Change search
Refine search result
1234567 51 - 100 of 965
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Mattsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia
    Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Minga, Eva
    Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Agathangelidis, Andreas
    Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece.;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.;IRCCS San Raffaele Sci Inst, Div Expt Oncol, Strateg Res Program CLL, Milan, Italy..
    Sutton, Lesley Ann
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Scarfo, Lydia
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.;IRCCS San Raffaele Sci Inst, Div Expt Oncol, Strateg Res Program CLL, Milan, Italy..
    Davis, Zadie
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Haematol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England..
    Yan, Xiao-Jie
    Northwell Hlth, Feinstein Inst Med Res, New York, NY USA..
    Plevova, Karla
    CEITEC Cent European Inst Technol, Masarykbrno, Czech Republic.;Univ Hosp Brno, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Sandberg, Yorick
    Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Dept Immunol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Vojdeman, Fie J.
    Rigshosp, Dept Hematol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Tzenou, Tatiana
    Univ Athens, Dept Propaedeut Med 1, Athens, Greece..
    Chu, Charles C.
    Northwell Hlth, Feinstein Inst Med Res, New York, NY USA..
    Veronese, Silvio
    Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Mol Pathol Unit, Niguarda Canc Ctr, Milan, Italy.;Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Dept Haematol, Niguarda Canc Ctr, Milan, Italy..
    Mansouri, Larry
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Smedby, Karin E.
    Karolinska Inst, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Dept Med Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Hematol Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Giudicelli, Veronique
    Univ Montpellier, Lab ImmunoGenet Mol LIGM, IMGT, IGH,UPR CNRS 1142, Montpellier, France..
    Nguyen-Khac, Florence
    Hematol Dept, Paris, France.;Univ Paris 06, Hop Pitie Salpetriere, Paris, France..
    Panagiotidis, Panagiotis
    Univ Athens, Dept Propaedeut Med 1, Athens, Greece..
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    Lund Univ & Hosp, Dept Hematol, Lund Stem Cell Ctr, Lund, Sweden..
    Anagnostopoulos, Achilles
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Hematol Dept, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Lefranc, Marie-Paule
    Univ Montpellier, Lab ImmunoGenet Mol LIGM, IMGT, IGH,UPR CNRS 1142, Montpellier, France..
    Trentin, Livio
    Padova Univ, Hematol & Clin Immunol Branch, Dept Med, Sch Med, Padua, Italy.;Venetian Inst Mol Med, Padua, Italy..
    Catherwood, Mark
    Belfast City Hosp, Dept Hematooncol, Belfast, Antrim, North Ireland..
    Montillo, Marco
    Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Mol Pathol Unit, Niguarda Canc Ctr, Milan, Italy.;Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Dept Haematol, Niguarda Canc Ctr, Milan, Italy..
    Niemann, Carsten U.
    Rigshosp, Dept Hematol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Langerak, Anton W.
    Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Dept Immunol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Pospisilova, Sarka
    CEITEC Cent European Inst Technol, Masarykbrno, Czech Republic.;Univ Hosp Brno, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Stavroyianni, Niki
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Hematol Dept, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Chiorazzi, Nicholas
    Northwell Hlth, Feinstein Inst Med Res, New York, NY USA..
    Oscier, David
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Haematol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England..
    Jelinek, Diane F.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Immunol, Rochester, MN USA..
    Shanafelt, Tait
    Mayo Clin, Dept Med, Div Hematol, Rochester, MN USA..
    Darzentas, Nikos
    CEITEC Cent European Inst Technol, Masarykbrno, Czech Republic..
    Belessi, Chrysoula
    Nikea Gen Hosp, Dept Hematol, Piraeus, Greece..
    Davi, Frederic
    Hematol Dept, Paris, France..
    Ghia, Paolo
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.;IRCCS San Raffaele Sci Inst, Div Expt Oncol, Strateg Res Program CLL, Milan, Italy..
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, Hematol Dept, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    No improvement in long-term survival over time for chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients in stereotyped subsets #1 and #2 treated with chemo(immuno)therapy2018In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 103, no 4, p. E158-E161Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Moreno, Carol
    Hosp Santa Creu & Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain.
    Cuellar, Carolina
    St Pau Hosp, Barcelona, Spain.
    Scarfo, Lydia
    Osped San Raffaele, Segrate, Italy.
    Ghia, Paolo
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy; IRCCS Ist Sci San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.
    Brandell, Richard Rosenquist
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Vicente, Eva Puy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Is FCR the treatment of choice for IGHV mutated CLL without poor FISH cytogenetics?2017In: Leukemia and Lymphoma, ISSN 1042-8194, E-ISSN 1029-2403, Vol. 58, no Supplement: 1, p. 170-171Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Moysiadis, Theodoros
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Xochelli, Aliki
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Jeromin, Sabine
    MLL Munich Leukemia Lab, Munich, Germany.
    Agathangelidis, Andreas
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Mattsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sutton, Lesley Ann
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Minga, Eva
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Scarfo, Lydia
    IRCCS Ist Sci San Raffaele, Div Expt Oncol, Milan, Italy;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.
    Rossi, Davide
    Oncol Inst Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, Switzerland.
    Davis, Zadie
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Haematol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England.
    Villamor, Neus
    Hosp Clin Barcelona, Hemopathol Unit, Barcelona, Spain.
    Parker, Helen
    Univ Southampton, Canc Res UK Ctr, Acad Unit Canc Sci, Canc Genon, Southampton, Hants, England;Univ Southampton, Fac Med, Expt Canc Med Ctr, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Kotaskova, Jana
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic;Univ Hosp Brno, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Stalika, Evangelia
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece;G Papanicolaou Hosp, Hematol Dept, Thessaloniki, Greece;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Plevova, Karla
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic;Univ Hosp Brno, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Mansouri, Larry
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Cortese, Diego
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Navarro, Alba
    Hosp Clin Barcelona, Hemopathol Unit, Barcelona, Spain.
    Delgado, Julio
    Hosp Clin Barcelona, Hematol Dept, Barcelona, Spain.
    Larrayoz, Marta
    Univ Southampton, Canc Res UK Ctr, Acad Unit Canc Sci, Canc Genon, Southampton, Hants, England;Univ Southampton, Fac Med, Expt Canc Med Ctr, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Young, Emma
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Anagnostopoulos, Achilles
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Hematol Dept, Thessaloniki, Greece;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Smedby, Karin E.
    Karolinska Inst, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    Lund Univ & Hosp, Lund Stem Cell Ctr, Dept Hematol, Lund, Sweden.
    Sheehy, Oonagh
    Belfast City Hosp, Dept Hematooncol, Belfast, Antrim, North Ireland.
    Catherwood, Mark
    Belfast City Hosp, Dept Hematooncol, Belfast, Antrim, North Ireland.
    Strefford, Jonathan C.
    Univ Southampton, Canc Res UK Ctr, Acad Unit Canc Sci, Canc Genon, Southampton, Hants, England;Univ Southampton, Fac Med, Expt Canc Med Ctr, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Stavroyianni, Niki
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Hematol Dept, Thessaloniki, Greece;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Belessi, Chrysoula
    Nikea Gen Hosp, Hematol Dept, Piraeus, Greece.
    Pospisilova, Sarka
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic;Univ Hosp Brno, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Oscier, David
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Haematol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England.
    Gaidano, Gianluca
    Amedeo Avogadro Univ Eastern Piedmont, Dept Translat Med, Div Hematol, Novara, Italy.
    Campo, Elias
    Hosp Clin Barcelona, Hemopathol Unit, Barcelona, Spain;Univ Barcelona, Dept Pathol, Barcelona, Spain.
    Haferlach, Claudia
    MLL Munich Leukemia Lab, Munich, Germany.
    Ghia, Paolo
    IRCCS Ist Sci San Raffaele, Div Expt Oncol, Milan, Italy;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Karolinska Inst, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tailored approaches grounded on immunogenetic features for refined prognostication in chronic lymphocytic leukemia2019In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 104, no 2, p. 360-369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients with differential somatic hypermutation status of the immunoglobulin heavy variable genes, namely mutated or unmutated, display fundamental clinico-biological differences. Considering this, we assessed prognosis separately within mutated (M-CLL) and unmutated (U-CLL) CLL in 3015 patients, hypothesizing that the relative significance of relevant indicators may differ between these two categories. Within Binet A M-CLL patients, besides TP53 abnormalities, trisomy 12 and stereotyped subset #2 membership were equivalently associated with the shortest time-to first -treatment and a treatment probability at Five and ten years after diagnosis of 40% and 55%, respectively; the remaining cases exhibited 5-year and 10-year treatment probability of 12% and 25%, respectively. Within Binet A U-CLL patients, besides TP53 abnormalities, del(11q) and/or ST3B1 mutations were associated with the shortest time-to-First treatment (5- and 10-year treatment probability: 78% and 98%, respectively); in the remaining cases, males had a significantly worse prognosis than females. In conclusion, the relative weight of indicators that can accurately risk stratify early-stage CLL patients differs depending on the somatic hypermutation status of the immunoglobulin heavy variable genes of each patient. This finding highlights the fact that compartmentalized approaches based on immunogenetic features are necessary to refine and tailor prognostication in CLL.

  • 54.
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Puiggros, Anna
    Hosp Mar, Lab Citogenet Mol Servei Patol, Barcelona, Spain.;IMIM Hosp Mar, Canc Res Program, Grp Recerca Translac Neoplasies Hematol, Barcelona, Spain..
    Xochelli, Aliki
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Sutton, Lesley-Ann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Nguyen-Khac, Florence
    Hop La Pitie Salpetriere, AP HP, Dept Hematol, Paris, France.;Univ Paris 06, UMRS 1138, Paris, France..
    Gardiner, Anne
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Haematol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England..
    Plevova, Karla
    Univ Hosp Brno, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Minga, Eva
    CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia
    CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Walewska, Renata
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Haematol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England..
    McCarthy, Helen
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Haematol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England..
    Ortega, Margarita
    Hosp Univ Vall Hebron, Barcelona, Spain..
    Collado, Rosa
    Consorcio Hosp Gen Univ Valencia, Valencia, Spain..
    Gonzalez, Teresa
    Fdn Publ Galega Med Xenom, Santiago De Compostela, Spain..
    Granada, Isabel
    Univ Autonoma Barcelona, ICO Hosp Gerans Trias & Pujol, Inst Recerca Leucemia Josep Carreras IJC, Badalona, Spain..
    Luno, Elisa
    Hosp Univ Cent Asturias, Oviedo, Spain..
    Kotaskova, Jana
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, CS-60177 Brno, Czech Republic.;Univ Hosp Brno, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Moysiadis, Theodoros
    CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Davis, Zadie
    Stavroyianni, Niki
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Anagnostopoulos, Achilles
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Strefford, Jonathan C.
    Univ Southampton, Fac Med, Canc Sci, Southampton SO9 5NH, Hants, England..
    Pospisilova, Sarka
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, CS-60177 Brno, Czech Republic..
    Davi, Frederic
    Athanasiadou, Anastasia
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Oscier, David
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Haematol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England..
    Espinet, Blanca
    Hosp Mar, Lab Citogenet Mol Servei Patol, Barcelona, Spain.;IMIM Hosp Mar, Canc Res Program, Grp Recerca Translac Neoplasies Hematol, Barcelona, Spain..
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Additional trisomies amongst patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia carrying trisomy 12: the accompanying chromosome makes a difference2016In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 101, no 7, p. 299-302Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Strefford, Jonathan C.
    Bikos, Vasilis
    Parry, Marina
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Oscier, David
    Splenic marginal-zone lymphoma: ontogeny and genetics2015In: Leukemia and Lymphoma, ISSN 1042-8194, E-ISSN 1029-2403, Vol. 56, no 2, p. 301-310Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Splenic marginal-zone lymphoma (SMZL) is a rare tumor that has recently emerged as a prototype for how the interplay between genetics and environment shapes the natural history of lymphomas. Indeed, the recent identification of molecular immunogenetic subgroups within SMZL may prove to be relevant not only for the sub-classification of the disease but also for improved understanding of the underlying biology. In contrast to other B-cell lymphomas, SMZL lacks a characteristic genetic lesion, although the majority of cases harbor genomic aberrations, as recently revealed by high-throughput studies that identified recurrent genetic aberrations, several in pathways related to marginal-zone differentiation and B-cell signaling. Here we provide an overview of recent research into the molecular and cellular biology of SMZL and related disorders, with special emphasis on immunogenetics and genomic aberrations, and discuss the value of molecular and cellular markers for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of these entities.

