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  • 51. Alexander, John H
    et al.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lopes, Renato D
    Hijazi, Ziad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Hohnloser, Stefan H
    Ezekowitz, Justin A
    Halvorsen, Sigrun
    Hanna, Michael
    Commerford, Patrick
    Ruzyllo, Witold
    Huber, Kurt
    Al-Khatib, Sana M
    Granger, Christopher B
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Apixaban 5 mg Twice Daily and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation and Advanced Age, Low Body Weight, or High Creatinine: A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial2016In: JAMA cardiology, ISSN 2380-6583, E-ISSN 2380-6591, Vol. 1, no 6, p. 673-681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE: In the Apixaban for Reduction of Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Complications in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) trial, the standard dose of apixaban was 5 mg twice daily; patients with at least 2 dose-reduction criteria-80 years or older, weight 60 kg or less, and creatinine level 1.5 mg/dL or higher-received a reduced dose of apixaban of 2.5 mg twice daily. Little is known about patients with 1 dose-reduction criterion who received the 5 mg twice daily dose of apixaban.

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of 1 dose-reduction criterion and whether the effects of the 5 mg twice daily dose of apixaban on stroke or systemic embolism and bleeding varied among patients with 1 or no dose-reduction criteria.

    DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Among 18 201 patients in the ARISTOTLE trial, 17 322 were included in this analysis. Annualized event rates of stroke or systemic embolism and major bleeding and hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs were evaluated. Interactions between the effects of apixaban vs warfarin and the presence of 1 or no dose-reduction criteria were assessed. The first patient was enrolled in the ARISTOTLE trial on December 19, 2006, and follow-up was completed on January 30, 2011. Data were analyzed from January 2015 to May 30, 2016.

    MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Analysis of major bleeding included events during study drug treatment. Analysis of stroke or systemic embolism was based on intention to treat.

    RESULTS: Of the patients with 1 or no dose-reduction criteria assigned to receive the 5 mg twice daily dose of apixaban or warfarin, 3966 had 1 dose-reduction criterion; these patients had higher rates of stroke or systemic embolism (HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.20-1.81) and major bleeding (HR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.62-2.20) compared with those with no dose-reduction criteria (n = 13 356). The benefit of the 5 mg twice daily dose of apixaban (n = 8665) compared with warfarin (n = 8657) on stroke or systemic embolism in patients with 1 dose-reduction criterion (HR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.66-1.32) and no dose-reduction criterion (HR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.62-0.97) were similar (P for interaction = .36). Similarly, the benefit of 5 mg twice daily dose of apixaban compared with warfarin on major bleeding in patients with 1 dose-reduction criterion (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.53-0.87) and no dose-reduction criterion (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.60-0.86) were similar (P for interaction = .71). Similar patterns were seen for each dose-reduction criterion and across the spectrum of age, body weight, creatinine level, and creatinine clearance.

    CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Patients with atrial fibrillation and isolated advanced age, low body weight, or renal dysfunction have a higher risk of stroke or systemic embolism and major bleeding but show consistent benefits with the 5 mg twice daily dose of apixaban vs warfarin compared with patients without these characteristics. The 5 mg twice daily dose of apixaban is safe, efficacious, and appropriate for patients with only 1 dose-reduction criterion.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00412984.

  • 52.
    Alexander, Karen P.
    et al.
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA.;Duke Univ, Durham, NC 27710 USA..
    Weisz, Giora
    Shaare Zedek Med Ctr, Jerusalem, Israel.;Cardiovasc Res Fdn, New York, NY USA..
    Prather, Kristi
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA.;Duke Univ, Durham, NC 27710 USA..
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Mark, Daniel B.
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA.;Duke Univ, Durham, NC 27710 USA..
    Anstrom, Kevin J.
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA.;Duke Univ, Durham, NC 27710 USA..
    Davidson-Ray, Linda
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA.;Duke Univ, Durham, NC 27710 USA..
    Witkowski, Adam
    Inst Cardiol, Dept Intervent Cardiol & Angiol, Warsaw, Poland..
    Mulkay, Angel J.
    Holy Name Med Ctr, Hackensack, NJ USA..
    Osmukhina, Anna
    Gilead Sci Inc, Foster City, CA 94404 USA..
    Farzaneh-Far, Ramin
    Gilead Sci Inc, Foster City, CA 94404 USA..
    Ben-Yehuda, Ori
    Cardiovasc Res Fdn, New York, NY USA.;Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, New York Presbyterian Hosp, New York, NY 10027 USA..
    Stone, Gregg W.
    Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, New York Presbyterian Hosp, New York, NY 10027 USA..
    Ohman, E. Magnus
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA.;Duke Univ, Durham, NC 27710 USA..
    Effects of Ranolazine on Angina and Quality of Life After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention With Incomplete Revascularization Results From the Ranolazine for Incomplete Vessel Revascularization (RIVER-PCI) Trial2016In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 133, no 1, p. 39-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Angina often persists or returns in populations following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We hypothesized that ranolazine would be effective in reducing angina and improving quality of life (QOL) in incomplete revascularization (ICR) post-PCI patients. Methods and Results In RIVER-PCI, 2604 patients with a history of chronic angina who had ICR post-PCI were randomized 1:1 to oral ranolazine versus placebo; QOL analyses included 2389 randomized subjects. Angina and QOL questionnaires were collected at baseline and months 1, 6, and 12. Ranolazine patients were more likely than placebo to discontinue study drug by month 6 (20.4% versus 14.1%, P<0.001) and 12 (27.2% versus 21.3%, P<0.001). Following qualifying index PCI, the primary QOL outcome (Seattle Angina Questionnaire [SAQ] angina frequency score) improved markedly, but similarly, in the ranolazine and placebo groups, respectively, from baseline (67.324.5 versus 69.724.0, P=0.01) to month 1 (86.6 +/- 18.1 versus 85.8 +/- 18.5, P=0.27) and month 12 (88.4 +/- 17.8 versus 88.5 +/- 17.8, P=0.94). SAQ angina frequency repeated measures did not differ in adjusted analysis between groups post baseline (mean difference 1.0; 95% CI -0.2, 2.2; P=0.11). Improvement in SAQ angina frequency was observed with ranolazine at month 6 among diabetics (mean difference 3.3; 95% CI 0.6, 6.1; P=0.02) and those with more angina (baseline SAQ angina frequency 60; mean difference 3.4; 95% CI 0.6, 6.2; P=0.02), but was not maintained at month 12. Conclusions Despite ICR following PCI, there was no incremental benefit in angina or QOL measures by adding ranolazine in this angiographically-identified population. These measures markedly improved within 1 month of PCI and persisted up to 1 year in both treatment arms. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01442038.

  • 53.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Management and Outcome in Non ST-Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes: Similarities and Differences Between Women nad Men2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Non ST-elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes are the most frequent manifestations of acute ischemic heart disease. Gender differences in treatment intensity, including differences in level of care, have been reported. Also differences in benefit from certain treatments, especially invasive treatment, have been discussed. Finally, difference in outcome between men and women, have been proposed. Results have been inconsistent, partly depending on if and how adjustment for differences in background characteristics has been made. The aims of the studies in this thesis were to assess differences between the genders in baseline characteristics, level of care, medical treatment and non-invasive and invasive cardiac procedures. The aims were also to determine gender differences in short and long-term mortality, including impact of level of care, and to determine differences between the genders in benefit from an invasive strategy, with special reference to benefit in women.

    Method: We used prospectively collected data from the RIKS-HIA registry in two studies (Paper I and IV). In one study we merged data from patients admitted to general wards in the south-east region of Sweden (The AKUT registry), with data from patients admitted to CCU´s (RIKS-HIA) at participating hospitals during the same time (Paper II). We also randomly assigned women to a routine invasive or a selective invasive treatment strategy, and performed a meta-analysis, to determine gender differences in benefit from a routine invasive strategy (Paper III).

    Results: Women were older than men and more likely to have a history of diabetes and hypertension, while men were more likely to have a history of myocardial infarction and revascularisation. Women were also more likely to have normal coronary arteries on the angiogram. After adjustment for baseline differences there were only minor, and directionally inconsistent, differences between women and men in pharmacological treatment. Men were more often referred for coronary angiography, even after adjustment. While CABG-rate was lower in women, after adjustment PCI-rate was similar or even higher compared to men. After adjustment for differences in age, longterm outcome was better in women. In our small but randomised trial there was no benefit from a routine invasive strategy in women. A meta-analysis indicated interaction between gender and treatment strategy, with lack of benefit in women, in contrast to in men. However, our large observational study indicated no gender difference with an invasive strategy. Moreover, benefit was similar in women and men with invasive treatment.

    Conclusion: There are substantial differences between women and men in baseline characteristics that affect management and outcome more than gender per se. After adjustment women have better long-term outcome than men. There appear to be a difference in benefit from a routine invasive strategy between the genders, with less benefit in women, but in routine clinical management there was no difference between women and men managed with an invasive strategy.

  • 54. Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Clayton, Tim
    Damman, Peter
    Fox, Keith A. A.
    Fredriksson, Mats
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    de Winter, Robbert J.
    Swahn, Eva
    Impact of an invasive strategy on 5 years outcome in men and women with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes2014In: American Heart Journal, ISSN 0002-8703, E-ISSN 1097-6744, Vol. 168, no 4, p. 522-529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background A routine invasive (RI) strategy in non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE ACS) has been associated with better outcome compared with a selective invasive (SI) strategy in men, but results in women have yielded disparate results. The aim of this study was to assess gender differences in long-term outcome with an SI compared with an RI strategy in NSTE ACS. Methods Individual patient data were obtained from the FRISC II trial, ICTUS trial, and RITA 3 trial for a collaborative meta-analysis. Results Men treated with an RI strategy had significantly lower rate of the primary outcome 5-year cardiovascular (CV) death/myocardial infarction (MI) compared with men treated with an SI strategy (15.6% vs 19.8%, P = .001); risk-adjusted hazards ratio (HR) 0.73 (95% CI 0.63-0.86). In contrast, there was little impact of an RI compared with an SI strategy on the primary outcome among women (16.5% vs 15.1%, P = .324); risk-adjusted HR 1.13 (95% CI 0.89-1.43), interaction P = .01. For the individual components of the primary outcome, a similar pattern was seen with lower rate of MI (adjusted HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.57-0.83) and CV death (adjusted HR 0.71, 95% CI 0.56-0.89) in men but without obvious difference in women in MI (adjusted HR 1.13, 95% CI 0.85-1.50) or CV death (adjusted HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.68-1.39). Conclusions In this meta-analysis comparing an SI and RI strategy, benefit from an RI strategy during long-term follow-up was confirmed in men. Conversely, in women, there was no evidence of benefit.

