Change search
Refine search result
12345 51 - 100 of 202
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Hamark, Christoffer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Berntsson, Ronnie P. -A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Masuyer, Geoffrey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Henriksson, Linda M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gustafsson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Stenmark, Pål
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Glycans Confer Specificity to the Recognition of Ganglioside Receptors by Botulinum Neurotoxin A2017In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 139, no 1, p. 218-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The highly poisonous botulinum neurotoxins, produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum, act on their hosts by a high-affinity association to two receptors on neuronal cell surfaces as the first step of invasion. The glycan motifs of gangliosides serve as initial coreceptors for these protein complexes, whereby a membrane protein receptor is bound. Herein we set out to characterize the carbohydrate minimal binding epitope of the botulinum neurotoxin serotype A. By means of ligand-based NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, computer simulations, and isothermal titration calorimetry, a screening of ganglioside analogues together with a detailed characterization of various carbohydrate ligand complexes with the toxin were accomplished. We show that the representation of the glycan epitope to the protein affects the details of binding. Notably, both branches of the oligosaccharide GD la can associate to botulinum neurotoxin serotype A when expressed as individual trisaccharides. It is, however, the terminal branch of GD1a as well as this trisaccharide motif alone, corresponding to the sialyl-Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen, that represents the active ligand epitope, and these compounds bind to the neurotoxin with a high degree of predisposition but with low affinities. This finding does not correlate with the oligosaccharide moieties having a strong contribution to the total affinity, which was expected to be the case. We here propose that the glycan part of the ganglioside receptors mainly provides abundance and specificity, whereas the interaction with the membrane itself and protein receptor brings about the strong total binding of the toxin to the neuronal membrane.

  • 52.
    Hamark, Christoffer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Berntsson, Ronnie Per-Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gustafsson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Svensson, Linda M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Stenmark, Pål
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Recognition of Ganglioside Receptors by Botulinum Neurotoxin AManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Hamark, Christoffer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Landström, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ethyl 3,6-di-O-benzyl-2-deoxy-N-phthalimido-1-thio-β-D-glucopyranoside2010In: Acta Crystallographica Section E: Structure Reports Online, ISSN 1600-5368, E-ISSN 1600-5368, Vol. E66, p. o3250-o3251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the title compound, C30H31NO6S, the plane of the N-phthalimido group is nearly orthogonal to the least-squares plane of the sugar ring (defined by atoms C2, C3, C5 and O5 using standard glucose nomenclature), making a dihedral angle of 72.8 (1)°. The thioethyl group has the exo-anomeric conformation. The hydroxy group forms an intermolecular hydrogen bond to the O atom in the sugar ring, generating [100] chains. There are four close - contacts with centroid-centroid distances less than 4.0 Å, all with dihedral angles between the interacting systems of only 8°, supporting energetically favourable stacking interactions

  • 54.
    Hamark, Christoffer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Landström, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ethyl 4,6-O-benzylidene-2-deoxy-N-phthalimido-1-thio-β-D-glucopyranoside2010In: Acta Crystallographica Section E: Structure Reports Online, ISSN 1600-5368, E-ISSN 1600-5368, Vol. E66, p. o3249-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Hamark, Christoffer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Landström, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    SEAL by NMR: Glyco-Based Selenium-Labeled Affinity Ligands Detected by NMR Spectroscopy2014In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 20, no 43, p. 13905-13908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a method for the screening of interactions between proteins and selenium-labeled carbohydrate ligands. SEAL by NMR is demonstrated with selenoglycosides binding to lectins where the selenium nucleus serves as an NMR-active handle and reports on binding through Se-77 NMR spectroscopy. In terms of overall sensitivity, this nucleus is comparable to C-13 NMR, while the NMR spectral width is ten times larger, yielding little overlap in Se-77 NMR spectroscopy, even for similar compounds. The studied ligands are singly selenated bioisosteres of methyl glycosides for which straightforward preparation methods are at hand and libraries can readily be generated. The strength of the approach lies in its simplicity, sensitivity to binding events, the tolerance to additives and the possibility of having several ligands in the assay. This study extends the increasing potential of selenium in structure biology and medicinal chemistry. We anticipate that SEAL by NMR will be a beneficial tool for the development of selenium-based bioactive compounds, such as glycomimetic drug candidates.

  • 56.
    Hamark, Christoffer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Pendrill, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Landström, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Dotson Fagerström, Alexandra
    Sandgren, Mats
    Ståhlberg, Jerry
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Enantioselective Binding of Propranolol and Analogues Thereof to Cellobiohydrolase Cel7A2018In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 24, no 68, p. 17975-17985Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the catalytic site for the hydrolysis of cellulose the enzyme cellobiohydrolase Cel7A binds the enantiomers of the adrenergic beta-blocker propranolol with different selectivity. Methyl-to-hydroxymethyl group modifications of propranolol, which result in higher affinity and improved selectivity, were herein studied by H-1,H-1 and H-1,C-13 scalar spin-spin coupling constants as well as utilizing the nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations of the ligands per se, which showed the presence of all-antiperiplanar conformations, except for the one containing a vicinal oxygen-oxygen arrangement governed by the gauche effect. For the ligand-protein complexes investigated by NMR spectroscopy using, inter alia, transferred NOESY and saturation-transfer difference (STD) NMR experiments the S-isomers were shown to bind with a higher affinity and a conformation similar to that preferred in solution, in contrast to the R-isomer. The fact that the S-form of the propranolol enantiomer is pre-arranged for binding to the protein is also observed for a crystal structure of dihydroxy-(S)-propranolol and Cel7A presented herein. Whereas the binding of propranolol is entropy driven, the complexation with the dihydroxy analogue is anticipated to be favored also by an enthalpic term, such as for its enantiomer, that is, dihydroxy-(R)-propranolol, because hydrogen-bond donation replaces the corresponding bonding from hydroxyl groups in glucosyl residues of the natural substrate. In addition to a favorable entropy component, albeit lesser in magnitude, this represents an effect of enthalpy-to-entropy compensation in ligand-protein interactions.

  • 57. Hatcher, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Säwén, Elin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    MacKerell, Jr., Alexander D.
    Conformational properties of methyl β-maltoside and methyl α- and β-cellobioside disaccharides2011In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 115, no 3, p. 597-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An investigation of the conformational properties of methyl β-maltoside, methyl α-cellobioside, and methyl β-cellobioside disaccharides using NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) techniques, is presented. Emphasis is placed on validation of a recently presented force field for hexopyranose disaccharides followed by elucidation of the conformational properties of two different types of glycosidic linkages, α-(1 → 4) and β-(1 → 4). Both gas-phase and aqueous-phase simulations are performed to gain insight into the effect of solvent on the conformational properties. A number of transglycosidic J-coupling constants and proton−proton distances are calculated from the simulations and are used to identify the percent sampling of the three glycosidic conformations (syn, anti-, and anti-ψ) and, in turn, describe the flexibility around the glycosidic linkage. The results show the force field to be in overall good agreement with experiment, although some very small limitations are evident. Subsequently, a thorough hydrogen bonding analysis is performed to obtain insights into the conformational properties of the disaccharides. In methyl β-maltoside, competition between HO2′−O3 intramolecular hydrogen bonding and intermolecular hydrogen bonding of those groups with solvent leads to increased sampling of syn, anti-, and anti-ψ conformations and better agreement with NMR J-coupling constants. In methyl α- and β-cellobioside, O5′−HO6 and HO2′−O3 hydrogen bonding interactions are in competition with intermolecular hydrogen bonding involving the solvent molecules. This competition leads to retention of the O5′−HO3 hydrogen bond and increased sampling of the syn region of the /ψ map. Moreover, glycosidic torsions are correlated to the intramolecular hydrogen bonding occurring in the molecules. The present results verify that in the β-(1 → 4)-linkage intramolecular hydrogen bonding in the aqueous phase is due to the decreased ability of water to successfully compete for the O5′ and HO3 hydrogen bonding moieties, in contrast to that occurring between the O5′ and HO6 atoms in this α-(1 → 4)-linkage.