  • 56.
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Xochelli, Aliki
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. ;G Papanicolaou Hosp, Hematol Dept, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece.;CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Minga, E.
    CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Karavalakis, G.
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Hematol Dept, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Athanasiadou, A.
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Hematol Dept, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Stalika, E.
    CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Douka, V.
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Hematol Dept, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Protopappa, M.
    Gen Hosp Serres, Hematol Dept, Serres, Greece..
    Mpanti, A.
    Papageorgiou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Kotsianidis, I.
    Democritus Univ Thrace, Dept Hematol, Alexandroupolis, Greece..
    Papaioannou, M.
    Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, AHEPA Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Stavroyianni, N.
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Hematol Dept, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Anagnostopoulos, A.
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Hematol Dept, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Belessi, C.
    Nikea Gen Hosp, Dept Hematol, Piraeus, Greece..
    Hadzidimitriou, A.
    CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. G Papanicolaou Hosp, Hematol Dept, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece.;CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Hypogammaglobulinemia In Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Clinicobiological Associations2016In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 101, p. 438-438Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Ballesteros, J.
    et al.
    Vivia Biotech, Tres Cantos, Spain..
    Scarfo, L.
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.;Osped San Raffaele, Milan, Italy..
    Mattsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Xochelli, A.
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Ranghetti, P.
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.;Osped San Raffaele, Milan, Italy..
    Primo, D.
    Vivia Biotech, Tres Cantos, Spain..
    Robles, A.
    Vivia Biotech, Tres Cantos, Spain..
    Gorrochategui, J.
    Vivia Biotech, Tres Cantos, Spain..
    Martinez Lopez, J.
    Hosp 12 Octubre, Madrid, Spain..
    de la Serna, J.
    Hosp 12 Octubre, Madrid, Spain..
    Gonzalez, M.
    Hosp Clin Univ Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain..
    Munugalavadla, V.
    Gilead Sci Inc, 353 Lakeside Dr, Foster City, CA 94404 USA..
    Tannheimer, S.
    Gilead Sci Inc, 353 Lakeside Dr, Foster City, CA 94404 USA..
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Stamatopoulos, K.
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Ghia, P.
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.;Osped San Raffaele, Milan, Italy..
    Ex Vivo Lymph Node Native Microenvironment Assay Shows Novel Antiproliferative Activity For Idelalisib And Ibrutinib On Cll Cells2016In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 101, p. 426-426Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Ballesteros, Joan
    et al.
    Vivia Biotech, Madrid, Spain..
    Scarfo, Lydia
    Ist Sci San Raffaele, Unit Lymphoid Malignancies, Dept Oncohematol, I-20132 Milan, Italy..
    Mattsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Xochelli, Aliki
    CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Ranghetti, Pamela
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.;Osped San Raffaele, Madrid, Spain..
    Primo, Daniel
    Vivia Biotech, Madrid, Spain..
    Robles, Alicia
    Vivia Biotech, Madrid, Spain..
    Gorrochategui, Julian
    Vivia Biotech, Madrid, Spain..
    Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin
    Hosp Univ 12 Octubre, Madrid, Spain..
    De la Serna, Javier
    Hosp Univ 12 Octubre, Madrid, Spain..
    Gonzalez, Marcos
    Hosp Clin Univ Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain..
    Munugalavadla, Veerendra
    Gilead Sci, Foster City, CA USA..
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Queva, Christophe
    Gilead Sci, Foster City, CA USA..
    Ghia, Paolo
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.;IRCCS Ist Sci San Raffaele, Milan, Italy..
    An Innovative High-Throughput Ex Vivo Drug Assay Incorporating the Native Microenvironment Reveals a Novel Mechanism of Action of Idelalisib in CLL2015In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 126, no 23Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Banch Clausen, Frederik
    et al.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark; Natl Univ Singapore, Singapore.
    Barrett, Angela Natalie
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark; Natl Univ Singapore, Singapore.
    Akkok, Cigdem Akalin
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Armstrong-Fisher, Sylvia
    Scottish Natl Blood Transfus Serv, Scotland.
    Danielsson Bergstrom, Karolina
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Trucco Boggione, Carolina
    Univ Nacl Rosario, Argentina.
    Sillhagen Baevre, Mette
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Choolani, Mahesh
    Natl Univ Singapore City, Singapore.
    Christiansen, Mette
    Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Cotorruelo, Carlos
    Univ Nacl Rosario, Argentina.
    Drnovsek, Tadeja Dovc
    Blood Transfus Ctr Slovenia, Slovenia.
    Finning, Kirstin
    NHS Blood and Transplant, England.
    Guz, Katarzyna
    Inst Hematol and Transfus Med, Poland.
    de Haas, Masja
    Sanquin Blood Supply Fdn, Netherlands.
    Haimila, Katri
    Finnish Red Cross Blood Serv, Finland.
    Halldorsdottir, Anna Margret
    Landspitali Univ Hosp, Iceland.
    Hellberg, Asa
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Henny, Christine
    Interreg Blood Transfus SRC, Switzerland.
    Holmertz, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Al Houghton, Jayne
    Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Hyland, Catherine
    Australian Red Cross Blood Serv, Australia.
    Jakobsen, Marianne Antonius
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Kvitland, Mona Andersen
    St Olavs Hosp, Norway.
    Lambert, Mark
    Natl Blood Ctr, Ireland.
    Legler, Tobias J.
    Georg August Univ, Germany.
    Liew, Yew-Wah
    Australian Red Cross Blood Serv, Australia.
    Muniz-Diaz, Eduardo
    Banc Sang and Teixits, Spain.
    Mortberg, Anette
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Niederhauser, Christoph
    Interreg Blood Transfus SRC, Switzerland.
    Nogues, Nuria
    Banc Sang and Teixits, Spain.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Hematopoiesis and Developmental Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Olsson, Martin L.
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Orzinska, Agnieszka
    Inst Hematol and Transfus Med, Poland.
    Parks, Michael
    Nonacus Ltd, England.
    Rietkotter, Eva
    LADR GmbH MVZ Dr Kramer and Kollegen, Germany.
    Ryan, Helen
    Natl Blood Ctr, Ireland.
    Sachs, Ulrich J.
    Justus Liebig Univ, Germany.
    van der Schoot, Ellen
    Sanquin Res CLB, Netherlands.
    Silcock, Lee
    Nonacus Ltd, England.
    Steffensen, Rudi
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Sulin, Kati
    Finnish Red Cross Blood Serv, Finland.
    Sorensen, Anne Solling
    Naestved Hosp, Denmark.
    Tarrant, Sarah
    NHS Blood and Transplant, England.
    Thorlacius, Steinunn
    Landspitali Univ Hosp, Iceland.
    Wienzek-Lischka, Sandra
    Justus Liebig Univ, Germany.
    Wikman, Agneta
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Wulf-Johansson, Helle
    Naestved Hosp, Denmark.
    Zupan, Mojca
    Blood Transfus Ctr Slovenia, Slovenia.
    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark; Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Noninvasive fetal RHD genotyping to guide targeted anti-D prophylaxis-an external quality assessment workshop2019In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 114, no 4, p. 386-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objectives Fetal RHD genotyping of cell-free fetal DNA from RhD-negative pregnant women can be used to guide targeted antenatal and postnatal anti-D prophylaxis for the prevention of RhD immunization. To assure the quality of clinical testing, we conducted an external quality assessment workshop with the participation of 28 laboratories. Materials and Methods Aliquots of pooled maternal plasma were sent to each laboratory. One sample was positive, and the second sample was negative for fetal RHD, verified by pre-workshop testing using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis of RHD exons 4, 5, 7 and 10. Plasma samples were shipped at room temperature. A reporting scheme was supplied for data collection, including questions regarding the methodological setup, results and clinical recommendations. Different methodological approaches were used, all employing qPCR with a total of eight different combinations of RHD exon targets. The samples were tested blindly. Results Fetal RHD genotyping was performed with no false-negative and no false-positive results. One inconclusive result was reported for the RHD-positive sample, and four inconclusive results were reported for the RHD-negative sample. All clinical conclusions were satisfactory. Conclusion This external quality assessment workshop demonstrates that despite the different approaches taken to perform the clinical assays, fetal RHD genotyping is a reliable laboratory assay to guide targeted use of Rh prophylaxis in a clinical setting.

  • 60. Banegas, José R
    et al.
    López-García, Esther
    Dallongeville, Jean
    Guallar, Eliseo
    Halcox, Julian P
    Borghi, Claudio
    Massó-González, Elvira L
    Sazova, Ogün
    Perk, Joep
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Steg, Philippe Gabriel
    De Backer, Guy
    Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando
    Achievement of lipoprotein goals among patients with metabolic syndrome at high cardiovascular risk across Europe. The EURIKA study.2013In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 166, no 1, p. 210-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To examine for the first time the achievement of lipoprotein treatment goals in patients with metabolic syndrome and lipid abnormalities who are at elevated cardiovascular risk in Europe. METHODS: Cross-sectional study conducted in 2009-2010 in 12 European countries among outpatients aged ≥50years free of clinical cardiovascular disease. We assessed achievement of American Diabetes Association/American College of Cardiology lipid treatment goals in those with metabolic syndrome at highest risk (diabetes plus ≥1 additional major cardiovascular risk factor beyond lipid abnormalities) or high risk (no diabetes but ≥2 additional major cardiovascular risk factors). RESULTS: Among 1431 highest-risk patients, 64.6% (between-country range [BCR] 40-84.5%) were on lipid-lowering medication. Of them, 13.4% (BCR: 2.5-28.6%) had LDL-cholesterol<70mg/dl, non-HDL-cholesterol<100mg/dl, and apolipoprotein B<80mg/dl. Among 832 high-risk patients, 38.7% BCR: 27.5-55.3%) were on lipid-lowering medication. Of them, 20.5% (BCR: 5.5-57.6%) had LDL-cholesterol<100mg/dl, non-HDL-cholesterol<130mg/dl, and apolipoprotein B<90mg/dl. About 96% of highest-risk patients and 94% of high-risk patients were given at least one lifestyle advice (weight reduction, healthy diet, physical activity, no-smoking), but only 1.3% of the former and 4.9% of the latter reached all three lipid goals. CONCLUSION: There is a substantial gap between clinical guidelines and medical practice since only one in 5-7 patients met all treatment targets. Although most patients received lifestyle advice, the effectiveness of counseling was very low. Large between-country differences in outcomes suggest considerable room for improvement.