  • 55.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas L
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin M
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Logander, Elisabeth
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Large early variation of residual platelet reactivity in Acute Coronary Syndrome patients treated with clopidogrel: Results from Assessing Platelet Activity in Coronary Heart Disease (APACHE).2015In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 136, no 2, p. 335-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: There is a large inter-individual variation in response to clopidogrel treatment and previous studies have indicated higher risk of thrombotic events in patients with high residual platelet reactivity (HRPR), but the optimal time-point for testing is not established. The aim of this study was to investigate the optimal time-point for aggregometry testing and the risk of major adverse cardiac events associated with HRPR.

    METHOD AND RESULTS: We included 125 patients with ACS (73 with STEMI, and 71 received abciximab). The prevalence of HRPR varied substantially over time. The rate of HRPR in patients treated and not treated with abciximab were 43% vs 67% (p=0.01) before, 2% vs 23% (p=0.001) 6-8h after, 8% vs 9% (p=0.749) 3days after, and 23% vs 12% (p=0.138) 7-9 days after loading dose of clopidogrel. We found HRPR in 18% of the patients but only four ischemic events during 6months follow-up, with no significant difference between HRPR patients compared to the rest of the population. There were 3 TIMI major bleedings, all of which occurred in the low residual platelet reactivity (LRPR) group.

    CONCLUSION: There is a large variation in platelet reactivity over time, also depending on adjunctive therapy, which has a large impact on optimal time-point for assessment. We found HRPR in almost 1 in 5 patients, but very few MACE, and not significantly higher in HRPR patients. In a contemporary ACS population, with low risk for stent thrombosis, the predictive value of HRPR for ischemic events will probably be low.

  • 56. Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Lindbäck, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Swahn, Eva
    Similar outcome with an invasive strategy in men and women with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes: From the Swedish Web-System for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-Based Care in Heart Disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART)2011In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 32, no 24, p. 3128-3136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To assess gender differences in outcome with an early invasive or non-invasive strategy in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE ACS).

    Methods and results

    We included 46 455 patients [14 819 women (32%) and 31 636 men (68%)] from the SWEDEHEART register, with NSTE ACS, between 2000 and 2006, and followed them for 1 year. In the non-invasive strategy arm, the relative risk (RR) of death was (women vs. men) 1.02 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.94-1.11] and in the invasive strategy arm 1.12 (95% CI, 0.96-1.29). After adjustment for baseline differences between the genders, with propensity score and discharge medication, there was a similar trend towards better outcome among women in both the early non-invasive cohort [RR 0.90 (95% CI, 0.82-0.99)] and the early invasive cohort [RR 0.90 (95% CI, 0.76-1.06)], although it did not reach statistical significance in the early invasive cohort. Results were similar with the combined endpoint death/myocardial infarction. An early invasive treatment was associated with a marked, and similar, mortality reduction in women [RR 0.46 (95% CI, 0.38-0.55)] and men [RR 0.45 (95% CI, 0.40-0.52)], without interaction with gender.

    Conclusion

    In this large cohort of patients with NSTE ACS, reflecting real-life management, women and men had similar and better outcome associated with an invasive strategy.

  • 57.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Duke Clin Research Institute, NC USA.
    Neely, Benjamin
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC USA.
    Neely, Megan L.
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC USA.
    Bhatt, Deepak L.
    Brigham and Womens Hospital, MA 02115 USA; Harvard Medical Sch, MA USA.
    Goodman, Shaun G.
    St Michaels Hospital, Canada; University of Alberta, Canada; University of Alberta, Canada.
    Tricoci, Pierluigi
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC USA; Duke University, NC 27706 USA.
    Mahaffey, Kenneth W.
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Cornel, Jan H.
    Medical Centre Alkmaar, Netherlands.
    White, Harvey D.
    Auckland City Hospital, New Zealand.
    Fox, Keith A. A.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Prabhakaran, Dorairaj
    Centre Chron Disease Control and Public Health Fdn India, India.
    Winters, Kenneth J.
    Eli Lilly and Co, IN 46285 USA.
    Armstrong, Paul W.
    University of Alberta, Canada; University of Alberta, Canada.
    Magnus Ohman, E.
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC USA; Duke University, NC 27706 USA.
    Roe, Matthew T.
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC USA; Duke University, NC 27706 USA.
    Predicting the risk of bleeding during dual antiplatelet therapy after acute coronary syndromes2017In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 103, no 15, p. 1168-1176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with aspirin + a P2Y12 inhibitor is recommended for at least 12 months for patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), with shorter durations considered for patients with increased bleeding risk. However, there are no decision support tools available to predict an individual patients bleeding risk during DAPT treatment in the post-ACS setting. Methods To develop a longitudinal bleeding risk prediction model, we analysed 9240 patients with unstable angina/non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) from the Targeted Platelet Inhibition to Clarify the Optimal Strategy to Medically Manage Acute Coronary Syndromes (TRILOGY ACS) trial, who were managed without revascularisation and treated with DAPT for a median of 14.8 months. Results We identified 10 significant baseline predictors of non-coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG)-related Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Arteries (GUSTO) severe/life-threatening/moderate bleeding: age, sex, weight, NSTEMI (vs unstable angina), angiography performed before randomisation, prior peptic ulcer disease, creatinine, systolic blood pressure, haemoglobin and treatment with beta-blocker. The five significant baseline predictors of Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) major or minor bleeding included age, sex, angiography performed before randomisation, creatinine and haemoglobin. The models showed good predictive accuracy with Therneaus C-indices: 0.78 (SE=0.024) for the GUSTO model and 0.67 (SE=0.023) for the TIMI model. Internal validation with bootstrapping gave similar C-indices of 0.77 and 0.65, respectively. External validation demonstrated an attenuated C-index for the GUSTO model (0.69) but not the TIMI model (0.68). Conclusions Longitudinal bleeding risks during treatment with DAPT in patients with ACS can be reliably predicted using selected baseline characteristics. The TRILOGY ACS bleeding models can inform riskbenefit considerations regarding the duration of DAPT following ACS.

  • 58.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Roe, Matthew T
    Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, NC.
    Balancing the risks and benefits of long-term antiplatelet therapies for cardiovascular disease: clinical, research, and regulatory implications.2015In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 4, no 3, article id e001897Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin M
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Logander, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Individual long-term variation of platelet reactivity in patients with dual antiplatelet therapy after myocardial infarction.2018In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a large inter-individual variation in response to clopidogrel treatment, and previous studies have indicated higher risk of thrombotic events in those with high residual platelet reactivity (HPR). Less is known about individual variation over time. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to investigate intra-individual variation in platelet reactivity. Platelet aggregation in whole blood was assessed in 77 patients, at 3 days, 8 days and 6 months after admission for acute myocardial infarction and loading dose of clopidogrel. All patients were treated with aspirin and clopidogrel through 6-month follow-up. We found a significant increase in median ADP-stimulated aggregation from third to eighth day (195 vs. 250 AU*min, p-value = 0.001) but not from day 8 to 6 months (250 vs. 223 AU*min, p-value = 0.666). There was no significant change in the overall rate of HPR (15.6% vs 20.8%, p-value 0.503) or low platelet reactivity (LPR) (37.7% vs 33.8%, p-value = 0.609) from day 8 to 6-month follow-up. In contrast, more than one in four changed HPR status, 15.6% from non-HPR to HPR and 10.4% HPR to non-HPR. A shift in LPR status appeared even more frequent, occurring in about one of three patients. In spite of similar median aggregation and rate of HPR during 6-month follow-up, about one in four of the patients changed HPR status and one in three changed LPR status. This may be important information for a concept of risk stratification based on a single aggregation value early after an acute coronary syndromes.

  • 60.
    Alhede, Christina
    et al.
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Johannessen, Arne
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Dixen, Ulrik
    Hvidovre University Hospital, Denmark.
    Jensen, Jan S.
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Raatikainen, Pekka
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Hindricks, Gerhard
    Leipzig University Hospital, Germany.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Kongstad, Ole
    Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
    Pehrson, Steen
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Englund, Anders
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hartikainen, Juha
    Kupio University Hospital, Finland.
    Hansen, Peter S.
    Varde Heart Centre, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Jens C.
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Jons, Christian
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Higher burden of supraventricular ectopic complexes early after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation is associated with increased risk of recurrent atrial fibrillation2018In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 50-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Early identification of patients who could benefit from early re-intervention after catheter ablation is highly warranted. Our aim was to investigate the association between post-procedural burden of supraventricular ectopic complexes (SVEC) and the risk of long-term atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrence. Methods and results A total of 125 patients undergoing catheter ablation for AF were included. Patients underwent 7-day Holter recordings immediately post-procedural. The number of SVEC in post-procedural Holter recordings was categorized into quartiles: 0-72, 73-212, 213-782 and amp;gt;= 783 SVEC/day. Long-term AF recurrence was defined as a combined endpoint of AF amp;gt;= 1 min during follow-up Holter recordings, cardioversion or hospitalization for AF after a 3-month blanking period and within 24 months of follow-up. High post-procedural supraventricular ectopy burden was associated with an increased risk of long-term AF recurrence in a dose-dependent manner (amp;gt;= 783 SVEC: HR 4.6 [1.9-11.5], P amp;lt; 0.001) irrespective of AF recurrence during the blanking period or other risk factors. In patients with early AF recurrence amp;lt; 90 days after catheter ablation ectopy burden was also highly predictive of long-term AF recurrence (SVEC amp;gt;= 213: HR 3.0 [1.3-6.7], P = 0.007). Correspondingly, patients with early AF recurrence but low ectopy burden remained at low risk of long-term AF recurrence after the blanking period. Conclusion Our results indicate that post-procedural ectopy burden is highly associated with long-term AF recurrence and could be a potent risk marker for selection of patients for early re-ablation. Development of future ablation risk stratification and strategies should include focus on post-procedural ectopy burden.