  • 58. He, Xibing
    et al.
    Hatcher, Elizabeth
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    MacKerell, Alexander D., Jr.
    Bifurcated Hydrogen Bonding and Asymmetric Fluctuations in a Carbohydrate Crystal Studied via X-ray Crystallography and Computational Analysis2013In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 117, no 25, p. 7546-7553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structure of the O-methyl glycoside of the naturally occurring 6-O-[(R)-1-carboxyethyl]-alpha-D-galactopyranose, C10H18O8, has been determined by X-ray crystallography at 100 K, supplementing the previously determined structure obtained at 293 K (Acta Crystallogr. 1996, C52, 2285-2287). Molecular dynamics simulations of this glycoside were Performed in the crystal environment with different numbers of units cells included in the primary simulation system at both 100 and 293 K. The Calculated unit cell Parameters and the intramolecular geometries (bonds, angles, and dihedrals) agree well with experimental results. Atomic fluctuations, including B-factors and anisotropies, are in good agreement with respect to the relative values on an atom-by-atom basis. In addition, the fluctuations increase with increasing simulation system size, with the simulated values converging to values lower than those observed experimentally indicating that the simulation model is not accounting for all possible contributions to the experimentally observed B-factors, which may be related to either the simulation time scale or size. In the simulation's, the hydroxyl group of O7 is found to from bifurcated hydrogen bonds with O6 and O8 of an adjacent molecule, with the interactions dominated by the interaction HO7-O6 interaction. Quantum mechanical calculations support this observation.

  • 59. Hughes, Arwel
    et al.
    Patel, Dhilon S.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Klauda, Jeffery B.
    Clifton, Luke A.
    Im, Wonpil
    Physical Properties of Bacterial Outer Membrane Models: Neutron Reflectometry & Molecular Simulation2019In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, E-ISSN 1542-0086, Vol. 116, no 6, p. 1095-1104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria is an asymmetric bilayer having phospholipids in the inner leaflet and lipopolysaccharides in the outer leaflet. This unique asymmetry and the complex carbohydrates in lipopolysaccharides make it a daunting task to study the asymmetrical OM structure and dynamics, its interactions with OM proteins, and its roles in translocation of substrates, including antibiotics. In this study, we combine neutron reflectometry and molecular simulation to explore the physical properties of OM mimetics. There is excellent agreement between experiment and simulation, allowing experimental testing of the conclusions from simulations studies and also atomistic interpretation of the behavior of experimental model systems, such as the degree of lipid asymmetry, the lipid component (tail, head, and sugar) profiles along the bilayer normal, and lateral packing (i.e., average surface area per lipid). Therefore, the combination of both approaches provides a powerful new means to explore the biological and biophysical behavior of the bacterial OM.

  • 60. Jakhetia, Richa
    et al.
    Marri, Aruna
    Ståhle, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Verma, Naresh K.
    Serotype-conversion in Shigella flexneri: identification of a novel bacteriophage, Sf101, from a serotype 7a strain2014In: BMC Genomics, ISSN 1471-2164, E-ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 15, p. 742-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Shigella flexneri is the major cause of bacillary dysentery in the developing countries. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen of S. flexneri plays an important role in its pathogenesis and also divides S. flexneri into 19 serotypes. All the serotypes with an exception for serotype 6 share a common O-antigen backbone comprising of N-acetylglucosamine and three rhamnose residues. Different serotypes result from modification of the basic backbone conferred by phage-encoded glucosyltransferase and/or acetyltransferase genes, or plasmid-encoded phosphoethanolamine transferase. Recently, a new site for O-acetylation at positions 3 and 4 of Rha(III), in serotypes 1a, 1b, 2a, 5a and Y was shown to be mediated by the oacB gene. Additionally, this gene was shown to be carried by a transposon-like structure inserted upstream of the adrA region on the chromosome. Results: In this study, a novel bacteriophage Sf101, encoding the oacB gene was isolated and characterised from a serotype 7a strain. The complete sequence of its 38,742 bp genome encoding 66 open reading frames (orfs) was determined. Comparative analysis revealed that phage Sf101 has a mosaic genome, and most of its proteins were >90% identical to the proteins from 12 previously characterised lambdoid phages. In addition, the organisation of Sf101 genes was found to be highly similar to bacteriophage Sf6. Analysis of the Sf101 OacB identified two amino acid substitutions in the protein; however, results obtained by NMR spectroscopy confirmed that Sf101-OacB was functional. Inspection of the chromosomal integration site of Sf101 phage revealed that this phage integrates in the sbcB locus, thus unveiling a new site for integration of serotype-converting phages of S. flexneri, and determining an alternative location of oacB gene in the chromosome. Furthermore, this study identified oacB gene in several serotype 7a isolates from various regions providing evidence of O-acetyl modification in serotype 7a. Conclusions: This is the first report on the isolation of bacteriophage Sf101 which contains the S. flexneri O-antigen modification gene oacB. Sf101 has a highly mosaic genome and was found to integrate in the sbcB locus. These findings contribute an advance in our current knowledge of serotype converting phages of S. flexneri.

  • 61.
    Jansson, Jennie L. M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Maliniak, Arnold
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Conformational Dynamics of Oligosaccharides: NMR Techniques and Computer Simulations2006In: NMR Spectroscopy and Computer Modeling of Carbohydrates: Recent Advances / [ed] Johannes F. G Vliegenthar & Robert J. Woods, American Chemical Society (ACS), 2006, p. 20-39Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    NMR spectroscopy techniques in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations facilitate description of conformation and dynamics of oligosaccharides in solution. Herein we describe approaches based on hetero-nuclear carbon-proton spin-spin coupling constants useful for assessing conformational preferences at the glycosidic linkage, exemplified for á-cyclodextrin. Furthermore, we utilize hetero-nuclear carbon-proton residual dipolar couplings together with molecular dynamics simulations in the analysis of the conformational dynamics of the milk oligosaccharide Lacto-N-neotetraose.

  • 62. Jansson, JLM
    et al.
    Maliniak, A
    Stockholm University.
    Widmalm, G
    Stockholm University.
    Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy applied to columnar liquid crystals2006In: NMR Spectroscopy and Computer Modeling of Carbohydrates: Recent Advances, Vol. 930, p. 20-39Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 63. Jo, Sunhwan
    et al.
    Myatt, Daniel
    Qi, Yifei
    Doutch, James
    Clifton, Luke A.
    Im, Wonpil
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Multiple Conformational States Contribute to the 3D Structure of a Glucan Decasaccharide: A Combined SAXS and MD Simulation Study2018In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 122, no 3, p. 1169-1175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The inherent flexibility of carbohydrates is dependent on stereochemical arrangements, and characterization of their influence and importance will give insight into the three-dimensional structure and dynamics. In this study, a beta-(1 -> 4)/beta-(1 -> 3)-linked glucosyl decasaccharide is experimentally investigated by synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering from which its radius of gyration (R-g) is obtained. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the decasaccharide show four populated states at each glycosidic linkage, namely, syn- and anti-conformations. The calculated R-g values from the MD simulation reveal that in addition to syn-conformers the presence of anti-psi conformational states is required to reproduce experimental scattering data, unveiling inherent glycosidic linkage flexibility. The CHARMM36 force field for carbohydrates thus describes the conformational flexibility of the decasaccharide very well and captures the conceptual importance that anti-conformers are to be anticipated at glycosidic linkages of carbohydrates.

  • 64. Johannessen, Christian
    et al.
    Pendrill, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Hecht, Lutz
    Barron, Laurence D.
    Glycan structure of a high-mannose glycoprotein from Raman optical activity2011In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 50, no 23, p. 5349-5351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A revealing signature: The glycan structure of intact yeast external invertase, a high-mannose glycoprotein used as biocatalyst, was investigated by using Raman optical activity (ROA) spectroscopy. The conformational preferences present in mannose-containing di- and trisaccharides were found to be preserved in the glycan chains, with secondary polpeptide backbone structure suppressed.

  • 65.
    Jonsson, Hanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Säwén, Elin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Studies on the conformational flexibility of α-L-Rhap-(1→2)-α-L-Rhap-OMe using molecular simulation and 13C-site-specific labeling: a model for a commonly occurring disaccharide in bacterial polysaccharidesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacterial polysaccharides are comprised of a variety of monosaccharides, L-rhamnose (6-deoxy-Lmannose) being one of them. This sugar is often part of α-(1→2)- and/or α-(1→3)-linkages and wehave therefore studied the disaccharide α-L-Rhap-(1→2)-α-L-Rhap-OMe to obtain information onconformational preferences at this glycosidic linkage. The target disaccharide was synthesized with 13C site-specific labeling at C1' and at C2', i.e., in the terminal group. 2D 1H,13C-HSQC-HECADE and 1H,13C-J-HMBC NMR experiments, 1D 13C and 1H NMR spectra together with total line-shape analysis were used to extract conformationally dependent hetero- and homonuclear spin-spincoupling constants. This resulted in the determination of 2JC2',H1' , 3JC1',C1 , 3JC1',C3 , 3JC2',C2 , 2JC1',C2 ,1JC1',C2' , and 1JC1',H1' . These data together with previously determined JC,H and 1H,1H NOEs result in fourteen conformationally dependent NMR parameters that are available for analysis of glycosidiclinkage flexibility and conformational preferences. A molecular dynamics simulation of the disaccharide with explicit water molecules as solvent showed a major conformational state at ΦH =40° and ψH = –35°, consistent with experimental NMR data.

  • 66.
    Jonsson, Hanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    NMR analysis of conformationally dependent nJCH and nJCC in the trisaccharide α-L-Rhap-(1→2)[α-L-Rhap-(1→3)]-α-L-Rhap-OMe and a site-specifically labeled isotopologue thereofManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An array of NMR spectroscopy experiments have been carried out to obtain conformationallydependent 1H,13C- and 13C,13C-spin-spin coupling constants in the trisaccharide a-L-Rhap-(1®2)[a-LRhap-(1®3)]-a-L-Rhap-OMe. The trisaccharide was synthesized with 13C site-specific labeling at C2'and C2'', i.e., in the rhamnosyl groups in order to alleviate 1H spectral overlap. Using both the naturalabundance compound and the 13C-labeled sample 2D 1H,13C-J-HMBC and 1H,13C-HSQC-HECADENMR experiments, total line-shape analysis of 1H NMR spectra and 1D 13C NMR experiments wereemployed to extract 3C,H J , 2C,H J , 3C,C J , and1C,C J . The 13C site-specific labeling facilitates straightforward determination of nC,C J as the splitting of the 13C natural abundance resonances. This studyresulted in seven conformationally dependent coupling constants for the trisaccharide and illustrates theuse of 13C site-specific labeling as a valuable tool that extends the 1D and 2D NMR methods in currentuse to attain both hetero- and homonuclear spin-spin coupling constants.

  • 67.
    Jonsson, K. Hanna M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Methyl 4-O-benzoyl-2,3-O-isopropylidene-a-L-rhamnopyranoside2006In: Acta Crystallographica Section C: Crystal Structure Communications, ISSN 0108-2701, E-ISSN 1600-5759, Vol. 62, no 8, p. o447-o449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The title compound, C17H22O6, having an ester group at O4 of the hexopyranosyl sugar residue shows for the exo-cyclic C=O bond a conformation that is eclipsed to the C4-H4 bond. The two related torsion angles are denoted by syn and cis conformations. The q1 torsion angle (H4-C4-O4-C10) is indicated to have a similar conformation in solution as analyzed by NMR spectroscopy and a Karplus-type relationship.

  • 68.
    Jonsson, K. Hanna M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Pendrill, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    NMR analysis of conformationally dependent nJC,H and nJC,C in the trisaccharide α-L-Rhap-(1→2)[α-L-Rhap-(1→3)]-α-L-Rhap-OMe and a site-specifically labeled isotopologue thereof2011In: Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry, ISSN 0749-1581, E-ISSN 1097-458X, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 117-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An array of NMR spectroscopy experiments have been carried out to obtain conformationally dependent 1H,13C- and 13C,13C-spin–spin coupling constants in the trisaccharide α-L-Rhap-(1 → 2)[α-L-Rhap-(1 → 3)]-α-L-Rhap-OMe. The trisaccharide was synthesized with 13C site-specific labeling at C2′ and C2″, i.e. in the rhamnosyl groups in order to alleviate 1H spectral overlap. This facilitated the measurement of a key trans-glycosidic proton–proton cross-relaxation rate using 1D 1H,1H-T-ROESY experiments as well as a 3JC, H coupling employing 1D 1H,13C-long-range experiments, devoid of potential interference from additional J coupling. By means of both the natural abundance compound and the 13C-labeled sample 2D 1H,13C-J-HMBC and 1H,13C-HSQC-HECADE NMR experiments, total line-shape analysis of 1H NMR spectra and 1D 13C NMR experiments were employed to extract 3JC, H, 2JC, H, 3JC, C, and 1JC, C coupling constants. The 13C site-specific labeling facilitates straightforward determination of nJC, C as the splitting of the 13C natural abundance resonances. This study resulted in eight conformationally dependent coupling constants for the trisaccharide and illustrates the use of 13C site-specific labeling as a valuable approach that extends the 1D and 2D NMR methods in current use to attain both hetero- and homonuclear spin–spin coupling constants that subsequently can be utilized for conformational analysis.

  • 69.
    Jonsson, K. Hanna M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Säwén, Elin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Studies on the conformational flexibility of alpha-L-rhamnose-containing oligosaccharides using C-13-site-specific labeling, NMR spectroscopy and molecular simulations: implications for the three-dimensional structure of bacterial rhamnan polysaccharides2012In: Organic and biomolecular chemistry, ISSN 1477-0520, E-ISSN 1477-0539, Vol. 10, no 12, p. 2453-2463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacterial polysaccharides are comprised of a variety of monosaccharides, L-rhamnose (6-deoxy-L-mannose) being one of them. This sugar is often part of alpha-(1 -> 2)- and/or alpha-(1 -> 3)-linkages and we have therefore studied the disaccharide alpha-L-Rhap-(1 -> 2)-alpha-L-Rhap-OMe to obtain information on conformational preferences at this glycosidic linkage. The target disaccharide was synthesized with C-13 site-specific labeling at C1' and at C2', i.e., in the terminal group. 2D H-1, C-13-HSQC-HECADE and H-1, C-13-J-HMBC NMR experiments, 1D C-13 and H-1 NMR spectra together with total line-shape analysis were used to extract conformationally dependent hetero- and homonuclear spin-spin coupling constants. This resulted in the determination of (2)JC(2',H1'), (3)J(C1',C1), (3)J(C1',C3), (3)J(C2',C2), (2)J(C1',C2), (1)JC(1',C2'), and (1)J(C1',H1'). These data together with previously determined J(CH) and H-1, H-1 NOEs result in fourteen conformationally dependent NMR parameters that are available for analysis of glycosidic linkage flexibility and conformational preferences. A 100 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the disaccharide with explicit water molecules as solvent showed a major conformational state at phi(H) approximate to 40 degrees and psi(H) approximate to -35 degrees, consistent with experimental NMR data. In addition, MD simulations were carried out also for alpha-L-Rhap-(1 -> 3)-alpha-L-Rhap-OMe and a rhamnan hexasaccharide. The gathered information on the oligosaccharides was used to address conformational preferences for a larger structure, a 2- and 3-linked nonasaccharide, with implications for the 3D structure of rhamnan polysaccharides, which should be regarded as flexible polymers.

  • 70.
    Jonsson, K. Hanna M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Weintraub, Andrej
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Structural determination of the O-antigenic polysaccharide from Escherichia coli O742009In: Carbohydrate Research, ISSN 0008-6215, E-ISSN 1873-426X, Vol. 344, no 12, p. 1592-1595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structure of the O-antigen polysaccharide (PS) from Escherichia coli O74 has been determined. Component analysis, together with 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy as well as 1H,15N-HSQC experiments were employed to elucidate the structure. Inter-residue correlations were determined by 1H,1H-NOESY and 1H,13C-heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation experiments. The PS is composed of tetrasaccharide repeating units with the following structure:

    Full-size image (5K)

    Cross-peaks of low intensity from an α-linked N-acetylglucosamine residue were present in the NMR spectra, and spectral analysis indicates that they originate from the penultimate residue in the polysaccharide. Consequently, the biological repeating unit has a 3-substituted N-acetyl-d-glucosamine residue at its reducing end. The 1H, 13C and 15N NMR chemical shifts of the α- and β-anomeric forms of d-Fucp3NAc are also reported. The repeating unit of the E. coli O74 O-antigen is identical to that of the capsular polysaccharide from E. coli K45.

  • 71.
    Jonsson, K. Hanna M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Weintraub, Andrej
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Structural studies of the O-antigenic polysaccharide from Shigella dysenteriae type 3 and Escherichia coli O124, a reinvestigation2006In: Carbohydrate Research, ISSN 0008-6215, E-ISSN 1873-426X, Vol. 341, p. 2986-2989Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 72. Kaderavek, Pavel
    et al.
    Zapletal, Vojtech
    Fiala, Radovan
    Srb, Pavel
    Padrta, Petr
    Precechtelova, Jana Pavlikova
    Soltesova, Maria
    Kowalewski, Jozef
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Chmelik, Josef
    Sklenar, Vladimir
    Zidek, Lukas
    Spectral density mapping at multiple magnetic fields suitable for C-13 NMR relaxation studies2016In: Journal of magnetic resonance, ISSN 1090-7807, E-ISSN 1096-0856, Vol. 266, p. 23-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Standard spectral density mapping protocols, well suited for the analysis of N-15 relaxation rates, introduce significant systematic errors when applied to C-13 relaxation data, especially if the dynamics is dominated by motions with short correlation times (small molecules, dynamic residues of macromolecules). A possibility to improve the accuracy by employing cross-correlated relaxation rates and on measurements taken at several magnetic fields has been examined. A suite of protocols for analyzing such data has been developed and their performance tested. Applicability of the proposed protocols is documented in two case studies, spectral density mapping of a uniformly labeled RNA hairpin and of a selectively labeled disaccharide exhibiting highly anisotropic tumbling. Combination of auto- and cross-correlated relaxation data acquired at three magnetic fields was applied in the former case in order to separate effects of fast motions and conformational or chemical exchange. An approach using auto-correlated relaxation rates acquired at five magnetic fields, applicable to anisotropically moving molecules, was used in the latter case. The results were compared with a more advanced analysis of data obtained by interpolation of auto-correlated relaxation rates measured at seven magnetic fields, and with the spectral density mapping of cross-correlated relaxation rates. The results showed that sufficiently accurate values of auto- and cross-correlated spectral density functions at zero and C-13 frequencies can be obtained from data acquired at three magnetic fields for uniformly C-13-labeled molecules with a moderate anisotropy of the rotational diffusion tensor. Analysis of auto-correlated relaxation rates at five magnetic fields represents an alternative for molecules undergoing highly anisotropic motions.

  • 73. Kang, Yu
    et al.
    Gohlke, Ulrich
    Engström, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Hamark, Christoffer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Scheidt, Tom
    Heinemann, Udo
    Max-Delbrück-Centrum für Molekulare Medizin.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lipowski, Reinhard
    Santer, Mark
    Barbirz, Stefanie
    Probing the conformational space of Shigella flexneri O‑antigen bound to the tailspike protein of bacteriophage Sf6 by X-ray crystallography, NMR, and Molecular DynamicsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 74. Kang, Yu
    et al.
    Gohlke, Ulrich
    Engström, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Hamark, Christoffer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Scheidt, Tom
    Kunstrnann, Sonja
    Heinemann, Udo
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Santer, Mark
    Barbirz, Stefanie
    Bacteriophage Tailspikes and Bacterial O-Antigens as a Model System to Study Weak-Affinity Protein-Polysaccharide Interactions2016In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 138, no 29, p. 9109-9118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding interactions of bacterial surface polysaccharides with receptor protein scaffolds is important for the development of antibiotic therapies. The corresponding protein recognition domains frequently form low-affinity complexes with polysaccharides that are difficult to address with experimental techniques due to the conformational flexibility of the polysaccharide. In this work, we studied the tailspike protein (TSP) of the bacteriophage Sf6. Sf6TSP binds and hydrolyzes the high-rhamnose, serotype Y O-antigen polysaccharide of the Gram-negative bacterium Shigella flexneri (S. flexneri) as a first step of bacteriophage infection. Spectroscopic analyses and enzymatic cleavage assays confirmed that Sf6TSP binds long stretches of this polysaccharide. Crystal structure analysis and saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy using an enhanced method to interpret the data permitted the detailed description of affinity contributions and flexibility in an Sf6TSP-octasaccharide complex. Dodecasaccharide fragments corresponding to three repeating units of the O-antigen in complex with Sf6TSP were studied computationally by molecular dynamics simulations. They showed that distortion away from the low-energy solution conformation found in the octasaccharide complex is necessary for ligand binding. This is in agreement with a weak-affinity functional polysaccharide protein contact that facilitates correct placement and thus hydrolysis of the polysaccharide close to the catalytic residues. Our simulations stress that the flexibility of glycan epitopes together with a small number of specific protein contacts provide the driving force for Sf6TSP-polysaccharide complex formation in an overall weak-affinity interaction system.

  • 75.
    Kapla, Jon
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Engström, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Stevensson, Baltzar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Wohlert, Jakob
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Maliniak, Arnold
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Molecular dynamics simulations and NMR spectroscopy studies of trehalose-lipid bilayer systems2015In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 17, no 34, p. 22438-22447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The disaccharide trehalose (TRH) strongly affects the physical properties of lipid bilayers. We investigate interactions between lipid membranes formed by 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and TRH using NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. We compare dipolar couplings derived from DMPC/TRH trajectories with those determined (i) experimentally in TRH using conventional high-resolution NMR in a weakly ordered solvent (bicelles), and (ii) by solid-state NMR in multilamellar vesicles (MLV) formed by DMPC. Analysis of the experimental and MD-derived couplings in DMPC indicated that the force field used in the simulations reasonably well describes the experimental results with the exception for the glycerol fragment that exhibits significant deviations. The signs of dipolar couplings, not available from the experiments on highly ordered systems, were determined from the trajectory analysis. The crucial step in the analysis of residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) in TRH determined in a bicelle-environment was access to the conformational distributions derived from the MD trajectory. Furthermore, the conformational behavior of TRH, investigated by J-couplings, in the ordered and isotropic phases is essentially identical, indicating that the general assumptions in the analyses of RDCs are well founded.

  • 76.
    Kapla, Jon
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Wohlert, Jakob
    Stevensson, Baltzar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Engström, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Maliniak, Arnold
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Membrane-Sugar Interactions2013In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 117, no 22, p. 6667-6673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well documented that disaccharides in general and trehalose (TRH) in particular strongly affect physical properties and functionality of lipid bilayers. We investigate interactions between lipid membranes formed by 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and TRH by means of molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Ten different TRH concentrations were studied in the range W-TRH = 0-0.20 (w/w). The potential of mean force (PMF) for DMPC bilayer TRH interactions was determined using two different force fields, and was subsequently used in a simple analytical model for description of sugar binding at the membrane interface. The MD results were in good agreement with the predictions of the model. The net affinities of TRH for the DMPC bilayer derived from the model and MD simulations were compared with experimental results. The area per lipid increases and the membrane becomes thinner with increased TRH concentration, which is interpreted as an intercalation effect of the TRH molecules into the polar part of the lipids, resulting in conformational changes in the chains. These results are consistent with recent experimental observations. The compressibility modulus related to the fluctuations of the membrane increases dramatically with increased TRH concentration, which indicates higher order and rigidity of the bilayer. This is also reflected in a decrease (by a factor of 15) of the lateral diffusion of the lipids. We interpret these observations as a formation of a glassy state at the interface of the membrane, which has been suggested in the literature as a hypothesis for the membrane sugar interactions.

  • 77. Kim, Seonghoon
    et al.
    Patel, Dhilon-S.
    Park, Soohyung
    Slusky, Joanna
    Klauda, Jeffery B.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Im, Wonpil
    Bilayer Properties of Lipid A from Various Gram-Negative Bacteria2016In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, E-ISSN 1542-0086, Vol. 111, no 8, p. 1750-1760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lipid A is the lipid anchor of a lipopolysaccharide in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. In general, lipid A consists of two phosphorylated N-acetyl glucosamine and several acyl chains that are directly linked to the two sugars. Depending on the bacterial species and environments, the acyl chain number and length vary, and lipid A can be chemically modified with phosphoethanolamine, aminoarabinose, or glycine residues, which are key to bacterial pathogenesis. In this work, homogeneous lipid bilayers of 21 distinct lipid A types from 12 bacterial species are modeled and simulated to investigate the differences and similarities of their membrane properties. In addition, different neutralizing ion types (Ca2+, K+, and Na+) are considered to examine the ion's influence on the membrane properties. The trajectory analysis shows that (1) the area per lipid is mostly correlated to the acyl chain number, and the area per lipid increases as a function of the acyl chain number; (2) the hydrophobic thickness is mainly determined by the average acyl chain length with slight dependence on the acyl chain number, and the hydrophobic thickness generally increases with the average acyl chain length; (3) a good correlation is observed among the area per lipid, hydrophobic thickness, and acyl chain order; and (4) although the influence of neutralizing ion types on the area per lipid and hydrophobic thickness is minimal, Ca2+ stays longer on the membrane surface than K+ or Na+, consequently leading to lower lateral diffusion and a higher compressibility modulus, which agrees well with available experiments.

  • 78. Kotsyubynskyy, Dmytro
    et al.
    Zerbetto, Mirco
    Šoltésová, Mária
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Charles University Prague .
    Engström, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Pendrill, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Kowalewski, Josef
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Polimeno, Antonin
    Stochastic Modeling of Flexible Biomolecules Applied to NMR Relaxation: 2. Interpretation of Complex Dynamics in Linear Oligosaccharides2012In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 116, no 50, p. 14541-14555Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A computational stochastic approach is applied to the description of flexible molecules. By combining (i) molecular dynamics simulations, (ii) hydrodynamics approaches, and (iii) a multidimensional diffusive description for internal and global dynamics, it is possible to build an efficient integrated approach to the interpretation of relaxation processes in flexible systems. In particular, the model is applied to the interpretation of nuclear magnetic relaxation measurements of linear oligosaccharides, namely a mannose-containing trisaccharide and the pentasaccharide LNF-1. Experimental data are reproduced with sufficient accuracy without free model parameters.

  • 79. Kuttel, Michelle M.
    et al.
    Ståhle, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    CarbBuilder: Software for building molecular models of complex oligo- and polysaccharide structures2016In: Journal of Computational Chemistry, ISSN 0192-8651, E-ISSN 1096-987X, Vol. 37, no 22, p. 2098-2105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CarbBuilder is a portable software tool for producing three-dimensional molecular models of carbohydrates from the simple text specification of a primary structure. CarbBuilder can generate a wide variety of carbohydrate structures, ranging from monosaccharides to large, branched polysaccharides. Version 2.0 of the software, described in this article, supports monosaccharides of both mammalian and bacterial origin and a range of substituents for derivatization of individual sugar residues. This improved version has a sophisticated building algorithm to explore the range of possible conformations for a specified carbohydrate molecule. Illustrative examples of models of complex polysaccharides produced by CarbBuilder demonstrate the capabilities of the software. CarbBuilder is freely available under the Artistic License 2.0.

  • 80. Kuttel, Michelle
    et al.
    Mao, Yue
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lundborg, Magnus
    CarbBuilder: an adjustable tool for building 3D molecular structures of carbohydrates for molecular simulation2011In:  Proceedings - 2011 7th IEEE International Conference on eScience, eScience 2011, , art. no. 6123304, 2011, p. 395-402Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CarbBuilder is a software tool for building 3D structures of carbohydrates, which are the most structurally varied of all molecular classes. CarbBuilder was designed with the dual aims of portability and adaptability, using an iterative software development approach. CarbBuilder employs a simple algorithm, using heuristics based upon experimental data to convert a primary structure description of a carbohydrate molecule into a three-dimensional structure file. This straightforward approach means that CarbBuilder can be easily adapted: users can add additional monosaccharide building blocks or alter the conformational defaults to suit specific requirements. The output carbohydrate structure can be used for subsequent molecular simulation investigations. CarbBuilder is freely available and portable: it is a text-based stand-alone program that can run on Windows, Linux and MacOS X systems without installation.

  • 81.
    Landersjö, Clas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Stevensson, Baltzar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Eklund, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Östervall, Jennie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Maliniak, Arnold
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Söderman, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Molecular conformations of a disaccharide investigated using NMR spectroscopy2006In: Journal of Biomolecular NMR, ISSN 0925-2738, E-ISSN 1573-5001, Vol. 35, p. 89-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The molecular structure of -l-Rhap-(1→ 2)--l-Rhap-OMe has been investigated using conformation sensitive NMR parameters: cross-relaxation rates, scalar 3 J CH couplings and residual dipolar couplings obtained in a dilute liquid crystalline phase. The order matrices of the two sugar residues are different, which indicates that the molecule cannot exist in a single conformation. The conformational distribution function, , related to the two glycosidic linkage torsion angles and was constructed using the APME method, valid in the low orientational order limit. The APME approach is based on the additive potential (AP) and maximum entropy (ME) models. The analyses of the trajectories generated in molecular dynamics and Langevin dynamics (LD) computer simulations gave support to the distribution functions constructed from the experimental NMR parameters. It is shown that at least two conformational regions are populated on the Ramachandran map and that these regions exhibit very different molecular order. Electronic Supplementary Material  Supplementary material is available for this article at http://www.dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10858-006-9006-0 and is accessible for authorized users.

  • 82.
    Landström, Jens
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bergström, Maria
    Naturvetenskapliga institutionen, Högskolan i Kalmar.
    Hamark, Christoffer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ohlson, Sten
    Naturvetenskapliga institutionen, Högskolan i Kalmar.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Combining WAC, NMR and computer simulations in Lysozyme interaction studiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 83.
    Landström, Jens
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bergström, Maria
    Hamark, Christoffer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ohlson, Sten
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Combining weak affinity chromatography, NMR spectroscopy and molecular simulations in carbohydrate-lysozyme interaction studies2012In: Organic and biomolecular chemistry, ISSN 1477-0520, E-ISSN 1477-0539, Vol. 10, no 15, p. 3019-3032Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By examining the interactions between the protein hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) and commercially available and chemically synthesized carbohydrate ligands using a combination of weak affinity chromatography (WAC), NMR spectroscopy and molecular simulations, we report on new affinity data as well as a detailed binding model for the HEWL protein. The equilibrium dissociation constants of the ligands were obtained by WAC but also by NMR spectroscopy, which agreed well. The structures of two HEWL-disaccharide complexes in solution were deduced by NMR spectroscopy using H-1 saturation transfer difference (STD) effects and transferred H-1,H-1-NOESY experiments, relaxation-matrix calculations, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations. In solution the two disaccharides beta-D-Galp-(1 -> 4)-beta-D-GlcpNAc-OMe and beta-D-GlcpNAc-(1 -> 4)-beta-D-GlcpNAc-OMe bind to the B and C sites of HEWL in a syn-conformation at the glycosidic linkage between the two sugar residues. Intermolecular hydrogen bonding and CH/pi-interactions form the basis of the protein-ligand complexes in a way characteristic of carbohydrate-protein interactions. Molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water molecules of both the apo-form of the protein and a ligand-protein complex showed structural change compared to a crystal structure of the protein. The flexibility of HEWL as indicated by a residue-based root-mean-square deviation analysis indicated similarities overall, with some residue specific differences, inter alia, for Arg61 that is situated prior to a flexible loop. The Arg61 flexibility was notably larger in the ligand-complexed form of HEWL. N,N'-Diacetylchitobiose has previously been observed to bind to HEWL at the B and C sites in water solution based on H-1 NMR chemical shift changes in the protein whereas the disaccharide binds at either the B and C sites or the C and D sites in different crystal complexes. The present study thus highlights that protein-ligand complexes may vary notably between the solution and solid states, underscoring the importance of targeting the pertinent binding site(s) for inhibition of protein activity and the advantages of combining different techniques in a screening process.

  • 84.
    Landström, Jens
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Nordmark, Eva-Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Eklund, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Weintraub, Andrej
    Seckler, Robert
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Interaction of a Salmonella enteritidis O-antigen octasaccharide with the phage P22 tailspike protein by NMR spectroscopy and docking studies2008In: Glycoconjugate Journal, ISSN 0282-0080, E-ISSN 1573-4986, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 137-143Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 85.
    Landström, Jens
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Persson, Karina
    Rademacher, Christoph
    Lundborg, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Peters, Thomas
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Exploration of the molecular recognition and dynamic properties of WaaG glycosyltransferaseManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 86.
    Landström, Jens
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Persson, Karina
    Rademacher, Christoph
    Lundborg, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Wakarchuk, Warren
    Peters, Thomas
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Small molecules containing hetero-bicyclic ring systems compete with UDP-Glc for binding to WaaG glycosyltransferase2012In: Glycoconjugate Journal, ISSN 0282-0080, E-ISSN 1573-4986, Vol. 29, no 7, p. 491-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The alpha-1,3-glucosyltransferase WaaG is involved in the synthesis of the core region of lipopolysaccharides in E. coli. A fragment-based screening for inhibitors of the WaaG glycosyltrasferase donor site has been performed using NMR spectroscopy. Docking simulations were performed for three of the compounds of the fragment library that had shown binding activity towards WaaG and yielded 3D models for the respective complexes. The three ligands share a hetero-bicyclic ring system as a common structural motif and they compete with UDP-Glc for binding. Interestingly, one of the compounds promoted binding of uridine to WaaG, as seen from STD NMR titrations, suggesting a different binding mode for this ligand. We propose these compounds as scaffolds for the design of selective high-affinity inhibitors of WaaG. Binding of natural substrates, enzymatic activity and donor substrate selectivity were also investigated by NMR spectroscopy. Molecular dynamics simulations of WaaG were carried out with and without bound UDP and revealed structural changes compared to the crystal structure and also variations in flexibility for some amino acid residues between the two WaaG systems studied.

  • 87.
    Landström, Jens
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Glycan flexibility: Insights into nanosecond dynamics from a microsecond molecular dynamics simulation explaining an unusual nuclear Overhauser effectManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 88.
    Landström, Jens
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Glycan flexibility: insights into nanosecond dynamics from a microsecond molecular dynamics simulation explaining an unusual nuclear Overhauser effect2010In: Carbohydrate Research, ISSN 0008-6215, E-ISSN 1873-426X, Vol. 345, no 2, p. 330-333Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 89. Lee, Jumin
    et al.
    Patel, Dhilon S.
    Ståhle, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Park, Sang-Jun
    Kern, Nathan R.
    Kim, Seonghoon
    Lee, Joonseong
    Cheng, Xi
    Valvano, Miguel A.
    Holst, Otto
    Knirel, Yuriy A.
    Qi, Yifei
    Jo, Sunhwan
    Klauda, Jeffery B.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Im, Wonpil
    CHARMM-GUI Membrane Builder for Complex Biological Membrane Simulations with Glycolipids and Lipoglycans2019In: Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation, ISSN 1549-9618, E-ISSN 1549-9626, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 775-786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glycolipids (such as glycoglycerolipids, glycosphingolipids, and glycosylphosphatidylinositol) and lipoglycans (such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS), lipooligosaccharides (LOS), mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan, and mycoplasma lipoglycans) are typically found on the surface of cell membranes and play crucial roles in various cellular functions. Characterizing their structure and dynamics at the molecular level is essential to understand their biological roles, but systematic generation of glycolipid and lipoglycan structures is challenging because of great variations in lipid structures and glycan sequences (i.e., carbohydrate types and their linkages). To facilitate the generation of all-atom glycolipid/LPS/LOS structures, we have developed Glycolipid Modeler and LPS Modeler in CHARMM-GUI (http://www.charmm-gui.org), a web-based interface that simplifies building of complex biological simulation systems. In addition, we have incorporated these modules into Membrane Builder so that users can readily build a complex symmetric or asymmetric biological membrane system with various glycolipids and LPS/LOS. These tools are expected to be useful in innovative and novel glycolipid/LPS/LOS modeling and simulation research by easing tedious and intricate steps in modeling complex biological systems and shall provide insight into structures, dynamics, and underlying mechanisms of complex glycolipid-/LPS-/LOS-containing biological membrane systems.

  • 90.
    Lihammar, Richard
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Rönnols, Jerk
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Epimerization of Glycal Derivatives by a Cyclopentadienylruthenium Catalyst: Application to Metalloenzymatic DYKAT2014In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 20, no 45, p. 14756-14762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epimerization of a non-anomeric stereogenic center in carbohydrates is an important transformation in the synthesis of natural products. In this study an epimerization procedure of the allylic alcohols of glycals by cyclopentadienylruthenium catalyst 1 is presented. The epimerization of 4,6-O-benzylidene-D-glucal 4 in toluene is rapid, and an equlibrium with its D-allal epimer 5 is established within 5min at room temperature. Exchange rates for allal and glucal formation were determined by 1D H-1 EXSY NMR experiments to be 0.055s(-1) and 0.075s(-1), respectively. For 4-O-benzyl-L-rhamnal 8 the epimerization was less rapid and four days of epimerization was required to achieve equilibration of the epimers at room temperature. The epimerization methodology was subsequently combined with acylating enzymes in a dynamic kinetic asymmetric transformation (DYKAT), giving stereoselective acylation to the desired stereoisomers 12, 13, and 15. The net effect of this process is an inversion of a stereogenic center on the glycal, and yields ranging from 71% to 83% of the epimer were obtained.

  • 91. Liu, Bin
    et al.
    Perepelov, Andrei V.
    Svensson, Mona V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Shevelev, Sergei D.
    Guo, Dan
    Senchenkova, Sof'ya N.
    Shashkov, Alexander S.
    Weintraub, Andrej
    Feng, Lu
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Knirel, Yuriy A.
    Wang, Lei
    Genetic and structural relationships of Salmonella O55 and Escherichia coli O103 O-antigens and identification of a 3-hydroxybutanoyltransferase gene involved in the synthesis of a Fuc3N derivative2010In: Glycobiology, ISSN 0959-6658, E-ISSN 1460-2423, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 679-688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    O-antigen (O-polysaccharide), a part of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, is one of the most variable cell constituents and is related to bacterial virulence. O-antigen diversity is almost entirely due to genetic variations in O-antigen gene clusters. In this study, the O-polysaccharide structures of Salmonella O55 and Escherichia coli O103 were elucidated by chemical analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. It was found that the O-polysaccharides have similar pentasaccharide O-units, which differ only in one sugar (glucose versus N-acetylglucosamine) and in the N-acyl group (acetyl versus 3-hydroxybutanoyl) on 3-amino-3,6-dideoxy-d-galactose (d-Fuc3N). The Salmonella O55 antigen gene cluster was sequenced and compared with the E. coli O103 antigen gene cluster reported previously. The two gene clusters were found to share high-level similarity (DNA identity ranges from 53% to 76%), except for two putative acyl transferase genes (fdtC in Salmonella O55 and fdhC in E. coli O103) which show no similarity. Replacement of the fdtC gene in Salmonella O55 with the fdhC gene from E. coli O103 resulted in production of a modified O-antigen, which contains a 3-hydroxybutanoyl derivative of Fuc3N in place of 3-acetamido-3,6-dideoxygalactose. This finding strongly suggests that fdhC is a 3-hydroxybutanoyltransferase gene. The sequence similarity level suggested that the O-antigen gene clusters of Salmonella O55 and E. coli O103 originate from a common ancestor, and this evolutionary relationship is discussed.

  • 92.
    Lundborg, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ali, Eunus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    An in silico virtual screening study for the design of norovirus inhibitors: fragment-based molecular docking and binding free energy calculations2013In: Carbohydrate Research, ISSN 0008-6215, E-ISSN 1873-426X, Vol. 378, p. 133-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gastrointestinal infections caused by noroviruses may be prevented by the inhibition of their binding to histo-blood group carbohydrate antigens. A fragment-based virtual screening approach was used, employing docking followed by molecular dynamics simulations in order to enable binding free energy calculations using the linear interaction energy method. The resulting structures, composed of high-affinity fragments, can be a good starting point for lead optimizations and four molecules that pass both REOS and SYLVIA filters, which can remove known toxic features and assess the synthetic accessibility, respectively, are proposed as inhibitors.

  • 93.
    Lundborg, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Eunus, Ali
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Fragment-based design of norovirus inhibitors by molecular docking and LIE binding free energy calculationsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 94.
    Lundborg, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Fontana, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Automatic structure determination of regular polysaccharides based solely on NMR spectroscopy2011In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 12, no 11, p. 3851-3855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structural analysis of polysaccharides requires that the sugar components and their absolute configurations are determined. We here show that this can be performed based on NMR spectroscopy by utilizing butanolysis with (+)- and (-)-2-butanol that gives the corresponding 2-butyl glycosides with characteristic 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts. The subsequent computer-assisted structural determination by CASPER can then be based solely on NMR data in a fully automatic way as shown and implemented herein. The method is additionally advantageous in that reference data only have to be prepared once and from a user's point of view only the unknown sample has to be derivatized for use in CASPER.

  • 95.
    Lundborg, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Modhukur, Vijayachitra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Glycosyltransferase functions of E. coli O-antigens2010In: Glycobiology, ISSN 0959-6658, E-ISSN 1460-2423, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 366-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ECODAB (the E. coli O-antigen database) has been expanded to include information about glycosyltransferases (GTs) involved in the assembly of the O-antigen polysaccharide. Similarity searches have been performed to be able to determine GT functions that have not been reported prior to this work. In addition to suggesting the function of 179 GTs, the approach leads to the prediction of part of the O-antigen structures of a number of serogroups. The procedure suggests a novel way of combining genetic information with experimental techniques in structural analysis of oligo- and polysaccharides.

  • 96.
    Lundborg, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Structural analysis of glycans by NMR chemical shift prediction2011In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 83, no 5, p. 1514-1517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Structural determination of N- and O-linked glycans as well as polysaccharides is hampered by the limited spectral dispersion. The computerized approach CASPER, an acronym for computer assisted spectrum evaluation of regular polysaccharides, uses liquid state NMR data to elucidate carbohydrate structure based on agreement with predicted 1H and 13C chemical shifts. We here demonstrate developments based on multiple through-bond J-based correlations that significantly enhance the credence to the sequence connectivities proposed in the analysis exemplified by an oligosaccharide and a bacterial polysaccharide. The approach is also suitable for predicting 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of synthesized oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates, thereby corroborating a proposed structure.

  • 97.
    Maliniak, Arnold
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Structural Analysis of Carbohydrates by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Molecular Simulations: Application to Human Milk Oligosaccharides2014In: FOOD OLIGOSACCHARIDES: PRODUCTION, ANALYSIS AND BIOACTIVITY, OXFORD: BLACKWELL SCIENCE PUBL , 2014, p. 320-349Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 98. Mally, Manuela
    et al.
    Fontana, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    LeibundGut-Landmann, Salome
    Laacisse, Lamia
    Fan, Yao-Yun
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Aebi, Markus
    Glycoengineering of host mimicking type-2 LacNAc polymersand Lewis X antigens on bacterial cell surfaces2013In: Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0950-382X, E-ISSN 1365-2958, Vol. 87, no 1, p. 112-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacterial carbohydrate structures play a central role in mediating a variety of host-pathogen interactions. Glycans can either elicit protective immune response or lead to escape of immune surveillance by mimicking host structures. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major component on the surface of Gram-negative bacteria, is composed of a lipid A-core and the O-antigen polysaccharide. Pathogens like Neisseria meningitidis expose a lipooligosaccharide (LOS), which outermost glycans mimick mammalian epitopes to avoid immune recognition. Lewis X (Gal beta 1-4(Fuc alpha 1-3)GlcNAc) antigens of Helicobacter pylori or of the helminth Schistosoma mansoni modulate the immune response by interacting with receptors on human dendritic cells. In a glycoengineering approach we generate human carbohydrate structures on the surface of recombinant Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium that lack O-antigen. A ubiquitous building block in mammalian N-linked protein glycans is Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc, referred to as a type-2 N-acetyllactosamine, LacNAc, sequence. Strains displaying polymeric LacNAc were generated by introducing a combination of glycosyltransferases that act on modified lipid A-cores, resulting in efficient expression of the carbohydrate epitope on bacterial cell surfaces. The poly-LacNAc scaffold was used as an acceptor for fucosylation leading to polymers of Lewis X antigens. We analysed the distribution of the carbohydrate epitopes by FACS, microscopy and ELISA and confirmed engineered LOS containing LacNAc and Lewis X repeats by MALDI-TOF and NMR analysis. Glycoengineered LOS induced pro-inflammatory response in murine dendritic cells. These bacterial strains can thus serve as tools to analyse the role of defined carbohydrate structures in different biological processes.

  • 99. Martínez-Gómez, Estrella
    et al.
    Ståhle, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Gil-Ramírez, Yolanda
    Zúñiga-Ripa, Amaia
    Zaccheus, Mona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Moriyón, Ignacio
    Iriarte, Maite
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Conde-Álvarez, Raquel
    Genomic Insertion of a Heterologous Acetyltransferase Generates a New Lipopolysaccharide Antigenic Structure in Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis2018In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 9, article id 1092Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brucellosis is a bacterial zoonosis of worldwide distribution caused by bacteria of the genus Brucella. In Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis, the major species infecting domestic ruminants, the smooth lipopolysaccharide (S-LPS) is a virulence factor. This S-LPS carries a N-formyl-perosamine homopolymer O-polysaccharide that is the major antigen in serodiagnostic tests and is required for virulence. We report that the Brucella O-PS can be structurally and antigenically modified using wbdR, the acetyl-transferase gene involved in N-acetyl-perosamine synthesis in Escherichia coli O157:H7. Brucella constructs carrying plasmidic wbdR expressed a modified O-polysaccharide but were unstable, a problem circumvented by inserting wbdR into a neutral site of chromosome II. As compared to wild-type bacteria, both kinds of wbdR constructs expressed shorter O-polysaccharides and NMR analyses showed that they contained both N-formyl and N-acetyl-perosamine. Moreover, deletion of the Brucella formyltransferase gene wbkC in wbdR constructs generated bacteria producing only N-acetyl-perosamine homopolymers, proving that wbdR can replace for wbkC. Absorption experiments with immune sera revealed that the wbdR constructs triggered antibodies to new immunogenic epitope(s) and the use of monoclonal antibodies proved that B. abortus and B. melitensis wbdR constructs respectively lacked the A or M epitopes, and the absence of the C epitope in both backgrounds. The wbdR constructs showed resistance to polycations similar to that of the wild-type strains but displayed increased sensitivity to normal serum similar to that of a per R mutant. In mice, the wbdR constructs produced chronic infections and triggered antibody responses that can be differentiated from those evoked by the wild-type strain in S-LPS ELISAs. These results open the possibilities of developing brucellosis vaccines that are both antigenically tagged and lack the diagnostic epitopes of virulent field strains, thereby solving the diagnostic interference created by current vaccines against Brucella.

  • 100. Mensch, Carl
    et al.
    Pendrill, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Johannessen, Christian
    Studying the Glycan Moiety of RNase B by Means of Raman and Raman Optical Activity2014In: ChemPhysChem, ISSN 1439-4235, E-ISSN 1439-7641, Vol. 15, no 11, p. 2252-2254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Raman and Raman optical activity (ROA) spectroscopy are used to study the solution-phase structure of the glycan moiety of the protein ribonuclease B (RNase B). Spectral data of the intact glycan moiety of RNase B is obtained by subtracting high-quality spectral data of RNase A, the non-glycosylated form of the RNase, from the spectra of the glycoprotein. The remaining difference spectra are compared to spectra generated from Raman and ROA data of the constituent disaccharides of the RNase glycan, achieving convincing spectral overlap. The results show that ROA spectroscopy is able to extract detailed spectral data of the glycan moieties of proteins, provided that the non-glycosylated isoform is available. Furthermore, good comparison between the full glycan spectrum and the regenerated spectra based on the disaccharide data lends great promise to ROA as a tool for the solution-phase structural analysis of this structurally elusive class of biomolecules.

12345 51 - 100 of 202
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf