Digitala Vetenskapliga Arkivet

Change search
Refine search result
1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Enrico, Alessandro
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems. Synthetic Physiology lab, Department of Civil Engineering and Architecture, University of Pavia, Via Ferrata 3, Pavia, 27100 Italy.
    Buchmann, Sebastian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, Centres, Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences, AIMES.
    De Ferrari, Fabio
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Lin, Yunfan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wang, Yazhou
    Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Flexible Electronic Materials and Wearable Devices School of Materials Science and Engineering Sun Yat‐sen University Guangzhou 510275 P. R. China.
    Yue, Wan
    Key Laboratory for Polymeric Composite and Functional Materials of Ministry of Education School of Materials Science and Engineering Sun Yat‐sen University Guangzhou 510275 P. R. China.
    Mårtensson, Gustaf
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Mycronic AB Nytorpsvägen 9 Täby 183 53 Sweden.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Niklaus, Frank
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Herland, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, Centres, Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences, AIMES.
    Zeglio, Erica
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, Centres, Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences, AIMES. Wallenberg Initiative Materials Science for Sustainability, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm, 114 18 Sweden.
    Cleanroom‐Free Direct Laser Micropatterning of Polymers for Organic Electrochemical Transistors in Logic Circuits and Glucose Biosensors2024In: Advanced Science, E-ISSN 2198-3844Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) are promising devices for bioelectronics, such as biosensors. However, current cleanroom-based microfabrication of OECTs hinders fast prototyping and widespread adoption of this technology for low-volume, low-cost applications. To address this limitation, a versatile and scalable approach for ultrafast laser microfabrication of OECTs is herein reported, where a femtosecond laser to pattern insulating polymers (such as parylene C or polyimide) is first used, exposing the underlying metal electrodes serving as transistor terminals (source, drain, or gate). After the first patterning step, conducting polymers, such as poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), or semiconducting polymers, are spin-coated on the device surface. Another femtosecond laser patterning step subsequently defines the active polymer area contributing to the OECT performance by disconnecting the channel and gate from the surrounding spin-coated film. The effective OECT width can be defined with high resolution (down to 2 µm) in less than a second of exposure. Micropatterning the OECT channel area significantly improved the transistor switching performance in the case of PEDOT:PSS-based transistors, speeding up the devices by two orders of magnitude. The utility of this OECT manufacturing approach is demonstrated by fabricating complementary logic (inverters) and glucose biosensors, thereby showing its potential to accelerate OECT research.

  • 2.
    Lander, Sanna
    et al.
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping, Sweden; Cellfion AB, Drottning Kristinas väg 53, SE-114 28 Stockholm, Sweden, Drottning Kristinas väg 53.
    Pang, Jiu
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping, Sweden; Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    Cellfion AB, Drottning Kristinas väg 53, SE-114 28 Stockholm, Sweden, Drottning Kristinas väg 53; Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping, Sweden.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping, Sweden; Wallenberg Initiative Materials Science for Sustainability, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping 60174, Sweden.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, 58183 Linköping, Sweden.
    Korhonen, Leena
    BillerudKorsnäs AB, Frövi SE-718 80, Sweden.
    Yang, Hongli
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping, Sweden.
    Abrahamsson, Tobias
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping, Sweden.
    Ding, Penghui
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping, Sweden.
    Gueskine, Viktor
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping, Sweden; Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping, Sweden.
    Mehandzhiyski, Aleksandar Y.
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping, Sweden.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, 58183 Linköping, Sweden.
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping, Sweden; Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping, Sweden.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping,.
    Crispin, Reverant
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping, Sweden; Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping, Sweden; Wallenberg Initiative Materials Science for Sustainability, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping 60174, Sweden.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping, Sweden; Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping, Sweden; Wallenberg Initiative Materials Science for Sustainability, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping 60174, Sweden.