  • 61.
    Barbuil, Tiziano
    et al.
    Osped Giovanni 23, Div Hematol, Bergamo, Italy.
    Tefferi, Ayalew
    Mayo Clin, Dept Med, Div Hematol, Rochester, MN USA.
    Vannucchi, Alessandro M.
    Univ Florence, AOU Careggi, Ctr Res & Innovat Myeloproliferat Neoplasms, CRIMM, Florence, Italy.
    Passamonti, Francesco
    Univ Insubria, Osped Circolo, Dept Med & Surg, Div Hematol,ASST Sette Laghi, Varese, Italy.
    Silvers, Richard T.
    Weill Cornell Med, Div Hematol Oncol, New York, NY USA.
    Hoffman, Ronald
    Mt Sinai Sch Med, Dept Med, Tisch Canc Inst, New York, NY USA.
    Verstovsek, Srdan
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Leukemia, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Mesa, Ruben
    UT Hlth San Antonio Canc Ctr, San Antonio, TX USA.
    Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques
    Univ Paris 07, Hop St Louis, AP HP, INSERM,Ctr Invest Clin CIC 1427, Paris, France.
    Hehlmann, Rudiger
    Heidelberg Univ, Univ Hosp Mannheim, Dept Hematol & Oncol, Mannheim, Germany.
    Reiter, Andreas
    Heidelberg Univ, Univ Hosp Mannheim, Dept Hematol & Oncol, Mannheim, Germany.
    Cervantes, Francisco
    Univ Barcelona, IDIBAPS, Hosp Clin, Barcelona, Spain.
    Harrison, Claire
    Guys & St Thomas NHS Fdn Trust, Dept Hematol, London, England.
    Mc Mullin, Mary Frances
    Queens Univ, Ctr Med Educ, Belfast, Antrim, North Ireland.
    Hasselbalch, Hans Carl
    Zealand Univ Hosp, Dept Hematol, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Koschmieder, Steffen
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Fac Med, Dept Hematol Oncol Hemostaseol & Stem Cell Transp, Aachen, Germany.
    Marchetti, Monia
    Hosp Cardinal Massaia, Oncol SOC, Hematol Day Serv, Asti, Italy.
    Bacigalupo, Andrea
    Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Fdn Policlin Univ Gemelli, Ist Ematol, Rome, Italy.
    Finazzil, Guido
    Osped Giovanni 23, Div Hematol, Bergamo, Italy.
    Kroeger, Nicolaus
    Univ Hosp Hamburg Eppendorf, Dept Stem Cell Transplantat, Hamburg, Germany.
    Griesshammer, Martin
    Univ Hannover, Acad Hosp, Johannes Wesling Med Ctr Minden, Dept Hematol & Oncol, Minden, Germany.
    Birgegård, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Barosi, Giovanni
    IRCCS Policlin S Matteo Fdn, Ctr Study Myelofibrosis, Pavia, Italy.
    Philadelphia chromosome-negative classical myeloproliferative neoplasms: revised management recommendations from European LeukemiaNet2018In: Leukemia, ISSN 0887-6924, E-ISSN 1476-5551, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 1057-1069Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This document updates the recommendations on the management of Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph-neg MPNs) published in 2011 by the European LeukemiaNet (ELN) consortium. Recommendations were produced by multiple-step formalized procedures of group discussion. A critical appraisal of evidence by using Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology was performed in the areas where at least one randomized clinical trial was published. Seven randomized controlled trials provided the evidence base; earlier phase trials also informed recommendation development. Key differences from the 2011 diagnostic recommendations included: lower threshold values for hemoglobin and hematocrit and bone marrow examination for diagnosis of polycythemia vera (PV), according to the revised WHO criteria; the search for complementary clonal markers, such as ASXL1, EZH2, IDH1/IDH2, and SRSF2 for the diagnosis of myelofibrosis (MF) in patients who test negative for JAK2V617, CALR or MPL driver mutations. Regarding key differences of therapy recommendations, both recombinant interferon alpha and the JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib are recommended as second-line therapies for PV patients who are intolerant or have inadequate response to hydroxyurea. Ruxolitinib is recommended as first-line approach for MF-associated splenomegaly in patients with intermediate-2 or high-risk disease; in case of intermediate-1 disease, ruxolitinib is recommended in highly symptomatic splenomegaly. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is recommended for transplant-eligible MF patients with high or intermediate-2 risk score. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is also recommended for transplant-eligible MF patients with intermediate-1 risk score who present with either refractory, transfusion-dependent anemia, blasts in peripheral blood > 2%, adverse cytogenetics, or high-risk mutations. In these situations, the transplant procedure should be performed in a controlled setting.

  • 62. Barosi, G
    et al.
    Tefferi, A
    Besses, C
    Birgegård, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Cervantes, F
    Finazzi, G
    Gisslinger, H
    Griesshammer, M
    Harrison, C
    Hehlmann, R
    Hermouet, S
    Kiladjian, J-J
    Kröger, N
    Mesa, R
    Mc Mullin, M F
    Pardanani, A
    Passamonti, F
    Samuelsson, J
    Vannucchi, A M
    Reiter, A
    Silver, R T
    Verstovsek, S
    Tognoni, G
    Barbui, T
    Clinical end points for drug treatment trials in BCR-ABL1-negative classic myeloproliferative neoplasms: consensus statements from European LeukemiaNET (ELN) and Internation Working Group-Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Research and Treatment (IWG-MRT)2015In: Leukemia, ISSN 0887-6924, E-ISSN 1476-5551, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 20-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The discovery of somatic mutations, primarily JAK2V617F and CALR, in classic BCR-ABL1-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) has generated interest in the development of molecularly targeted therapies, whose accurate assessment requires a standardized framework. A working group, comprised of members from European LeukemiaNet (ELN) and International Working Group for MPN Research and Treatment (IWG-MRT), prepared consensus-based recommendations regarding trial design, patient selection and definition of relevant end points. Accordingly, a response able to capture the long-term effect of the drug should be selected as the end point of phase II trials aimed at developing new drugs for MPNs. A time-to-event, such as overall survival, or progression-free survival or both, as co-primary end points, should measure efficacy in phase III studies. New drugs should be tested for preventing disease progression in myelofibrosis patients with early disease in randomized studies, and a time to event, such as progression-free or event-free survival should be the primary end point. Phase III trials aimed at preventing vascular events in polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia should be based on a selection of the target population based on new prognostic factors, including JAK2 mutation. In conclusion, we recommended a format for clinical trials in MPNs that facilitates communication between academic investigators, regulatory agencies and drug companies.

  • 63.
    Barro, Lassina
    et al.
    Taipei Med Univ, Coll Biomed Engn, Int PhD Program Biomed Engn, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Su, Yu-Ting
    Taipei Med Univ, Sch Med, Dept Biochem & Mol Cell Biol, Coll Med, Taipei, Taiwan;Taipei Med Univ, Res Ctr Cell Therapy & Regenerat Med, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Nebie, Ouada
    Taipei Med Univ, Grad Inst Biomed Mat & Tissue Engn, Coll Biomed Engn, 250 Wu Xing St, Taipei 11031, Taiwan.
    Wu, Yu-Wen
    Taipei Med Univ, Grad Inst Biomed Mat & Tissue Engn, Coll Biomed Engn, 250 Wu Xing St, Taipei 11031, Taiwan.
    Huang, Yen-Hua
    Taipei Med Univ, Sch Med, Dept Biochem & Mol Cell Biol, Coll Med, Taipei, Taiwan;Taipei Med Univ, Res Ctr Cell Therapy & Regenerat Med, Taipei, Taiwan;Taipei Med Univ, Coll Med, Int PhD Program Cell Therapy & Regenerat Med, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Koh, Mickey B. C.
    St Georges Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, Stem Cell Transplantat Programme, London SW17 0QT, England;Hlth Sci Author, Blood Serv Grp, Cell Therapy Programme, Singapore, Singapore.
    Knutson, Folke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Burnouf, Thierry
    Taipei Med Univ, Coll Biomed Engn, Int PhD Program Biomed Engn, Taipei, Taiwan;Taipei Med Univ, Grad Inst Biomed Mat & Tissue Engn, Coll Biomed Engn, 250 Wu Xing St, Taipei 11031, Taiwan;Taipei Med Univ, Coll Med, Int PhD Program Cell Therapy & Regenerat Med, Taipei, Taiwan.
    A double-virally-inactivated (Intercept-solvent/detergent) human platelet lysate for in vitro expansion of human mesenchymal stromal cells2019In: Transfusion, ISSN 0041-1132, E-ISSN 1537-2995, Vol. 59, no 6, p. 2061-2073Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND Pooled human platelet lysate (HPL) can replace fetal bovine serum (FBS) as xeno-free supplement for ex vivo expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). We evaluate here whether a double-virally-inactivated HPL (DVI-HPL) prepared from expired Intercept-treated platelet concentrates (PCs) and treated by solvent/detergent (S/D) can be used for MSC expansion. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Expired Intercept-treated PCs in 65% platelet (PLT) additive solution were pooled and subjected to a 1% tri-n-butyl phosphate/1% Triton X-45 treatment followed by soybean oil, hydrophobic interaction chromatography purification, and sterile filtration. Bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) were expanded for four passages in growth medium containing 10% DVI-HPL, I-HPL (from Intercept-PC only), untreated HPL, and FBS. MSC morphology, doubling time, immunophenotype, immunosuppressive activity, and differentiation capacity were compared. RESULTS Expanded cells had typical spindle morphology and showed higher viability in all HPL conditions than in FBS. The DVI-HPL and FBS-expanded cells were morphologically larger than in I-HPL and HPL supplements. The cumulative population doubling was lower using DVI-HPL than with HPL and I-HPL, but significantly higher than using FBS. Immunophenotype was not affected by the supplements used. Immunosuppressive activity was maintained with all supplements. Differentiation capacity into chondrocytes and osteocytes was more effective in DVI-HPL but less toward adipocytes compared to other supplements. CONCLUSIONS Human PLT lysate made from Intercept-PCs subjected to S/D treatment may be an alternative to untreated HPL and to I-HPL for BM-MSC expansion. This finding reinforces the potential of HPL as a virally safe alternative to FBS for clinical grade MSC expansion protocols.