  • 61.
    Alhede, Christina
    et al.
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Lauridsen, Trine K.
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Johannessen, Arne
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Dixen, Ulrik
    Hvidovre University Hospital, Denmark.
    Jensen, Jan S.
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Raatikainen, Pekka
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Hindricks, Gerhard
    Leipzig University Hospital, Germany.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Kongstad, Ole
    Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
    Pehrson, Steen
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Englund, Anders
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hartikainen, Juha
    Kupio University Hospital, Finland.
    Hansen, Peter S.
    Varde Heart Centre, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Jens C.
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Jons, Christian
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Antiarrhythmic medication is superior to catheter ablation in suppressing supraventricular ectopic complexes in patients with atrial fibrillation2017In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 244, p. 186-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Supraventricular ectopic complexes (SVEC) originating in the pulmonary veins are known triggers of atrial fibrillation (AF) which led to the development of pulmonary vein isolation for AF. However, the long-term prevalence of SVEC after catheter ablation (CA) as compared to antiarrhythmic medication (AAD) is unknown. Our aims were to compare the prevalence of SVEC after AAD and CA and to estimate the association between baseline SVEC burden and AF burden during 24 months of follow-up. Methods: Patients with paroxysmal AF (N = 260) enrolled in the MANTRA PAF trial were treated with AAD (N = 132) or CA (N = 128). At baseline and 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months follow-up patients underwent 7-day Holter monitoring to assess SVEC and AF burden. We compared SVEC burden between treatments with Wilcoxon sum rank test. Results: Patients treated with AAD had significantly lower daily SVEC burden during follow-up as compared to CA (AAD: 19 [6-58] versus CA: 39 [14-125], p = 0.003). SVEC burden increased post-procedurally followed by a decrease after CA whereas after AAD SVEC burden decreased and stabilized after 3 months of follow-up. Patients with low SVEC burden had low AF burden after both treatments albeit this was more pronounced after CA at 24 months of follow-up. Conclusion: AAD was superior to CA in suppressing SVEC burden after treatment of paroxysmal AF. After CA SVEC burden increased immediately post-procedural followed by a decrease whereas after AAD an early decrease was observed. Lower SVEC burden was highly associated with lower AF burden during follow-up especially after CA. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 62.
    Alhede, Christina
    et al.
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Lauridsen, Trine K.
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Johannessen, Arne
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Dixen, Ulrik
    Hvidovre University Hospital, Denmark.
    Jensen, Jan S.
    Herlev Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Raatikainen, Pekka
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Hindricks, Gerhard
    Leipzig University Hospital, Germany.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Kongstadf, Ole
    Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
    Pehrson, Steen
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Englund, Anders
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hartikainen, Juha
    Kupio University Hospital, Finland.
    Hansen, Peter S.
    Varde Heart Centre, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Jens C.
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Jons, Christian
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    The impact of supraventricular ectopic complexes in different age groups and risk of recurrent atrial fibrillation after antiarrhythmic medication or catheter ablation2018In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 250, p. 122-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Supraventricular ectopic complexes (SVEC) are known risk factors of recurrent atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the impact of SVEC in different age groups is unknown. We aimed to investigate the risk of AF recurrence with higher SVEC burden in patients +/- 57 years, respectively, after treatment with antiarrhythmic medication (AAD) or catheter ablation (CA). Methods: In total, 260 patients with LVEF amp;gt;40% and age amp;lt;= 70 years were randomized to AAD (N = 132) or CA (N = 128) as first-line treatment for paroxysmal AF. All patients underwent 7-day Holter monitoring at baseline, and after 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months and were categorized according to median age +/- 57 years. We used multi-variate Cox regression analyses and we defined high SVEC burden at 3 months of follow-up as the upper 75th percentile amp;gt;195 SVEC/day. AF recurrence was defined as AF amp;gt;= 1 min, AF-related cardioversion or hospitalization. Results: Age amp;gt;57 years were significantly associated with higher AF recurrence rate after CA (58% vs 36%, p = 0.02). After CA, we observed a higher SVEC burden during follow-up in patients amp;gt;57 years which was not observed in the younger age group treatedwith CA (p = 0.006). High SVEC burden at 3 months after CA was associated with AF recurrence in older patients but not in younger patients (amp;gt;57 years: HR 3.4 [1.4-7.9], p = 0.005). We did not find any age-related differences after AAD. Conclusion: We found that younger and older patients respond differently to CA and that SVEC burden was only associated with AF recurrence in older patients. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 63. Ali, Ashfaq
    et al.
    Varga, Tibor V.
    Stojkovic, Ivana A.
    Schulz, Christina-Alexandra
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Barroso, Ines
    Poveda, Alaitz
    Renström, Frida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Orho-Melander, Marju
    Franks, Paul W.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
    Do Genetic Factors Modify the Relationship Between Obesity and Hypertriglyceridemia?: Findings From the GLACIER and the MDC Studies2016In: Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics, ISSN 1942-325X, E-ISSN 1942-3268, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 162-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Obesity is a major risk factor for dyslipidemia, but this relationship is highly variable. Recently published data from 2 Danish cohorts suggest that genetic factors may underlie some of this variability.

    Methods and Results We tested whether established triglyceride-associated loci modify the relationship of body mass index (BMI) and triglyceride concentrations in 2 Swedish cohorts (the Gene-Lifestyle Interactions and Complex Traits Involved in Elevated Disease Risk [GLACIER Study; N=4312] and the Malmo Diet and Cancer Study [N=5352]). The genetic loci were amalgamated into a weighted genetic risk score (WGRS(TG)) by summing the triglyceride-elevating alleles (weighted by their established marginal effects) for all loci. Both BMI and the WGRS(TG) were strongly associated with triglyceride concentrations in GLACIER, with each additional BMI unit (kg/m(2)) associated with 2.8% (P=8.4x10(-84)) higher triglyceride concentration and each additional WGRS(TG) unit with 2% (P=7.6x10(-48)) higher triglyceride concentration. Each unit of the WGRS(TG) was associated with 1.5% higher triglyceride concentrations in normal weight and 2.4% higher concentrations in overweight/obese participants (P-interaction=0.056). Meta-analyses of results from the Swedish cohorts yielded a statistically significant WGRS(TG)xBMI interaction effect (P-interaction=6.0x10(-4)), which was strengthened by including data from the Danish cohorts (P-interaction=6.5x10(-7)). In the meta-analysis of the Swedish cohorts, nominal evidence of a 3-way interaction (WGRS(TG)xBMIxsex) was observed (P-interaction=0.03), where the WGRS(TG)xBMI interaction was only statistically significant in females. Using protein-protein interaction network analyses, we identified molecular interactions and pathways elucidating the metabolic relationships between BMI and triglyceride-associated loci.

    Conclusions Our findings provide evidence that body fatness accentuates the effects of genetic susceptibility variants in hypertriglyceridemia, effects that are most evident in females.

  • 64.
    Alibegovic, A.
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Department of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pretreatment with glucose infusion prevents fatal outcome after hemorrhage in food deprived rats1993In: Circulatory Shock, ISSN 0092-6213, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Twenty-four hour food deprivation increases mortality after experimental hemorrhage. Survival after hemorrhage is closely related to the capacity of the animal to develop hyperglycemia. In this study, 24 hr food deprived rats were given a 3-hr infusion of either 0.3 ml/100 g b.wt./h 30% glucose iv (n = 10) or the same volume of 0.9% NaCl (n = 10) prior to 60 min of standardized hemorrhage. Glucose infusion resulted in a transient hyperglycemia, and 600% greater hepatic glycogen content compared to saline (P < 0.001). During hemorrhage, glucose-treated rats developed substantial hyperglycemia while glucose levels fell in saline treated (P < 0.001). Concomitant developments in hematocrits indicated improved plasma refill in glucose treated animals (P < 0.01). While saline treated rats developed irreversible shock and died within 3 hr of bleeding, glucose treated rats had a MAP of 52 ± 2 (mean ± SEM) mm Hg by the end of hemorrhage (P < 0.01). All glucose-treated rats recovered and survived the seven-day observation period. It is concluded that glucose infusion leading to hepatic glycogen repletion alters outcome after experimental hemorrhage in food deprived animals. These experimental results may be of clinical relevance, since elective surgery is generally performed after overnight fasting, which substantially reduces the hepatic glycogen reserve.

  • 65.
    Almeida, Joao G.
    et al.
    Ctr Hosp Gaia Espinho, Dept Cardiol, R Conceicao Fernandes 1079, Vila Nova De Gaia, Portugal.
    Fontes-Carvalho, Ricardo
    Ctr Hosp Gaia Espinho, Dept Cardiol, R Conceicao Fernandes 1079, Vila Nova De Gaia, Portugal; Univ Porto, Dept Surg & Physiol, Fac Med, Alameda Prof Hernani Monteiro, P-4200319 Porto, Portugal.
    Sampaio, Francisco
    Ctr Hosp Gaia Espinho, Dept Cardiol, R Conceicao Fernandes 1079, Vila Nova De Gaia, Portugal.
    Ribeiro, Jose
    Ctr Hosp Gaia Espinho, Dept Cardiol, R Conceicao Fernandes 1079, Vila Nova De Gaia, Portugal.
    Bettencourt, Paulo
    Univ Porto, Dept Med, Fac Med, Alameda Prof Hernani Monteiro, P-4200319 Porto, Portugal.
    Flachskampf, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Leite-Moreira, Adelino
    Univ Porto, Dept Surg & Physiol, Fac Med, Alameda Prof Hernani Monteiro, P-4200319 Porto, Portugal; Sao Joao Hosp Ctr, Dept Cardiothorac Surg, Alameda Prof Hernani Monteiro, P-4200319 Porto, Portugal.
    Azevedo, Ana
    Univ Porto, Dept Clin Epidemiol, Predict Med & Publ Hlth, Fac Med, Alameda Prof Hernani Monteiro, P-4200319 Porto, Portugal; Univ Porto ISPUP, Inst Publ Hlth, Epidemiol Res Unit, EPIUnit, Rua Taipas 135, P-4050600 Porto, Portugal.
    Impact of the 2016 ASE/EACVI recommendations on the prevalence of diastolic dysfunction in the general population2018In: European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 2047-2404, E-ISSN 2047-2412, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 380-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Diastolic dysfunction (DD) is frequent in the general population; however, the assessment of diastolic function remains challenging. We aimed to evaluate the impact of the recent 2016 American Society of Echocardiography (ASE)/European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI) recommendations in the prevalence and grades of DD compared with the 2009 guidelines and the Canberra Study Criteria (CSC).

    Methods and results: Within a population-based cohort, a total of 1000 individuals, aged ≥45 years, were evaluated retrospectively. Patients with previously known cardiac disease or ejection fraction <50% were excluded. Diastolic function was assessed by transthoracic echocardiography. DD prevalence and grades were determined according to the three classifications. The mean age was 62.0 ± 10.5 years and 37% were men. The prevalence of DD was 1.4% (n = 14) with the 2016 recommendations, 38.1% (n = 381) with the 2009 recommendations, and 30.4% (n = 304) using the CSC. The concordance between the updated recommendations and the other two was poor (from k = 0.13 to k = 0.18, P < 0.001). Regarding the categorization in DD grades, none of the 14 individuals with DD by the 2016 guidelines were assigned to Grade 1 DD, 64% were classified as Grade 2, 7% had Grade 3, and 29% had indeterminate grade.

    Conclusion: The application of the new 2016 ASE/EACVI recommendations resulted in a much lower prevalence of DD. The concordance between the classifications was poor. The updated algorithm seems to be able to diagnose only the most advanced cases.

  • 66.
    Almroth, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Atrial fibrillation: inflammatory and pharmacological studies2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 67.
    Almroth, Henrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Höglund, Niklas
    Boman, Kurt
    Englund, Anders
    Jensen, Steen
    Kjellman, Björn
    Tornvall, Per
    Rosenqvist, Mårten
    Atorvastatin and persistent atrial fibrillation following cardioversion: a randomized placebo-controlled multicentre study2009In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 827-833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To evaluate the effect of atorvastatin in achieving stable sinus rhythm (SR) 30 days after electrical cardioversion (CV) in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). METHODS AND RESULTS: The study included 234 patients. The patients were randomized to treatment with atorvastatin 80 mg daily (n = 118) or placebo (n = 116) in a prospective, double-blinded fashion. Treatment was initiated 14 days before CV and was continued 30 days after CV. The two groups were well-balanced with respect to baseline characteristics. Mean age was 65 +/- 10 years, 76% of the patients were male and 4% had ischaemic heart disease. Study medication was well-tolerated in all patients but one. Before primary endpoint 12 patients were excluded. In the atorvastatin group 99 patients (89%) converted to SR at electrical CV compared with 95 (86%) in the placebo group (P = 0.42). An intention-to-treat analysis with the available data, by randomization group, showed that 57 (51%) in the atorvastatin group and 47 (42%) in the placebo group were in SR 30 days after CV (OR 1.44, 95%CI 0.85-2.44, P = 0.18). CONCLUSION: Atorvastatin was not statistically superior to placebo with regards to maintaining SR 30 days after CV in patients with persistent AF.

  • 68. Almroth, Henrik
    et al.
    Höglund, Niklas
    Department of Cardiology, Heart Centre, University Hospital, S-901 85 Umeå, Sweden.
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Englund, Anders
    Jensen, Steen
    Department of Cardiology, Heart Centre, University Hospital, S-901 85 Umeå, Sweden.
    Kjellman, Björn
    Tornvall, Per
    Rosenqvist, Mårten
    Atorvastatin and persistent atrial fibrillation following cardioversion: a randomized placebo-controlled multicentre study2009In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 827-833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To evaluate the effect of atorvastatin in achieving stable sinus rhythm (SR) 30 days after electrical cardioversion (CV) in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). METHODS AND RESULTS: The study included 234 patients. The patients were randomized to treatment with atorvastatin 80 mg daily (n = 118) or placebo (n = 116) in a prospective, double-blinded fashion. Treatment was initiated 14 days before CV and was continued 30 days after CV. The two groups were well-balanced with respect to baseline characteristics. Mean age was 65 +/- 10 years, 76% of the patients were male and 4% had ischaemic heart disease. Study medication was well-tolerated in all patients but one. Before primary endpoint 12 patients were excluded. In the atorvastatin group 99 patients (89%) converted to SR at electrical CV compared with 95 (86%) in the placebo group (P = 0.42). An intention-to-treat analysis with the available data, by randomization group, showed that 57 (51%) in the atorvastatin group and 47 (42%) in the placebo group were in SR 30 days after CV (OR 1.44, 95%CI 0.85-2.44, P = 0.18). CONCLUSION: Atorvastatin was not statistically superior to placebo with regards to maintaining SR 30 days after CV in patients with persistent AF.

  • 69.
    Alström, Ulrica
    et al.
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Anesthesiology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Granath, Fredrik
    Department of Medicine Solna, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Friberg, Örjan
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery.
    Ekbom, Anders
    Department of Medicine Solna, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ståhle, Elisabeth
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Anesthesiology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Risk factors for re-exploration due to bleeding after coronary artery bypass grafting2012In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 39-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The study aimed to investigate relevant clinical risk factors for re-exploration due to bleeding after primary coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, and to evaluate the influence of antiplatelet and antifibrinolytic drugs.

    Design: Three retrospective analyses were performed on patients who underwent CABG: (1) Logistic regression was used to identify clinical risk factors for re-exploration (n = 3000). (2) A case-control study (n = 228) was used to obtain information on exposure of antithrombotic and hemostatic therapy. (3) Based on exposure to antiplatelet and antifibrinolytic therapy, and odds ratios (ORs) in multivariate logistic models, the proportion of re-explorations attributed to these drugs was calculated.

    Results: A receiver operating characteristic curve was created for clinical risk factors. The C-index was 0.64, indicating limited ability to predict re-exploration for bleeding. Clopidogrel was the only drug influencing the risk of re-exploration (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.7-5.9). The harmful effect of clopidogrel was confirmed in multivariate model (OR 4.7, 95% CI 2.2-9.9), and aprotinin had a protective effect of the same magnitude (OR 0.2, 95% CI 0.1-0.6).

    Conclusions: Clopidogrel is an essential risk factor for re-exploration due to bleeding, and attributable to at least one-quarter of surveyed cases. Aside from pharmaceuticals, there are no strong clinical risk factors.

  • 70. Alsén, Martin
    et al.
    Hagström, Emil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Eggers, Kai
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Johnston, Nina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    »HEART score« – lösningen på säker handläggning av patienter med misstänkt akut kranskärlsjukdom på akutmottagningen?: ["HEART score"--the solution for secure management of patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome in the emergency department?]2013In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 110, no 27-28, p. 1297-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 71.
    Ambavane, Apoorva
    et al.
    Modeling and Simulation, Evidera, London, United Kingdom.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Giannitsis, Evangelos
    Medizinische Klinik III, University Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany .
    Roiz, Julie
    Modeling and Simulation, Evidera, London, United Kingdom .
    Mendivil, Joan
    Market Access, Roche Diagnostics International Ltd., Rotkreuz, Switzerland .
    Frankenstein, Lutz
    Department of Cardiology, Angiology, Pulmonology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany .
    Body, Richard
    Emergency Department, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom .
    Christ, Michael
    Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Paracelsus Medical University, Nuremberg General Hospital, Nuremberg, Germany .
    Bingisser, Roland
    Emergency Department, University of Basel, University Hospital, Basel, Switzerland .
    Alquezar, Aitor
    Servei de Urgencies. Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain .
    Mueller, Christian
    Department of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Research Institute Basel, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland .
    Economic evaluation of the one-hour rule-out and rule-in algorithm for acute myocardial infarction using the high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T assay in the emergency department2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 11, article id e0187662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The 1-hour (h) algorithm triages patients presenting with suspected acute myocardial infarction (AMI) to the emergency department (ED) towards "rule-out," "rule-in," or "observation," depending on baseline and 1-h levels of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin (hs-cTn). The economic consequences of applying the accelerated 1-h algorithm are unknown.

    METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed a post-hoc economic analysis in a large, diagnostic, multicenter study of hs-cTnT using central adjudication of the final diagnosis by two independent cardiologists. Length of stay (LoS), resource utilization (RU), and predicted diagnostic accuracy of the 1-h algorithm compared to standard of care (SoC) in the ED were estimated. The ED LoS, RU, and accuracy of the 1-h algorithm was compared to that achieved by the SoC at ED discharge. Expert opinion was sought to characterize clinical implementation of the 1-h algorithm, which required blood draws at ED presentation and 1h, after which "rule-in" patients were transferred for coronary angiography, "rule-out" patients underwent outpatient stress testing, and "observation" patients received SoC. Unit costs were for the United Kingdom, Switzerland, and Germany. The sensitivity and specificity for the 1-h algorithm were 87% and 96%, respectively, compared to 69% and 98% for SoC. The mean ED LoS for the 1-h algorithm was 4.3h-it was 6.5h for SoC, which is a reduction of 33%. The 1-h algorithm was associated with reductions in RU, driven largely by the shorter LoS in the ED for patients with a diagnosis other than AMI. The estimated total costs per patient were £2,480 for the 1-h algorithm compared to £4,561 for SoC, a reduction of up to 46%.

    CONCLUSIONS: The analysis shows that the use of 1-h algorithm is associated with reduction in overall AMI diagnostic costs, provided it is carefully implemented in clinical practice. These results need to be prospectively validated in the future.

  • 72.
    Amofah, H. A.
    et al.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Thoracic surgical unit, Bergen, Norway.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Eide, L. S. P. E.
    Bergen University College, Institute of Nursing, Bergen, Norway.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Haaverstad, R. H.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Departement of Heart Disease, Bergen, Norway.
    Hufthammer, K. O. H.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Centre for Clinical research, Bergen, Norway.
    Kuiper, K. K. J. K.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Departement of Heart Disease, Bergen, Norway.
    Schjott, J. S.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Section of Clinical Pharmacology, Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Bergen, Norway.
    Ranhoff, A. H. R.
    University of Bergen, Department of Clinical Science, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Bergen, Norway.
    Norekval, T. M. N.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Departement of Heart Disease, Bergen, Norway.
    Factors affecting in-hospital sleep-wake pattern in octogenarians during the early postoperative phase after transcutaneous aortic valve replacement2017In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no Suppl. 1, p. S53-S53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Octogenarian patients are an increasing group admitted for advanced cardiac treatment. Little is known about factors disturbing their sleep-wake pattern in the early postoperative phase after transcutaneous aortic valve replacement (TAVI), as current knowledge is based upon studies on younger age groups treated for surgical aortic valve replacement.

    Aim: To determine factors affecting the in-hospital sleep wake pattern in octogenarian patients after TAVI.

    Methods: This is a prospective cohort study in a tertiary university hospital. Inclusion criteria were age > 80 years with severe aortic stenosis accepted for TAVI. Actigraphy was used to identify sleep-wake pattern (sleep time night and sleep time day), and the Minimal Insomnia Symptom Scale (MISS) to measure self-reported insomnia daily during the first five postoperative days. Charlson`s comorbidity index was used as a measure of comorbidities and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) to rate pain severity. Information regarding duration of anesthesia, blood transfusion and parenteral administration of morphine equivalents were derived from the patients’ medical journals. Multiple regression analysis was used to test associations between variables.

    Results: In all, 65 patients (41 women) were included. Mean age was 85 years (SD 2.8). No significant associations were found between age, comorbidities, blood transfusion and morphine equivalents and sleep. Gender was significantly associated with sleep time night and sleep efficiency as men had shortest duration of sleep from the third to the fifth postoperative night (p < .001, and adjusted R2=.230 to .283). Duration of anesthesia had a significant association with sleep time night and sleep efficiency from the third to the fifth postoperative night (p=.013 to p < .001, and adjusted R2=.230 to .283), where longer duration gave less total sleep and lower sleep efficiency. VAS score correlated with wake time night the third night, where a higher VAS score gave more wake time (p=.006 and adjusted R2 .236).

    Conclusion: Male gender, longer duration of perioperative anesthesia and postoperative pain were associated with disturbances in the postoperative sleep-wake pattern in octogenarian patients in the early postoperative phase after TAVI. This knowledge is important and relevant and should have implications in improving patient care.

  • 73.
    Amofah, H. A.
    et al.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Thoracic surgical unit, Bergen, Norway.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Eide, L. S. P. E.
    Bergen University College, Institute of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Science, Bergen, Norway.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Haaverstad, R. H.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Departement of Heart Disease, Bergen, Norway.
    Hufthammer, K. O. H.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Centre for Clinical research, Bergen, Norway.
    Kuiper, K. K. J. K.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Departement of Heart Disease, Bergen, Norway.
    Schjott, J. S.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Section of Clinical Pharmacology, Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Bergen, Norway.
    Ranhoff, A. H. R.
    University of Bergen, Department of Clinical Science, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Bergen, Norway.
    Norekval, T. M. N.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Departement of Heart Disease, Bergen, Norway .
    Factors associated with disturbances in sleep-wake pattern in octogenarian patients in the early postoperative phase after surgical aortic valve replacement2017In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no Suppl. 1, p. S63-S64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Disturbances of the sleep-wake pattern are known phenomenon in the postoperative phase after aortic valve replacement (SAVR) that have negative impact on the morbidity, quality of life and mortality. Octogenarian patients are an increasing group admitted for cardiac surgery, however knowledge is based on younger patients.

    Aims: To determine factors associated with disturbances in postoperative sleep-wake pattern in octogenarian patients after SAVR.

    Methods: A prospective cohort study of octogenarian patients in a single center university hospital. Inclusion criteria were age > 80 years, severe aortic stenosis, accepted for SAVR. Actigraphy was used to identify the sleep-wake pattern (sleep-time, sleep efficiency and wake time night and sleep- and wake-time day) for the five first postoperative days, and the sleep questionnaires Minimal Insomnia Symptom scale (MISS) to measure the selfreported insomnia at baseline and daily for the five first postoperative days. 

    Charlsons comorbidity index was used to score comorbidities and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), was used to rate pain severity. The patients’ medical journals were used to record duration of anesthesia, duration of cardiopulmonary by-pass, blood transfusions and parenteral administration of morphine equivalents. Multiple regression analysis was used to test associations between variables.

    Results: In all, 78 patients were included (40 women). Mean age was 82 years (SD 2.0). For the sleep-wake pattern first to fifth postoperative night, mean sleep-time night was 330-370 minutes (SD 32-124). Mean sleep efficiency was 68-77% (SD 21-26). Mean sleep-time day was 545-712 minutes (SD 146-169). Mean insomnia score was 1,8-5,3 (SD 2,6-3,8). On the first postoperative night the pain VAS score correlated with wake time night, where a higher VAS indicated more wake time (p=.014, adjusted R2=.213). No other variable; age, gender, duration of anesthesia, duration of cardiopulmonary by-pass, blood transfusion or morphine equivalents showed significant association with the sleep-wake pattern or insomnia.

    Conclusion: Postoperative pain was associated with disturbances in sleep-wake pattern in octogenarian patients in the early postoperative phase after SAVR. This indicates that pain management may be inadequate for patients after SAVR. More research on this issue is needed to establish data needed to improve treatment and care.

  • 74.
    Amofah, Hege A.
    et al.
    Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Institute of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Science, Bergen University College, Norway.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Bjorvatn, Bjørn
    Norwegian Competence Centre for Sleep Disorders, Bergen, Norway.
    Haaverstad, Rune
    Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Hufthammer, Karl Ove
    Centre for Clinical Research, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Kuiper, Karel K. J.
    Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Ranhoff, Anette H.
    Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Norway.
    Norekvål, Tone M.
    Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Sleep in octogenarians during the postoperative phase after transcatheter or surgical aortic valve replacement2016In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 168-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Octogenarians with aortic stenosis are an increasing population of patients admitted for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Although adequate sleep is important after illness and surgery, it has scarcely been studied in the immediate postoperative phase.

    Aims: To determine and compare the nature of self-reported sleep and insomnia, and recorded sleep–wake patterns in octogenarians during the in-hospital postoperative phase after SAVR or TAVI.

    Methods: A prospective cohort design was used that included octogenarian patients undergoing SAVR or TAVI at a regional university hospital. Self-reports were used to document sleep and insomnia, and actigraphy was used to record sleep–wake patterns. Data were collected at baseline preoperatively, and then daily for the first five postoperative days.

    Results: SAVR patients experienced the most insomnia on postoperative nights later in recovery, while TAVI patients experienced the most insomnia on postoperative nights early in recovery. The median total sleep time, as measured by actigraphy, was 6.4 h, and the median sleep efficiency was 79% for the five postoperative nights, but no differences were found between SAVR and TAVI patients on this parameter. All patients slept more during daytime than at night, with SAVR patients having significantly more total sleep hours for all five days than TAVI patients (p < 0.01).

    Conclusion: Octogenarians with aortic stenosis had disturbed self-reported sleep, increased insomnia, and disturbed sleep–wake patterns postoperatively, resulting in more daytime sleep and inactivity. In patients undergoing SAVR or TAVI, sleep evolves differently during the in-hospital postoperative phase.

  • 75. Andell, P.
    et al.
    Erlinge, D.
    Smith, J. G.
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Koul, S.
    The effect of beta-blockers on mortality in COPD patients after myocardial infarction: A Swedish nation-wide observational study2014In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 35, p. 686-687Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 76.
    Andell, P.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Karlsson, S.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Mohammad, M.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Gotberg, M.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Jensen, J.
    Capio St Goran Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Frobert, O.
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Orebro, Sweden..
    Angeras, O.
    Sahlgrens Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Nilsson, J.
    Umea Univ Hosp, Umea, Sweden..
    Omerovic, E.
    Sahlgrens Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Persson, J.
    Danderyd Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Koul, S.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Erlinge, D.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Intravascular ultrasound guidance is associated with lower mortality in patients undergoing stenting for unprotected left main coronary artery lesions compared to angiography-guided stent implantation2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 77. Andell, Pontus
    et al.
    Erlinge, David
    Smith, J. Gustav
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    James, Stefan K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Koul, Sasha
    beta-Blocker Use and Mortality in COPD Patients After Myocardial Infarction: A Swedish Nationwide Observational Study2015In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 4, no 4, article id e001611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-Patients with myocardial infarction (MI) and concomitant chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) constitute a high-risk group with increased mortality. beta-Blocker therapy has been shown to reduce mortality, prevent arrhythmias, and delay heart failure development after an MI in broad populations. However, the effect of beta-blockers in COPD patients is less well established and they may also be less treated due to fear of adverse reactions. We investigated beta-blocker prescription at discharge in patients with COPD after MI. ethods and Results-Patients hospitalized for MI between 2005 and 2010 were identified from the nationwide Swedish SWEDEHEART registry. Patients with COPD who were alive and discharged after an MI were selected as the study population. In this cohort, patients who were discharged with beta-blockers were compared to patients not discharged with beta-blockers. The primary end point was all-cause mortality. A total of 4858 patients were included, of which 4086 (84.1%) were discharged with a beta-blocker while 772 (15.9%) were not. After adjusting for potential confounders including baseline characteristics, comorbidities, and in-hospital characteristics, patients discharged with a beta-blocker had lower all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.87, 95% CI 0.78 to 0.98) during the total follow-up time (maximum 7.2 years). In the subgroup of patients with a history of heart failure, the corresponding hazard ratio was 0.77 (95% CI 0.63 to 0.95). Conclusions-Patients with COPD discharged with beta-blockers after an MI had a lower all-cause mortality compared to patients not prescribed beta-blockers. The results indicate that MI patients with COPD may benefit from beta-blockers.

  • 78.
    Andell, Pontus
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, S-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    James, Stefan K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Cannon, Christopher P.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Cardiovasc, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Harvard Clin Res Inst, Boston, MA USA..
    Cyr, Derek D.
    Duke Univ, Med Ctr, Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA..
    Himmelmann, Anders
    AstraZeneca Res & Dev, Molndal, Sweden..
    Husted, Steen
    Hosp Unit West, Dept Med, Herning Holstebro, Denmark..
    Keltai, Matyas
    Semmelweis Univ, Hungarian Inst Cardiol, H-1085 Budapest, Hungary..
    Koul, Sasha
    Lund Univ, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, S-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Santoso, Anwar
    Univ Indonesia, Natl Cardiovasc Ctr, Harapan Kita Hosp, Dept Cardiol,Vasc Med,Fac Med, Jakarta, Indonesia. INSERM, U1148, Paris, France. Hop Bichat Claude Bernard, AP HP, Dept Hosp Univ FIRE, F-75877 Paris, France. Univ Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris, France. Royal Brompton Hosp, ICMS, NHLI Imperial Coll, London SW3 6LY, England..
    Steg, Gabriel
    Storey, Robert F.
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Cardiovasc Sci, Sheffield S10 2TN, S Yorkshire, England..
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Erlinge, David
    Lund Univ, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, S-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Ticagrelor Versus Clopidogrel in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: An Analysis From the Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes (PLATO) Trial2015In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 4, no 10, article id e002490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experiencing acute coronary syndromes (ACS) are at high risk for clinical events. In the Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes (PLATO) trial, ticagrelor versus clopidogrel reduced the primary endpoint of death from vascular causes, myocardial infarction, or stroke after ACS, but increased the incidence of dyspnea, which may lead clinicians to withhold ticagrelor from COPD patients. Methods and Results-In 18 624 patients with ACS randomized to treatment with ticagrelor or clopidogrel, history of COPD was recorded in 1085 (5.8%). At 1 year, the primary endpoint occurred in 17.7% of patients with COPD versus 10.4% in those without COPD (P<0.001). The 1-year event rate for the primary endpoint in COPD patients treated with ticagrelor versus clopidogrel was 14.8% versus 20.6% (hazard ratio [HR]=0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.54 to 0.97), for death from any cause 8.4% versus 12.4% (HR=0.70; 95% CI: 0.47 to 1.04), and for PLATO-defined major bleeding rates at 1 year 14.6% versus 16.6% (HR=0.85; 95% CI: 0.61 to 1.17). Dyspnea occurred more frequently with ticagrelor (26.1% vs. 16.3%; HR=1.71; 95% CI: 1.28 to 2.30). There was no differential increase in the relative risk of dyspnea compared to non-COPD patients (HR=1.85). No COPD status-by-treatment interactions were found, showing consistency with the main trial results. Conclusions-In this post-hoc analysis, COPD patients experienced high rates of ischemic events. Ticagrelor versus clopidogrel reduced and substantially decreased the absolute risk of ischemic events (5.8%) in COPD patients, without increasing overall major bleeding events. The benefit-risk profile supports the use of ticagrelor in patients with ACS and concomitant COPD.

  • 79.
    Andell, Pontus
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Karlsson, Sofia
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Mohammad, Moman A.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Gotberg, Matthias
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Jensen, Jens
    Karolinska Inst, Soder Sjukhuset, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Stockholm, Sweden.;Capio St Gorans Sjukhus, Unit Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Frobert, Ole
    Orebro Univ, Fac Hlth, Dept Cardiol, Orebro, Sweden..
    Angeras, Oskar
    Sahlgrens Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Johan
    Umea Univ Hosp, Heart Ctr, Dept Cardiol, Umea, Sweden..
    Omerovic, Elmir
    Sahlgrens Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Persson, Jonas
    Danderyd Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci, Div Cardiovasc Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Koul, Sasha
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Erlinge, David
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Intravascular Ultrasound Guidance Is Associated With Better Outcome in Patients Undergoing Unprotected Left Main Coronary Artery Stenting Compared With Angiography Guidance Alone2017In: Circulation. Cardiovascular Interventions, ISSN 1941-7640, E-ISSN 1941-7632, Vol. 10, no 5, article id e004813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Small observational studies have indicated better outcome with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance when performing unprotected left main coronary artery (LMCA) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), but the overall picture remains inconclusive and warrants further investigation. We studied the impact of IVUS guidance on outcome in patients undergoing unprotected LMCA PCI in a Swedish nationwide observational study.

    Methods and Results: Patients who underwent unprotected LMCA PCI between 2005 and 2014 because of stable coronary artery disease or acute coronary syndrome were included from the nationwide SCAAR (Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry). Of 2468 patients, IVUS guidance was used in 621 (25.2%). The IVUS group was younger (median age, 70 versus 75 years) and had fewer comorbidities but more complex lesions. IVUS was associated with larger stent diameters (median, 4 mm versus 3.5 mm). After adjusting for potential confounders, IVUS was associated with significantly lower occurrence of the primary composite end point of all-cause mortality, restenosis, or definite stent thrombosis (hazard ratio, 0.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.50-0.84) and all-cause mortality alone (hazard ratio, 0.62; 95% confidence interval, 0.47-0.82). In 340 propensity score-matched pairs, IVUS was also associated with significantly lower occurrence of the primary end point (hazard ratio, 0.54; 95% confidence interval, 0.37-0.80).

    Conclusions: IVUS was associated with an independent and significant outcome benefit when performing unprotected LMCA PCI. Potential mediators of this benefit include larger and more appropriately sized stents, perhaps translating into lower risk of subsequent stent thrombosis. Although residual confounding cannot be ruled out, our findings indicate a possible hazard when performing unprotected LMCA PCI without IVUS guidance.

  • 80.
    Andell, Pontus
    et al.
    Department of Cardiology, Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Sofia
    Department of Cardiology, Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Mohammad, Moman A.
    Department of Cardiology, Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Götberg, Matthias
    Department of Cardiology, Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    James, Stefan
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jensen, Jens
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet, Unit of Medicine, Capio St Görans Sjukhus, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Angeras, Oskar
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden; University and Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Johan
    Department of Cardiology, Heart Centre, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Omerovic, Elmir
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden; University and Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Persson, Jonas
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Koul, Sasha
    Department of Cardiology, Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlinge, David
    Department of Cardiology, Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Intravascular Ultrasound Guidance Is Associated With Better Outcome in Patients Undergoing Unprotected Left Main Coronary Artery Stenting Compared With Angiography Guidance Alone2017In: Circulation. Cardiovascular Interventions, ISSN 1941-7640, E-ISSN 1941-7632, Vol. 10, no 5, article id e004813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Small observational studies have indicated better outcome with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance when performing unprotected left main coronary artery (LMCA) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), but the overall picture remains inconclusive and warrants further investigation. We studied the impact of IVUS guidance on outcome in patients undergoing unprotected LMCA PCI in a Swedish nationwide observational study.

    Methods and Results: Patients who underwent unprotected LMCA PCI between 2005 and 2014 because of stable coronary artery disease or acute coronary syndrome were included from the nationwide SCAAR (Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry). Of 2468 patients, IVUS guidance was used in 621 (25.2%). The IVUS group was younger (median age, 70 versus 75 years) and had fewer comorbidities but more complex lesions. IVUS was associated with larger stent diameters (median, 4 mm versus 3.5 mm). After adjusting for potential confounders, IVUS was associated with significantly lower occurrence of the primary composite end point of all-cause mortality, restenosis, or definite stent thrombosis (hazard ratio, 0.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.50-0.84) and all-cause mortality alone (hazard ratio, 0.62; 95% confidence interval, 0.47-0.82). In 340 propensity score-matched pairs, IVUS was also associated with significantly lower occurrence of the primary end point (hazard ratio, 0.54; 95% confidence interval, 0.37-0.80).

    Conclusions: IVUS was associated with an independent and significant outcome benefit when performing unprotected LMCA PCI. Potential mediators of this benefit include larger and more appropriately sized stents, perhaps translating into lower risk of subsequent stent thrombosis. Although residual confounding cannot be ruled out, our findings indicate a possible hazard when performing unprotected LMCA PCI without IVUS guidance.

  • 81.
    Andell, Pontus
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, S-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Sjogren, Johan
    Skane Univ Hosp, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Dept Cardiothorac Surg, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Batra, Gorav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Szummer, Karolina
    Dept Med, Huddinge, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Koul, Sasha
    Lund Univ, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, S-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Outcome of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and severe coronary artery disease who had a coronary artery bypass graft or a percutaneous coronary intervention2017In: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 52, no 5, p. 930-936Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who also have acute coronary syndromes are a high-risk population with a high mortality rate. Little is known about these patients following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). METHODS: Patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes between 2006 and 2014 with an angiogram showing 3-vessel disease or left main coronary artery involvement who were treated with CABG or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) only were included from the nationwide SWEDEHEART registry. Patients were stratified according to COPD status and compared with regard to outcome. The primary end-point was the 5-year mortality rate; secondary outcomes were the 30-day mortality rate and in-hospital complications after CABG. RESULTS: We identified 6985 patients in the population who had CABG (COPD prevalence = 8.0%) and 14 209 who had PCI only (COPD = 8.2%). Patients with COPD were older and had more comorbidities than patients without COPD. The 5-year mortality rate was nearly doubled in patients with COPD versus patients without COPD (CABG: 27.2% vs 14.5%, P < 0.001; PCI only: 50.1% vs 29.1%, P < 0.001). After adjusting for age, sex and comorbidities, patients with COPD in both CABG-treated [hazard ratio = 1.52 (1.25-1.86), P < 0.001] and PCI-treated populations still had a significantly higher 5-year mortality rate. COPD was also independently associated with significantly more postoperative infections in need of antibiotics [odds ratio = 1.48 (1.07-2.04), P = 0.017] and pneumonia [odds ratio = 2.21 (1.39-3.52), P = 0.001]. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with COPD presenting with acute coronary syndromes and severe coronary artery disease are a high-risk population following CABG or PCI only, with higher risk of long-term and short-term death and postoperative infections. Preventive measures, including careful monitoring for signs of infection and prompt antibiotic treatment when indicated, should be considered.

  • 82.
    Andersen, Kasper
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Disease2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate associations of fitness and types and levels of physical activity with subsequent risk of cardiovascular disease.

    Four large-scale longitudinal cohort studies were used. The exposures were different measures related to physical activity and the outcomes were obtained through linkage to the Swedish In-Patient Register. In a cohort of 466 elderly men without pre-existing cardiovascular disease, we found that skeletal muscle morphology was associated with risk of cardiovascular events. A high amount of type I (slow-twitch, oxidative) skeletal muscle fibres was associated with lower risk of cardiovascular events and high amount of type IIx was associated with higher risk of cardiovascular events. This association was only seen among physically active men. Among 39,805 participants in a fundraising event, higher levels of both total and leisure time physical activity were associated with lower risk of heart failure. The associations were strongest for leisure time physical activity. In a cohort of 53,755 participants in the 90 km skiing event Vasaloppet, a higher number of completed races was associated with higher risk of atrial fibrillation and a higher risk of bradyarrhythmias. Further, better relative performance was associated with a higher risk of bradyarrhythmias. Among 1,26 million Swedish 18-year-old men, exercise capacity and muscle strength were independently associated with lower risk of vascular disease. The associations were seen across a range of major vascular disease events (ischemic heart disease, heart failure, stroke and cardiovascular death). Further, high exercise capacity was associated with higher risk of atrial fibrillation and a U-shaped association with bradyarrhythmias was found. Higher muscle strength was associated with lower risk of bradyarrhythmias and lower risk of ventricular arrhythmias.

    These findings suggest a higher rate of atrial fibrillation with higher levels of physical activity. The higher risk of atrial fibrillation does not appear to lead to a higher risk of stroke. In contrast, we found a strong inverse association of higher exercise capacity and muscle strength with vascular disease. Further, high exercise capacity and muscle strength are related to lower risk of cardiovascular death, including arrhythmia deaths. From a population perspective, the total impact of physical activity on cardiovascular disease is positive.

  • 83.
    Andersen, Kasper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Daniela, Mariosa
    Adami, Hans-Olov
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Lagerros, Ylva Trolle
    Nyren, Olof
    Ye, Weimin
    Bellocco, Rino
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Dose–Response Relationship of Total and Leisure Time Physical Activity to Risk of Heart Failure: a prospective cohort study2014In: Circulation Heart Failure, ISSN 1941-3289, E-ISSN 1941-3297, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 16p. 701-708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background—The nature of the association between levels of physical activity and risk of heart failure is little known. We investigated nonlinear associations of total and leisure time physical activity with risk of heart failure.

    Methods and Results—In 1997, 39 805 persons without heart failure completed a questionnaire of lifestyle factors and medical history. We used Cox regression models to investigate total (adjusting for education and previous myocardial infarction) and direct (multivariable-adjusted) effects of self-reported total and leisure time physical activity on risk of heart failure of any cause and heart failure of nonischemic origin. Heart failure diagnoses were obtained until December 31, 2010. Higher leisure time physical activity was associated with lower risk of heart failure of any cause; hazard ratio of the total effect of leisure time physical activity was for fifth versus first quintile 0.54; 95% confidence interval was 0.44 to 0.66. The direct effect was similar. High total daily physical activity level was associated with lower risk of heart failure, although the effect was less pronounced than for leisure time physical activity (total effect hazard ratio, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.69–0.95; fifth versus first quintile). A similar direct effect observed.

    Conclusions—Leisure time physical activity was inversely related to risk of developing heart failure in a dose–response fashion. This was reflected in a similar but less pronounced association of total physical activity with risk of heart failure. Only part of the effects appeared to be mediated by traditional risk factors.

  • 84.
    Andersen, Kasper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Neovius, Martin
    Tynelius, Per
    Rasmussen, Finn
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Exercise capacity and muscle strength and risk of vascular disease and arrhythmias: A cohort study of 1.26 million young menManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    While physical activity and exercise protects against cardiovascular disease, athletes have higher risk of atrial fibrillation and other arrhythmias. Graded independent and joint influences of exercise capacity and muscle strength on these diseases are unknown.

    Methods:

    All 1.26 million Swedish men who participated in mandatory military conscription between 1972 and 1995 (at a median age of 18.2 years) contributed. Multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the associations of maximal exercise capacity and muscle strength at conscription to subsequent risk of vascular disease and arrhythmias, as identified in national registries.

    Results:

    During a median follow-up of 26.3 years, about 26,000 hospitalizations for vascular disease events and 17,000 for arrhythmias occurred. Exercise capacity was inversely associated with risk of vascular disease (hazard ratio [HR] 0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61-0.67]; for 5th vs. 1st quintile) and so was muscle strength (HR 0.79; 0.76-0.83; for 5th vs. 1st quintile ). Similar associations were seen across a range of major vascular disease events. Exercise capacity was associated with incidence of arrhythmias in a U-shaped fashion (HR 0.91; 0.86-0.96; for 3rd vs. 1st quintile, and 0.99; 0.94-1.04; for 5th vs. 1st quintile). Higher muscle strength was associated with lower risk of arrhythmias (HR 0.87; 0.83-0.91; for 5th vs. 1st quintile). 

    Conclusion:

    Exercise capacity and muscle strength in late adolescence are independently and jointly associated with long-term risk of vascular disease and arrhythmias. The lower risk of vascular events with higher exercise capacity was not outweighed by higher risk of arrhythmias.

  • 85.
    Andersen, Kasper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Skeletal muscle morphology and risk of cardiovascular disease in elderly men2015In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 231-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    While it is well known that physical inactivity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, there is still a search for the mechanisms by which exercise exerts its positive effect. Skeletal muscle fibre type can be affected to some extent by exercise, and different fibre types possess different anti-inflammatory and glucometabolic properties that may influence cardiovascular disease risk.

    DESIGN:

    Population-based cohort study.

    METHODS:

    We investigated relations of skeletal muscle morphology to risk of cardiovascular events in a sample of 466 71-year-old men without cardiovascular disease, of which 295 were physically active (strenuous physical activity at least 3 h/week).

    RESULTS:

    During a median of 13.1 years of follow up, 173 major cardiovascular events occurred. Among physically active men, 10% higher proportion of type-I (slow-twitch oxidative) fibres was associated with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.84 (95% confidence interval 0.74-0.95) for cardiovascular events, and 10% higher proportion of type-IIx (fast-twitch glycolytic) fibres was associated with a HR of 1.24 (1.06-1.45), adjusting for age. Similar results were observed in several sets of multivariable-adjusted models. No association of muscle fibre type with risk of cardiovascular events was observed among physically inactive men.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Higher skeletal muscle proportion of type-I fibres was associated with lower risk of cardiovascular events and a higher proportion of type-IIx fibres was associated with higher risk of cardiovascular events. These relations were only observed in physically active men. Skeletal muscle fibre composition may be a mediator of the protective effects of exercise against cardiovascular disease.

  • 86.
    Andersen, Kasper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Rasmussen, F.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Neovius, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tynelius, P.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Anthropometric measures and risk of atrial fibrillation - a cohort study of 1.2 million young men2015In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, no Suppl. 1, p. 910-910Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 87.
    Andersen, Kasper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Rasmussen, F.
    Lund Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Lund, Sweden.
    Neovius, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tynelius, P.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Epidemiol & Community Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Body size and risk of atrial fibrillation: a cohort study of 1.1 million young men2018In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 283, no 4, p. 346-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Whilst tall stature has been related to lower risk of vascular disease, it has been proposed as a risk factor for atrial fibrillation. Little is known about other anthropometric measures and their joint effects on risk of atrial fibrillation.

    Objectives: We aim to investigate associations and potential joint effects of height, weight, body surface area (BSA) and body mass index (BMI) with risk of atrial fibrillation.

    Methods: In a cohort covering 1 153 151 18-year-old men participating in the Swedish military conscription (1972-1995), Cox regression was used to investigate associations of height, weight, BSA and BMI with risk of atrial fibrillation.

    Results: During a median of 26.3 years of follow-up, higher height was associated with higher risk of atrial fibrillation (hazard ratio [HR] 2.80; 95% CI 2.63-2.98; for 5th vs. 1st quintile) and so was larger BSA (HR 3.05; 95% CI 2.82-3.28; for 5th vs. 1st quintile). Higher weight and BMI were to a lesser extent associated with risk of atrial fibrillation (BMI: 1.42; 95% CI 1.33-1.52, for 5th vs. 1st quintile). We found a multiplicative joint effect of height and weight. Adjusting for muscle strength, exercise capacity and diseases related to atrial fibrillation attenuated these measures.

    Conclusions: Higher height and weight are strongly associated with higher risk of atrial fibrillation. These associations are multiplicative and independent of each other and are summarized in a strong association of body surface area with risk of atrial fibrillation. The mechanisms remain unknown but may involve increased atrial volume load with larger body size.

  • 88.
    Andersen, Kasper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Rasmussen, Finn
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Child & Adolescent Publ Hlth Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Neovius, Martin
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tynelius, Per
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Child & Adolescent Publ Hlth Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Exercise capacity and muscle strength and risk of vascular disease and arrhythmia in 1.1 million young Swedish men: cohort study2015In: BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, ISSN 1756-1833, Vol. 351, article id h4543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the associations of exercise capacity and muscle strength in late adolescence with risk of vascular disease and arrhythmia. DESIGN Cohort study. SETTING General population in Sweden. PARTICIPANTS 1.1 million men who participated in mandatory military conscription between 1 August 1972 and 31 December 1995, at a median age of 18.2 years. Participants were followed until 31 December 2010. MAIN OUTCOMES Associations between exercise capacity and muscle strength with risk of vascular disease and subgroups (ischaemic heart disease, heart failure, stroke, and cardiovascular death) and risk of arrhythmia and subgroups (atrial fibrillation or flutter, bradyarrhythmia, supraventricular tachycardia, and ventricular arrhythmia or sudden cardiac death). Maximum exercise capacity was estimated by the ergometer bicycle test, and muscle strength was measured as handgrip strength by a hand dynamometer. High exercise capacity or muscle strength was deemed as above the median level. RESULTS During a median follow-up of 26.3 years, 26 088 vascular disease events and 17 312 arrhythmia events were recorded. Exercise capacity was inversely associated with risk of vascular disease and its subgroups. Muscle strength was also inversely associated with vascular disease risk, driven by associations of higher muscle strength with lower risk of heart failure and cardiovascular death. Exercise capacity had a U shaped association with risk of arrhythmia, driven by a direct association with risk of atrial fibrillation and a U shaped association with bradyarrhythmia. Higher muscle strength was associated with lower risk of arrhythmia (specifically, lower risk of bradyarrhythmia and ventricular arrhythmia). The combination of high exercise capacity and high muscle strength was associated with a hazard ratio of 0.67 (95% confidence interval 0.65 to 0.70) for vascular events and 0.92 (0.88 to 0.97) for arrhythmia compared with the combination of low exercise capacity and low muscle strength. CONCLUSIONS Exercise capacity and muscle strength in late adolescence are independently and jointly associated with long term risk of vascular disease and arrhythmia. The health benefit of lower risk of vascular events with higher exercise capacity was not outweighed by higher risk of arrhythmia.

  • 89.
    Andersson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Inflammation and lifestyle in cardiovascular medicine2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite major advances in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerosis the last several decades, cardiovascular disease still accounts for the majority of deaths in Sweden. With the population getting older, more obese and with rising numbers of diabetics, the cardiovascular disease burden may increase further in the future.

    The focus in cardiovascular disease has shifted with time from calcification and narrowing of arteries to the biological processes within the atherosclerotic plaque. C-reactive protein (CRP) has emerged as one of many proteins that reflect a low grade systemic inflammation and is suitable for analysis as it is more stable and easily measured than most other inflammatory markers. Several large prospective studies have shown that CRP is not only an inflammatory marker, but even a predictive marker for cardiovascular disease. C-reactive protein is associated with several other risk factors for cardiovascular disease including obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

    Our study of twenty healthy men during a two week endurance cross country skiing tour demonstrated a decline in already low baseline CRP levels immediately after the tour and six weeks later.

    In a study of 200 obese individuals with impaired glucose tolerance randomised to a counselling session at their health care centre or a one month stay at a wellness centre, we found decreased levels of CRP in subjects admitted to the wellness centre. The effect remained at one, but not after three years of follow-up.

    In a prospective, nested, case-referent study with 308 ischemic strokes, 61 intracerebral haemorrhages and 735 matched referents, CRP was associated with ischemic stroke in both uni- and multivariate analyses. No association was found with intracerebral haemorrhages. When classifying ischemic stroke according to TOAST criteria, CRP was associated with small vessel disease. The CRP 1444 (CC/CT vs. TT) polymorphism was associated with plasma levels of CRP, but neither with ischemic stroke nor with intracerebral haemorrhage.

    A study on 129 patients with atrial fibrillation was used to evaluate whether inflammation sensitive fibrinolytic variables adjusted for CRP could predict recurrence of atrial fibrillation after electrical cardioversion. In multivariate iv models, lower PAI-1 mass was associated with sinus rhythm even after adjusting for CRP and markers of the metabolic syndrome.

    In conclusion, lifestyle intervention can be used to reduce CRP levels, but it remains a challenge to maintain this effect. CRP is a marker of ischemic stroke, but there are no significant associations between the CRP1444 polymorphism and any stroke subtype, suggesting that the CRP relationship with ischemic stroke is not causal. The fibrinolytic variable, PAI-1, is associated with the risk of recurrence of atrial fibrillation after electrical cardioversion after adjustment for CRP. Our findings suggest a pathophysiological link between atrial fibrillation and PAI-1, but the relation to inflammation remains unclear.

  • 90.
    Andersson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Johansson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Ladenvall, Per
    Wiklund, Per-Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Stegmayr, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Jern, Christina
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    C-reactive protein is a determinant of first-ever stroke: prospective nested case-referent study2009In: Cerebrovascular Diseases, ISSN 1015-9770, E-ISSN 1421-9786, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 544-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: C-reactive protein (CRP) is a determinant of stroke, but there are no prospective studies on CRP and first ischemic stroke divided into etiologic subtypes. Our primary aim was to study CRP as a determinant of ischemic stroke, classified according to Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) criteria, and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a prospective study. A secondary aim was to study the relationship between the 1444C>T polymorphism, plasma levels of CRP and stroke.

    METHODS: The study was a prospective population-based case-referent study nested within the Northern Sweden Cohorts. We defined 308 cases of ischemic stroke and 61 ICH. Two controls for each case were defined from the same cohort.

    RESULTS: The OR for the highest (>3 mg/l) versus lowest group (<1 mg/l) of CRP was 2.58 (95% CI 1.74-3.84) for ischemic stroke and 1.63 (95% CI 0.67-3.93) for ICH. In a multivariate model including traditional risk factors, CRP remained associated with ischemic stroke (OR 2.06; 95% CI 1.29-3.29). Small-vessel disease was associated with CRP in the multivariate model (OR 3.88; 95% CI 1.10-13.7). The CRP 1444 (CC/CT vs. TT) polymorphism was associated with plasma levels of CRP but neither with ischemic stroke nor with ICH.

    CONCLUSIONS: This prospective population-based study shows that CRP is significantly associated with the risk of having a first ischemic stroke, especially for small-vessel disease. No significant associations were found between the CRP 1444C>T polymorphism and any stroke subtype.

  • 91.
    Andersson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Mellberg, Caroline
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Otten, Julia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Ryberg, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Rinnström, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Larsson, Christel
    Lindahl, Bernt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hauksson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. d Department of Radiography and Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Johansson, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Left ventricular remodelling changes without concomitant loss of myocardial fat after long-term dietary intervention2016In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 216, p. 92-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Accumulation of myocardial triglycerides (MTG) is associated with impaired left ventricular (LV) remodelling and function in obese and diabetic subjects. The role of MTG accumulation in development of heart failure in this group of patients is unknown. Short-term studies suggest that diets that lead to weight loss could mobilize MTG, with a favourable effect on cardiac remodelling. In a 24-month, randomized, investigator-blinded study, we assessed the effect of two different diets and subsequent weight loss on cardiac function and MTG in postmenopausal women. Methods: Sixty-eight healthy postmenopausal women with body mass index [BMI] >= 27 kg/m(2) were randomized to an ad libitum Palaeolithic diet (PD) or a Nordic Nutrition Recommendation (NNR) diet for 24 months. Morphology, cardiac function, and MTG levels were measured using magnetic resonance (MR) scanning, including proton spectroscopy at baseline and 6 and 24 months. Results: Despite mean weight losses of 4.9 (1.0) kg (NNR) and 7.8 (1.1) kg (PD), the MTG content did not change over time (p = 0.98 in the NNR and p = 0.11 in the PD group at 24 months). Reduced left ventricular mass was observed in both diet groups over 24 months. Blood pressure was reduced at 6 months, but returned to baseline levels at 24 months. End diastolic volume, stroke volume, and cardiac output decreased over time. No differences between diet groups were observed. Conclusions: Diet intervention and moderate weight loss over 24 months improved LV remodelling but did not alter MTG levels in overweight/obese postmenopausal women.

  • 92.
    Andersson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Rosenqvist, Mårten
    Tornvall, Per
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    NT-proBNP predicts maintenance of sinus rhythm after electrical cardioversion.2015In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 135, no 2, p. 289-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia. NT-proBNP is a fragment of the prohormone brain natriuretic peptide. Previous studies indicate that increased levels of NT-proBNP are associated with higher recurrence rates of AF after electrical cardioversion. Our null hypothesis was that NT-proBNP does not predict recurrence of AF after restoration of sinus rhythm.

    METHODS: We performed a hypothesis generating study within a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized, prospective multicentre study of the effects of atorvastatin on recurrence of AF after electrical cardioversion. 199 patients with persistent AF and an indication for cardioversion were included in the present substudy. NT-proBNP was assessed prior to cardioversion. Cardioversion was performed according to local standard clinical practice on an elective outpatient basis. Patients were followed-up one month after cardioversion.

    RESULTS: 181 patients had a successful cardioversion and 91 of the study group remained in sinus rhythm at day 30. Recurrence of AF was observed in 108 patients at day 30. An optimal cutpoint for NT-proBNP at 500 ng/L predicted recurrence of AF after cardioversion (OR 2.94; 95% CI 1.30-6.63). In multivariate analysis adjusting for age, sex, hypertension, and treatment group strengthened the results (OR 3,56; 95% CI 1,44-8,81). When analysing the ROC curve of NT-proBNP in baseline and atrial fibrillation at day 30 the result was 0.57.

    CONCLUSION: NT-proBNP levels are a predictor of recurrence of AF 30 days after cardioversion. ROC curves indicates that the practical value of NT-proBNP for the individual patient is limited.

  • 93.
    Andersson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Wennberg, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Lundblad, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Escher, Stefan A
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Diabetes mellitus, high BMI and low education level predict sudden cardiac death within 24 hours of incident myocardial infarction2016In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 23, no 17, p. 1814-1820Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: More than half of cardiovascular mortality occurs outside the hospital, mainly due to consistently low survival rates from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    METHODS: This is a prospective, nested, case-control study derived from the Västerbotten Intervention Programme and the World Health Organization's Multinational Monitoring of Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Disease study in northern Sweden (1986-2006). To determine predictors for sudden cardiac death risk factors for cardiovascular disease were compared between incident myocardial infarction with sudden cardiac death (n = 363) and survivors of incident myocardial infarction (n = 1998) using multivariate logistic regression analysis.

    RESULTS: Diabetes had the strongest association with sudden cardiac death out of all evaluated risk factors (odds ratio (OR) 1.83, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30-2.59), followed by low education (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.19-2.01), high body mass index (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.02-1.08) and male sex (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.001-2.01).

    CONCLUSIONS: The pattern of risk factors for incident myocardial infarction is different among survivors and those who die within 24 hours. The risk factors that contribute the most to death within 24 hours are diabetes mellitus, high body mass index and low education level, and can be addressed at both the public health level and by general practitioners.

  • 94.
    Andersson, Kennet
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Suhr, Ole B.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Faes, Luca
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Directed coherence analysis in patients with severe autonomic dysfunction2014In: 2014 8th conference of the European Study Group on Cardiovascular Oscillations (ESGCO), IEEE conference proceedings, 2014, p. 167-168Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many different approaches have been applied to analyse the coupling between cardiovascular signals. This study evaluated the use of directed coherence, based on multivariate autoregressive modelling, for analysis of cardiovascular signals in patients with transthyretin amyloidosis, a rare disease where severe autonomic dysfunction is common.

  • 95.
    Andersson, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Ronmark, Eva
    Lindberg, Anne
    Emtner, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy.
    Physical activity and fatigue in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - A population based study2015In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 109, no 8, p. 1048-1057Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), symptoms of fatigue, concomitant heart disease and low physical activity levels are more frequently described than in subjects without COPD. However, there are no population-based studies addressing the relationship between physical activity, fatigue and heart disease in COPD. The aim was to compare physical activity levels among subjects with and without COPD in a population based study, and to evaluate if concomitant heart disease and fatigue was associated to physical activity. Methods: In this, 470 subjects with COPD and 659 subjects without COPD (non-COPD) participated in examinations including structured interview and spirometry. A ratio of the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)/best of forced vital capacity (FVC) and vital capacity (VC) <0.7 was used to define COPD. Physical activity was assessed with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), and fatigue with the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy - Fatigue scale (FACIT-F). Results: The prevalence of low physical activity was higher among subjects with FEV1 <80% predicted compared to non-COPD subjects (22.4% vs. 14.6%, p = 0.041). The factors most strongly associated with low physical activity in subjects with COPD were older age, OR 1.52, (95% CI 1.12-2.06), a history of heart disease, OR 2.11 (1.10-4.08), and clinically significant fatigue, OR 2.33 (1.31-4.13); while obesity was the only significant factor among non-COPD subjects, OR 2.26 (1.17-4.35). Conclusion: Physical activity levels are reduced when lung function is decreased below 80% of predicted, and the factors associated with low physical activity are different among subject with and without COPD. We propose that the presence of fatigue and heart disease are useful to evaluate when identifying subjects for pulmonary rehabilitation.

  • 96.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Internal Medicine, County Council of Jönköping, Jönköping.
    Landberg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Norrköping, Sweden.
    Consequences of high-sensitivity troponin T testing applied in a primary care population with chest pain compared with a commercially available point-of-care troponin T analysis: an observational prospective study2015In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:There is a demand for a highly sensitive and specific point-of care test to detect acute myocardial infarction (AMI). It is unclear if a high-sensitivity troponin assay will have enough discriminative power to become a decision support in primary care. The aim of this study was to evaluate a high-sensitivity troponin T assay performed in three primary health care centres in southeast Sweden and to compare the outcome with a point-of-care troponin T test.METHODS:This study included 115 patients who consulted their general practitioner for chest pain, dyspnoea on exertion, unexplained weakness and/or fatigue in the last 7days. Troponin T was analysed by a point-of-care test and a high-sensitivity method together with N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and creatinine. All patients were checked for AMI or unstable angina (UA) within 30days of study enrolment. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was carried out to examine possible connections between troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L, clinical variables and laboratory findings at baseline. In addition, 21 patients with troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L and no signs of AMI or UA were followed up for 2-3years.RESULTS:Three patients were diagnosed with AMI and three with UA. At the [greater than or equal to]15ng/L cut-off, the troponin T method had 100% sensitivity, 75% specificity for AMI and a positive predictive value of 10%. The troponin T point-of-care test missed one case of AMI and the detection limit was 50ng/L. Troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L was correlated to age [greater than or equal to]65years (odds ratio (OR), 10.9 95% CI 2.28-51.8) and NT-proBNP in accordance with heart failure (OR 8.62 95% CI 1.61-46.1). Fourteen of the 21 patients, without signs of AMI or UA at baseline, still had increased troponin T at follow-up after 2-3years.CONCLUSIONS:A high-sensitivity troponin T assay could become useful in primary care as a point-of-care test for patients <65years. For patients older than 65-70years, a higher decision limit than [greater than or equal to]15ng/L should be considered and used in conjunction with clinical parameters and possibly with NT-proBNP.

  • 97.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Sjöberg, Rickard L
    Öhrvik, John
    Leppert, Jerzy
    Effects of family history and personal experience of illness on inclination to change health related behavior2009In: Central European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1210-7778, E-ISSN 1803-1048, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 3-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to examine how personal experience of illness and family history of cardiovascular disease (CVD), adjusted for gender, education and nationality, affects risk behaviour. Subjects were 2054 men and women of age 50 from two countries, Sweden (n=1011) and Poland (n=1043), who were recruited from screening program in primary health care. Family history, personal experience and risk behaviours (smoking habits, exercise habits, BMI-level) were self-reported. The results show that smoking behaviour is affected by personal experience of illness but not by family history of CVD. No effects of these variables were found on the remaining risk related variables that were tested in this study.  These results suggest that individuals with a personal experience of illness may be inclined to change smoking behaviour more than the average person. Smoking prevention strategies may thus benefit from targeting this group in particular.

     

  • 98.
    Andersson, T. A.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Larsen, F.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Pulmonary embolism in Sweden, a national cohort and survival analysis2012In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 33, no suppl. 1, p. 29-29Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 99.
    Andersson, T.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Larsen, F.
    Soderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Searching for CTEPH: a Swedish National Follow-Up after en Episode of Acute Pulmonary Embolism2016In: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation, ISSN 1053-2498, E-ISSN 1557-3117, Vol. 35, no 4, p. S149-S149Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 100.
    Andersson, Therese
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Incidence of acute pulmonary embolism, related comorbidities and survival: analysis of a Swedish national cohort2017In: BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, ISSN 1471-2261, E-ISSN 1471-2261, Vol. 17, article id 155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of the study was to determine the incidence of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) in Sweden and any regional differences. To assess short-and long-term survival analysis after an episode of PE, before and after excluding patients with known malignancies, and to determine the most common comorbidities prior to the PE event. Methods: All in-hospital patients, including children, diagnosed with acute PE in 2005 were retrieved from the Swedish National Patient Registry (NPR) and incidence rates were calculated. All registered comorbidities from 1998 until the index events were collected and survival up to 4 years after the event were calculated and compared to matched controls. Results: There were 5793 patients of all ages diagnosed with acute PE in 2005 resulting in a national incidence of 0.6/1000/year. The mean age was 70 years and 52% were women. The most frequent comorbidities were cardiac-, vascular-, infectious-and gastrointestinal diseases, injuries and malignancies. The mortality rates were more than doubled in patients with recent PE compared to that in a matched control group (49.1% vs 21.9%), and the excess mortality remained after exclusion of deaths occurring within one year and after exclusion of patients with any malignancy prior to the event. Conclusions: PE is associated with high age as well as with multiple comorbidities, and with an increased shortand long-term mortality. This study highlights the importance of a proper follow-up after an acute PE.

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