    Controlling the rate of posolyte degradation in all-quinone aqueous organic redox flow batteries by sulfonated nanocellulose based membranes: The role of crossover and Michael addition2024In: Journal of Energy Storage, ISSN 2352-152X, E-ISSN 2352-1538, Vol. 83, article id 110338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aqueous organic redox flow battery (AORFB) is a technological route towards the large-scale sustainable energy storage. However, several factors need to be controlled to maintain the AORFB performance. Prevention of posolyte and negolyte cross-contamination in asymmetric AORFBs, one of the main causes of capacity decay, relies on their membranes' ability to prevent migration of the redox-active species between the two electrolytes. The barrier properties are often traded for a reduction in ionic conductivity which is crucial to enable the device operation. Another factor greatly affecting quinone-based AORFBs is the Michael addition reaction (MAR) on the charged posolyte, quinone, which has been identified as a major reason for all-quinone AORFBs performance deterioration. Herein, we investigate deterioration scenarios of an all-quinone AORFB using both experimental and computational methods. The study includes a series of membranes based on sulfonated cellulose nanofibrils and different membrane modifications. The layer-by-layer (LbL) surface modifications, i.e. the incorporation of inorganic materials and the reduction of the pore size of the sulfonated cellulose membranes, were all viable routes to reduce the passive diffusion permeability of membranes which correlated to an increased cycling stability of the battery. The kinetics of MAR on quinone was detected using NMR and its impact on the performance fading was modeled computationally. The localization of MAR close to the membrane, which can be assigned to the surface reactivity, affects the diffusion of MAR reagent and the deterioration dynamics of the present all-quinone AORFB.

  • 3.
    Pankratova, M.
    et al.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, 75120, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Miranda, I. P.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, 75120, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Thonig, Danny
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, 75120, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pereiro, M.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, 75120, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sjöqvist, E.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, 75120, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Delin, A.
    Department of Applied Physics, School of Engineering Sciences, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, AlbaNova University Center, 10691, Stockholm, Sweden; Swedish e-Science Research Center (SeRC), KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 10044, Stockholm, Sweden; Wallenberg Initiative Materials Science for Sustainability (WISE), KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 10044, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Scheid, P.
    LPCT, CNRS, UMR 7019, BP 70239, Université de Lorraine, 54506, Vandoeuvre-lés-Nancy Cedex, France; IJL, CNRS, UMR 7198, BP 70239, Université de Lorraine, 54000, Nancy Cedex, France.
    Eriksson, O.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, 75120, Uppsala, Sweden; Wallenberg Initiative Materials Science for Sustainability, Uppsala University, 75121, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bergman, A.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, 75120, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Coupled atomistic spin-lattice simulations of ultrafast demagnetization in 3d ferromagnets2024In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 8138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite decades of research, the role of the lattice and its coupling to the magnetisation during ultrafast demagnetisation processes is still not fully understood. Here we report on studies of both explicit and implicit lattice effects on laser induced ultrafast demagnetisation of bcc Fe and fcc Co. We do this using atomistic spin- and lattice dynamics simulations following a heat-conserving three-temperature model. We show that this type of Langevin-based simulation is able to reproduce observed trends of the ultrafast magnetization dynamics of fcc Co and bcc Fe. The parameters used in our models are all obtained from electronic structure theory, with the exception of the lattice dynamics damping term, where a range of parameters were investigated. It was found that while the explicit spin-lattice coupling in the studied systems does not impact the demagnetisation process notably, the lattice damping has a large influence on the details of the magnetization dynamics. The dynamics of Fe and Co following the absorption of a femtosecond laser pulse are compared with previous results for Ni and similarities and differences in the materials' behavior are analysed. For all elements investigated so far with this model, we obtain a linear relationship between the value of the maximally demagnetized state and the fluence of the laser pulse , which is in agreement with experiments. Moreover, we demonstrate that the demagnetization amplitude is largest for Ni and smallest for Co. This holds over a wide range of the reported electron-phonon couplings, and this demagnetization trend is in agreement with recent experiments.

