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  • 51.
    Rostami, Jowan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Mathew, A. P.
    Edlund, Ulrica
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Zwitterionic acetylated cellulose nanofibrils2019In: Molecules, ISSN 1420-3049, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 24, no 17, article id 3147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A strategy is devised to synthesize zwitterionic acetylated cellulose nanofibrils (CNF). The strategy included acetylation, periodate oxidation, Schiff base reaction, borohydride reduction, and a quaternary ammonium reaction. Acetylation was performed in glacial acetic acid with a short reaction time of 90 min, yielding, on average, mono-acetylated CNF with hydroxyl groups available for further modification. The products from each step were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, ζ-potential, SEM-EDS, AFM, and titration to track and verify the structural changes along the sequential modification route.

  • 52.
    Tian, Weiqian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    VahidMohammadi, Armin
    Auburn Univ, Dept Mech & Mat Engn, Auburn, AL 36849 USA..
    Reid, Michael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wang, Zhen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Fibre & Polymer Technol, Tekn Ringen 56, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Beidaghi, Majid
    Auburn Univ, Dept Mech & Mat Engn, Auburn, AL 36849 USA..
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Multifunctional Nanocomposites with High Strength and Capacitance Using 2D MXene and 1D Nanocellulose2019In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, article id 1902977Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The family of two-dimensional (2D) metal carbides and nitrides, known as MXenes, are among the most promising electrode materials for supercapacitors thanks to their high metal-like electrical conductivity and surface-functional-group-enabled pseudocapacitance. A major drawback of these materials is, however, the low mechanical strength, which prevents their applications in lightweight, flexible electronics. A strategy of assembling freestanding and mechanically robust MXene (Ti3C2Tx) nanocomposites with one-dimensional (1D) cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) from their stable colloidal dispersions is reported. The high aspect ratio of CNF (width of approximate to 3.5 nm and length reaching tens of micrometers) and their special interactions with MXene enable nanocomposites with high mechanical strength without sacrificing electrochemical performance. CNF loading up to 20%, for example, shows a remarkably high mechanical strength of 341 MPa (an order of magnitude higher than pristine MXene films of 29 MPa) while still maintaining a high capacitance of 298 F g(-1) and a high conductivity of 295 S cm(-1). It is also demonstrated that MXene/CNF hybrid dispersions can be used as inks to print flexible micro-supercapacitors with precise dimensions. This work paves the way for fabrication of robust multifunctional MXene nanocomposites for printed and lightweight structural devices.

  • 53.
    Tian, Weiqian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    VahidMohammadi, Armin
    Auburn Univ, Dept Mech & Mat Engn, Auburn, AL 36849 USA..
    Wang, Zhen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Beidaghi, Majid
    Auburn Univ, Dept Mech & Mat Engn, Auburn, AL 36849 USA..
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Layer-by-layer assembly of pillared MXene multilayers for high volumetric energy storage and beyond2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Träger, Andrea
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Strategies for Molecular Engineering of Macroscopic Adhesion and Integrity Focusing on Cellulose Based Materials2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many aspects of modern human life pose a strain on the delicate ecosystems around us. One example is marine litter – mainly various plastic items – which accumulate in the marine environment, where they cause problems for the fauna, such as ingestion and entanglement.The widely used plastics offer many advantages for packaging, such as low cost and easy processing into many shapes. However, in addition to their low biodegradability leading to their persistence and accumulation in nature, they are largely manufactured from petroleum,a non‐renewable resource. Clearly, it would be highly desirable to exchange the petroleum‐based materials for biodegradable ones from renewable resources. Cellulose, as the most abundant biopolymer, is one choice. There are however challenges in terms of replacing currently used plastics with cellulosic materials. One is the low ductility and formability of cellulose. Various efforts are undertaken to increase the formability of cellulose. One approach to increase the renewable fraction within a material is to utilise the intrinsic stiffness and strength of cellulose to increase the structural integrity of a composite. To fully optimise these types of materials, a fundamental understanding of the interaction across interfaces within the material is essential. The main objective in this thesis was to elucidate strategies to measure, to tune and to control the interaction across interfaces. Specific polymers were designed and synthesised which could be used to modify surfaces to achieve a wet adhesion as high as that of mussel foot protein. Many properties of the joint were tuneable by varying length and structure of the polymer and amount of polymer deposited on the surfaces. A method to accurately evaluate interfacial adhesion between a chemically modified cellulose material and another surface was successfully developed, using nanometre smooth cellulose probes exhibiting bulk material properties. Two composite materials containing cellulose as reinforcing element were successfully prepared,utilising different strategies to control and enhance the interaction between the composite constituents. Together, these findings contribute to the knowledge of how to evaluate and control the interaction across an interface.

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  • 55.
    Wang, Zhen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Malti, Abdellah
    KTH.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Tu, D.
    Tian, Weiqian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Copper-Plated Paper for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries2018In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 14, no 48, article id 1803313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Paper is emerging as a promising flexible, high surface-area substrate for various new applications such as printed electronics, energy storage, and paper-based diagnostics. Many applications, however, require paper that reaches metallic conductivity levels, ideally at low cost. Here, an aqueous electroless copper-plating method is presented, which forms a conducting thin film of fused copper nanoparticles on the surface of the cellulose fibers. This paper can be used as a current collector for anodes of lithium-ion batteries. Owing to the porous structure and the large surface area of cellulose fibers, the copper-plated paper-based half-cell of the lithium-ion battery exhibits excellent rate performance and cycling stability, and even outperforms commercially available planar copper foil-based anode at ultra-high charge/discharge rates of 100 C and 200 C. This mechanically robust metallic-paper composite has promising applications as the current collector for light-weight, flexible, and foldable paper-based 3D Li-ion battery anodes.

  • 56.
    Wang, Zhen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Tian, Weiqian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Marais, Andrew
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Tybrandt, Klas
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Sci & Technol, Lab Organ Elect, S-60174 Norrkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Sci & Technol, Lab Organ Elect, Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, S-60174 Norrkoping, Sweden..
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Layer-by-Layer Assembly of High-Performance Electroactive Composites Using a Multiple Charged Small Molecule2019In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 35, no 32, p. 10367-10373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly is a versatile tool for fabricating multilayers with tailorable nanostructures. LbL, however, generally relies on polyelectrolytes, which are mostly insulating and induce large interlayer distances. We demonstrate a method in which we replace polyelectrolytes with the smallest unit capable of LbL self-assembly: a molecule with multiple positive charges, tris(3-aminopropyl)amine (TAPA), to fabricate LbL films with negatively charged single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). TAPA introduces less defects during the LbL build-up and results in more efficient assembly of films with denser micromorphology. Twenty bilayers of TAPA/CNT showed a low sheet resistance of 11 k Omega, a high transparency of 91% at 500 nm, and a high electronic conductivity of 1100 S/m on planar substrates. We also fabricated LbL films on porous foams with a conductivity of 69 mS/m and used them as electrodes for supercapacitors with a high specific capacitance of 43 F/g at a discharging current density of 1 A/g.

12 51 - 56 of 56
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  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
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