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  • 51.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Sustainable use of resources in the Polar Regions: conclusions2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 52.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Sveagruvan och Svalbardtraktaten: samarbete och konflikt i kamp om ingenmansland2005In: Daedalus 2005: Tekniska museets årsbok / [ed] Anne Louise Kemdal, Helene Sjunnesson, Lars Paulsson, Stockholm: Tekniska museet , 2005, p. 65-90Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Sveagruvan: svensk gruvhantering mellan industri, diplomati och geovetenskap 1910-19342005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this thesis is to analyse the development of a mining industry in Spitsbergen and its relationship to Swedish scientific polar research. The empirical focus is the history of Swedish coal mining on Spitsbergen between 1910 and 1934 and the mining activities at Sveagruvan 1917-1925. The aim of the thesis is to explain why this coal-mining project was started, why it was developed and why it was terminated. It critically examines a linear model that has been used to explain the development of this mining project, i.e. the idea that scientific research leads on to technological development and industrial activities in a linear sequence.

    A theoretical and methodological framework called Actor Network Theory (ANT) is used to describe and analyse the Swedish coal-mining project. In the construction of an actor network human as well as non-human actors are involved, shaping the project and influencing its results. If an industrial project shall be successful, the project leadership must maintain control over both the local and global parts of the network and maintain a flow of resources between them.

    The actors that initiated the Swedish coal-mining project on Spitsbergen in 1910 wanted it to fulfil both economic and political needs. Investors from the iron- and steel industry wanted Swedish coal for the production of coke for blast furnaces. At the same time the Swedish government wanted to stop Norwegian attempts to take control over Spitsbergen – at the time a no-mans land. By opening up Swedish coalfields on Spitsbergen, Sweden would strengthen its position in future international negotiations on the legal status of this Arctic Archipelago.

    Over time, the motives for the project were changed. This was a result of shifting economic and political priorities. The quality of the coal resources was not suitable for coke production, but good enough for steam production. There was also a shift in focus from foreign policy to the politics of energy after the Svalbard treaty was signed in 1920.

    With the use of the theoretical model of the thesis, an attempt is made to prove that the project failed for three main reasons. First, the actors financing the project did not deliver the necessary resources to maintain the industrial activities. Second, the Swedish coalmine Sveagruvan did not deliver enough resources to maintain the support of the politicians and the private investors. Third, the project managers failed to maintain their control over the project.