  • 4.
    Borisov, Vladislav
    et al.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120, Uppsala, Sweden, Box 516.
    Salehi, Nastaran
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120, Uppsala, Sweden, Box 516.
    Pereiro, Manuel
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120, Uppsala, Sweden, Box 516.
    Delin, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120, Uppsala, Sweden, Box 516; Wallenberg Initiative Materials Science for Sustainability, Uppsala University, 75121, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions, Néel skyrmions and V4 magnetic clusters in multiferroic lacunar spinel GaV4S82024In: npj Computational Materials, E-ISSN 2057-3960, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using ab initio density functional theory with static mean-field correlations, we calculate the Heisenberg and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions (DMI) for an atomistic spin Hamiltonian for the lacunar spinel, GaV4S8. The parameters describing these interactions are used in atomistic spin dynamics and micromagnetic simulations. The magnetic properties of the lacunar spinel GaV4S8, a material well-known from experiment to host magnetic skyrmions of Néel character, are simulated with these ab initio calculated parameters. The Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya contribution to the micromagnetic energy is a sum of two Lifshitz invariants, supporting the formation of Néel skyrmions and its symmetry agrees with what is usually expected for C3ν-symmetric systems. There are several conclusions one may draw from this work. One concerns the quantum nature of the magnetism, where we show that the precise magnetic state of the V4 cluster is crucial for understanding quantitatively the magnetic phase diagram. In particular, we demonstrate that a distributed-moment state of each V4 cluster explains well a variety of properties of GaV4S8, such as the band gap, observed Curie temperature and especially the stability of Néel skyrmions in the experimentally relevant temperature and magnetic-field range. In addition, we find that electronic correlations change visibly the calculated value of the DMI.

  • 5.
    Keller, Florian
    et al.
    Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, Ulm University, Oberberghof 7, 89081 Ulm, Germany.
    Döhn, Johannes
    Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, Ulm University, Oberberghof 7, 89081 Ulm, Germany.
    Groß, Axel
    Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, Ulm University, Oberberghof 7, 89081 Ulm, Germany.
    Busch, Michael
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, Ulm University, Oberberghof 7, 89081 Ulm, Germany; Wallenberg Initiative Materials Science for Sustainability (WISE), Luleå University of Technology, 971 87 Luleå, Sweden.
    Exploring the Mechanism of the Electrochemical Polymerization of CO2 to Hard Carbon over CeO2(110)2024In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conversion of CO2 to hard carbon is an interesting technology for the removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Recently, it was shown that CeO2 can selectively catalyze this reaction, but we still lack information regarding the reaction mechanism. Using density functional theory modeling, we explore possible reaction mechanisms that allow for the polymerization of CO2. According to our computations, the reaction is initialized by the adsorption of CO2 in an oxygen vacancy. Owing to the rich defect chemistry of ceria, a large number of suitable sites are available at the surface. C–C bond formation is achieved through an aldol condensation-type mechanism which comprises the electrochemical elimination of water to form a carbene. This carbene then performs a nucleophilic attack on CO2. The reaction mechanism possesses significant similarities to the corresponding reactions in synthetic organic chemistry. Since the mechanism is completely generic, it allows for all relevant steps of the formation of hard carbon like chain growth, chain linkage, and the formation of side chains or aromatic rings. Surprisingly, ceria mainly serves as an anchor for CO2 in an oxygen vacancy, while all other subsequent reaction steps are almost completely independent from the catalyst. These insights are important for the development of novel catalysts for CO2 reduction and may also lead to new reactions for the electrosynthesis of organic molecules. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Khakpour, Reza
    et al.
    Department of Chemistry and Material Science, School of Chemical Engineering, Aalto University, 02150 Espoo, Finland.
    Farshadfar, Kaveh
    Department of Chemistry and Material Science, School of Chemical Engineering, Aalto University, 02150 Espoo, Finland.
    Dong, Si-Thanh
    Synchrotron SOLEIL, Route Departementale 128, l’Orme des Merisiers, 91190 Saint-Aubin, France.
    Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt
    Synchrotron SOLEIL, Route Departementale 128, l’Orme des Merisiers, 91190 Saint-Aubin, France.
    Laasonen, Kari
    Department of Chemistry and Material Science, School of Chemical Engineering, Aalto University, 02150 Espoo, Finland.
    Busch, Michael
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Wallenberg Initiative Materials Science for Sustainability (WISE), Luleå University of Technology, 971 87 Luleå, Sweden.
    Mechanism of CO2 Electroreduction to Multicarbon Products over Iron Phthalocyanine Single-Atom Catalysts2024In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 128, no 14, p. 5867-5877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon dioxide reduction reaction (CO2RR) is a promising method for converting CO2 into value-added products. CO2RR over single-atom catalysts (SACs) is widely known to result in chemical compounds such as carbon monoxide and formic acid that contain only one carbon atom (C1). Indeed, at least two active sites are commonly believed to be required for C–C coupling to synthesize compounds, such as ethanol and propylene (C2+), from CO2. However, experimental evidence suggests that iron phthalocyanine (PcFe), which possesses only a single metal center, can produce a trace amount of C2+ products. To the best of our knowledge, the mechanism by which C2+ products are formed over a SAC such as PcFe is still unknown. Using density functional theory (DFT), we analyzed the mechanism of the CO2RR to C1 and C2+ products over PcFe. Due to the high concentration of bicarbonate at pH 7, CO2RR competes with HCO3– reduction. Our computations indicate that bicarbonate reduction is significantly more favorable. However, the rate of this reaction is influenced by the H3O+ concentration. For the formation of C2+ products, our computations reveal that C–C coupling proceeds through the reaction between in situ-formed CO and PcFe(“0”)–CH2 or PcFe(“-I”)–CH2 intermediates. This reaction step is highly exergonic and requires only low activation energies of 0.44 and 0.24 eV for PcFe(“0”)–CH2 and PcFe(“-I”)–CH2. The DFT results, in line with experimental evidence, suggest that C2+ compounds are produced over PcFe at low potentials whereas CH4 is still the main post-CO product. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Xu, Qichen
    et al.
    Department of Applied Physics, School of Engineering Sciences, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm, Sweden; Swedish e-Science Research Center (SeRC), KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Miranda, I. P.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pereiro, Manuel
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rybakov, Filipp N.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Thonig, Danny
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sjöqvist, Erik
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bessarab, Pavel F.
    Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Linnaeus University, Hus Magna, Kalmar, Sweden; Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.
    Bergman, Anders
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Herman, Pawel
    Division of Computational Science and Technology, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm, Sweden; Swedish e-Science Research Center (SeRC), KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Delin, Anna
    Department of Applied Physics, School of Engineering Sciences, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm, Sweden; Swedish e-Science Research Center (SeRC), KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden; Wallenberg Initiative Materials Science for Sustainability (WISE), KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Metaheuristic conditional neural network for harvesting skyrmionic metastable states2023In: Physical Review Research, E-ISSN 2643-1564, Vol. 5, no 4, article id 043199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a metaheuristic conditional neural-network-based method aimed at identifying physically interest-ing metastable states in a potential energy surface of high rugosity. To demonstrate how this method works, we identify and analyze spin textures with topological charge Q ranging from 1 to -13 (where antiskyrmions have Q < 0) in the Pd/Fe/Ir(111) system, which we model using a classical atomistic spin Hamiltonian based on parameters computed from density functional theory. To facilitate the harvest of relevant spin textures, we make use of the newly developed segment anything model. Spin textures with Q ranging from -3 to -6 are further analyzed using finite-temperature spin-dynamics simulations. We observe that for temperatures up to around 20 K, lifetimes longer than 200 ps are predicted, and that when these textures decay, new topological spin textures are formed. We also find that the relative stability of the spin textures depend linearly on the topological charge, but only when comparing the most stable antiskyrmions for each topological charge. In general, the number of holes (i.e., non-self-intersecting curves that define closed domain walls in the structure) in the spin texture is an important predictor of stability-the more holes, the less stable the texture. Methods for systematic identification and characterization of complex metastable skyrmionic textures-such as the one demonstrated here-are highly relevant for advancements in the field of topological spintronics.

  • 8.
    Ryan, Sinéad A.
    et al.
    JILA, University of Colorado Boulder, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, USA..
    Johnsen, Peter C.
    JILA, University of Colorado Boulder, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, USA..
    Elhanoty, Mohamed F.
    Division of Materials Theory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box-516, SE 75120, Sweden..
    Grafov, Anya
    JILA, University of Colorado Boulder, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, USA..
    Li, Na
    JILA, University of Colorado Boulder, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, USA..
    Delin, Anna
    KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics. Wallenberg Initiative Materials Science for Sustainability, Uppsala University, 75121 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Markou, Anastasios
    Physics Department, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina, Greece; Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, 01187 Dresden, Germany.
    Lesne, Edouard
    Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, 01187 Dresden, Germany.
    Felser, Claudia
    Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, 01187 Dresden, Germany.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Division of Materials Theory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box-516, SE 75120, Sweden; Wallenberg Initiative Materials Science for Sustainability, Uppsala University, 75121 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kapteyn, Henry C.
    JILA, University of Colorado Boulder, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, USA; KMLabs Inc., Boulder, CO 80301, USA.
    Grånäs, Oscar
    Division of Materials Theory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box-516, SE 75120, Sweden.
    Murnane, Margaret M.
    JILA, University of Colorado Boulder, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, USA.
    Optically controlling the competition between spin flips and intersite spin transfer in a Heusler half-metal on sub-100-fs time scales2023In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 9, no 45, p. 1428-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The direct manipulation of spins via light may provide a path toward ultrafast energy-efficient devices. However, distinguishing the microscopic processes that can occur during ultrafast laser excitation in magnetic alloys is challenging. Here, we study the Heusler compound Co2MnGa, a material that exhibits very strong light-induced spin transfers across the entire M-edge. By combining the element specificity of extreme ultraviolet high-harmonic probes with time-dependent density functional theory, we disentangle the competition between three ultrafast light-induced processes that occur in Co2MnGa: same-site Co-Co spin transfer, intersite Co-Mn spin transfer, and ultrafast spin flips mediated by spin-orbit coupling. By measuring the dynamic magnetic asymmetry across the entire M-edges of the two magnetic sublattices involved, we uncover the relative dominance of these processes at different probe energy regions and times during the laser pulse. Our combined approach enables a comprehensive microscopic interpretation of laser-induced magnetization dynamics on time scales shorter than 100 femtoseconds.

  • 9.
    Cardias, Ramon
    et al.
    AlbaNova Univ Ctr, KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Engn Sci, Dept Appl Phys, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Fed Fluminense, Inst Fis, BR-24210346 Niteroi, RJ, Brazil..
    dos Santos Silva, Jhonatan
    Univ Fed Para, Fac Fis, Belem, PA, Brazil.;Inst Fed Educ Ciencia & Tecnol Para, Obidos, PA, Brazil..
    Bergman, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Szilva, Attila
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Kvashnin, Yaroslav O.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Fransson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Klautau, Angela B.
    Univ Fed Para, Fac Fis, Belem, PA, Brazil.;Univ Aveiro, Dept Fis, P-3810183 Aveiro, Portugal..
    Eriksson, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory. Wallenberg Initiative Materials Science for Sustainability (WISE).
    Delin, Anna
    AlbaNova Univ Ctr, KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Engn Sci, Dept Appl Phys, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, E2C, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, SeRC Swedish E Sci Res Ctr, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nordström, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Unraveling the connection between high-order magnetic interactions and local-to-global spin Hamiltonian in noncollinear magnetic dimers2023In: Physical Review B, ISSN 2469-9950, E-ISSN 2469-9969, Vol. 108, no 22, article id 224408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A spin Hamiltonian that characterizes interatomic interactions between spin moments is highly valuable in predicting and comprehending the magnetic properties of materials. Here, we explore a method for explicitly calculating interatomic exchange interactions in noncollinear configurations of magnetic materials considering only a bilinear spin Hamiltonian in a local scenario. Based on density-functional theory calculations of dimers adsorbed on metallic surfaces, and with a focus on the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) which is essential for stabilizing chiral noncollinear magnetic states, we discuss the interpretation of the DMI when decomposed into microscopic electron and spin densities and currents. We clarify the distinct origins of spin currents induced in the system and their connection to the DMI. In addition, we reveal how noncollinearity affects the usual DMI, which is solely induced by spin-orbit coupling, and DMI-like interactions brought about by noncollinearity. We explain how the dependence of the DMI on the magnetic configuration establishes a connection between high-order magnetic interactions, enabling the transition from a local to a global spin Hamiltonian.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 10.
    Cardias, Ramon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics. Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24210-346 Niterói, RJ, Brazil.
    Silva, Jhonatan dos Santos
    Faculdade de Física, Universidade Federal do Pará, 66075-110 Belém, PA, Brazil; Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Pará, 68250-000 Óbidos, PA, Brazil.
    Bergman, Anders
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Szilva, Attila
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kvashnin, Yaroslav O.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fransson, Jonas
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Klautau, Angela B.
    Faculdade de Física, Universidade Federal do Pará, 66075-110 Belém, PA, Brazil; Departamento de Física da Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-183 Aveiro, Portugal.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden; Wallenberg Initiative Materials Science for Sustainability (WISE), Uppsala University Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Delin, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. Wallenberg Initiative Materials Science for Sustainability (WISE).
    Nordström, Lars
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Unraveling the connection between high-order magnetic interactions and local-to-global spin Hamiltonian in noncollinear magnetic dimers2023In: Physical Review B, ISSN 2469-9950, E-ISSN 2469-9969, Vol. 108, no 22, article id 224408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A spin Hamiltonian that characterizes interatomic interactions between spin moments is highly valuable in predicting and comprehending the magnetic properties of materials. Here, we explore a method for explicitly calculating interatomic exchange interactions in noncollinear configurations of magnetic materials considering only a bilinear spin Hamiltonian in a local scenario. Based on density-functional theory calculations of dimers adsorbed on metallic surfaces, and with a focus on the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) which is essential for stabilizing chiral noncollinear magnetic states, we discuss the interpretation of the DMI when decomposed into microscopic electron and spin densities and currents. We clarify the distinct origins of spin currents induced in the system and their connection to the DMI. In addition, we reveal how noncollinearity affects the usual DMI, which is solely induced by spin-orbit coupling, and DMI-like interactions brought about by noncollinearity. We explain how the dependence of the DMI on the magnetic configuration establishes a connection between high-order magnetic interactions, enabling the transition from a local to a global spin Hamiltonian.

  • 11.
    Buchmann, Sebastian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. AIMES – Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences at Karolinska Institutet and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden/ Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stoop, Pepijn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. AIMES – Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences at Karolinska Institutet and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden/ Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Roekevisch, Kim
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. AIMES – Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences at Karolinska Institutet and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden/ Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jain, Saumey
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Kroon, Renee
    Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Müller, Christian
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Zeglio, Erica
    AIMES – Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences at Karolinska Institutet and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden/ Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden/ Wallenberg Initiative Materials Science for Sustainability, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Herland, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. AIMES – Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences at Karolinska Institutet and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden/ Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    In situ functionalization of polar polythiophene based organic electrochemical transistor to interface in vitro modelsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf