulations will show a small gain.

  • 46.
    Abraham, Mark J
    et al.
    Australian National University, Australia.
    Gready, Jill E
    Optimization of parameters for molecular dynamics simulation using smooth particle-mesh Ewald in GROMACS 4.52011In: Journal of Computational Chemistry, ISSN 0192-8651, E-ISSN 1096-987X, Vol. 32, no 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on our critique of requirements for performing an efficient molecular dynamics simulation with the particle-mesh Ewald (PME) implementation in GROMACS 4.5, we present a computational tool to enable the discovery of parameters that produce a given accuracy in the PME approximation of the full electrostatics. Calculations on two parallel computers with different processor and communication structures showed that a given accuracy can be attained over a range of parameter space, and that the attributes of the hardware and simulation system control which parameter sets are optimal. This information can be used to find the fastest available PME parameter sets that achieve a given accuracy. We hope that this tool will stimulate future work to assess the impact of the quality of the PME approximation on simulation outcomes, particularly with regard to the trade-off between cost and scientific reliability in biomolecular applications.

  • 47.
    Abraham, Mark J
    et al.
    Australian National University, Australia.
    Gready, Jill E
    Australian National University.
    Ensuring Mixing Efficiency of Replica-Exchange Molecular Dynamics Simulations2008In: Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation, ISSN 1549-9618, E-ISSN 1549-9626, Vol. 4, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We address the question of constructing a protocol for replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations that make efficient use of the replica space, assess whether published applications are achieving such "mixing" efficiency, and provide a how-to guide to assist users to plan efficient REMD simulations. To address our first question, we introduce and discuss three metrics for assessing the number of replica-exchange attempts required to justify the use of a replica scheme and define a "transit number" as the lower bound for the length of an efficient simulation. Our literature survey of applications of REMD simulations of peptides in explicit solvent indicated that authors are not routinely reporting sufficient details of their simulation protocols to allow readers to make independent assessments of the impact of the method on their results, particularly whether mixing efficiency has been achieved. Necessary details include the expected or observed replica-exchange probability, together with the total number of exchange attempts, the exchange period, and estimates of the autocorrelation time of the potential energy. Our analysis of cases where the necessary information was reported suggests that in many of these simulations there are insufficient exchanges attempted or an insufficiently long period between them to provide confidence that the simulation length justifies the size of the replica scheme. We suggest guidelines for designing REMD simulation protocols to ensure mixing efficiency. Two key recommendations are that the exchange period should in general be larger than 1 ps and the number of exchange attempts should be chosen to significantly exceed the transit number for the replica scheme.

  • 48. Abrahamsson, Christoffer
    et al.
    Nordstierna, Lars
    Nordin, Matias
    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry. St. Petersburg State University, Russian Federation.
    Nyden, Magnus
    Magnetic orientation of nontronite clay in aqueous dispersions and its effect on water diffusion2015In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 437, 205-210 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The diffusion rate of water in dilute clay dispersions depends on particle concentration, size, shape, aggregation and water-particle interactions. As nontronite clay particles magnetically align parallel to the magnetic field, directional self-diffusion anisotropy can be created within such dispersion. Here we study water diffusion in exfoliated nontronite clay dispersions by diffusion NMR and time-dependant 1H-NMR-imaging profiles. The dispersion clay concentration was varied between 0.3 and 0.7 vol%. After magnetic alignment of the clay particles in these dispersions a maximum difference of 20% was measured between the parallel and perpendicular self-diffusion coefficients in the dispersion with 0.7 vol% clay. A method was developed to measure water diffusion within the dispersion in the absence of a magnetic field (random clay orientation) as this is not possible with standard diffusion NMR. However, no significant difference in self-diffusion coefficient between random and aligned dispersions could be observed.

  • 49.
    Abrahamsson, Malin L. A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry.
    Berglund Baudin, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry.
    Tran, A.
    Philouze, C.
    Berg, K.
    Raymond-Johansson, Mary Katherine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry.
    Sun, L.
    Åkermark, B.
    Styring, S.
    Hammarström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry.
    Ruthenium-Manganese Complexes for Artificial Photosynthesis: Factors Controlling Intramolecular Electron Transfer and Excited State Quenching Reactions2002In: Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0020-1669, E-ISSN 1520-510X, Vol. 41, no 6, 1534-1544 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continuing our work toward a system mimicking the electron-transfer steps from manganese to P(680)(+) in photosystem II (PS II), we report a series of ruthenium(II)-manganese(II) complexes that display intramolecular electron transfer from manganese(II) to photooxidized ruthenium(III). The electron-transfer rate constant (k(ET)) values span a large range, 1 x 10(5)-2 x 10(7) s(-1), and we have investigated different factors that are responsible for the variation. The reorganization energies determined experimentally (lambda = 1.5-2.0 eV) are larger than expected for solvent reorganization in complexes of similar size in polar solvents (typically lambda approximately 1.0 eV). This result indicates that the inner reorganization energy is relatively large and, consequently, that at moderate driving force values manganese complexes are not fast donors. Both the type of manganese ligand and the link between the two metals are shown to be of great importance to the electron-transfer rate. In contrast, we show that the quenching of the excited state of the ruthenium(II) moiety by manganese(II) in this series of complexes mainly depends on the distance between the metals. However, by synthetically modifying the sensitizer so that the lowest metal-to-ligand charge transfer state was localized on the nonbridging ruthenium(II) ligands, we could reduce the quenching rate constant in one complex by a factor of 700 without changing the bridging ligand. Still, the manganese(II)-ruthenium(III) electron-transfer rate constant was not reduced. Consequently, the modification resulted in a complex with very favorable properties.

  • 50.
    Abrahamsson, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Chemical Physics.
    Becker, Hans-Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Chemical Physics.
    Hammarström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Chemical Physics.
    Bonnefous, Celine
    Chamchoumis, Charles
    Thummel, Randolph
    Six-membered Ring Chelate Complexes of Ru(II): Structural and photophysical effects2007In: Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0020-1669, E-ISSN 1520-510X, Vol. 46, no 24, 10354-10364 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structural and photophysical properties of Ru(II)−polypyridyl complexes with five- and six-membered chelate rings were studied for two bis-tridentate and two tris-bidentate complexes. The photophysical effect of introducing a six-membered chelate ring is most pronounced for the tridentate complex, leading to a room-temperature excited-state lifetime of 810 ns, a substantial increase from 180 ns for the five-membered chelate ring model complex. Contrasting this, the effect is the opposite in tris-bidentate complexes, in which the lifetime decreases from 430 ns to around 1 ns in going from a five-membered to six-membered chelate ring. All of the complexes were studied spectroscopically at both 80 K and ambient temperatures, and the temperature dependence of the excited-state lifetime was investigated for both of the bis-tridentate complexes. The main reason for the long excited-state lifetime in the six-membered chelate ring bis-tridentate complex was found to be a strong retardation of the activated decay via metal-centered states, largely due to an increased ligand field splitting due to the complex having a more-octahedral geometry.

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