  • 64.
    Baudet, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Gene Therapy Lund University Lund Sweden; Department of Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Lund University Lund Sweden .
    Ek, Fredrik
    Department of Chemical Biology and Therapeutics Lund University Lund Sweden.
    Davidsson, Josef
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Gene Therapy Lund University Lund Sweden.
    Soneji, Shamit
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Gene Therapy Lund University Lund Sweden.
    Olsson, Roger
    Department of Chemical Biology and Therapeutics Lund University Lund Sweden.
    Magnusson, Mattias
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Gene Therapy Lund University Lund Sweden.
    Cammenga, Jörg
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Gene Therapy Lund University Lund Sweden;Department of Chemical Biology and Therapeutics Lund University Lund Sweden .
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    Department of Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Lund University Lund Sweden; Departments of Haematology Skanes University Hospital Lund University Lund Sweden.
    Small molecule screen identifies differentiation-promoting compounds targeting genetically diverse acute myeloid leukaemia2016In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141, Vol. 175, no 2, p. 342-346Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 65.
    Baygan, Arjang
    et al.
    Translational Cell Therapy Research Group (TCR), Division of Therapeutic Immunology, Department of LabMed, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Aronsson-Kurttila, Wictor
    Translational Cell Therapy Research Group (TCR), Division of Therapeutic Immunology, Department of LabMed, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Moretti, Gianluca
    Translational Cell Therapy Research Group (TCR), Division of Therapeutic Immunology, Department of LabMed, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tibert, Babylonia
    Translational Cell Therapy Research Group (TCR), Division of Therapeutic Immunology, Department of LabMed, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahllöf, Göran
    Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Klingspor, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Microbiology. Department of Microbiology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology.
    Khoein, Bita
    Translational Cell Therapy Research Group (TCR), Division of Therapeutic Immunology, Department of LabMed, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Moll, Guido
    Translational Cell Therapy Research Group (TCR), Division of Therapeutic Immunology, Department of LabMed, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hausmann, Charlotta
    Center for Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation, Department of Pathology/Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svahn, Britt-Marie
    Translational Cell Therapy Research Group (TCR), Division of Therapeutic Immunology, Department of LabMed, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westgren, Magnus
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Remberger, Mats
    Center for Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation, Department of Pathology/Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sadeghi, Behnam
    Translational Cell Therapy Research Group (TCR), Division of Therapeutic Immunology, Department of LabMed, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ringden, Olle
    Translational Cell Therapy Research Group (TCR), Division of Therapeutic Immunology, Department of LabMed, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Safety and Side Effects of Using Placenta-Derived Decidual Stromal Cells for Graft-versus-Host Disease and Hemorrhagic Cystitis2017In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 8, article id 795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are increasingly used in regenerate medicine. Placenta-derived decidual stromal cells (DSCs) are a novel therapy for acute graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) and hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). DSCs are more immunosuppressive than MSCs. We assessed adverse events and safety using DSCs among 44 treated patients and 40 controls. The median dose of infused cells was 1.5 (range 0.9–2.9) × 106 DSCs/kg. The patients were given 2 (1–5) doses, with a total of 82 infusions. Monitoring ended 3 months after the last DSC infusion. Three patients had transient reactions during DSC infusion. Laboratory values, hemorrhages, and transfusions were similar in the two groups. The frequency of leukemic relapse (2/2, DSC/controls) and invasive fungal infections (6/6) were the same in the two groups. Causes of death were those seen in HSCT patients: infections (5/3), respiratory failure (1/1), circulatory failure (3/1), thromboembolism (1/0), multiorgan failure (0/1), and GVHD and others (2/7). One-year survival for the DSC patients with GVHD was 67%, which was significantly better than achieved previously at our center. One-year survival was 90% in the DSC-treated HC group. DSC infusions appear safe. Randomized studies are required to prove efficacy.

  • 66.
    Beghini, A.
    et al.
    Univ Milan, Dept Hlth Sci, Milan, Italy..
    Lazzaroni, F.
    Univ Milan, Dept Hlth Sci, Milan, Italy..
    Del Giacco, L.
    Univ Milan, Dept Biosci, Milan, Italy..
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Biasci, D.
    Univ Cambridge, Cambridge Inst Med Res, Cambridge, England..
    Turrini, M.
    Valduce Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Como, Italy..
    Prosperi, L.
    Univ Milan, Dept Biosci, Milan, Italy..
    Brusamolino, R.
    Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Dept Pathol, Milan, Italy..
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Cairoli, R.
    Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Dept Oncol, Hematol Unit, Milan, Italy..
    Clinical Relevance Of Recurrent Allele-Specific Recombination Expressing The Wnt10Bivs1 Allele Variant In Acute Myeloid Leukemia2016In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 101, p. 668-669Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 67.
    Bejanyan, Nelli
    et al.
    Univ Minnesota, Div Hematol Oncol & Transplantat, 420 Delaware St SE,Mayo Mail Code 480, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA.
    Zhang, Mei-Jie
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Inst Hlth & Soc, Div Biostat, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA;Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, CIBMTR Ctr Int Blood & Marrrow Trasnsplantat, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.
    Wang, Hai-Lin
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, CIBMTR Ctr Int Blood & Marrrow Trasnsplantat, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.
    Lazaryan, Aleksandr
    Univ Minnesota, Div Hematol Oncol & Transplantat, 420 Delaware St SE,Mayo Mail Code 480, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA.
    de Lima, Marcos
    Univ Hosp Case Med Ctr, Seidman Canc Ctr, Dept Med, Cleveland, OH USA.
    Marks, David I.
    Univ Hosp Bristol NHS Trust, Adult Bone Marrow Transplant, Bristol, Avon, England.
    Sandmaier, Brenda M.
    Univ Washington, Div Med Oncol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA;Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Res, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Bachanova, Veronika
    Univ Minnesota, Div Hematol Oncol & Transplantat, 420 Delaware St SE,Mayo Mail Code 480, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA.
    Rowe, Jacob
    Shaare Zedek Med Ctr, Dept Hematol, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Tallman, Martin
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Med, Leukemia Serv, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA.
    Kebriaei, Partow
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Div Canc Med, Dept Stem Cell Transplantat, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed
    H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Tampa, FL USA.
    Gale, Robert Peter
    Imperial Coll London, Div Expt Med, Dept Med, Hematol Res Ctr, London, England.
    Lazarus, Hillard M.
    Univ Hosp Cleveland Med Ctr, Seidman Canc Ctr, Cleveland, OH USA.
    Ustun, Celalettin
    Univ Minnesota, Div Hematol Oncol & Transplantat, 420 Delaware St SE,Mayo Mail Code 480, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA.
    Copelan, Edward
    Carolinas HealthCare Syst, Levine Canc Inst, Dept Hematol Oncol & Blood Disorders, Charlotte, NC USA.
    Hamilton, Betty Ky
    Cleveland Clin, Taussig Canc Inst, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA.
    Schiller, Gary
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, David Geffen Sch Med, Hematol Malignancy Stem Cell Transplant Program, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Hogan, William
    Mayo Clin Rochester, Dept Hematol, Rochester, MN USA;Mayo Clin Rochester, Transplant Ctr, Rochester, MN USA.
    Hashmi, Shahrukh
    Mayo Clin, Dept Internal Med, Rochester, MN USA;King Faisal Specialist Hosp & Res Ctr, Ctr Oncol, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Seftel, Matthew
    CancerCare Manitoba, Dept Med Oncol & Hematol, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
    Kanakry, Christopher G.
    NCI, Expt Transplantat & Immunol Branch, Ctr Canc Res, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Olsson, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Therapeut Immunol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Martino, Rodrigo
    Hosp Santa Creu & Sant Pau, Div Clin Hematol, Barcelona, Spain.
    Saber, Wael
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, CIBMTR Ctr Int Blood & Marrrow Trasnsplantat, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.
    Khoury, H. Jean
    Emory Univ Hosp, 1364 Clifton Rd NE, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA.
    Weisdorf, Daniel J.
    Univ Minnesota, Div Hematol Oncol & Transplantat, 420 Delaware St SE,Mayo Mail Code 480, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA.
    Pretransplant Consolidation Is Not Beneficial for Adults with ALL Undergoing Myeloablative Allogeneic Transplantation2018In: Biology of blood and marrow transplantation, ISSN 1083-8791, E-ISSN 1523-6536, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 945-955Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) is curative for patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who achieve complete remission (CR1) with chemotherapy. However, the benefit of consolidation chemotherapy remains uncertain in patients undergoing alloHCT. We compared clinical outcomes of 524 adult patients with ALL in CR1 who received ≥2 (n = 109), 1 (n = 93), or 0 cycles (n = 322) of consolidation before myeloablative alloHCT from 2008 to 2012. As expected, time to alloHCT was longer with increasing cycles of consolidation. Patients receiving ≥2, 1, or 0 cycles of consolidation had an adjusted 3-year cumulative incidence of relapse of 20%, 27%, and 22%; 1-year transplant-related mortality (TRM) of 16%, 18%, and 23%; adjusted 3-year leukemia-free survival (LFS) of 54%, 48%, and 47%; and 3-year overall survival (OS) of 63%, 59%, and 54% (all P values >.40). Multivariable analysis confirmed that consolidation was not prognostic for LFS (relative risk, 1.20, 95% confidence interval, .86 to 1.67; P = .28 for no consolidation; RR, 1.18, 95% confidence interval, .79 to 1.76; P = .41 for 1 cycle versus ≥2 cycles = reference). Similarly, consolidation was not associated with OS, relapse, TRM, or graft-versus-host disease. We conclude that consolidation chemotherapy does not appear to provide added benefit in adult ALL patients with available donors who undergo myeloablative alloHCT in CR1.

  • 68. Benner, Axel
    et al.
    Mansouri, Larry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Rossi, Davide
    Majid, Aneela
    Willander, Kerstin
    Parker, Anton
    Bond, Gareth
    Pavlova, Sarka
    Nueckel, Holger
    Merkel, Olaf
    Ghia, Paolo
    Montserrat, Emili
    Kaderi, Mohd Arifin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Gaidano, Gianluca
    Dyer, Martin J. S.
    Soederkvist, Peter
    Linderholm, Mats
    Oscier, David
    Tvaruzkova, Zuzana
    Pospisilova, Sarka
    Duehrsen, Ulrich
    Greil, Richard
    Doehner, Hartmut
    Stilgenbauer, Stephan
    Zenz, Thorsten
    MDM2 promotor polymorphism and disease characteristics in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: results of an individual patient data-based meta-analysis2014In: Haematologica (online), ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 99, no 8, p. 1285-1291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of single nucleotide polymorphisms have been associated with disease predisposition in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. A single nucleotide polymorphism in the MDM2 promotor region, MDM2SNP309, was shown to soothe the p53 pathway. In the current study, we aimed to clarify the effect of the MDM2SNP309 on chronic lymphocytic leukemia characteristics and outcome. We performed a meta-analysis of data from 2598 individual patients from 10 different cohorts. Patients' data and genetic analysis for MDM2SNP309 genotype, immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region mutation status and fluorescence in situ hybridization results were collected. There were no differences in overall survival based on the polymorphism (log rank test, stratified by study cohort; P=0.76; GG genotype: cohort-adjusted median overall survival of 151 months; TG: 153 months; TT: 149 months). In a multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, advanced age, male sex and unmutated immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region genes were associated with inferior survival, but not the MDM2 genotype. The MDM2SNP309 is unlikely to influence disease characteristics and prognosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Studies investigating the impact of individual single nucleotide polymorphisms on prognosis are often controversial. This may be due to selection bias and small sample size. A meta-analysis based on individual patient data provides a reasonable strategy for prognostic factor analyses in the case of small individual studies. Individual patient data-based meta-analysis can, therefore, be a powerful tool to assess genetic risk factors in the absence of large studies.

  • 69.
    Ben-Yosef, Yaara
    et al.
    PixCell Med Technol Ltd, Yokneam Ilit, Israel.
    Marom, Barak
    PixCell Med Technol Ltd, Yokneam Ilit, Israel.
    Hirshberg, Galit
    PixCell Med Technol Ltd, Yokneam Ilit, Israel.
    D'Souza, Carol
    Univ Westminster, Fac Sci & Technol, Biomed Sci, London, England.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Bransky, Avishay
    PixCell Med Technol Ltd, Yokneam Ilit, Israel.
    The HemoScreen, a novel haematology analyser for the point of care2016In: Journal of Clinical Pathology, ISSN 0021-9746, E-ISSN 1472-4146, Vol. 69, no 8, p. 720-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: A haematology analyser, based on a new technology, is presented herein. The analyser that provides a complete blood count (CBC) and five-part differential accepts disposable cartridges containing all required reagents, making it maintenance-free and ideal for point-of-care (POC) settings. The test reproducibility and imperviousness to analytical errors are attributed to the imaging-based analysis employed. Imaging enables cell-morphology-based differentiation, which is analogous to the gold standard microscopic analysis. This article presents the HemoScreen new technology and evaluates its performance through a small-scale study conducted in its designated clinical settings.