    In the thesis it is shown that the linear model can be questioned, in this case with regard to the idea that the coal-mining project was a product of Swedish polar science. No doubt the input of geo-scientific knowledge from Swedish polar scientists was important, but so were other forms of knowledge and other actors. The linear model was a useful instrument, however, in the construction of history – a history valuable as a tool to enrol investors and to defeat political enemies. In the last-mentioned sense, the model was used to create a prestigious Swedish history of Spitsbergen – a history that gave Swedish citizens credit for the industrial development of the Arctic Archipelago.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 54.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Greening of Arctic Mining Landscapes: The Politics of Industrial Heritage at Svalbard2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The industrialisation of Svalbard 1870-1925: Science, coalmining and international politics in a no mans land2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    The LASHIPA project: Industry and geo-politics in the polar areas, from 17th century to the present2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    THE LASHIPA PROJECT: science plan and implementation2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    The Svea mine: Swedish Mining Between Industry, Diplomacy and Geo-science2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    The value of industrial heritage sites in the Polar Areas for historical research2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 60.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Valfångst, industriarv och geopolitik i Sydatlanten2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 61.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Vägen till Braganzavågen2004In: Artefakter: Industrin, vetenskapen och de tekniska nätverken / [ed] Sven Widmalm, Hedemora: Gidlunds förlag, 2004, p. 27-60Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Avango, Dag
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Working geopolitics: sealing, whaling, and industrialized Antarctica2017In: Handbook on the politics of Antarctica / [ed] Klaus Dodds, Alan D. Hemmings, Peder Roberts, Cheltenham UK; Northhampton, MA, USA: Edward Elgar Publishing , 2017, p. 485-506Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 63.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Aalders, Ypie
    Arctic Centre, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Gustafsson, Ulf
    Arctic Centre, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    de Haas, Hidde
    Arctic Centre, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Hacquebord, Louwrens
    Arctic Centre, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Hartnell, Cameron
    Industrial Archeology, Dept of Social Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Michigan, USA.
    LASHIPA 4: Archaeological Expedition on Svalbard August 2-25, 20072008Report (Other academic)
  • 64.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    af Geijerstam, Jan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Houltz, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Isacson, Maths
    The Imprints of Industry: Marie Nisser and the development of industrial heritage research in Sweden2011In: Patrimoine d'industrie/Industrial patrimony, Vol. 26, p. 151-160Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 65.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Arctic Centre, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Basberg, Björn
    Economic History Section, Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration, Bergen, Norway.
    Gustafsson, Ulf
    Rossnes, Gustav
    Riksantikvaren, Norge.
    Industrial heritage in the Polar areas as sources for historical research2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remains of industrial sites in the Polar Regions are increasingly becoming popular visitor’s sites for the expanding tourism industry and a concern for researchers, authorities and other actors who are dealing with environmental issues and heritage management there. How shall we balance between the need to protect the environment and the heritage values of industrial remains? One question which is to seldom touched upon in the discussion, is the source value of industrial sites for historical research. In this presentation we will discuss this, by focusing on the remains of two whaling stations on South Georgia – Prince Olav Harbour and Ocean Harbour. These stations were mapped during a historical-archaeological expedition in March 2009, within the framework of the IPY project LASHIPA. This project aims to explain the development of large scale natural resource exploitation in the Polar Areas and its consequences for the geo-political situation there. How can these research problems be addressed by analysing the remains of these whaling stations? We will show that these whaling stations provide information pertaining to the following research themes in LASHIPA: driving forces behind industrial development in the polar areas, design of technology and settlements in polar environments, and international competition over natural resources and polar territories. The remains of the stations reflect the multiple roles they have played since they were established in the early twentieth century. Initially they were socio-technical networks with productive purposes, and at the same time anchor points for territorial claims. After the stations were closed, they were turned in to refuges for scientific expeditions and later also for military troops. Finally, we will present an example on the results of an extensive environmental clean-up at a whaling station – Grytviken – and its consequences for the source value of industrial heritage sites for historical research.

  • 66.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Ben, Bekooy
    Arctic Centre, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Gustafsson, Ulf
    Arctic Centre, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Hacquebord, Louwrens
    Hartnell, Cameron
    Industrial archaeology, Dept of Social Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Michigan, USA.
    LASHIPA 2: Archaeological Expedition on Svalbard August 8-20, 20052007Report (Other academic)
  • 67.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Brugmans, Peter
    Opp og ned i 100 år: Sveagruva 1917-20172018Book (Refereed)
  • 68.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    de Haas, Hidde
    Kruse, Frigga
    LASHIPA 9: Archaeological Expedition on Spitsbergen 31 July - 15 August2010Report (Other academic)
  • 69.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    DePasqual, Seth
    Industrial Archaeology, Dept of Social Science, Michigan Technological University, Michigan, USA.
    Gustafsson, Ulf
    de Haas, Hidde
    Hacquebord, Louwrens
    Arctic Centre, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Hartnell, Cameron
    Industrial Archeology, Dept of Social Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Michigan, USA.
    Kruse, Frigga
    LASHIPA 5: Archaeological Expedition on Spitsbergen 27 July - 17 August2009Report (Other academic)
  • 70.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Elondou, Lazare
    UNESCO.
    Mission Report: Reactive Monitoring Mission to Mapungubwe Cultural Landscape World Heritage Property (South Africa) 15 – 20 January 20122012Report (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 71.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Grönlund-Myrberg, Lena
    Falun Copper Mine World Heritage Site.
    Falun copper mine – industrial heritage in mining futures2014In: Industrial and Mining Landscapes within world heritage context / [ed] Albrecht, Helmuth and Hansell, Friederike, Freiberg: IWTG/TU Bergakademie Freiberg , 2014, p. 142-153Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Falun copper mine is an industrial heritage site locatedin middle Sweden. Mining began here in the 8th century AD. Over a thousand years later, in 1992, the mine was closed and in 2001 Unesco declared it a world heritage site. Eight years later the Australian company Drake Resources started prospect drilling, right in the middle of the world heritage area, to investigate the possibilities for re-opening the mine again. This development is not unique. Rising world market prices for raw materials in recent years is driving a mining boom, in which companies seek licenses for prospecting and mining in increasingly remote locations, as well as in national parks and cultural heritage sites. World heritage sites are not excluded. From Cornwall to Falun, prospecting and mining companies attempt to reopen mining operations in world heritage sites where the historical remains that form the bases of the sites are a result of a long history of mining. This has led to a discussion within global heritage organisations such as TICCIH and ICOMOS, on how to deal with this development – are new mining operations in historical mining districts only a problem or could it also be seen as a resource, an activity representing continuity rather than destruction?

    The objective of this article is to describe the developmentof prospecting activities and mining plans at the Falu coppermine world heritage site and its possible consequences. What prospecting activities have taken place at the Falu copper mine after Unesco inscribed it on the world heritage list and why? How has local media and the organizations managing and protecting, responded to these plans andactivities and why? What could be the consequences of renewedmining operations at Falun?

  • 72.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Gustafsson, Ulf
    Arctic Centre, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Hacquebord, Louwrens
    Arctic Centre, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Hartnell, Cameron
    Industrial Archeology, Dept of Social Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Michigan, USA.
    LASHIPA 3: Archaeological Expedition on Spitsbergen August 7-24, 20062008Report (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Hacquebord, Louwrens
    Arctic Centre, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Centers in the periphery: the impact of polar politics on Arctic resource frontier settlements2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Hacquebord, Louwrens
    Arctic Centre, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    LASHIPA 3: Industry and its impacts in the polar areas from 1600 till present2007In: Polarforskningssekretariatet: årsbok 2006 / [ed] Sofia Rickberg, Stockholm: Swedish Polar Research Secretariat , 2007, p. 62-66Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Hacquebord, Louwrens
    Arctic Centre, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    LASHIPA 4: Natural resources and geo-politics from 1600 to the present, cases from Grønfjorden, Svalbard2008In: Polarforskningssekretariatet: årsbok 2007 / [ed] Sofia Rickberg, Stockholm: Polarforskningssekretariatet , 2008, p. 80-86Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Hacquebord, Louwrens
    Arctic Centre, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    LASHIPA 5: the archaeology of natural resource exploitation and geo-politics on Svalbard2009In: Polarforskningssekretariatet: årsbok 2008 / [ed] Ann Thorén, Stockholm: Polarforskningssekretariatet , 2009, p. 32-33Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 77.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Hacquebord, Louwrens
    Arctic Centre, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    The history and heritage of natural resource exploitation in the Arctic and Antarctic: the LASHIPA project2008In: Patrimoine de l'industrie, ISSN 1296-7750, Vol. 19, p. 7-16Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 78.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Arctic Centre, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Hacquebord, Louwrens
    Arctic Centre, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Aalders, Ypie
    Arctic Centre, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    de Haas, Hidde
    Gustafsson, Ulf
    Kruse, Frigga
    Between markets and geo-politics: natural resource exploitation on Spitsbergen from 1600 to the present day2010In: Polar Record, ISSN 0032-2474, E-ISSN 1475-3057, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 29-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What are the driving forces behind large scale natural resource exploitation in the Polar Regions and how should we understand the relations between these forces? New historical-archaeological research performed during the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007–2009 on whaling, hunting and mining in Spitsbergen (1600–present) show both economic and geopolitical factors driving the development of those industries, both the whaling industries in the 17th

    century and 1900’s, and the mining industry of the early 20th century. However, the relation between these driving forces has differed, both between time periods and between actors. In most cases economic motives provided the main rationale for utilising resources and for government support for resource exploiters, but in some instances governments would support even unprofitable ventures in order to maintain a foothold on Spitsbergen.

  • 79.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Hacquebord, Louwrens
    Martin, Patrick E.
    THE LASHIPA PROJECT: Industry, Geopolitics and Environment in the Polar Areas Through the Lens of Industrial Heritage2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 80.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Hacquebord, Louwrens
    Wrakberg, Urban
    Industrial extraction of Arctic natural resources since the sixteenth century: technoscience and geo-economics in the history of northern whaling and mining2014In: Journal of Historical Geography, ISSN 0305-7488, E-ISSN 1095-8614, Vol. 44, p. 15-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A comparative perspective is applied in analyzing the large-scale utilization of Arctic natural resources driven by economies and agents outside the Arctic and subarctic regions. This paper focuses on whaling since the sixteenth century, and on the development of mining from the nineteenth century to the present. The European sector of the Arctic and subarctic regions including the high-Arctic archipelago of Spitsbergen provides the main cases for this study. The social, economic and environmental contexts and consequences of northern industry are considered; as part of this line of research, the little-known symbolic and geopolitical uses of industrial field installations are considered. The northern transfer of Western technoscience, including scientific navigation, colonial geography, steam-propulsion and aviation, often failed initially despite much enthusiasm and underwent painstaking on-site modification. In this industrialists and other Arctic entrepreneurs attempted to control a complex combination of factors including the sparse local population, the lack of major infrastructure, and the environmental impact of their own businesses. This combined with the social problems of keeping peace among collaborators and competitors under isolated and lawless conditions. In conclusion, the greatest challenges to industry in the Arctic throughout modern history were local and social rather than climatic or geopolitical. Indigenous interests were long disregarded while Arctic seas and some land areas were exploited by Western nations as unregulated commons. Not only nature and local inhabitants but also the industry itself suffered from increased scales of operations. The record of Arctic extractive industries over four hundred years reveals a need to develop and share relevant environmental and socio-economic knowledge and to develop international regulations and instruments such as industry certification to guarantee sustainable northern resource utilization.

  • 81.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Houltz, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Arbetets hjältar?: Skildringar av liv och arbete i Arktis under tidigt 1900-tal2008In: Arbete pågår: i tankens mönster och kroppens miljöer / [ed] Anders Houltz, Brita Lundström, Lars Magnusson, Mats Morell, Marie Nisser och Eva Silven, Uppsala: Uppsala Universitet , 2008, p. 37-88Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 82.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Houltz, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Industriarvet Idag2013In: Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0349-2834, p. 5-9Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction to thematic issue of Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, identifying trends.

  • 83.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Houltz, Anders
    Maths Isacson: att förstå det globala i det lokala2015In: Fabrik og bolig, ISSN 0106-3324, p. 3-6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 84.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Houltz, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    ‘The essence of the adventure’: Narratives of Arctic work and engineering in th early 20th century2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Why do people decide to leave everything behind to find work in harsh Arctic environments? This is an important question, if we want to explain the development of industry in the Polar Regions. In this presentation we will try to answer it, by analyzing the stories of employees in the Spitsbergen mining industry in the early 20th century.

    The late 19th and early 20th centuries experienced the culmination of an exceptional hero cult surrounding polar scientists and explorers. Far less celebrated, but probably no less important, were the numerous mining workers and engineers present and active in industrial enterprises in the High Arctic at about the same period. While the motives and driving forces of polar scientists and explorers have been relatively carefully examined, very little attention has been paid to these, less glamorous, people and their choice to earn a living in an Arctic industrial community.

    By examining a unique material of written accounts, diaries, newspaper articles and images from the Swedish coal mining establishment of Sveagruvan (the Svea Mine) on Spitsbergen, in production during the first two decades of the 20th century, we will analyze the narratives of workers, foremen and managers, men and women, expressing their views of the time they spent on Spitsbergen. The material will be discussed from four identity creating perspectives:  gender, nationality, class and profession. How did individuals in different positions narrate their life and work at the Svea Mine? What was the source of inspiration for those narratives? To what extent were they inspired by the established heroic picture of the Arctic scientists and explorers? What does this tell us about the motives for working in the High Arctic?

  • 85.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Houltz, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    "The essence of the adventure": Narratives of Arctic work and engineering in the early 20th century2012In: LASHIPA: History of Large Scale Resource Exploitation in Polar Areas / [ed] Louwrens Hacquebord, Groningen: Barkhuis Publishing , 2012, p. 87-104Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 86.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Högselius, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Under the Ice: Exploring the Arctic’s Energy Resources, 1898-19852013In: Media and the Politics of Arctic Climate Change: When the Ice Breaks / [ed] Miyase Christensen, Annika E. Nilsson and Nina Wormbs, Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, p. 128-155Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 87.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Högselius, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Nilsson, David
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Foreign Policy and Natural Resources: Swedish Neutrality from an Environmental History Perspective2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The year 2014 marks the 200th anniversary of the last time that Sweden was technically at war. Since then, Sweden has built an international image of itself as a peace-loving and morally advanced country. This is in sharp contrast with earlier Swedish history, in which Swedish Vikings and famous warrior kings like Gustavus Adolphus and Charles XII caused havoc across much of the European continent. In Swedish history-writing as well as in the country's dominant social and political self-understanding, the 200 years of peace are typically attributed to a policy of neutrality, or non-alignment. The non-alignment policy has also been coupled - both in theoretical terms and in practical effect - with an expansive development aid policy towards former colonies and other developing countries in the South. The image of a benevolent and disinterested neutral country was further strengthened by high-profile international pro-activism, for example, through the United Nations and institutions like the Nobel Prize. However, after the fall of the Iron Curtain, a vivid debate among Swedish historians has led to reinterpretations Swedish neutrality during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This paper contributes to this debate by applying an environmental history lens to the analysis of political neutrality. Our hypothesis is that Sweden's non-alignment has been intimately linked to the country's role in the global natural resource system. Starting from the observation that Swedish non-alignment policy became firmly established precisely at the time of Sweden's resource-dependent industrial breakthrough in the late nineteenth century, we use primary and secondary sources to explore the intimate connections between two sets of actors: foreign policy actors and the rapidly expanding community of industrial actors. The latter sought to influence foreign policymaking both in the context of the need for secure access to natural resources not available domestically - of crucial importance for the country's growing production and export of steel, agricultural produce, and increasingly sophisticated technological artefacts - and in the context of investment in extractive industries abroad, particularly in colonial regions. At the same time, however, Swedish industrialists, engineers, and scientists active abroad were also eyed by the government as political tools.

  • 88.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Högselius, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Nilsson, David
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sweden and the Origins of Global Resource Colonialism: Exploring a Neutral Country's Natural Resource Interests in Africa, Caucasia and the Arctic2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The quest for the world's remaining natural resources has intensified markedly in recent years. A salient and controversial point of debate in this context has become the extent to and ways in which old colonial relations are argued to live on in a new global “resource colonialism”. Although Sweden is rarely thought of as a colonial power, Swedish actors are currently very active when it comes to resource exploitation in many parts of the world. As a small, neutral country with an excellent international reputation and virtually without enemies, we argue that Sweden has been able to mobilize the international resource system to its benefit much more effectively than many other European countries. This paper takes an historical perspective on the present by exploring the origins of Swedish interests and activities in the colonial resource arena from around 1880 to 1945. More precisely, we analyze and compare Swedish natural resource interests in three colonial arenas: Africa, Caucasia and the Arctic. In the case of Africa, we explore Sweden's virtually unknown - but highly active - participation at the Berlin conference in 1884-85. In the Caucasus case, we reinterpret the Nobel brothers crucial role in creating Baku's oil industry as a salient example of Swedish involvement in Russian resource colonialism. In the Arctic, we explore the connections between state and private interests in coal mining in Spitsbergen. An essential research issue concerns the extent to which it is possible to discern a common Swedish 'style' with regard to the country's interests and activities in colonial areas.

  • 89.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Högselius, Per
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Nilsson, David
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Swedish Explorers, In-Situ Knowledge, and Resource-Based Business in the Age of Empire2018In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 43, p. 324-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The period from 1870 to 1914 plays a unique role in the history of natural resource exploration and extraction. This article analyses, from a Swedish viewpoint, the connections between two actor categories of special importance in this context: scientific-geographical explorers and industrial actors. The article examines their activities in three broadly defined regions: the Arctic, Russia, and Africa. We show that the Swedes generally had far-reaching ambitions, on par with those of the large imperial powers. In some cases, notably in Africa, Sweden was not able to compete with the larger imperial powers; but in other cases, such as the exploration of the Arctic – from Spitsbergen to Siberia – and the industrial exploitation of coal at Spitsbergen and petroleum in Russia’s colonial periphery, Swedish actors played a leading role, in competition with players from the larger European nations. Our paper shows that scientific exploration and industry were closely linked, and that foreign policy also influenced the shaping of these links. We distinguish different types of knowledge produced by the Swedish actors, pointing to local, situated knowledge as the most important type for many resource-based businesses, although modern, scientific knowledge was on the increase during this period.

  • 90.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Högselius, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Vikström, Hanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology.
    Colonizing the poles2015In: Seminar : the monthly symposium, ISSN 0037-1947Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 91.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Kaijser, Arne
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Vetenskaplig forskning - teknisk förändring - industriell förnyelse: slutrapportering av ett forskningsprojekt finansierat av Riksbankens jubileumsfond 1998-20072008Book (Other academic)
  • 92.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Lagerås, Per
    Riksantikvarieämbetet.
    Inledning2012In: Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0349-2834, no 63Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 93.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Marie, NisserKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Stålindustri och tung utrustning - vad kan vi bevara?: rapport från ett seminarium vid Karmansbo bruk, den 27-28 maj 20022006Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 94.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Nilsson, Annika
    Roberts, Peder
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Assessing Arctic Futures: Voices, Resources, and Governance2013In: The Polar Journal, ISSN 2154-896X, E-ISSN 2154-8978, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 431-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interest in the future of the Arctic is running high, motivated in large part by belief that climate change will open new possibilities (and unleash new threats). Wealth from shipping and natural resource extraction features prominently in narratives about the Arctic in the media, and governance of the region has become a major concern as new actors demand influence. We use three components of current discourse about the Arctic to help reveal connections between how the region is constructed and how the right to decide its future is articulated. Voices are the actors who participate in the discursive construction of Arctic futures, with varying degrees of influence. Resources are objects upon which actors inscribe values, thus locating them in the discourse. Governance refers to the structural features through which action is regulated within spaces, restricting also the range of legitimate actors. We demonstrate the usefulness of these concepts through brief case studies of coal on Spitsbergen, hydrocarbons in the Barents Sea and whaling in the North Atlantic. We conclude by emphasizing the value of a historical perspective to understanding contemporary debates about the future of the Arctic.

  • 95.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Roberts, Peder
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Heritage, Conservation, and the Geopolitics of Svalbard: Writing the History of Arctic Environments2017In: Arctic Environmental Modernities: From the age of polar exploration to the era of the anthropocene / [ed] Lill-Ann Körber, Scott MacKenzie, Anna Westerståhl Stenport, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan , 2017, p. 125-143Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 96.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Roberts, Peder
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Resource extraction and sustainable arctic communities2016In: TICCIH bulletin / The International Committee for the Conservation of the Industrial Heritage, ISSN 1605-6647, Vol. 71, p. 12-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Roberts, Peder
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sustainable Communities and the Legacies of Mining in the Nordic Arctic2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 98.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Why history and industrial heritage matter for Arctic communities2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 99.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Robin, Libby
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Placing the Anthropocene2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 100.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Solnes, Sander
    Registrering av kulturminner i Pyramiden: Registrering utfört på oppdrag fra Sysselmannen på Svalbard2013Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta är en rapport från ett uppdrag vars syfte var att 1) registrere fredete kulturminner och 2) finna och kartfeste faste kulturminner fra før 1946 samt beskrive dem slik de er i dag og prøve å tolke tidligere funksjon. I uppdraget ingick att se närmmere på de teknisk industrielle kulturminnene som ligger i dagen, samt vurdere verdien av tidligere (men ikke fredete) industrielle kulturminner. Uppdraget ble utført av Dag Avango og Sander Solnes i Pyramiden i perioden 21.08-28.08. Rapporten innehåller resultaten av Avangos och Solnes inventering.

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