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  • 851.
    Turner, Anthony P. F.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Biosensors 90: An introduction1991In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 177-178Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 852.
    Turner, Anthony P. F.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Biosensors 94 — the biosensor trail1994In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 9, no 3, p. i-iiArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the many pleasures of Chairing the World Congress on Biosensors is the chance to visit exciting locations and this years meeting in New Orleans is certainly no exception. In considering what useful contribution I might make in this guest editorial, however, I remembered my first visit to the USA when I discovered the delight of Bostons Freedom Trail. It occurred to met that it would be helpful to create a Biosensors Trail offering some suggested routes through the intense three-day parallel programme.

  • 853.
    Turner, Anthony P. F.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Biosensors: Switching channels makes sense1997In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 387, no 6633, p. 555-557Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 854.
    Turner, Anthony P. F.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Forward2011In: Smart Nanomaterials for Sensor Applications / [ed] Songjun Li, Bentham Science , 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 855.
    Turner, Anthony P. F.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Immunosensors: The next generation1997In: Nature Biotechnology, ISSN 1087-0156, E-ISSN 1546-1696, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 421-421Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 856.
    Turner, Anthony P. F.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Special issue - Selected papers from the Seventh World Congress on Biosensors - Kyoto, Japan - 15-17 May 2002 - Preface2003In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 18, no 5-6, p. 501-501Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 857.
    Turner, Anthony P. F.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Tech.Sight. Biochemistry. Biosensors--sense and sensitivity2000In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 290, no 5495, p. 1315-1317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biosensors are a cunning combination of biological molecules and microelectronics that can be used to measure blood glucose levels, pollutants in the environment or food-borne pathogens in the food supply. In a comprehensive TechView, Anthony Turner takes us on a tour of historical developments and the latest innovations in biosensor research.

  • 858.
    Turner, Anthony P. F.
    et al.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Magan, Naresh
    Cranfield University at Silsoe, UK.
    Electronic noses and disease diagnostics2004In: Nature Reviews Microbiology, ISSN 1740-1526, E-ISSN 1740-1534, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 161-166Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid developments in sensor technology have facilitated the production of devices known as electronic noses - that can detect and discriminate the production profiles of volatile compounds from microbial infections in situ. Such qualitative and semi-quantitative approaches could have a significant role in the early diagnosis and detection of microbial diseases. Using artificial intelligence and web-based knowledge systems, electronic noses might also have a valuable role in monitoring disease epidemiology

  • 859.
    Turner, Anthony P. F.
    et al.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Tang, A. X. J.
    Cranfield University, Silsoe, Bedfordshire, UK.
    Biosensors and Bioelectronics' impact grows2005In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 839-839Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 860.
    Turner, Anthony
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Parlak, Onur
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Towards cholesterol biosensors based on goldnanoparticle-functionalised graphene oxide by direct electron transfer2012In: Label-free technologies, Elsevier, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 861.
    Turner, Anthony P.F.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Paper potentiostats for bioelectrochemistry2015In: Program of the XXIII International Symposium on Bioelectrochemistry and Bioenergetics of the Bioelectrochemical Society. 14-18 June, 2015. Malmö, Sweden, Lausenne: Bioelectrochemical Society , 2015, p. 166-166Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation will focus on meeting current challenges in decentralised diagnostics by using amperometric and votammetric systems printed on paper or plastic substrates to deliver inexpensive instruments for a wide range of electroanalytical applications. This approach combines the sophistication of advanced electrochemical biosensors with a simple manufacturing technique to create a use-and-throw instrument. A key driver for next-generation electroanalytical devices is rapid, convenient and easy ways to measure our body chemistries at the genomic, proteomic and metabolomic levels. We are targeting fully-integrated platforms such as all-printed biosensing systems, integrated sampling and wearable devices. Further development will result in cost reduction and a diversity of formats such as point-of-care tests, smart packaging, telemetric paper strips and print-on-demand analytical devices. These platforms form workhorses in our hands for a variety of diagnostic systems including enzyme electrodes for multi-parametric diabetes monitoring and for the management of chronic kidney disease, electrochemical sensors for enzymes such as G6-P or amylase (a marker for stress), label-free affinity sensors for cancer markers and heart disease, aptasensors for cancer cells, DNA Sensors and robust devices based on imprinted and smart polymers. Using these technologies, we envision over-the-counter paper instruments for self-diagnosis of common diseases such as diabetes, kidney disease and urinary tract infection; inexpensive devices for use by caregivers or paramedics such as the ”Stressometer” or heart attack indicators; home kits to support people after transplant surgery or cancer treatment, smart cartons for pharmaceuticals; pocket tests for allergens, food toxicity, drinking water etc. and strips or patches that communicate with mobile telecommunications. Realisation of these paradigm-changing new products requires the effective harnessing of emerging technology, inspired vision from clinical partners or others “users” and leading-edge engineering to design and produce functional systems in appropriate volumes at the right cost.

  • 862.
    Turner, Anthony
    et al.
    University of Cranfield, UK.
    Poma, Alessandro
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Guerreiro, Antonio
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Whitcombe, Michael
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Piletska, Elana
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Piletsky, Sergey
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Solid-Phase Synthesis of Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Nanoparticles with a Reusable Template–“Plastic Antibodies"2013In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 23, no 22, p. 2821-2827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are generic alternatives to antibodies in sensors, diagnostics, and separations. To displace biomolecules without radical changes in infrastructure in device manufacture, MIPs should share their characteristics (solubility, size, specifi city and affinity, localized binding domain) whilst maintaining the advantages of MIPs (low-cost, short development time, and high stability) hence the interest in MIP nanoparticles. Herein, a reusable solid-phase template approach is reported (fully compatible with automation) for the synthesis of MIP nanoparticles and their precise manufacture using a prototype automated UV photochemical reactor. Batches of nanoparticles (30–400 nm) with narrow size distributions imprinted with: melamine (= 60 nm, K d = 6.3 × 10 8 M ), vancomycin ( d = 250 nm, K d = 3.4 ×10− 9 M ), a peptide ( d = 350 nm, K d = 4.8 × 10 8 M ) and proteins have been produced. The instrument uses a column packed with glass beads, bearing the template. Process parameters are under computer control, requiring minimal manual intervention. For the fi rst time, the reliable re-use of molecular templates is demonstrated in the synthesis of MIPs (≥ 30 batches of nanoMIPs without loss of performance). NanoMIPs are produced template-free and the solid-phase acts both as template and affi nity separation medium.

  • 863.
    Turner, Anthony
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sebastian-Avila, J. L.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Samitier, J.
    Prieto-Simon, B.
    Aptamer-based electrochemical assay fordetection of Salmonella typhimurium2013In: BioSensing Technologies, 2013 / [ed] Richard Luxton, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2013, p. P 214-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 864.
    Turner, Anthony
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sekretaryova, Alina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karyakin, Arkady
    Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia.
    Electrochemicalsensing platform based on sol-gel/phenothiazine/enzyme composite films2013In: Advanced Materials World Congress, 2013, VBRI , 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 865.
    Turner, Anthony
    et al.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Sergey, Piletsky
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Molecular Imprinting of Polymers2006Book (Refereed)
  • 866.
    Turner, Anthony
    et al.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Sergey, Piletsky
    Molecularly imprinted polymers – a collective vision2006In: Molecular Imprinting of Polymers / [ed] Piletsky, Sergey and AnthonyTurner, Landes Bioscience , 2006, p. 64-79Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 867.
    Turner, Anthony
    et al.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Sergey, Piletsky
    New generation of chemical sensors based on Molecularly Imprinted Polymers2006In: Molecular Imprinting of Polymers / [ed] Piletsky, Sergey and Turner, Anthony, Landes Bioscience , 2006, p. 64-79Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 868.
    Turner, Anthony
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Torrens del Valle, M.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ortiz, M.
    O'Sullivan, Ciara
    Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Spain.
    Development of alternative for carbon surface functionalisation with diazonium derivative andits application on DNA and protein detections2013In: Doctoral Days, 2013, Tarragona, Spain: Universitat Rovira i Virgili , 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 869.
    Turner, Anthony
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Torréns del Valle, Mabel
    Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Spain.
    Oritz, M.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    O’Sullivan, Ciara
    Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Spain.
    Development of a novel route for surface functionalisation and itsapplication in electrochemical genosensing2013In: BioSensing Technologies, 2013 / [ed] Richard Luxton, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2013, p. P 211-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 870.
    Turner, Anthony
    et al.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Yevdokimov, Yu.M.
    Advances in Biosensors 3:  A Russian Perspective1995Book (Refereed)
  • 871.
    Turner, Anthony
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zhybak, M.
    Dempsey, E.
    Korpan, Y.
    Ammonium IonNanocomposite Sensor Fabricated at Copper-Plated/Nafion/PolyanilineScreen-Printed Carbon Electrodes2013In: Recent Advances in Nanosensorsfor Mono- and Multi-Target Assays / [ed] Y.Korpan, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 872.
    TURNER, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    AMPEROMETRIC BIOSENSORS BASED ON MEDIATOR-MODIFIED ELECTRODES1988In: Methods in Enzymology, ISSN 0076-6879, E-ISSN 1557-7988, Vol. 137, p. 90-103Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 873.
    TURNER, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    AMPEROMETRIC BIOSENSORS BASED ON MODIFIED POROUS GRAPHITE-ELECTRODES in ANNALS OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, vol 501, issue , pp 551-5521987In: ANNALS OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Blackwell Publishing Ltd , 1987, Vol. 501, p. 551-552Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 874.
    Turner, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Biographical-Item: Obituary - Prof. Dr Dr h.c. mult. Wolfgang Gopel in BIOSENSORS and BIOELECTRONICS, vol 15, issue 08-jul, pp 331-3322000Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 875.
    Turner, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Biosensors 2000: The Sixth World Congress on Biosensors2001In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 16, no 12-sep, p. 609-609Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 876.
    Turner, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Biosensors 2004: The Eighth World Congress on Biosensors, 24-26 May 2004, Granada, Spain2005In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 1459-1460Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 877.
    Turner, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Biosensors 2004: The Eighth World Congress on Biosensors, 24-26 May 2004, Granada, Spain2005In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 1895-1896Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 878.
    Turner, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Biosensors: A western-European perspective. in ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, vol 213, issue , pp1997In: ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, AMER CHEMICAL SOC , 1997, Vol. 213Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 879.
    Turner, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Biosensors and bioelectronics 20 years on2005In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 20, no 12, p. 2387-2387Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 880.
    Turner, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Biosensors for environmental monitoring: A report on the 5th European Workshop on Biosensors for Environmental Monitoring and Stability of Biosensors, held in Freising, Germany, 28-30 May 19971997In: TrAC. Trends in analytical chemistry, ISSN 0165-9936, E-ISSN 1879-3142, Vol. 16, no 7, p. R8-R9Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 881.
    Turner, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Biosensors: Realities and aspirations1997In: Annali di Chimica, ISSN 0003-4592, E-ISSN 1612-8877, Vol. 87, no 04-mar, p. 255-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glucose biosensors have proved an enormous success and are used by a growing number of people with diabetes throughout the world. There are several other notable biosensor developments that are already having an impact on analytical science, but the vast majority of possibilities remain restricted to the realm of academic papers. Generic goals may be identified which underpin more applied biosensor programmes and tackle some of the principal hurdles to the widespread adoption of biosensor technology for analysis. The design of integrated systems, approaches to patterning sensitive elements and methods to improve the sensitivity, stability and selectivity of biosensors are key areas which are being tackled in our laboratories. This review considers some recent progress under each of these headings and speculates on the socio-economic impact of success.

  • 882.
    TURNER, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    BIOSENSORS-94 - A PREVIEW OF THE THIRD-WORLD CONGRESS ON BIOSENSORS1994In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 9, no 2, p. R10-R12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 883.
    TURNER, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    CHEMICAL SENSORS FOR INVIVO MONITORING1993In: Analusis, ISSN 1618-2642, E-ISSN 1618-2650, Vol. 21, no 2, p. M17-M19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    European scientists have worked together for four years in a concerted effort to overcome the problems associated with operating chemical sensors inside the body. The rewards for successfully imitating the homeostatic mechanisms which monitor and control the chemical composition and reactions within our bodies are enormous, but the complexity ot the task has engaged the efforts of 30 European laboratories covering a wide range of disciplines.

  • 884.
    TURNER, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    CURRENT TRENDS IN BIOSENSOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT1989In: SENSORS AND ACTUATORS, ISSN 0250-6874, Vol. 17, no 04-mar, p. 433-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 885.
    TURNER, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    ELECTROCHEMICAL SENSORS FOR CONTINUOUS MONITORING DURING SURGERY AND INTENSIVE-CARE1995In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 39, p. 15-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current state of development of electrochemical sensors and biosensors for continuous use during surgery and intensive care is briefly reviewed with an emphasis on recent developments. The clinical usefulness of invasive and non-invasive sensors is discussed. Recent advances in the design of electrochemical sensors and experience with ex vivo and in vivo applications are described. The importance of developing appropriate fabrication technology is emphasised in order to meet the demand for reliable and reproducible analytical devices.

  • 886.
    TURNER, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    REDOX MEDIATORS AND THEIR APPLICATION IN AMPEROMETRIC SENSORS in SELECTIVE ELECTRODE REVIEWS, vol 10, issue 1, pp 37-381988In: SELECTIVE ELECTRODE REVIEWS, PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD , 1988, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 37-38Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 887.
    TURNER, APF
    et al.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    ALLEN, M
    ; .
    SCHNEIDER, BH
    ; .
    SWAIN, A
    ; .
    TAYLOR, F
    ; .
    AN INEXPENSIVE METHOD FOR ULTRA-RAPID DETECTION OF MICROBIAL-CONTAMINATION IN INDUSTRIAL FLUIDS1989In: International Biodeterioration, ISSN 0265-3036, E-ISSN 1878-2736, Vol. 25, no 03-jan, p. 137-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 888.
    TURNER, APF
    et al.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    ASTON, WJ
    UNIV OXFORD,INORGAN CHEM LAB,OXFORD OX1 3QR,ENGLAND; SUNDERLAND POLYTECH,DEPT BIOL,SUNDERLAND SR1 3SD,ENGLAND; .
    HIGGINS, IJ
    UNIV OXFORD,INORGAN CHEM LAB,OXFORD OX1 3QR,ENGLAND; SUNDERLAND POLYTECH,DEPT BIOL,SUNDERLAND SR1 3SD,ENGLAND; .
    BELL, JM
    UNIV OXFORD,INORGAN CHEM LAB,OXFORD OX1 3QR,ENGLAND; SUNDERLAND POLYTECH,DEPT BIOL,SUNDERLAND SR1 3SD,ENGLAND; .
    COLBY, J
    UNIV OXFORD,INORGAN CHEM LAB,OXFORD OX1 3QR,ENGLAND; SUNDERLAND POLYTECH,DEPT BIOL,SUNDERLAND SR1 3SD,ENGLAND; .
    DAVIS, G
    UNIV OXFORD,INORGAN CHEM LAB,OXFORD OX1 3QR,ENGLAND; SUNDERLAND POLYTECH,DEPT BIOL,SUNDERLAND SR1 3SD,ENGLAND; .
    HILL, HAO
    UNIV OXFORD,INORGAN CHEM LAB,OXFORD OX1 3QR,ENGLAND; SUNDERLAND POLYTECH,DEPT BIOL,SUNDERLAND SR1 3SD,ENGLAND; .
    CARBON-MONOXIDE - ACCEPTOR OXIDOREDUCTASE FROM PSEUDOMONAS-THERMOCARBOXYDOVORANS STRAIN-C2 AND ITS USE IN A CARBON-MONOXIDE SENSOR1984In: Analytica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0003-2670, E-ISSN 1873-4324, Vol. 163, no SEP, p. 161-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 889.
    TURNER, APF
    et al.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    ASTON, WJ
    UNIV OXFORD,INORGAN CHEM LAB,OXFORD OX1 3QR,ENGLAND; .
    HIGGINS, IJ
    UNIV OXFORD,INORGAN CHEM LAB,OXFORD OX1 3QR,ENGLAND; .
    DAVIS, G
    UNIV OXFORD,INORGAN CHEM LAB,OXFORD OX1 3QR,ENGLAND; .
    HILL, HAO
    UNIV OXFORD,INORGAN CHEM LAB,OXFORD OX1 3QR,ENGLAND; .
    APPLIED ASPECTS OF BIOELECTROCHEMISTRY - FUEL-CELLS, SENSORS, AND BIOORGANIC SYNTHESIS1982In: Biotechnology and Bioengineering, ISSN 0006-3592, E-ISSN 1097-0290, p. 401-412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 890.
    TURNER, APF
    et al.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    BANNISTER, JV
    CRANFIELD INST TECHNOL,CTR BIOTECHNOL,CRANFIELD MK43 0AL,BEDS,ENGLAND; UNIV NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE,NEWCASTLE TYNE NE1 7RU,TYNE and WEAR,ENGLAND; .
    BIRCH, SW
    CRANFIELD INST TECHNOL,CTR BIOTECHNOL,CRANFIELD MK43 0AL,BEDS,ENGLAND; UNIV NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE,NEWCASTLE TYNE NE1 7RU,TYNE and WEAR,ENGLAND; .
    CARDOSI, MF
    CRANFIELD INST TECHNOL,CTR BIOTECHNOL,CRANFIELD MK43 0AL,BEDS,ENGLAND; UNIV NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE,NEWCASTLE TYNE NE1 7RU,TYNE and WEAR,ENGLAND; .
    DOWNS, MEA
    CRANFIELD INST TECHNOL,CTR BIOTECHNOL,CRANFIELD MK43 0AL,BEDS,ENGLAND; UNIV NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE,NEWCASTLE TYNE NE1 7RU,TYNE and WEAR,ENGLAND; .
    HIGGINS, IJ
    CRANFIELD INST TECHNOL,CTR BIOTECHNOL,CRANFIELD MK43 0AL,BEDS,ENGLAND; UNIV NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE,NEWCASTLE TYNE NE1 7RU,TYNE and WEAR,ENGLAND; .
    JOHANNSSON, A
    CRANFIELD INST TECHNOL,CTR BIOTECHNOL,CRANFIELD MK43 0AL,BEDS,ENGLAND; UNIV NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE,NEWCASTLE TYNE NE1 7RU,TYNE and WEAR,ENGLAND; .
    MCNEIL, CJ
    CRANFIELD INST TECHNOL,CTR BIOTECHNOL,CRANFIELD MK43 0AL,BEDS,ENGLAND; UNIV NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE,NEWCASTLE TYNE NE1 7RU,TYNE and WEAR,ENGLAND; .
    STANLEY, CJ
    CRANFIELD INST TECHNOL,CTR BIOTECHNOL,CRANFIELD MK43 0AL,BEDS,ENGLAND; UNIV NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE,NEWCASTLE TYNE NE1 7RU,TYNE and WEAR,ENGLAND; .
    WARNER, PJ
    CRANFIELD INST TECHNOL,CTR BIOTECHNOL,CRANFIELD MK43 0AL,BEDS,ENGLAND; UNIV NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE,NEWCASTLE TYNE NE1 7RU,TYNE and WEAR,ENGLAND; .
    ENZYME AND AFFINITY ELECTROCHEMICAL SENSING SYSTEMS in ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, vol 196, issue , pp 93-ANYL1988In: ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, AMER CHEMICAL SOC , 1988, Vol. 196, p. 93-ANYLConference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 891.
    Turner, APF
    et al.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Chen, BN
    Cranfield University, Institute Biosci and Technology, Cranfield MK43 0AL, Beds, England; .
    Piletsky, SA
    Cranfield University, Institute Biosci and Technology, Cranfield MK43 0AL, Beds, England; .
    In vitro diagnostics in diabetes: Meeting the challenge1999In: Clinical Chemistry, ISSN 0009-9147, E-ISSN 1530-8561, Vol. 45, no 9, p. 1596-1601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diabetes is one of the leading causes of death and disability in the world. There is a large population in the world suffering from this disease, and the healthcare costs increase every year. It is a chronic disorder resulting from insulin deficiency and hyperglycemia and has a high risk of development of complications for the eyes, kidneys, peripheral nerves, heart, and blood vessels. Quick diagnosis and early prevention are critical for the control of the disease status. Traditional biosensors such as glucose meters and glycohemoglobin test kits are widely used in vitro for this purpose because they are the two major indicators directly involved in diabetes diagnosis and long-term management. The market size and huge demand for these tests make it a model disease to develop new approaches to biosensors. In this review, we briefly summarize the principles of biosensors, the current commercial devices available for glucose and glycohemoglobin measurements, and the recent work in the area of artificial receptors and the potential for the development of new devices for diabetes specifically connected with in vitro monitoring of glucose and glycohemoglobin HbA(1c). (C) 1999 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  • 892.
    TURNER, APF
    et al.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    DCOSTA, EJ
    ; .
    HIGGINS, IJ
    ; .
    ENZYMATIC ANALYSIS USING QUINOPROTEIN DEHYDROGENASES1987In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 501, p. 283-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 893.
    TURNER, APF
    et al.
    University of Portsmouth, UK.
    HIGGINS, IJ
    UNIV KENT,BIOL LAB,CANTERBURY CT2 7NJ,KENT,ENGLAND; .
    GULL, K
    UNIV KENT,BIOL LAB,CANTERBURY CT2 7NJ,KENT,ENGLAND; .
    MICROBODIES IN CLADOSPORIUM-(AMORPHOTHECA) RESINAE GROWN ON GLUCOSE AND NORMAL-ALKANES1980In: FEMS Microbiology Letters, ISSN 0378-1097, E-ISSN 1574-6968, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 115-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 894.
    TURNER, APF
    et al.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    PICKUP, JC
    GUYS HOSP,SCH MED,DEPT CHEM PATHOL,LONDON SE1 9RT,ENGLAND; .
    DIABETES-MELLITUS - BIOSENSORS FOR RESEARCH AND MANAGEMENT1985In: BIOSENSORS, ISSN 0265-928X, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 85-115Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 895.
    TURNER, APF
    et al.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    RAMSAY, G
    ; .
    HIGGINS, IJ
    ; .
    APPLICATIONS OF ELECTRON-TRANSFER BETWEEN BIOLOGICAL-SYSTEMS AND ELECTRODES1983In: Biochemical Society Transactions, ISSN 0300-5127, E-ISSN 1470-8752, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 445-448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 896.
    TURNER, APF
    et al.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    SWAIN, A
    ; .
    COMMERCIAL PERSPECTIVES FOR DIAGNOSTICS USING BIOSENSOR TECHNOLOGIES1988In: AMERICAN BIOTECHNOLOGY LABORATORY, ISSN 0749-3223, Vol. 6, no 8, p. 10-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 897.
    Uludag, Yildiz
    et al.
    Cranfield Health, Cranfield University, Silsoe, UK.
    Piletsky, Sergey A.
    Cranfield Health, Cranfield University, Silsoe, UK .
    Turner, Anthony P. F.
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Cooper, Matthew A.
    Akubio Ltd, Cambridge, UK.
    Piezoelectric sensors based on molecular imprinted polymers for detection of low molecular mass analytes2007In: The FEBS Journal, ISSN 1742-464X, E-ISSN 1742-4658, Vol. 274, no 21, p. 5471-5480Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biomimetic recognition elements employed for the detection of analytes are commonly based on proteinaceous affibodies, immunoglobulins, single-chain and single-domain antibody fragments or aptamers. The alternative supra-molecular approach using a molecularly imprinted polymer now has proven utility in numerous applications ranging from liquid chromatography to bioassays. Despite inherent advantages compared with biochemical/biological recognition (which include robustness, storage endurance and lower costs) there are few contributions that describe quantitative analytical applications of molecularly imprinted polymers for relevant small molecular mass compounds in real-world samples. There is, however, significant literature describing the use of low-power, portable piezoelectric transducers to detect analytes in environmental monitoring and other application areas. Here we review the combination of molecularly imprinted polymers as recognition elements with piezoelectric biosensors for quantitative detection of small molecules. Analytes are classified by type and sample matrix presentation and various molecularly imprinted polymer synthetic fabrication strategies are also reviewed.

  • 898.
    Uzun, Lokman
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Hacettepe University, Beytepe, Ankara, Turkey.
    Rezai, Babak
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran Iran.
    Garipcan, Bora
    Boğaziçi University, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Reactive electrospun nanofibres as a versatile functional material on electrode surfaces for impedimetric sensor design2016In: Proceedings and Abstract Book : American Advanced Materials Congress 4-9 December 2016 / [ed] Ashutosh Tiwari, India: VBRI Press , 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrospinning is a highly attractive technique to incorporate functional materials into nanofibre structures. In this process, the polymer structure is transformed from a bulk to a fibrous network by means of a high voltage applied between two-electrode systems.1 The functionality of the bulk polymers defines the functionality of the final nanofibres as well, which is a major limitation for producing ease-to-use electrospun nanofibres.2 For this reason, researchers have focused on reactive electrospinning to produce functional nanofibres with the desired properties. For this aim, an extra step, oligomerisation, is applied to elongate the polymeric chain just before the electrospinning step. In addition, it is possible to adjust the functionality of the final fibres by using an appropriate initial functional monomer.3 Herein, we focused our attention on developing reactive electrospun nanofibres for designing a versatile functional material on electrode surfaces. We have developed a reactive electrospinning process for a functional monomer, glycidyl methacrylate, to obtain epoxy-containing fibres that are ready for immobilisation of a recognition element directly on the surface. After that, Anti-albumin antibody molecules were immobilised on the surface as a recognition element. Then the electrodes were characterised by scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The factors affecting albumin recognition were also evaluated by varying the dipping time, pH, and concentration. The results indicated that anti-albumin antibody molecules were successfully immobilised on the fibres and play an efficient recognition role for albumin detection in aqueous solutions as well as in human serum. In conclusion, the material and method developed here shows promise for the development of versatile sensor platforms, due to its excellent performance, reproducibility and low cost.

  • 899.
    Uzun, Lokman
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Hacettepe University, Turkey.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Molecularly-imprinted polymer sensors: realising their potential2016In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 76, p. 131-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In parallel with recent developments in communications, nanotechnology and materials sciences, there has been extraordinary growth in the area of biosensors, with almost half of the total number of papers ever published (1962-2015) appearing in the last five-years (2010-2015). Molecular imprinting offers a route to the creation of specific and selective cavities in a 3D-polymeric network, which are complementary not only to the size and shape of a target species, but also provide interaction points and a coordination sphere around the template molecule. Given the challenges facing biosensor technologists, it is natural that this approach to create potentially highly stable synthetic ligands as an alternative to, or to compliment natural receptors, should emerge as a key line of interdisciplinary research. Despite the profuse amount of recent literature on molecularly-imprinted polymers (MIPs) and some limited commercial activity, these promising materials still need to overcome some limitations before taking their place in analytical market. In this review, we have focused on the most promising advances in MIP-based biosensors to illustrate how close to market they really are. We present our material under five main sections covering computational design, polymerisation strategies, material combinations, recent sensor designs and manufacturing issues. Each section provides technical details and evaluates the effect on sensor performance. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 900.
    V. Piletska, Elena
    et al.
    Cranfield University, Bedford MK45 4DT, England.
    R. Guerreiro, Antonio
    Cranfield University, Bedford MK45 4DT, England.
    Romero-Guerra, Maria
    Cranfield University, Bedford MK45 4DT, England.
    Chianella, Iva
    Cranfield University, Bedford MK45 4DT, England.
    P. F. Turner, Anthony
    Cranfield University, UK.
    A. Piletsky, Sergey
    Cranfield University, Bedford MK45 4DT, England.
    Design of molecular imprinted polymers compatible with aqueous environment2008In: Analytica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0003-2670, E-ISSN 1873-4324, Vol. 607, no 1, p. 54-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main problem of poor water compatibility of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) was addressed in examples describing design of synthetic receptors with high affinity for drugs of abuse. An extensive potentiometric titration of 10 popular functional monomers and corresponding imprinted and Blank polymers was conducted in order to evaluate the subtleties of functional groups ionisation under aqueous conditions. It was found that polymers prepared using 2-trifluoromethacrylic acid (TFMAA) in combination with toluene as porogen possess superior properties which make them suitable for effective template recognition in water. The potential impact of phase separation during polymerisation on formation of high quality imprints has been discussed. Three drugs of abuse such as cocaine, deoxyephedrine and methadone were used as template models in polymer preparation for the practical validation of obtained results. The polymer testing showed that synthesized molecularly imprinted polymers have high affinity and selectivity for corresponding templates in aqueous environment, with imprinting factors of 2.6 for cocaine and 1.4 for methadone and deoxyephedrine. Corresponding Blank polymers were unable to differentiate between analytes, suggesting that imprinting phenomenon was responsible for the recognition properties. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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