    METHODS: Thirty anticoagulated whole blood samples were analysed on the HemoScreen and Sysmex XE-2100. Linear regression was performed for the methods comparison. Two samples with 15 replicates were processed for imprecision. Ease of use of the device was also considered.

    RESULTS: The HemoScreen demonstrated acceptable imprecision and good agreement with the Sysmex XE-2100. The white blood cells (WBCs), red blood cells (RBCs), haemoglobin (HGB), haematocrit (HCT), platelets (PLT), neutrophils, lymphocytes and eosinophils have coefficients of correlation (r) >0.97. For mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell HGB (MCH) and RBC distribution width (RDW), r values ranged from 0.92 to 0.96. For mean cell HGB concentration (MCHC) and monocytes r=0.82 was demonstrated. User-friendliness and suitability of the device for operation in the designated POC settings was also confirmed.

    CONCLUSIONS: The HemoScreen employs innovative technologies of viscoelastic focusing and microfluidics within a disposable cartridge for an image-based blood cell analysis. By providing accurate and repeatable CBC and five-part differential results within minutes and maintaining the simplicity of operation, the HemoScreen could have far-reaching implications for use at POC. Further extended evaluation is in progress.

  • 70. Berenjian, Saideh
    et al.
    Hu, Kefei
    Abedi-Valugerdi, Manuchehr
    Hassan, Moustapha
    Hassan, Sadia Bashir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Morein, Bror
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Medicine.
    The nanoparticulate Quillaja saponin KGI exerts anti-proliferative eff ects by down-regulation of cell cycle molecules in U937 and HL-60 human leukemia cells2014In: Leukemia and Lymphoma, ISSN 1042-8194, E-ISSN 1029-2403, Vol. 55, no 7, p. 1618-1624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cancer cells are characterized by uncontrolled replication involving loss of control of cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) and cyclins, and by abolished differentiation. In this study we introduce KGI, which is a nanoparticle with a Quillaja saponin as an active molecule. By the use of RNA array analysis and confirmation at the protein level, we show that KGI affects myeloid leukemia cells (in particular, the U937 monoblast cancer cell) by the following mechanisms: (A) ceasing cell replication via proteasome degradation, (B) down-regulation of key molecules at check points between G1/S and G2/M phases, (C) reduction of thymidine kinase activity, followed by (D) exit to differentiation and production of interleukin-8 (IL-8), eventually leading to apoptosis. Leukemia cell lines (U937 and HL-60 cells) were exposed to KGI for 8 h, after which the drug was removed. The cancer cells did not revert to replication over the following 10 days. Thus our findings suggest that the nanoparticle KGI inhibits proliferation and promotes differentiation in leukemic cells by interfering with the cell cycle process.

  • 71. Berge-Seidl, Victoria
    et al.
    Pihlstrøm, Lasse
    Maple-Grødem, Jodi
    Forsgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Linder, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Larsen, Jan Petter
    Tysnes, Ole-Bjørn
    Toft, Mathias
    The GBA variant E326K is associated with Parkinson's disease and explains a genome-wide association signal2017In: Neuroscience Letters, ISSN 0304-3940, E-ISSN 1872-7972, Vol. 658, p. 48-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Coding variants in the GBA gene have been identified as the numerically most important genetic risk factors for Parkinson's disease (PD). In addition, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified associations with PD in the SYT11-GBA region on chromosome 1q22, but the relationship to GBA coding variants have remained unclear. The aim of this study was to sequence the complete GBA gene in a clinical cohort and to investigate whether coding variants within the GBA gene may be driving reported association signals. Methods: We analyzed high-throughput sequencing data of all coding exons of GBA in 366 patients with PD. The identified low-frequency coding variants were genotyped in three Scandinavian case-controls series (786 patients and 713 controls). Previously reported risk variants from two independent association signals within the SYT11-GBA locus on chromosome 1 were also genotyped in the same samples. We performed association analyses and evaluated linkage disequilibrium (LD) between the variants. Results: We identified six rare mutations (1.6%) and two low-frequency coding variants in GBA. E326K (rs2230288) was significantly more frequent in PD patients compared to controls (OR 1.65, p = 0.03). There was no clear association of T369M (rs75548401) with disease (OR 1.43, p = 0.24). Genotyping the two GWAS hits rs35749011 and rs114138760 in the same sample set, we replicated the association between rs35749011 and disease status (OR 1.67, p = 0.03), while rs114138760 was found to have similar allele frequencies in patients and controls. Analyses revealed that E326K and rs35749011 are in very high LD (r(2) 0.95). Conclusions: Our results confirm that the GBA variant E326K is a susceptibility allele for PD. The results suggest that E326K may fully account for the primary association signal observed at chromosome 1q22 in previous GWAS of PD.

  • 72.
    Bergfelt, E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Kozlowski, P.
    Univ Orebro, Fac Med & Hlth, Dept Med Sci, Haematol, Orebro, Sweden..
    Ahlberg, L.
    Univ Hosp Linkoping, Dept Haematol, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Bernell, P.
    Karolinska Univ, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Div Haematol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hulegardh, E.
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Haematol & Coagulat, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Karbach, H.
    Karlsson, K.
    Univ Hosp Umea, Ctr Canc, Dept Haematol, Umea, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Haematol, Lund, Sweden..
    Tomaszewska-Toporska, B.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Haematol, Lund, Sweden..
    Astrom, M.
    Univ Orebro, Fac Med & Hlth, Dept Med Sci, Haematol, Orebro, Sweden..
    Hallböök, Helene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Relapse Of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia In Older/Elderly Patients - A Swedish Population-Based Study2016In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 101, p. 34-35Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Bergfelt, E.
    et al.
    Haematology, Dept of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kozlowski, Piotr
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Ahlberg, L.
    Dept of Haematology, University Hospital of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bernell, P.
    Div of Haematology, Dept of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hulegårdh, E.
    Dept of Haematology and Coagulation, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Karbach, H.
    Dept of Haematology, Cancer Centre, University Hospital of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Karlsson, K.
    Dept of Haematology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden .
    Tomaszewska-Toporska, B.
    Dept of Haematology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden .
    Åström, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Hallböök, H.
    Haematology, Dept of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    RELAPSE OF ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKAEMIA IN OLDER/ELDERLY PATIENTS: A SWEDISH POPULATION-BASED STUDY2016In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 101, no Suppl. 1, p. 34-35Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Bergfelt, E.
    et al.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kozlowski, Piotr
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Åström, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Ahlberg, L.
    Department of Haematology, University Hospital of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bernell, P.
    Dept Med, Div Haematol, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hulegårdh, E.
    Department of Haematology and Coagulation, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Karbach, H.
    Ctr Canc, Dept Haematol, Umeå Univ Hosp, Umeå, Sweden.
    Karlsson, K.
    Department of Haematology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Tomaszewska-Toporska, B.
    Department of Haematology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Hallböök, H.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Prognosis in older/elderly patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia diagnosed 2005-2012: results from a Swedish population-based study2015In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 100, no Suppl. 1, p. 202-202Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Bergfelt, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Kozlowski, P.
    Ahlberg, L.
    Hulegardh, E.
    Hägglund, H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Karlsson, K.
    Markuszewska-Kuczymska, A.
    Tomaszewska-Toporska, B.
    Smedmyr, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Astrom, M.
    Amini, Rose Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Hallböök, Helene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Minimal Residual Disease in Adults with Philadelphia Negative B-Cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia a Swedish Population-Based Study2014In: Haematologica (online), ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 99, no S1, p. 279-280Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Bergfelt, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Kozlowski, P.
    Univ Orebro, Fac Med & Hlth, Dept Med, Haematol Sect, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden..
    Astrom, M.
    Univ Orebro, Fac Med & Hlth, Dept Med, Haematol Sect, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden..
    Ahlberg, L.
    Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Haematol, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Bernell, P.
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Div Haematol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hulegardh, E.
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Haematol & Coagulat, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Karbach, H.
    Umea Univ Hosp, Ctr Canc, Dept Haematol, S-90185 Umea, Sweden..
    Karlsson, K.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Haematol, Lund, Sweden..
    Tomaszewska-Toporska, B.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Haematol, Lund, Sweden..
    Hallböök, Helene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    PROGNOSIS IN OLDER/ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKAEMIA DIAGNOSED 2005-2012: RESULTS FROM A SWEDISH POPULATION-BASED STUDY2015In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 100, p. 202-202Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 77.
    Berggren, Daniel Moreno
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Folkvaljon, Y.
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Reg Canc Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Engvall, M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Sundberg, J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Lehman, Sören
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Lambe, M.
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Reg Canc Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Antunovic, P.
    Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Hematol, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Garelius, H.
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Sect Haematol & Coagulat, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Hellström-Lindberg, E.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Ctr Hematol & Regenerat Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jadersten, M.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Ctr Hematol & Regenerat Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lorenz, F.
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Umea, Sweden..
    Nilsson, L.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Lund, Sweden..
    Ejerblad, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Validation Of Prognostic Scoring Systems For Myelodysplastic Syndromes In The Swedish Mds-Register2016In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 101, p. 243-243Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 78.
    Berggren, Daniel Moreno
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Folkvaljon, Yasin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Engvall, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Sundberg, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Lambe, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Antunovic, Petar
    Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Haematol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Garelius, Hege
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sect Haematol & Coagulat, Dept Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lorenz, Fryderyk
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Umea, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lars
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Haematol Oncol & Radiat Phys, Lund, Sweden.
    Rasmussen, Bengt
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sch Med Sci, Orebro, Sweden.
    Lehmann, Sören
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Hellstrom-Lindberg, Eva
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Huddinge, Ctr Haematol & Regenerat Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jadersten, Martin
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Huddinge, Ctr Haematol & Regenerat Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ejerblad, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Prognostic scoring systems for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in a population-based setting: a report from the Swedish MDS register2018In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141, Vol. 181, no 5, p. 614-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) have highly variable outcomes and prognostic scoring systems are important tools for risk assessment and to guide therapeutic decisions. However, few population-based studies have compared the value of the different scoring systems. With data from the nationwide Swedish population-based MDS register we validated the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS), revised IPSS (IPSS-R) and the World Health Organization (WHO) Classification-based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS). We also present population-based data on incidence, clinical characteristics including detailed cytogenetics and outcome from the register. The study encompassed 1329 patients reported to the register between 2009 and 2013, 14% of these had therapy-related MDS (t-MDS). Based on the MDS register, the yearly crude incidence of MDS in Sweden was 2<bold></bold>9 per 100000 inhabitants. IPSS-R had a significantly better prognostic power than IPSS (P<0<bold></bold>001). There was a trend for better prognostic power of IPSS-R compared to WPSS (P=0<bold></bold>05) and for WPSS compared to IPSS (P=0<bold></bold>07). IPSS-R was superior to both IPSS and WPSS for patients aged 70years. Patients with t-MDS had a worse outcome compared to de novo MDS (d-MDS), however, the validity of the prognostic scoring systems was comparable for d-MDS and t-MDS. In conclusion, population-based studies are important to validate prognostic scores in a real-world' setting. In our nationwide cohort, the IPSS-R showed the best predictive power.

  • 79.
    Berggren, Daniel Moreno
    et al.
    Department of Medical Science, Section of Haematology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Folkvaljon, Yasin
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Engvall, Marie
    Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sundberg, Johan
    Department of Medical Science, Section of Haematology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lambe, Mats
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Antunovic, Petar
    Department of Haematology, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Garelius, Hege
    Section for Haematology and Coagulation, Department of Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lorenz, Fryderyk
    Department of Medical Biosciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lars
    Department of Haematology, Oncology and Radiation Physics, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Rasmussen, Bengt
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Lehmann, Sören
    Department of Medical Science, Section of Haematology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hellström-Lindberg, Eva
    Centre for Haematology and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jädersten, Martin
    Centre for Haematology and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ejerblad, Elisabeth
    Department of Medical Science, Section of Haematology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Prognostic scoring systems for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in a population-based setting: a report from the Swedish MDS register2018In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141, Vol. 181, no 5, p. 614-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) have highly variable outcomes and prognostic scoring systems are important tools for risk assessment and to guide therapeutic decisions. However, few population-based studies have compared the value of the different scoring systems. With data from the nationwide Swedish population-based MDS register we validated the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS), revised IPSS (IPSS-R) and the World Health Organization (WHO) Classification-based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS). We also present population-based data on incidence, clinical characteristics including detailed cytogenetics and outcome from the register. The study encompassed 1329 patients reported to the register between 2009 and 2013, 14% of these had therapy-related MDS (t-MDS). Based on the MDS register, the yearly crude incidence of MDS in Sweden was 2<bold></bold>9 per 100000 inhabitants. IPSS-R had a significantly better prognostic power than IPSS (P<0<bold></bold>001). There was a trend for better prognostic power of IPSS-R compared to WPSS (P=0<bold></bold>05) and for WPSS compared to IPSS (P=0<bold></bold>07). IPSS-R was superior to both IPSS and WPSS for patients aged 70years. Patients with t-MDS had a worse outcome compared to de novo MDS (d-MDS), however, the validity of the prognostic scoring systems was comparable for d-MDS and t-MDS. In conclusion, population-based studies are important to validate prognostic scores in a real-world' setting. In our nationwide cohort, the IPSS-R showed the best predictive power.

  • 80. Berggren, Daniel Moreno
    et al.
    Folkvaljon, Yasin
    Engvall, Marie
    Sundberg, Johan
    Lambe, Mats
    Antunovic, Petar
    Garelius, Hege
    Lorenz, Fryderyk
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lars
    Rasmussen, Bengt
    Lehmann, Sören
    Hellström-Lindberg, Eva
    Jädersten, Martin
    Ejerblad, Elisabeth
    Prognostic scoring systems for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in a population-based setting: a report from the Swedish MDS register2018In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141, Vol. 181, no 5, p. 614-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) have highly variable outcomes and prognostic scoring systems are important tools for risk assessment and to guide therapeutic decisions. However, few population-based studies have compared the value of the different scoring systems. With data from the nationwide Swedish population-based MDS register we validated the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS), revised IPSS (IPSS-R) and the World Health Organization (WHO) Classification-based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS). We also present population-based data on incidence, clinical characteristics including detailed cytogenetics and outcome from the register. The study encompassed 1329 patients reported to the register between 2009 and 2013, 14% of these had therapy-related MDS (t-MDS). Based on the MDS register, the yearly crude incidence of MDS in Sweden was 2.9 per 100000 inhabitants. IPSS-R had a significantly better prognostic power than IPSS (P < 0001). There was a trend for better prognostic power of IPSS-R compared to WPSS (P=0.05) and for WPSS compared to IPSS (P=0.07). IPSS-R was superior to both IPSS and WPSS for patients aged <= 70years. Patients with t-MDS had a worse outcome compared to de novo MDS (d-MDS), however, the validity of the prognostic scoring systems was comparable for d-MDS and t-MDS. In conclusion, population-based studies are important to validate prognostic scores in a real-world' setting. In our nationwide cohort, the IPSS-R showed the best predictive power.

  • 81. Bergh, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Evaldsson, Chamilly
    Pedersen, Lone Bredo
    Geisler, Christian
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rosen, Anders
    Silenced B-cell receptor response to autoantigen in a poor-prognostic subset of chronic lymphocytic leukemia2014In: Haematologica (online), ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 99, no 11, p. 1722-1730Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells express auto/xeno antigen-reactive antibodies that bind to self-epitopes and resemble natural IgM antibodies in their repertoire. One of the antigenic structures recognized is oxidation-induced malonedialdehyde that is present on low-density lipoprotein, apoptotic blebs, and on certain microbes. The poor-prognostic stereotyped subset #1 (Clan I IGHV genes-IGKV1(D)-39) express IgM B-cell receptors that bind oxidized low-density lipoprotein. In this study, we have used for the first time this authentic cognate antigen for analysis of downstream B-cell receptor-signal transduction events, since it is more faithful to B-cell physiology than anti-IgM. Multivalent oxidized low-density lipoprotein showed specific binding to subset #1 IgM/IgD B-cell receptors, whereas native low-density lipoprotein did not. The antigen binding induced prompt receptor clustering followed by internalization. However, the receptor-signal transduction was silenced, revealing no Ca2+ mobilization or cell-cycle entry, while phosphorylated extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 basal levels were high and could not be elevated further by oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Interestingly, B-cell receptor responsiveness was recovered after 48-h culture in the absence of antigen in half of the cases. Toll-like receptor 9-ligand was found to breach the B-cell receptor-signaling incompetence in 5 of 12 cases pointing to intra-subset heterogeneity. Altogether, this study supports B-cell receptor unresponsiveness to cognate self-antigen on its own in poor-prognostic subset #1 chronic lymphocytic leukemia, indicating that these cells proliferate by other mechanisms that may override B-cell receptor silencing brought about in a context of self-tolerance/anergy. These novel findings have implications for the understanding of chronic lymphocytic leukemia pathobiology and therapy.

  • 82. Berglund, S.
    et al.
    Magalhaes, I.
    Gaballa, A.
    Vanherberghen, Bruno
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Uhlin, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cellular Biophysics. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Advances in umbilical cord blood cell therapy: the present and the future2017In: Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy, ISSN 1471-2598, E-ISSN 1744-7682, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 691-699Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Umbilical cord blood (UCB), previously seen as medical waste, is increasingly recognized as a valuable source of cells for therapeutic use. The best-known application is in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), where UCB has become an increasingly important graft source in the 28 years since the first umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) was performed. Recently, UCB has been increasingly investigated as a putative source for adoptive cell therapy. Areas covered: This review covers the advances in umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) to overcome the limitation regarding cellular dose, immunological naivety and additional cell doses such as DLI. It also provides an overview regarding the progress in adoptive cellular therapy using UCB. Expert opinion: UCB has been established as an important source of stem cells for HSCT. Successful strategies to overcome the limitations of UCBT, such as the limited cell numbers and naivety of the cells, are being developed, including novel methods to perform in vitro expansion of progenitor cells, and to improve their homing to the bone marrow. Promising early clinical trials of adoptive therapies with UCB cells, including non-immunological cells, are currently performed for viral infections, malignant diseases and in regenerative medicine.

  • 83.
    Bergsten, Elisabet
    et al.
    Childhood Cancer Research Unit, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Theme of Children’s and Women’s Health, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Horne, AnnaCarin
    Childhood Cancer Research Unit, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Theme of Children’s and Women’s Health, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Aricó, Maurizio
    Direzione Generale, Azienda Sanitaria Provinciale, Ragusa, Italy.
    Astigarraga, Itziar
    Servicio de Pediatria, BioCruces Health Research Institute, Hospital Universitario Cruces, Universidad del Pais Vasco–Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea (UPV/EHU), Barakaldo, Spain.
    Egeler, R. Maarten
    Division of Hematology & Oncology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto ON, Canada.
    Filipovich, Alexandra H.
    Division of Bone Marrow Transplant and Immune Deficiency, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati OH, USA.
    Ishii, Eiichi
    Department of Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Ehime University, Ehime, Japan.
    Janka, Gritta
    Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    Ladisch, Stephan
    Center for Cancer and Immunology Research, Children’s Research Institute, Children’s National Medical Center, Washington DC, USA.
    Lehmberg, Kai
    Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    McClain, Kenneth L.
    Texas Children’s Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston TX, USA.
    Minkov, Milen
    University Clinic of Pediatrics, St. Anna Children’s Hospital, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Montgomery, Scott
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Nanduri, Vasanta
    Department of Pediatrics, Watford General Hospital, Watford, United Kingdom.
    Rosso, Diego
    Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Hospital de Niños Dr Pedro De Elizalde, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Department of Pediatrics, Hospital de Clinicas Jose de San Martin, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Henter, Jan-Inge
    Childhood Cancer Research Unit, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Theme of Children’s and Women’s Health, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Confirmed efficacy of etoposide and dexamethasone in HLH treatment: long-term results of the cooperative HLH-2004 study2017In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 130, no 25, p. 2728-2738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a life-threatening hyperinflammatory syndrome comprising familial/genetic HLH (FHL) and secondary HLH. In the HLH-94 study, with an estimated 5-year probability of survival (pSu) of 54% (95% confidence interval, 48%-60%), systemic therapy included etoposide, dexamethasone, and, from week 9, cyclosporine A (CSA). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) was indicated in patients with familial/genetic, relapsing, or severe/persistent disease. In HLH-2004, CSA was instead administered upfront, aiming to reduce pre-HSCT mortality and morbidity. From 2004 to 2011, 369 children aged <18 years fulfilled HLH-2004 inclusion criteria (5 of 8 diagnostic criteria, affected siblings, and/or molecular diagnosis in FHL-causative genes). At median follow-up of 5.2 years, 230 of 369 patients (62%) were alive (5-year pSu, 61%; 56%-67%). Five-year pSu in children with (n = 168) and without (n = 201) family history/genetically verified FHL was 59% (52%-67%) and 64% (57%-71%), respectively (familial occurrence [n = 47], 58% [45%-75%]). Comparing with historical data (HLH-94), using HLH-94 inclusion criteria, pre-HSCT mortality was nonsignificantly reduced from 27% to 19% (P = .064 adjusted for age and sex). Time from start of therapy to HSCT was shorter compared with HLH-94 (P =020 adjusted for age and sex) and reported neurological alterations at HSCT were 22% in HLH-94 and 17% in HLH-2004 (using HLH-94 inclusion criteria). Five-year pSu post-HSCT overall was 66% (verified FHL, 70% [63%-78%]). Additional analyses provided specific suggestions on potential pre-HSCT treatment improvements. HLH-2004 confirms that a majority of patients may be rescued by the etoposide/dexamethasone combination but intensification with CSA upfront, adding corticosteroids to intrathecal therapy, and reduced time to HSCT did not improve outcome significantly.

  • 84.
    Berlin, Gösta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Cherif, Honar
    Akademiska sjukhuset - Hematologiska kliniken Uppsala, Sweden Akademiska sjukhuset - Hematologiska kliniken Uppsala, Sweden.
    Knutson, Folke
    Akademiska sjukhuset - Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin Uppsala, Sweden Akademiska sjukhuset - Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Jonas
    Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset - Centrum för allogen stamcellstransplantation Stockholm, Sweden .
    Axdorph Nygell, Ulla
    Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset - Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin Stockholm, Sweden .
    Granulocyttransfusion bör övervägas vid neutropeni och allvarlig infektion [Granulocyte transfusion – when and how should it be used?]2018In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 115, article id EXUUArticle, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are no randomized controlled trials proving the clinical benefit of granulocyte transfusions. However, clinical experience and a number of case studies suggest that granulocyte transfusions may be life-saving in certain situations. In our opinion granulocyte transfusions should be considered for patients with profound neutropenia and severe, life-threatening infection not responding to antibiotic or antifungal therapy. Since the clinical effect seems to be dose-dependent, the granulocyte concentrate should contain a large number of cells, which usually means that the donor should be mobilized with steroids and G-CSF. Regular blood donors as well as relatives to the patient can be used for granulocyte donations with apheresis technique after information of the process. Granulocyte transfusion should be given daily as long as the indication remains. The clinical efficacy of the transfusions should be evaluated daily.

  • 85.
    Berlin, Gösta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Cherif, Honar
    Akademiska sjukhuset - Hematologiska kliniken Uppsala, Sweden Akademiska sjukhuset - Hematologiska kliniken Uppsala, Sweden.
    Knutson, Folke
    Akademiska sjukhuset - Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin Uppsala, Sweden Akademiska sjukhuset - Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Jonas
    Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset - Centrum för allogen stamcellstransplantation Stockholm, Sweden Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset - Centrum för allogen stamcellstransplantation Stockholm, Sweden.
    Axdorph Nygell, Ulla
    Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset - Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin Stockholm, Sweden Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset - Klinisk immunologi och transfusionsmedicin Stockholm, Sweden.
    Replik gällande granulocyttransfusion: Rekommendationerna är väl underbyggda2018In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 115Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 86.
    Besses, C.
    et al.
    Hosp del Mar IMIM, Serv Hematol, Barcelona, Spain..
    Bello-Lopez, J. L.
    Univ Santiago, Hosp Clin, E-15706 Santiago, Spain..
    De la Serna, J.
    Hosp Univ 12 Octubre, Madrid, Spain..
    Hernandez-Boluda, J. C.
    Hosp Clin Univ, Valencia, Spain..
    Loscertales, J.
    Hosp Univ La Princesa, Madrid, Spain..
    Griesshammer, M.
    Johannes Wesling Med Ctr, Serv Hematol & Oncol, Minden, Germany..
    Gugliotta, L.
    St Orsola Malpighi Hosp, Serv Hematol, Bologna, Italy..
    Harrison, C.
    Guys & St Thomas NHS Fdn Trust, Serv Hematol, London, England..
    Kiladjian, J. J.
    Hop St Louis, APHP, Ctr Invest Clin, Paris, France..
    Hamdani, M.
    Shire Pharmaceut, Global Biometr, Wayne, NJ USA..
    Achenbach, H.
    Shire AG, Res & Dev, Eysins, Switzerland..
    Birgegård, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Treatment Of Essential Thrombocythemia In Europe: Observational Study Of 3649 Patients Of High Risk (Exels)2015In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 100, p. 29-29Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 87.
    Beydogan, Zelal
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Higher safety in platelet transfusions using Intercept Blood System2007Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Platelets (thrombocytes) are the smallest cells in the blood. Platelet fulfils functions as formation of blood clots when bleeding. Low levels leads to bleeding while high levels increase the risk of thrombosis (obstruction of the circulatory flow system). Platelet transfusions may be required for patients with systemic bleeding and for patients at higher risk of bleeding because of coagulation defects, sepsis (presence of bacteria in the bloodstream), or platelet dysfunction related to medication or disease. A pathogen-reduction system for platelet components would be a useful method since it reduces the risk of bacterial, protozoa, viral and white blood cell contamination. The Intercept Blood System method (IBS) for platelets, destroys DNA and RNA and was validated against the routine method in order to reduce pathogen transmission risk during transfusion. The validation of IBS, the trombocyte count for100 buffy coat concentrates from 2007 were compared to values for 100 buffy coat concentrates from 2006 that had been treated with gamma-radiation. Akademiska sjukhuset in Uppsala has a requirement that 75% of the platelet concentrates contain at least 300*10 9 platelets per unit. IBS fulfilled to 94% compared to 98% for the routine method.

    Thus, the IBS-method was well above the required value and is now used at

    Akademiska sjukhuset in Uppsala.

  • 88. Beziat, Vivien
    et al.
    Liu, Lisa L.
    Malmberg, Jenny-Ann
    Ivarsson, Martin A.
    Sohlberg, Ebba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Björklund, Andreas T.
    Retiere, Christelle
    Sverremark-Ekström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Traherne, James
    Ljungman, Per
    Schaffer, Marie
    Price, David A.
    Trowsdale, John
    Michaelsson, Jakob
    Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf
    Malmberg, Karl-Johan
    NK cell responses to cytomegalovirus infection lead to stable imprints in the human KIR repertoire and involve activating KIRs2013In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 121, no 14, p. 2678-2688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human natural killer (NK) cells are functionally regulated by killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and their interactions with HLA class I molecules. As KIR expression in a given NK cell is genetically hard-wired, we hypothesized that KIR repertoire perturbations reflect expansions of unique NK-cell subsets and may be used to trace adaptation of the NK-cell compartment to virus infections. By determining the human KIR-ome at a single-cell level in more than 200 donors, we were able to analyze the magnitude of NK cell adaptation to virus infections in healthy individuals. Strikingly, infection with human cytomegalovirus (CMV), but not with other common herpesviruses, induced expansion and differentiation of KIR-expressing NK cells, visible as stable imprints in the repertoire. Education by inhibitory KIRs promoted the clonal-like expansion of NK cells, causing a bias for self-specific inhibitory KIRs. Furthermore, our data revealed a unique contribution of activating KIRs (KIR2DS4, KIR2DS2, or KIR3DS1), in addition to NKG2C, in the expansion of human NK cells. These results provide new insight into the diversity of KIR repertoire and its adaptation to virus infection, suggesting a role for both activating and inhibitory KIRs in immunity to CMV infection.

  • 89.
    Bhoi, Sujata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University.
    Prognostic markers and DNA methylation profiling in lymphoid malignancies2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, great progress has been achieved towards identifying novel biomarkers in lymphoid malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), at the genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic level for accurate risk-stratification and prediction of treatment response. In paper I, we validated the prognostic relevance of a recently proposed RNA-based marker in CLL, UGT2B17, and analyzed its expression levels in 253 early-stage patients. Besides confirming its prognostic impact in multivariate analysis, we could identify 30% of IGHV-mutated CLL (M-CLL) cases with high expression and poor outcome, which otherwise lacked any other poor-prognostic marker. In paper II, we investigated the prognostic impact of a previously reported 5 CpG signature that divides CLL patients into three clinico-biological subgroups, namely naive B-cell-like CLL (n-CLL), memory B-cell-like CLL (m-CLL) and intermediate CLL (i-CLL), in 135 CLL patients using pyrosequencing. We validated the signature as an independent marker in multivariate analysis and further reported that subset #2 cases were predominantly classified as i-CLL, although displaying a similar outcome as n-CLL. In paper III, we investigated the methylation status and expression level of miR26A1 in both CLL (n=70) and MCL (n=65) cohorts. High miR26A1 methylation was associated with IGHV-unmutated (U-CLL) and shorter overall survival (OS) in CLL, while it was uniformly hypermethylated in MCL. Furthermore, overexpression of miR26A1 resulted in significant downregulation of EZH2 that in turn led to increased apoptosis. In paper IV, we performed DNA methylation profiling in 176 CLL cases assigned to one of 8 major stereotyped subsets (#1-8) in relation to non-subset CLL (n=325) and different normal B-cell subpopulations. Principal component analysis of subset vs. non-subset CLL revealed that U-CLL and M-CLL subsets generally clustered with n-CLL and m-CLL, respectively, indicating common cellular origins. In contrast, subset #2 emerged as the first defined member of the i-CLL subgroup, which in turn alludes to a distinct cellular origin for subset #2 and i-CLL patients. Altogether, this thesis confirms the prognostic significance of RNA and epigenetic-based markers in CLL, provides insight into the mechanism of miRNA deregulation in lymphoid malignancies and further unravels the DNA methylation landscape in stereotyped subsets of CLL.

     

  • 90.
    Bhoi, Sujata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Cortese, Diego
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Mattsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Sevov, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Smedby, Karin E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    Sutton, Lesley-Ann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Mansouri, Larry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    UGT2B17 expression: a novel prognostic marker within IGHV-mutated chronic lymphocytic leukemia?2016In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 101, no 2, p. E63-E65Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 91.
    Bhoi, Sujata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mansouri, Larry
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Castellano, G.
    IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain.
    Sutton, Lesley Ann
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Papakonstantinou, N.
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Queiros, A.
    Univ Barcelona, Dept Fundamentos Clin, Barcelona, Spain.
    Ek, S.
    Lund Univ, Dept Immunotechnol, Lund, Sweden.
    Emruli, V. K.
    Lund Univ, Dept Immunotechnol, Lund, Sweden.
    Plevova, K.
    Univ Hosp Brno, Dept Internal Med Hematol & Oncol, Brno, Czech Republic;Masaryk Univ, Fac Med, Brno, Czech Republic;Masaryk Univ, CEITEC Cent European Inst Technol, Ctr Mol Med, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Ntoufa, S.
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Davis, Z.
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Mol Pathol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England.
    Young, Emma
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Göransson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Isaksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Smedby, K. E.
    Karolinska Inst, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gaidano, G.
    Univ Piemonte Orientale, Dept Translat Med, Div Hematol, Novara, Italy.
    Langerak, A. W.
    Univ Med Ctr, Erasmus MC, Dept Immunol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Davi, F.
    Pitie Salpetriere, Paris, France;Univ Paris 06, Paris, France.
    Rossi, D.
    Oncol Inst Southern Switzerland, Hematol Dept, Bellinzona, Switzerland.
    Oscier, D.
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Mol Pathol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England.
    Pospisilova, S.
    Univ Hosp Brno, Dept Internal Med Hematol & Oncol, Brno, Czech Republic;Masaryk Univ, Fac Med, Brno, Czech Republic;Masaryk Univ, CEITEC Cent European Inst Technol, Ctr Mol Med, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Ghia, P.
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Div Expt Oncol, Milan, Italy;IRCCS San Raffaele Sci Inst, Milan, Italy.
    Campo, E.
    IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain;Univ Barcelona, Dept Fundamentos Clin, Barcelona, Spain.
    Stamatopoulos, K.
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Martin-Subero, J. -I
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.
    DNA METHYLATION PROFILING IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA PATIENTS CARRYING STEREOTYPED B-CELL RECEPTORS: A DIFFERENT CELLULAR ORIGIN FOR SUBSET #2?2017In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 102, no Suppl. 2, p. 68-68, article id P244Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 92. Billström, R
    et al.
    Björkegren, Karin
    Ljung, R
    Anemier2012In: Läkemedelsboken, Apoteksförlaget , 2012, p. 239-251Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 93.
    Bin Kaderi, Mohamed Arifin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Assessment of Novel Molecular Prognostic Markers in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The clinical course of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is highly heterogeneous, which has prompted the search for biomarkers that can predict prognosis in this disease. The IGHV gene mutation status and certain genomic aberrations have been identified as reliable prognostic markers of clinical outcome for this disorder. However, the search for more feasible prognostic markers in CLL is still being pursued. Recently, certain single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the GNAS1, BCL2 and MDM2 genes and the RNA expression levels of the LPL, ZAP70, TCL1, CLLU1 and MCL1 genes were suggested as novel prognostic markers in CLL.

    In papers I-III, we performed genotyping analyses of the GNAS1 T393C, BCL2 -938C>A and MDM2 SNP309 polymorphisms in 268-418 CLL patients and related the genotypes with clinical data. Association studies between the polymorphisms and established prognostic markers (i.e. IGHV mutation status, genomic aberrations, CD38 expression) were also performed. Our studies did not find any significant relationship between these SNPs with either clinical outcome or other known prognostic markers in CLL.

