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  • 51.
    Bhuiyan, Iftekhar Uddin
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Kemiteknik.
    Mouzon, Johanne
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser.
    Schröppel, Birgit
    Natural and Medical Sciences Institute (NMI), University of Tübingen.
    Kaech, Andres
    Center for Microscopy and Image Analysis, University of Zurich.
    Dobryden, Illia
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Materialvetenskap.
    Forsmo, Seija P.E.
    LKAB, Research & Development, 983 81 Malmberget.
    Hedlund, Jonas
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser.
    Microstructure of Bentonite in Iron Ore Green Pellets2014Inngår i: Microscopy and Microanalysis, ISSN 1431-9276, E-ISSN 1435-8115, Vol. 20, nr 1, s. 33-41Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Sodium-activated calcium bentonite is used as a binder in iron ore pellets and is known to increase strength of both wet and dry iron ore green pellets. In this article, the microstructure of bentonite in magnetite pellets is revealed for the first time using scanning electron microscopy. The microstructure of bentonite in wet and dry iron ore pellets, as well as in distilled water, was imaged by various imaging techniques (e.g., imaging at low voltage with monochromatic and decelerated beam or low loss backscattered electrons) and cryogenic methods (i.e., high pressure freezing and plunge freezing in liquid ethane). In wet iron ore green pellets, clay tactoids (stacks of parallel primary clay platelets) were very well dispersed and formed a voluminous network occupying the space available between mineral particles. When the pellet was dried, bentonite was drawn to the contact points between the particles and formed solid bridges, which impart strength to the solid compact.

  • 52.
    Bi, Ran
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för kemivetenskap (CHE), Fiber- och polymerteknologi, Träkemi och massateknologi. KTH, Skolan för kemivetenskap (CHE), Centra, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Huang, Shan
    KTH, Skolan för kemivetenskap (CHE), Fiber- och polymerteknologi, Träkemi och massateknologi. Linnaus University, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, Skolan för kemivetenskap (CHE), Fiber- och polymerteknologi, Träkemi och massateknologi. KTH, Skolan för kemivetenskap (CHE), Centra, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Isolation of exceedingly low oxygen consuming fungal strains able to utilize lignin as carbon sourceInngår i: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 53.
    Bi, Ran
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för kemivetenskap (CHE), Fiber- och polymerteknologi, Träkemi och massateknologi. KTH, Skolan för kemivetenskap (CHE), Centra, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Spadiut, Oliver
    KTH, Skolan för bioteknologi (BIO), Glykovetenskap. KTH, Skolan för kemivetenskap (CHE), Centra, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Brumer, Harry
    KTH, Skolan för bioteknologi (BIO), Glykovetenskap. KTH, Skolan för kemivetenskap (CHE), Centra, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, Skolan för kemivetenskap (CHE), Fiber- och polymerteknologi, Träkemi och massateknologi. KTH, Skolan för kemivetenskap (CHE), Centra, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Isolation and identification of microorganisms from soil able to live on lignin as acarbon source and to produce enzymes which cleave the β-o-4 bond in a lignin model compound2012Inngår i: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787, Vol. 46, nr 3-4, s. 227-242Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Several strains of fungi were isolated and identified from Scandinavian soil using agar plates with lignin as a carbon source. The strains grew significantly faster on this medium than on control plates without lignin. Different types of technical lignins were used, some of which contained trace amounts of sugars, even if the increased growth rate seemed not related to the sugar content. Some strains were cultivated in shaking flask cultures with lignin as a carbon source, with lignin apparently consumed by microbes - while accumulation of the microorganism biomass occurred. The cell-free filtrates of these cultures could reduce the apparent molecular weights of lignosulphonates, while the culture filtrate of one strain could cleave the beta-O-4 bond in a lignin model compound.

  • 54. Biasi, Pierdomenico
    et al.
    Serna, Juan Garcia
    Salmi, Tapio O.
    Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Department of Chemical Engineering, Process Chemistry Centre (PCC), Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering, Åbo Akademi University, ÅBO-TURKU, Finland.
    Hydrogen Peroxide Direct Synthesis: Enhancement of Selectivity and Production with non-Conventional Methods2013Inngår i: ICHEAP-11: 11TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON CHEMICAL AND PROCESS ENGINEERING, PTS 1-4 / [ed] Pierucci, S, Klemes, JJ, AIDIC - associazione italiana di ingegneria chimica, 2013, s. 673-678Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The present work is part of a comprehensive study on the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide in different fields, from chemistry to chemical engineering. Working on the different fields of the direct synthesis gave the possibility to look at the results and the challenges from different viewpoints. Here was investigated one parameter that enhances the direct synthesis. The H-2/Pd ratio is the key parameter that has to be investigated and optimize to enhance the hydrogen peroxide direct synthesis. Two reactors were built to study deeply the H-2/Pd ratio and to demonstrate how this parameter can affect the direct synthesis both in batch and continuous reactor with non-conventional experiments/methods. 1) A batch reactor was utilized as a "starving reactor" to enhance the productivity of hydrogen peroxide and to try to keep constant the selectivity. The starving method consists in refilling the hydrogen when it is consumed in the reactor. 2) A trickle bed reactor was utilized with a gradient of catalyst along the reactor to maximize both production and selectivity of hydrogen peroxide. The distribution of the catalyst along the bed gave the possibility to significantly improve the selectivity and the production of hydrogen peroxide (up to 0.5% in selected conditions). Higher production rate and selectivity were found when the catalyst concentration decreases along the bed from the top to the bottom compared to the uniformly dispersed catalyst. Selectivity in the batch reactor was enhanced by 5% and in the continuous reactor of 10%. The non-conventional experimental methods have been found to be novelty concepts to enhance the hydrogen peroxide direct synthesis.

  • 55.
    BIN HANNAN, KHALID
    KTH, Skolan för kemivetenskap (CHE).
    Organiska kväveföreningars påverkan på vätebehandlingsanläggningens prestanda2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 poäng / 30 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    Various distillates are treated with hydrogen gas during hydrotreatment in the presence of catalyst in order to reduce the sulfur and aromatic content of the product. Optimal hydrotreater performance is essential for producing Nynas specialty oils, in order to fulfill the planned production volume and to meet the product specification. Loss of catalyst activity is inevitable during the production. To adjust for the impact of catalyst deactivation, different process variables are manipulated. Different distillates affect the catalyst in different ways due to the variation in distillate composition. Distillates with higher organic nitrogen content and running at a lower temperature tend to deactivate the catalyst more due to the adsorption of nitrogen compounds on the active sites of the catalyst and their slow nature of desorption.

    In this master thesis, different catalyst deactivation mechanisms with a focus on nitrogen deactivation have been studied. Since nitrogen is not normally measured at Nynas, nitrogen content of different distillates and products and how these values change during operation was not known. Different distillates, blend of distillates and different products were measured to estimate roughly the typical nitrogen value of the distillates and products. The temperature data inside the reactors were analyzed to calculate and plot WABT (weighted average bed temperature) during different product runs and to see whether there is a correlation between the nitrogen content of the feed and operation severity (increase in WABT). Historical process data from hydrotreater unit 2 (mostly from 2013-2014) were analyzed with a view to finding out signs of catalyst deactivation. Similar product runs were also analyzed and compared to see how the catalysts performed at different periods of time. A kinetic model, based on HDS kinetics, has been used for following up two product runs. To do so, sulfur content of the feed and product were measured. Aromatic content of the product was also measured to see whether the product was on specification.

    .From the calculation and plotting of WABTs, it could be seen that there is an increase in WABT during the product runs operating at lower temperatures and with higher nitrogen content. From the comparison of two P3 product runs at two different time periods, it could be seen that ∆T development over one bed (amount of reaction over the bed) was much lower at one time. This can possibly be a sign of catalyst deactivation since it contributed to lesser amount of reaction over the bed.

    From the calculations by using the kinetic model, it could be seen that the actual temperatures were higher than the predicted temperatures. The increase in WABTs could also be noticed. These observations can possibly be coupled with nitrogen deactivation of the catalysts.  However, more tests are required to verify whether the temperature differences were significant or not. Other parameters which are also important from product selling point of view such as viscosity, color, flash point, acid number etc. and have not been covered in this degree project need to be taken into consideration before making further conclusions.

  • 56.
    Biollaz, S.
    et al.
    PSI.
    Calbry-Muzyka, A.
    PSI.
    Rodriguez, S.
    PSI.
    Sárossy, Z.
    DTU.
    Ravenni, G.
    DTU.
    Fateev, A.
    DTU.
    Seiser, R.
    UCSD.
    Eberhard, M.
    KIT.
    Kolb, T.
    KIT.
    Heikkinen, N.
    VTT.
    Reinikainen, M.
    VTT.
    Brown, R.C.
    Iowa State University, USA.
    Johnston, P.A.
    Iowa State University, USA.
    Nau, P.
    DLR.
    Geigle, K.P.
    DLR.
    Kutne, P.
    DLR.
    Işık-Gülsaç, I.
    TÜBİTAK Mam.
    Aksoy, P.
    TÜBİTAK Mam.
    Çetin, Y.
    TÜBİTAK Mam.
    Sarıoğlan, A.
    TÜBİTAK Mam.
    Tsekos, C.
    Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    de Jong, W.
    Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Benedikt, F.
    TU Wien, Austria.
    Hofbauer, H.
    TU Wien, Austria.
    Waldheim, L.
    SFC.
    Engvall, K.
    Royal Institute of Technology.
    Neubauer, Y.
    Technical University of Berlin, Germany.
    Funcia, I.
    CENER.
    Gil, J.
    CENER.
    del Campo, I.
    CENER.
    Wilson, I.
    University of Glasgow, UK.
    Khan, Z.
    University of Glasgow, UK.
    Gall, D.
    Gothenburg University.
    Gómez-Barea, A.
    University of Seville, Spain.
    Schmidt, F.
    Umeå University.
    Lin, Leteng
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för teknik (FTK), Institutionen för byggd miljö och energiteknik (BET).
    Strand, Michael
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för teknik (FTK), Institutionen för byggd miljö och energiteknik (BET).
    Anca-Couce, A.
    Graz University of Technology, Austria.
    von Berg, L.
    Graz University of Technology, Austria.
    Larsson, A.
    GoBiGas.
    Sánchez Hervás, J.M.
    CIEMAT.
    van Egmond, B.F.
    ECN part of TNO.
    Geusebroek, M.
    ECN part of TNO.
    Toonen, A.
    ECN part of TNO.
    Kuipers, J.
    ECN part of TNO.
    Cieplik, M.
    ECN part of TNO.
    Boymans, E.H.
    ECN part of TNO.
    Grootjes, A.J.
    ECN part of TNO.
    Fischer, F.
    TUM.
    Schmid, M.
    University of Stuttgart, Germany.
    Maric, J.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Defoort, F.
    CEA.
    Ravel, S.
    CEA.
    Thiery, S.
    CEA.
    Balland, M.
    CEA.
    Kienzl, N.
    Bioenergy 2020+.
    Martini, S.
    Bioenergy 2020+.
    Loipersböck, J.
    Bioenergy 2020+.
    Basset, E.
    ENGIE Lab CRIGEN.
    Barba, A.
    ENGIE Lab CRIGEN.
    Willeboer, W.
    RWE-Essent.
    Venderbosch, R.
    BTG.
    Carpenter, D.
    NREL.
    Pinto, F.
    LNEG.
    Barisano, D.
    ENEA.
    Baratieri, M.
    UNIBZ.
    Ballesteros, R.
    UCLM.
    Mourao Vilela, C. ()
    ECN part of TNO.
    Vreugdenhil, B.J. ()
    ECN part of TNO.
    Gas analysis in gasification of biomass and waste: Guideline report: Document 12018Rapport (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Gasification is generally acknowledged as one of the technologies that will enable the large-scale production of biofuels and chemicals from biomass and waste. One of the main technical challenges associated to the deployment of biomass gasification as a commercial technology is the cleaning and upgrading of the product gas. The contaminants of product gas from biomass/waste gasification include dust, tars, alkali metals, BTX, sulphur-, nitrogen- and chlorine compounds, and heavy metals. Proper measurement of the components and contaminants of the product gas is essential for the monitoring of gasification-based plants (efficiency, product quality, by-products), as well as for the proper design of the downstream gas cleaning train (for example, scrubbers, sorbents, etc.). In practice, a trade-off between reliability, accuracy and cost has to be reached when selecting the proper analysis technique for a specific application. The deployment and implementation of inexpensive yet accurate gas analysis techniques to monitor the fate of gas contaminants might play an important role in the commercialization of biomass and waste gasification processes.

    This special report commissioned by the IEA Bioenergy Task 33 group compiles a representative part of the extensive work developed in the last years by relevant actors in the field of gas analysis applied to(biomass and waste) gasification. The approach of this report has been based on the creation of a team of contributing partners who have supplied material to the report. This networking approach has been complemented with a literature review. The report is composed of a set of 2 documents. Document 1(the present report) describes the available analysis techniques (both commercial and underdevelopment) for the measurement of different compounds of interest present in gasification gas. The objective is to help the reader to properly select the analysis technique most suitable to the target compounds and the intended application. Document 1 also describes some examples of application of gas analysis at commercial-, pilot- and research gasification plants, as well as examples of recent and current joint research activities in the field. The information contained in Document 1 is complemented with a book of factsheets on gas analysis techniques in Document 2, and a collection of video blogs which illustrate some of the analysis techniques described in Documents 1 and 2.

    This guideline report would like to become a platform for the reinforcement of the network of partners working on the development and application of gas analysis, thus fostering collaboration and exchange of knowledge. As such, this report should become a living document which incorporates in future coming progress and developments in the field.

  • 57.
    Biollaz, S.
    et al.
    PSI.
    Calbry-Muzyka, A.
    PSI.
    Rodriguez, S.
    PSI.
    Sárossy, Z.
    DTU.
    Ravenni, G.
    DTU.
    Fateev, A.
    DTU.
    Seiser, R.
    UCSD.
    Eberhard, M.
    KIT.
    Kolb, T.
    KIT.
    Heikkinen, N.
    VTT.
    Reinikainen, M.
    VTT.
    Brown, R.C.
    Iowa State University, USA.
    Johnston, P.A.
    Iowa State University, USA.
    Nau, P.
    DLR.
    Geigle, K.P.
    DLR.
    Kutne, P.
    DLR.
    Işık-Gülsaç, I.
    TÜBİTAK Mam.
    Aksoy, P.
    TÜBİTAK Mam.
    Çetin, Y.
    TÜBİTAK Mam.
    Sarıoğlan, A.
    TÜBİTAK Mam.
    Tsekos, C.
    Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    de Jong, W.
    Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Benedikt, F.
    TU Wien, Austria.
    Hofbauer, H.
    TU Wien, Austria.
    Waldheim, L.
    SFC.
    Engvall, K.
    Royal Institute of Technology.
    Neubauer, Y.
    Technical University of Berlin, Germany.
    Funcia, I.
    CENER.
    Gil, J.
    CENER.
    del Campo, I.
    CENER.
    Wilson, I.
    University of Glasgow, UK.
    Khan, Z.
    University of Glasgow, UK.
    Gall, D.
    Gothenburg University.
    Gómez-Barea, A.
    University of Seville, Spain.
    Schmidt, F.
    Umeå University.
    Lin, Leteng
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för teknik (FTK), Institutionen för byggd miljö och energiteknik (BET).
    Strand, Michael
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för teknik (FTK), Institutionen för byggd miljö och energiteknik (BET).
    Anca-Couce, A.
    Graz University of Technology, Austria.
    von Berg, L.
    Graz University of Technology, Austria.
    Larsson, A.
    GoBiGas.
    Sánchez Hervás, J.M.
    CIEMAT.
    van Egmond, B.F.
    ECN part of TNO.
    Geusebroek, M.
    ECN part of TNO.
    Toonen, A.
    ECN part of TNO.
    Kuipers, J.
    ECN part of TNO.
    Cieplik, M.
    ECN part of TNO.
    Boymans, E.H.
    ECN part of TNO.
    Grootjes, A.J.
    ECN part of TNO.
    Fischer, F.
    TUM.
    Schmid, M.
    University of Stuttgart, Germany.
    Maric, J.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Defoort, F.
    CEA.
    Ravel, S.
    CEA.
    Thiery, S.
    CEA.
    Balland, M.
    CEA.
    Kienzl, N.
    Bioenergy 2020+.
    Martini, S.
    Bioenergy 2020+.
    Loipersböck, J.
    Bioenergy 2020+.
    Basset, E.
    ENGIE Lab CRIGEN.
    Barba, A.
    ENGIE Lab CRIGEN.
    Willeboer, W.
    RWE-Essent.
    Venderbosch, R.
    BTG.
    Carpenter, D.
    NREL.
    Pinto, F.
    LNEG.
    Barisano, D.
    ENEA.
    Baratieri, M.
    UNIBZ.
    Ballesteros, R.
    UCLM.
    Mourao Vilela, C. ()
    ECN part of TNO.
    Vreugdenhil, B.J. ()
    ECN part of TNO.
    Gas analysis in gasification of biomass and waste: Guideline report: Document 2 - Factsheets on gas analysis techniques2018Rapport (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Gasification is generally acknowledged as one of the technologies that will enable the large-scale production of biofuels and chemicals from biomass and waste. One of the main technical challenges associated to the deployment of biomass gasification as a commercial technology is the cleaning and upgrading of the product gas. The contaminants of product gas from biomass/waste gasification include dust, tars, alkali metals, BTX, sulphur-, nitrogen- and chlorine compounds, and heavy metals. Proper measurement of the components and contaminants of the product gas is essential for the monitoring of gasification-based plants (efficiency, product quality, by-products), as well as for the proper design of the downstream gas cleaning train (for example, scrubbers, sorbents, etc.). The deployment and implementation of inexpensive yet accurate gas analysis techniques to monitor the fate of gas contaminants might play an important role in the commercialization of biomass and waste gasification processes.

    This special report commissioned by the IEA Bioenergy Task 33 group compiles a representative part of the extensive work developed in the last years by relevant actors in the field of gas analysis applied to (biomass and waste) gasification. The approach of this report has been based on the creation of a team of contributing partners who have supplied material to the report. This networking approach has been complemented with a literature review. This guideline report would like to become a platform for the reinforcement of the network of partners working on the development and application of gas analysis, thus fostering collaboration and exchange of knowledge. As such, this report should become a living document which incorporates in future coming progress and developments in the field.

  • 58.
    Biswas, Amit Kumar
    KTH, Skolan för industriell teknik och management (ITM), Materialvetenskap, Energi- och ugnsteknik.
    Thermochemical behavior of pretreated biomass2011Licentiatavhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Mankind has to provide a sustainable alternative to its energy related problems. Bioenergy is considered as one of the potential renewable energy resources and as a result bioenergy market is also expected to grow dramatically in future. However, logistic issues are of serious concern while considering biomass as an alternative to fossil fuel. It can be improved by introducing pretreated wood pellet.

    The main objective of this thesis is to address thermochemical behaviour of steam exploded pretreated biomass. Additionally, process aspects of torrefaction were also considered in this thesis. Steam explosion (SE) was performed in a laboratory scale reactor using Salix wood chips. Afterwards, fuel and thermochemical aspects of SE residue were investigated. It was found that Steam explosion pretreatment improved both fuel and pellet quality. Pyrolysis of SE residue reveals that alerted biomass composition significantly affects its pyrolysis behaviour. Contribution from depolymerized components (hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin) of biomass was observed explicitly during pyrolysis. When devolatilization experiment was performed on pellet produced from SE residue, effect of those altered components was observed. In summary, pretreated biomass fuel characteristics is significantly different in comparison with untreated biomass. On the other hand, Process efficiency of torrefaction was found to be governed by the choice of appropriate operating conditions and the type of biomass.

  • 59.
    Biswas, Amit Kumar