    In paper IV, we measured the RNA expression levels of LPL, ZAP70, TCL1, CLLU1 and MCL1 in 252 CLL cases and correlated these levels with clinical outcome. Here, we verified that high expression of all these RNA-based markers, except MCL1, were associated with an unfavourable prognosis. We also confirmed a close relationship between IGHV mutation status and the RNA-based markers, especially for LPL and CLLU1 expression. Among the RNA-based markers, multivariate analysis revealed LPL expression as the strongest independent prognostic marker for overall survival and time to treatment. Furthermore, the RNA-based markers could add further prognostic information to established markers in subgroups of patients, with LPL expression status giving the most significant results.

    In summary, data from papers I-III could not verify the GNAS1 T393C, BCL2 -938C>A and MDM2 SNP309 polymorphisms as prognostic markers in CLL. Future SNP markers must hence be confirmed in large, independent cohorts before being proposed as prognostic marker in CLL. In paper IV, we conclude that LPL expression appears to be the strongest among the RNA-based markers for CLL prognostication. Further efforts to standardize LPL quantification are required before it can be applied in the clinical laboratory to predict clinical outcome in this disease.

  • 94. Binder, Zev A.
    et al.
    Haseley Thorne, Amy
    Bakas, Spyridon
    Wileyto, E. Paul
    Bilello, Michel
    Akbari, Hamed
    Rathore, Saima
    Ha, Sung Min
    Zhang, Logan
    Ferguson, Cole J.
    Dahiya, Sonika
    Bi, Wenya Linda
    Reardon, David A.
    Idbaih, Ahmed
    Felsberg, Joerg
    Hentschel, Bettina
    Weller, Michael
    Bagley, Stephen J.
    Morrissette, Jennifer J. D.
    Nasrallah, MacLean P.
    Ma, Jianhui
    Zanca, Ciro
    Scott, Andrew M.
    Orellana, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Davatzikos, Christos
    Furnari, Frank B.
    O'Rourke, Donald M.
    Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Extracellular Domain Mutations in Glioblastoma Present Opportunities for Clinical Imaging and Therapeutic Development2018In: Cancer Cell, ISSN 1535-6108, E-ISSN 1878-3686, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 163-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explored the clinical and pathological impact of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) extracellular domain missense mutations. Retrospective assessment of 260 de novo glioblastoma patients revealed a significant reduction in overall survival of patients having tumors with EGFR mutations at alanine 289 (EGFR(A289D/T/V)). Quantitative multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging analyses indicated increased tumor invasion for EGFR(A289D/T/V) mutants, corroborated in mice bearing intracranial tumors expressing EGFR(A289V) and dependent on ERK-mediated expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1. EGFR(A289V) tumor growth was attenuated with an antibody against a cryptic epitope, based on in silico simulation. The findings of this study indicate a highly invasive phenotype associated with the EGFR(A289V) mutation in glioblastoma, postulating EGFR(A289V) as a molecular marker for responsiveness to therapy with EGFR-targeting antibodies.

  • 95.
    Birgegard, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Does anything work for anaemia in myelofibrosis?2014In: Baillière's Best Practice & Research: Clinical Haematology, ISSN 1521-6926, E-ISSN 1532-1924, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 175-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anaemia is a common finding at diagnosis in myelofibrosis, and becomes a symptomatic problem in most patients with time. There are several treatment options for specific anaemia treatment, none of which has been tested in large, randomized, controlled trials. However, as myelofibrosis is not a disease with spontaneous remissions, even non-randomized trials carry weight In this survey, the existing evidence will be analysed, both for the commonly used treatments like erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, androgens and thalidomide and for the new drugs in the area, and conclusions will be drawn concerning standard clinical anaemia treatment in myelofibrosis, which according to evidence from studies has a 40-50% chance of response in patients with not too advanced disease. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 96.
    Birgegard, Gunnar
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Jan
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Ahlstrand, Erik
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Ejerblad, Elisabeth
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Enevold, Christian
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Ghanima, Waleed
    Ostfold Hosp, Norway.
    Hasselbalch, Hans
    Zealand Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Claus H.
    Zealand Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Knutsen, Havar
    Ulleval Hosp, Norway.
    Pedersen, Ole B.
    Naestved Hosp, Denmark.
    Sorensen, Anders
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark; Zealand Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Andreasson, Bjorn
    NU Hosp Grp, Sweden.
    Inflammatory functional iron deficiency common in myelofibrosis, contributes to anaemia and impairs quality of life. From the Nordic MPN study Group2019In: European Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0902-4441, E-ISSN 1600-0609, Vol. 102, no 3, p. 235-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The study investigates the hypothesis that inflammation in myelofibrosis (MF) like in myeloma and lymphoma, may disturb iron distribution and contribute to anaemia. Methods A cross-sectional study of 80 MF and 23 ET patients was performed. Results About 35% of anaemic MF patients had functional iron deficiency (FID) with transferrin saturation amp;lt;20 and normal or elevated S-ferritin (amp;lt;500 mu g/L). In ET, FID was rare. In MF patients with FID, 70.6% were anaemic, vs 29.4% in patients without FID (P = 0.03). Hepcidin was significantly higher in MF patients with anaemia, including transfusion-dependent patients, 50.6 vs 24.4 mu g/L (P = 0.01). There was a significant negative correlation between Hb and inflammatory markers in all MF patients: IL-2, IL-6 and TNF-alpha, (P amp;lt; 0.01-0.03), LD (P = 0.004) and hepcidin (P = 0.03). These correlations were also seen in the subgroup of anaemic MF patients (Table ). Tsat correlated negatively with CRP (P amp;lt; 0.001). Symptom burden was heavier in MF patients with FID, and MPN-SAF quality of life scores correlated with IL-6 and CRP. Conclusions The inflammatory state of MF disturbs iron turnover, FID is common and contributes to anaemia development and impairment of QoL. Anaemic MF patients should be screened for FID.

  • 97.
    Birgegård, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Advances and challenges in the management of essential thrombocythemia2015In: Therapeutic advances in hematology, ISSN 2040-6215, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 142-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new World Health Organization (WHO) diagnostic criteria for essential thrombocythemia (ET) issued in 2008 made an important distinction between true ET and early myelofibrosis (MF), which has helped to identify a more homogenous population for the diagnosis with longer survival and much less transformation to overt MF. The recent finding of a new mutation (CALR), which is mutually exclusive with JAK2 and MPL mutations, adds to the characterization of ET patients, since there are important phenotypic differences between the mutation types. CALR patients are younger, have lower white blood cell counts (WBC) and a lower thrombosis incidence. A growing field of interest is the state of hypercoagulation due to dysfunction of hemostatic systems, cell-cell interaction and hereditary prothrombotic traits. Activation of platelets, WBC and endothelial cells has been found, making the whole intravascular milieu prothrombotic. Several risk score models, based on retrospective studies, have been developed lately, distinguishing patient groups with graded risk for complications and death. Even if these may be helpful in evaluating patients, they have not been validated in prospective studies and there are not enough data to support their use as a basis for treatment algorithms. The traditional risk factors age, previous thrombosis and platelets >1500 × 10(9)/l are still recommended for the distinction between high risk and low risk ET and the decision to give cytoreductive therapy. However, cardiovascular (CV) risk factors add to thrombosis risk and should be considered both for specific treatment in any risk group and for upgrading low risk patients with high CV risk to an intermediary group where active therapy with aspirin and cytoreduction may be considered. First-line cytoreductive therapy differs with age; in younger patients interferon (IFN) or anagrelide are preferable, in older patients hydroxycarbamide (HC). Second-line therapy for younger patients is HC, for older patients IFN or anagrelide (ANA). JAK2 inhibitors may be suitable in rare cases with symptoms not responding to other therapy.

  • 98.
    Birgegård, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    The Use of Anagrelide in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms, with Focus on Essential Thrombocythemia2016In: Current Hematologic Malignancy Reports, ISSN 1558-8211, E-ISSN 1558-822X, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 348-355Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anagrelide (ANA) is a drug with specific platelet-lowering activity, used primarily in ET, registered as a second-line drug in essential thrombocythemia (ET) in Europe and in some countries as first-line therapy, in USA licensed by FDA for thrombocythemia in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). The platelet-lowering efficacy is similar to that of hydroxycarbamide (HC), around 70 % complete response and 90 % partial response. Side effects are common, especially headache and tachycardia, but usually subside or disappear within a few weeks. Around 20 % of patients stop ANA therapy due to side effects or insufficient response. Studies of treatment patterns in Europe show that ANA is preferentially given to younger patients, probably because of the concern for a possible leukemogenic effect of the common first-line drug, HC. Only two randomized studies have compared the efficacy of ANA and HC in preventing thrombosis and haemorrhage, the larger of them showing a slightly better efficacy of HC, the other showing non-inferiority of ANA to HC. A recent observational 5-year study of 3600 patients shows a low and basically similar efficacy of ANA and other cytoreductive therapies in ET. ANA does not appear to inhibit fibrosis development, and probably due to its anticoagulation properties, the combination of ASA and ANA produces an increased rate of haemorrhage. Combination of ANA with HC or interferon (IFN) is feasible and effective in patients with insufficient platelet response to mono-therapy.

  • 99.
    Birgegård, Gunnar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Besses, C.
    Hosp del Mar, IMIM, Dept Haematol, Barcelona, Spain..
    Griesshammer, M.
    Johannes Wesling Med Ctr, Hematol & Oncol, Minden, Germany..
    Gugliotta, L.
    St Orsola Malpighi Hosp, Dept Haematol, L & A Seragnoli, Bologna, Italy..
    Harrison, C.
    Guys & St Thomas NHS Fdn Trust, Dept Haematol, London, England..
    Hamdani, M.
    Shire Pharmaceut, Global Biometr, Wayne, NJ USA..
    Achenbach, H.
    Shire GmbH, Res & Dev, Zug, Switzerland..
    Kiladjian, J. -J
    RISK FACTORS FOR THROMBOHEMORRHAGIC AND TRANSFORMATION EVENTS IN 3649 HIGH-RISK PATIENTS WITH ESSENTIAL THROMBOCYTHEMIA: RESULTS FROM THE PROSPECTIVE LONG-TERM OBSERVATIONAL EXELS STUDY2015In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 100, p. 160-161Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 100.
    Birgegård, Gunnar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Besses, C.
    Hosp del Mar, IMIM, Dept Haematol, Barcelona, Spain..
    Griesshammer, M.
    Johannes Wesling Med Ctr, Hematol & Oncol, Minden, Germany..
    Gugliotta, L.
    St Orsola Malpighi Hosp, Dept Haematol, L&A Seragnoli, Bologna, Italy..
    Harrison, C.
    Guys & St Thomas NHS Fdn Trust, Dept Haematol, London, England..
    Hamdani, M.
    Shire Pharmaceut, Global Biometr, Wayne, PA USA..
    Achenbach, H.
    Shire AG, Res & Dev, Eysins, Switzerland..
    Kiladjian, J-J
    Hop St Louis, APHP, Ctr Invest Clin, Paris, France..
    Treatment of high risk ET: data from the EXELS study2016In: Leukemia research: a Forum for Studies on Leukemia and Normal Hemopoiesis, ISSN 0145-2126, E-ISSN 1873-5835, Vol. 44, p. S7-S8Article in journal (Other academic)
1234567 51 - 100 of 965
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf