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  • 51.
    Hua, Håkan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Emilsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kähäri, Kim
    Department of Audiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University.
    Widen, Stephen
    School of Health and Medical Sciences and Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    School of Health and Medical Sciences and Örebro University; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    The impact of different background noises: Effects on cognitive performance and perceived disturbance in employees with aided hearing impairment and normal hearing2014In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, Vol. 25, no 9, p. 859-868Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Health care professionals frequently meet employees with hearing impairment (HI) who experience difficulties at work. There are indications that the majority of these difficulties might be related to the presence of background noise. Moreover, research has also shown that high level noise has a more detrimental effect on cognitive performance and selfrated disturbance in individuals with HI than low level noise.

    Purpose: To examine the impact of different types of background noise on cognitive performance and perceived disturbance (PD) in employees with aided HI and normal hearing.

    Research Design: A mixed factorial design was conducted to examine the effect of noise under four experimental conditions.

    Study Sample: Forty participants (21 men and 19 women) were recruited to take part in the study .The study sample consisted of employees with HI (n =20) and normal hearing (n = 20). The group with HI had a mild-moderate sensorineural HI and they were all frequent hearing aid users.

    Intervention: The current study was conducted by employing four general work-related tasks (mental arithmetic, orthographic decoding, phonological decoding and serial recall) in four different background conditions: (1) quiet, (2) office noise at 56 dBA, (3) daycare noise at 73.5 dBA and (4) traffic noise at 72.5 dBA. Reaction time (RT) and the proportion of correct answers in the working tasks were used as outcome measures of cognitive performance. The Borg CR-10 scale was used to assess PD.

    Data Collection and Analysis: Data collection occurred on two separate sessions, completed within four weeks of each other. All tasks and experimental conditions were employed in a counterbalanced order. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to analyze the results. To examine interaction effects, pairwise t-tests were used. Pearson’s correlation coefficients between RT and proportion of correct answers, and cognitive performance and PD were also calculated to  examine the possible correlation between the different variables.

    Results: No significant between or within-group differences in cognitive performance were observed across the four background conditions. Ratings of PD showed that both groups rated PD according to noise level, where higher noise level generated a higher PD. The present findings also demonstrate that the group with HI was more disturbed by higher than lower levels of noise (i.e. traffic and daycare setting compared to the office setting). This pattern was observed consistently throughout four working tasks where the group with HI reported a significantly greater PD in the daycare and traffic setting compared to the office noise.

    Conclusions: The present results demonstrate that background noise does not impair cognitive performance in non-auditory tasks in employees with HI and normal hearing, but that PD is affected to a greater extent in employees with HI during higher level of background noise exposure. In addition, this study also supports previous studies regarding the detrimental effects high level noise has on employees with HI. We therefore emphasize the need of both self-rated and cognitive measurements in hearing care and occupational health services for both employees with normal hearing and HI.

  • 52.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Factors Influencing the Indication for Tonsillectomy: A Historical Overview and Current Concepts2013In: Journal for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, ISSN 0301-1569, E-ISSN 1423-0275, Vol. 75, no 3, p. 184-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tonsil surgery has been performed for more than 3,000 years. During the 19th century when anesthesia became available, techniques were refined and the number of procedures performed increased. Repeated throat infections often causing big tonsils was the reason why parents asked for the procedure. During the preantibiotic era, scarlet fever was feared since potential heart or kidney complications were life-threatening. The technique used before 1900 was tonsillotomy since neither a fingernail, snare nor the later guillotine were used extracapsularly. Bleeding was small and the surgery ambulatory. Extracapsular tonsillectomy developed around the turn of the 20th century with the purpose of avoiding remnants the focal infection theory was prevailing. The whole tonsil was now extirpated with good visibility of the tonsillar area in a deeply anesthetized patient. During the first half of the 20th century, the two methods competed, but by 1950, total tonsillectomy had become the only correct tonsil surgery. The indication was still recurrent infections. The risk for serious bleeding increased; therefore large clinics arose where patients remained for at least a week after tonsillectomy. When oral penicillin for children became available during the 1960s, the threat of throat infection decreased and the number of tonsillectomies declined. The awareness of obstructive problems in children rose at the same time when obstructive sleep apnea syndrome became a disease for adults (1970s). Tonsillotomy was revived during the 1990s and is today used increasingly in many countries. The indication is mainly obstructive sleep apnea syndromeor sleep-disordered breathing, especially in small children. Total tonsillectomy is still preferred for recurrent infections, which include periodic fever/adenitis/pharyngitis/aphthous ulcer syndrome and recurrent peritonsillitis.

  • 53.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hemlin, Claes
    Aleris Sabbatsberg Hospital, Stockholm.
    National Guidelines for Tonsillotomy in children in Sweden.2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Hemlin, Claes
    Aleris specialistvård Sabbatsberg, Stockholm.
    Eggertsen, Robert
    Avd. för Samhällsmedicin och folkhälsa/allmänmedicin, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Lundeborg-Hammarström, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Proczkowska-Björklund, Marie
    Barn- och ungdomspsykiatri, Psykiatriska kliniken, Höglandet Eksjö/Nässjö.
    Stjernquist-Desatnik, Anna
    Öron-näsa-hals-kliniken, Universitetssjukhuset Lund.
    Zettergren-Wijk, Lena
    Avdelningen för tandreglering, Folktandvården Gävleborg AB, Gävle.
    Moa, Gunnar
    Projektledare Nationella medicinska indikationer.
    Törnqvist, Helene
    Projektledare Nationella medicinska indikationer.
    Indikation för tonsillotomi på barn och ungdomar2011Report (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hemlin, Claes
    Öron näsa hals, Aleris Specialistvård Sabbatsberg, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hessén-Söderman, Anne-Charlotte
    Öron näsa hals, Aleris Specialistvård Sabbatsberg, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Roos, Kristian
    Öron-näsa-halsmottagningen, Capio Lundby Närsjukhus, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Sunnergren, Ola
    Öron-näs-halsmottagningen, Ryhovs Länssjukhus, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Stalfors, Joacim
    Öron-näs-halsmottagningen, Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Paradigm shift in Sweden from tonsillectomy to tonsillotomy for children with upper airway obstructive symptoms due to tonsillar hypertrophy2013In: European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, ISSN 0937-4477, E-ISSN 1434-4726, Vol. 270, no 9, p. 2531-2536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tonsillotomy (TT) is now used more often than tonsillectomy (TE) for tonsil obstructive symptoms in Sweden. Both TE and TT give high patient satisfaction although TT results in fewer postoperative bleedings and shorter time when analgesics are needed. The objective of this study is to analyze the current prevalence of different tonsil surgery procedures, the rates of early and late bleeding and other complications. Data from the National Tonsil Surgery Register in Sweden were analyzed. Patients 1–15 years operated for symptoms due to tonsil hypertrophy were included. Surgical procedure, technique and bleedings during hospital stay were registered. Thirty days after surgery, unplanned contacts due to bleeding, infection or pain were reported as were symptom relief after 6 months. 24,083 patients were registered. Of the 10,826 children 1–15 years operated for obstructive symptoms, 64 % were TT or TT+A, and 34 % TE, TE+A. 69 % answered the 30-day questionnaire and 50 % the 6 months. Bleeding in hospital occurred in 1.38 %, late bleedings in 2.06 %: 3.7 % after TE+A, 0.8 % after TT+A. Differences in readmissions due to bleeding, number of days using analgesics, health care contacts due to pain and nosocomial infections were significant between TT and TE, but not differences with regard to symptom relief after 6 months.

  • 56.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Nosrati-Zarenoe, Ramesh
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Corticosteroid treatment of Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss. Part 2: a meta-analysis of a RCT and the Swedish national databaseManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: A randomized placebo-controlled study (paper ON-11-66) has demonstrated no effect of Prednisolone in customary dosage on Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (ISSNHL). The aim of the present paper is to analyze a larger patient group by meta-analysis of data from the RCT together with corresponding material drawn from the Swedish national database for ISSNHL.

    Study design: Meta-analysis of data from a RCT and a Swedish national database for ISSNHL.

    Patients: Data from 192 patients, 18–80 years, with ISSNHL was available. All had a hearing loss of at least 30 dB measured as PTA in the three most affected contiguous frequencies. Patients had been enrolled within one week after onset and evaluated by audiograms after three months.

    Intervention: 45/99 (RCT) and 54/99 (the database) had been treated with Prednisolone in tapering doses from 60 mg daily and 42/93 with placebo (RCT) or 51/93 with no treatment (the database). Primary outcome was the mean hearing improvement on day 90 for the different groups. A mean difference of >10 dB improvement was needed to demonstrate treatment effect of Prednisolone compared to placebo/no treatment.

    Results: No significant difference was seen between the Prednisolone group and placebo/no treatment (p=0.06). Total recovery was 38% in Prednisolone group, 40% in the placebo and 14% in the no treatment group. Vertigo at the onset of hearing loss and age had a negative prognostic value equally in all groups and signs of inflammation had a positive.

    Conclusion: Prednisolone in customary dosage does not influence recovery after ISSNHL.

  • 57.
    Hägg, Mary
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Hudiksvall, Uppsala University/County Council of Gävleborg, Gävle, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Tibbling, Lita
    Hudiksvall, Uppsala University/County Council of Gävleborg, Gävle, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Effect of oral IQoro(R) and palatal plate training in post-stroke, four-quadrant facial dysfunction and dysphagia: A comparison study2015In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 135, no 9, p. 962-968Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conclusion: Training with either a palatal plate (PP) or an oral IQoro(R) screen (IQS) in patients with longstanding facial dysfunction and dysphagia after stroke can significantly improve facial activity (FA) in all four facial quadrants as well as swallowing capacity (SC). Improvements remained at late follow-up. The training modalities did not significantly differ in ameliorating facial dysfunction and dysphagia in these patients. However, IQS training has practical and economic advantages over PP training. Objectives: This study compared PP and oral IQS training in terms of (i) effect on four-quadrant facial dysfunction and dysphagia after a first-ever stroke, and (ii) whether the training effect persisted at late follow-up. Methods: Patients were included during two periods; 13 patients in 2005-2008 trained with a PP, while 18 patients in 2009-2012 trained with an IQS. Four-quadrant facial dysfunction was assessed with an FA test and swallowing dysfunction with a SC test: before and after a 3-month training period and at late follow-up. FA and SC significantly improved (p less than 0.001) in both groups. FA test scores after training and at late follow-up did not differ significantly between the groups, irrespective of whether the interval between stroke incidence and the start of training was long or short.

  • 58.
    Jain, Mayur Vilas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Paczulla, Anna M.
    University of Tubingen, Germany .
    Klonisch, Thomas
    University of Manitoba, Canada .
    Dimgba, Florence N.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rao, Sahana
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Schweizer, Frank
    University of Manitoba, Canada .
    Lengerke, Claudia
    University of Tubingen, Germany .
    Davoodpour, Padideh
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Palicharla, Vivek R.
    Centre DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnost CDFD, India .
    Maddika, Subbareddy
    Centre DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnost CDFD, India .
    Los, Marek Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Interconnections between apoptotic, autophagic and necrotic pathways: implications for cancer therapy development2013In: Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine (Print), ISSN 1582-1838, E-ISSN 1582-4934, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 12-29Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid accumulation of knowledge on apoptosis regulation in the 1990s was followed by the development of several experimental anticancer- and anti-ischaemia (stroke or myocardial infarction) drugs. Activation of apoptotic pathways or the removal of cellular apoptotic inhibitors has been suggested to aid cancer therapy and the inhibition of apoptosis was thought to limit ischaemia-induced damage. However, initial clinical studies on apoptosis-modulating drugs led to unexpected results in different clinical conditions and this may have been due to co-effects on non-apoptotic interconnected cell death mechanisms and the yin-yang role of autophagy in survival versus cell death. In this review, we extend the analysis of cell death beyond apoptosis. Upon introduction of molecular pathways governing autophagy and necrosis (also called necroptosis or programmed necrosis), we focus on the interconnected character of cell death signals and on the shared cell death processes involving mitochondria (e.g. mitophagy and mitoptosis) and molecular signals playing prominent roles in multiple pathways (e.g. Bcl2-family members and p53). We also briefly highlight stress-induced cell senescence that plays a role not only in organismal ageing but also offers the development of novel anticancer strategies. Finally, we briefly illustrate the interconnected character of cell death forms in clinical settings while discussing irradiation-induced mitotic catastrophe. The signalling pathways are discussed in their relation to cancer biology and treatment approaches.

  • 59.
    Jedlinski, Adam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Ansell, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    EGFR status and EGFR ligand expression influence the treatment response of head and neck cancer cell lines2013In: Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine, ISSN 0904-2512, E-ISSN 1600-0714, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 26-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Combination treatment (chemoradiotherapy) is the standard treatment for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); however, treatment resistance and local recurrence are significant problems. A high level of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been associated with a more aggressive phenotype as well as decreased responsiveness to radio- or chemotherapy. We examined the role of EGFR status and EGFR ligand expression for the treatment response. Methods: Intrinsic sensitivity to radiotherapy, cisplatin, and cetuximab treatments was investigated in 25 HNSCC cell lines. EGFR gene copy number, mRNA and protein expression, EGFR and Akt phosphorylation status, and mRNA expression of the EGFR ligands were analyzed using quantitative PCR and ELISA and assessed for their impact on treatment sensitivity. Results: Different treatment modalities yielded great diversity in outcome; of note, cetuximab treatment stimulated growth in one cell line. When treatments were combined primarily additive effects were observed. While radioresistance tended to be associated with a high level of phosphorylated EGFR (pEGFR; P = 0.09), cetuximab-resistant cells had low levels of pEGFR (P = 0.13). The three most cetuximab-sensitive cell lines had high EGFR gene copy numbers. Furthermore, cetuximab treatment response was significantly correlated with epiregulin mRNA expression (r = -0.408, P = 0.043). Cisplatin-resistant tumor cells expressed significantly lower levels of EGFR protein (P = 0.04) compared to cisplatin-sensitive cells and tended to have lower levels of phosphorylated Akt (pAkt; P = 0.13) and lower expression levels of amphiregulin (P = 0.18). Conclusions: Epidermal growth factor receptor status and ligand expression influence the treatment sensitivity of HNSCC cells and may be useful as predictive markers.

  • 60.
    Jerhammar, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Not Found:Linkoping Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Clin and Expt Med, Div Otorhinolaryngol and Head and Neck Surg, Linkoping, Sweden .
    Ceder, Rebecca
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grafstrom, Roland C.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden VTT Technical Research Centre Finland, Finland .
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    YAP1 is a potential biomarker for cetuximab resistance in head and neck cancer2014In: Oral Oncology, ISSN 1368-8375, E-ISSN 1879-0593, Vol. 50, no 9, p. 832-839Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Targeted therapy against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) only variably represents a therapeutic advance in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). This study addresses the need of biomarkers of treatment response to the EGFR-targeting antibody cetuximab (Erbitux (R)). Materials and Methods: The intrinsic cetuximab sensitivity of HNSCC cell lines was assessed by a crystal violet assay. Gene copy number analysis of five resistant and five sensitive cell lines was performed using the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 platform. Quantitative real-time PCR was used for verification of selected copy number alterations and assessment of mRNA expression. The functional importance of the findings on the gene and mRNA level was investigated employing siRNA technology. The data was statistically evaluated using Mann-Whitney U-test and Spearmans correlation test. Results: Analysis of the intrinsic cetuximab sensitivity of 32 HNSCC cell lines characterized five and nine lines as cetuximab sensitive or resistant, respectively. Gene copy number analysis of five resistant versus five sensitive cell lines identified 39 amplified protein-coding genes, including YAP1, in the genomic regions 11q22.1 or 5p13-15. Assessment using qPCR verified that YAP1 amplification associated with cetuximab resistance. Amplification of YAP1 correlated to higher mRNA levels, and RNA knockdown resulted in increased cetuximab sensitivity. Assessment of several independent clinical data sets in the public domain confirmed YAP1 amplifications in multiple tumor types including HNSCC, along with highly differential expression in a subset of HNSCC patients. Conclusion: Taken together, we provide evidence that YAP1 could represent a novel biomarker gene of cetuximab resistance in HNSCC cell lines.

  • 61.
    Jerhammar, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    YAP1 Gene Amplification is a Marker for Cetuximab Resistance in Head and Neck CancerManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is commonly overexpressed in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). The monoclonal antibody cetuximab (Erbitux®) inhibits its signaling and has been approved for treatment of HNSCC. However, since many patients do not benefit from cetuximab treatment, predictive biomarkers of cetuximab response are required. The present study aims at finding novel markers of cetuximab resistance.

    The intrinsic cetuximab sensitivity of 35 HNSCC cell lines was determined, and revealed a great variation in the response between cell lines. Five cell lines (14%) were cetuximab sensitive, and 12 (34%) were resistant. Interestingly, two cell lines proliferated after cetuximab treatment.

    10 cell lines (five cetuximab sensitive and five cetuximab resistant) were selected for gene copy number array analysis on the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 platform. 39 protein coding genes were amplified in cetuximab resistant cells and normal in sensitive cells, all present on genomic regions 11q22.1 or 5p13-15. Five genes were selected for quantitative PCR  verification, namely, YAP1 and TRPC6 (11q22.1) and PDCD6, TPPP, and PTGER4 (5p13-15). An extended panel of totally 10 cetuximab resistant and 10 sensitive cell lines verified that YAP1 amplified cells are cetuximab resistant.

    YAP1 gene amplification was highly correlated to the YAP1 mRNA expression, which was significantly higher in cetuximab resistant cells than in sensitive. YAP1 downregulation resulted in increased cetuximab sensitivity in one of two cetuximab resistant cell lines investigated and growth inhibition in another. We conclude that YAP1 is a marker for cetuximab resistance in head and neck cancer.

  • 62.
    Jerhammar, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Variation of intrinsic cetuximab sensitivity in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas in EJC SUPPLEMENTS, vol 8, issue 5, pp 50-502010In: EJC SUPPLEMENTS, Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. , 2010, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 50-50Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 63.
    Jerhammar, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, A C
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Gene Copy Number as Predictive Marker for Cetuximab Resistance in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CANCER, vol 47, issue , pp S571-S5712011In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CANCER, Elsevier , 2011, Vol. 47, p. S571-S571Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 64.
    Jiao, Yu
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Capital Medical University, Peoples R China.
    Palmgren, Bjorn
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Novozhilova, Ekaterina
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Englund Johansson, Ulrica
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Spieles-Engemann, Anne L.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Kale, Ajay
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Stupp, Samuel I.
    Northwestern University, IL 60208 USA; Northwestern University, IL 60208 USA; Northwestern University, IL 60208 USA; Northwestern University, IL 60208 USA.
    Olivius, Petri
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    BDNF Increases Survival and Neuronal Differentiation of Human Neural Precursor Cells Cotransplanted with a Nanofiber Gel to the Auditory Nerve in a Rat Model of Neuronal Damage2014In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2014, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. To study possible nerve regeneration of a damaged auditory nerve by the use of stem cell transplantation. Methods. We transplanted HNPCs to the rat AN trunk by the internal auditory meatus (IAM). Furthermore, we studied if addition of BDNF affects survival and phenotypic differentiation of the grafted HNPCs. A bioactive nanofiber gel (PA gel), in selected groups mixed with BDNF, was applied close to the implanted cells. Before transplantation, all rats had been deafened by a round window niche application of beta-bungarotoxin. This neurotoxin causes a selective toxic destruction of the AN while keeping the hair cells intact. Results. Overall, HNPCs survived well for up to six weeks in all groups. However, transplants receiving the BDNF-containing PA gel demonstrated significantly higher numbers of HNPCs and neuronal differentiation. At six weeks, a majority of the HNPCs had migrated into the brain stem and differentiated. Differentiated human cells as well as neurites were observed in the vicinity of the cochlear nucleus. Conclusion. Our results indicate that human neural precursor cells (HNPC) integration with host tissue benefits from additional brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) treatment and that these cells appear to be good candidates for further regenerative studies on the auditory nerve (AN).

  • 65.
    Johansson, A
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ansell, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ostman, A
    Karolinska Institute.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Cancer-associated fibroblasts desensitizes head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells to epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted therapy in EJC SUPPLEMENTS, vol 8, issue 5, pp 134-1342010In: EJC SUPPLEMENTS, Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. , 2010, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 134-134Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 66.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ansell, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jerhammar, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bradic Lindh, Maja
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Grenman, Reidar
    Turku University Hospital, Finland University of Turku, Finland .
    Munck-Wikland, Eva
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Ostman, Arne
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Induce Matrix Metalloproteinase-Mediated Cetuximab Resistance in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells2012In: Molecular Cancer Research, ISSN 1541-7786, E-ISSN 1557-3125, Vol. 10, no 9, p. 1158-1168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing body of evidence suggests that components of the tumor microenvironment, including cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF), may modulate the treatment sensitivity of tumor cells. Here, we investigated the possible influence of CAFs on the sensitivity of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines to cetuximab, an antagonistic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody. Cetuximab treatment caused a reduction in the proliferation rate of HNSCC cell lines, whereas the growth of HNSCC-derived CAF cultures was unaffected. When tumor cells were cocultured with CAFs in a transwell system, the cetuximab-induced growth inhibition was reduced, and a complete protection from growth inhibition was observed in one of the tumor cell lines investigated. Media that had been conditioned by CAFs offered protection from cetuximab treatment in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that the resistance to treatment was mediated by CAF-derived soluble factors. The coculture of HNSCC cell lines with CAFs resulted in an elevated expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) in both the tumor cells and CAFs. Moreover, the CAF-induced resistance was partly abolished by the presence of an MMP inhibitor. However, CAFs treated with siRNA targeting MMP-1 still protected tumor cells from cetuximab treatment, suggesting that several MMPs may cooperate to facilitate resistance or that the protective effect is mediated by another member of the MMP family. These results identify a novel CAF-dependent modulation of cetuximab sensitivity and suggest that inhibiting MMPs may improve the effects of EGFR-targeted therapy.

  • 67.
    Kaiser, Andreas
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Kale, Ajay
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Novozhilova, Ekaterina
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Siratirakun, Piyaporn
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Aquino, Jorge B.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Thonabulsombat, Charoensri
    Mahidol University, Thailand .
    Ernfors, Patrilz
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Olivius, Petri
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Brain stern slice conditioned medium contains endogenous BDNF and GDNF that affect neural crest boundary cap cells in co-culture2014In: Brain Research, ISSN 0006-8993, E-ISSN 1872-6240, Vol. 1566, p. 12-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conditioned medium (CM), made by collecting medium after a few days in cell culture and then re-using it to further stimulate other cells, is a known experimental concept since the 1950s. Our group has explored this technique to stimulate the performance of cells in culture in general, and to evaluate stem- and progenitor cell aptitude for auditory nerve repair enhancement in particular. As compared to other mediums, all primary endpoints in our published experimental settings have weighed in favor of conditioned culture medium, where we have shown that conditioned culture medium has a stimulatory effect on cell survival. In order to explore the reasons for this improved survival we set out to analyze the conditioned culture medium. We utilized ELISA kits to investigate whether brain stem (BS) slice CM contains any significant amounts of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). We further looked for a donor cell with progenitor characteristics that would be receptive to BDNF and GDNF. We chose the well-documented boundary cap (BC) progenitor cells to be tested in our in vitro co-culture setting together with cochlear nucleus (CN) of the BS. The results show that BS CM contains BDNF and GDNF and that survival of BC cells, as well as BC cell differentiation into neurons, were enhanced when BS CM were used. Altogether, we conclude that BC cells transplanted into a BDNF and GDNF rich environment could be suitable for treatment of a traumatized or degenerated auditory nerve.

  • 68.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi C.
    et al.
    Ryhov County Hospital.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Skargren, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Recovery after acute unilateral vestibular loss and predictors for remaining symptoms2011In: American Journal of Otolaryngology, ISSN 0196-0709, E-ISSN 1532-818X, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 366-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to follow recovery during the first 6 months after acute unilateral vestibular loss (AUVL) and to determine predictors for self-rated remaining symptoms. Materials and methods: Forty-two subjects were included less than 10 days after AUVL. Static and dynamic clinical balance tests, visual analogue scales, University of California Los Angeles Dizziness Questionnaire, Dizziness Beliefs Scale, European Quality of Life questionnaire, Dizziness Handicap Inventory, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were performed at inclusion and at 7 follow-ups over 6 months. Subjects rated their symptoms on visual analogue scales daily at home. Videonystagmography was performed in the acute stage and after 10 weeks. Results: Decrease of symptoms and improvement of balance function were larger during the first compared with the latter part of the follow-up period. Visual analogue scale ratings for balance problems were higher than those for dizziness. A prediction model was created based on the results of 4 tests in the acute stage: standing on foam with eyes closed, standing on 1 leg with eyes open, visual analogue scale rating of vertigo at rest, and European Quality of Life questionnaire rating of health-related quality of life. The prediction model identified subjects at risk of having remaining symptoms after 6 months with a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 79%. Conclusions: Recovery mainly takes place during the first weeks after AUVL. Subjects rate more balance problems than dizziness. Self-rated remaining symptoms after 6 months may be predicted by clinical balance tests and subjective ratings in the acute stage.

  • 69.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jonköping University, Sweden Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Test-retest reliability of the Swedish version of the Life-Space Assessment Questionnaire among community-dwelling older adults2014In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 817-823Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine the test-retest reliability of the Swedish version of the Life-Space Assessment Questionnaire. Design: Test-retest reliability study. Subjects: A total of 298 community-dwelling subjects between 75 and 90 years of age. Methods: The Life-Space Assessment Questionnaire was translated into Swedish. By personal interviews during home visits and two weeks later by telephone interviews the subjects were asked about their life-space mobility during the past four weeks, and how often and whether they were independent or needed assistance from another person or equipment to reach different life-space levels. Results: None of the four scoring methods showed significant difference between test sessions. The mean (SD) total scores were 65 (22) and 65 (23) out of the maximum possible score of 120 at the two sessions. High levels were found for independent, assisted, and maximal life-space at both sessions. Intraclass correlation coefficients and weighted Kappa-values between 0.84-0.94 were found for the total score, the independent, and the assisted life-space levels, indicating good to excellent reliability. A lower Kappa-value was observed for the maximal life-space level, mainly owing to skewed distributions. The method error values showed that a change of 10 in the total score and a change of one level in any of the three life-space levels can be considered to indicate a real change in clinical practice. Conclusion: The Swedish version of the Life-Space Assessment Questionnaire can be reliably used among community-dwelling older adults.

  • 70.
    Kilman, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands; Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Native and Non-native Speech Perception by Hearing-Impaired Listeners in Noise- and Speech Maskers2015In: TRENDS IN HEARING, ISSN 2331-2165, Vol. 19, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study evaluated how hearing-impaired listeners perceive native (Swedish) and nonnative (English) speech in the presence of noise- and speech maskers. Speech reception thresholds were measured for four different masker types for each target language. The maskers consisted of stationary and fluctuating noise and two-talker babble in Swedish and English. Twenty-three hearing-impaired native Swedish listeners participated, aged between 28 and 65 years. The participants also performed cognitive tests of working memory capacity in Swedish and English, nonverbal reasoning, and an English proficiency test. Results indicated that the speech maskers were more interfering than the noise maskers in both target languages. The larger need for phonetic and semantic cues in a nonnative language makes a stationary masker relatively more challenging than a fluctuating-noise masker. Better hearing acuity (pure tone average) was associated with better perception of the target speech in Swedish, and better English proficiency was associated with better speech perception in English. Larger working memory and better pure tone averages were related to the better perception of speech masked with fluctuating noise in the nonnative language. This suggests that both are relevant in highly taxing conditions. A large variance in performance between the listeners was observed, especially for speech perception in the nonnative language.

  • 71.
    Kilman, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. ENT/audiology, VU University Medical Center, the Netherlands.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The effects of native and non-native target and distractor language on speech perception are modulated by non-native proficiency2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying speech in noisy conditions requires both native and non-native listeners to cope with decreased intelligibility and thereby an increased cognitive load. The current study examined in four speech reception threshold (SRT) conditions how energetic (stationary, fluctuating) and informational (two-talker babble Swedish, two-talker babble English) maskers interfered with target speech in Swedish (native language) and English (non-native language). The participants also performed standardized tests in English proficiency, nonverbal reasoning and working memory capacity; the latter in both Swedish and English. Twenty-three normal-hearing native Swedish listeners participated, 13 females and 10 males, age-range between 28 and 64 years.The main result was that the target language, masker type and English proficiency all affected speech perception. The SRT’s were better when the target language was Swedish. The informational maskers were interfering more with perception than energetic maskers, specifically in the non-native language. High English proficiency was beneficial in three out of four conditions when the target language was English. The findings suggest that English proficiency is essential regarding automaticity in perceiving this non-native language

  • 72.
    Kilman, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    The influence of non-native language proficiency on speech perception perfomance2014In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 5, no 651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examined to what extent proficiency in a non-native language influences speech perception in noise. We explored how English proficiency affected native (Swedish) and non-native (English) speech perception in four speech reception threshold (SRT) conditions, including two energetic (stationary, fluctuating noise) and two informational (two-talker babble Swedish, two-talker babble English) maskers. Twenty-three normal-hearing native Swedish listeners participated, age between 28 and 64 years. The participants also performed standardized tests in English proficiency, non-verbal reasoning and working memory capacity. Our approach with focus on proficiency and the assessment of external as well as internal, listener-related factors allowed us to examine which variables explained intra- and interindividual differences in native and non-native speech perception performance. The main result was that in the non-native target, the level of English proficiency is a decisive factor for speech intelligibility in noise. High English proficiency improved performance in all four conditions when the target language was English. The informational maskers were interfering more with perception than energetic maskers, specifically in the non-native target. The study also confirmed that the SRTs were better when target language was native compared to non-native.

  • 73.
    La Fleur, Linnea
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    A CD44(high)/EGFR(low) Subpopulation within Head and Neck Cancer Cell Lines Shows an Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Phenotype and Resistance to Treatment2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mortality in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is high due to emergence of therapy resistance which results in local and regional recurrences that may have their origin in resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) or cells with an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype. In the present study, we investigate the possibility of using the cell surface expression of CD44 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), both of which have been used as stem cell markers, to identify subpopulations within HNSCC cell lines that differ with respect to phenotype and treatment sensitivity. Three subpopulations, consisting of CD44(high)/EGFR(low), CD44(high)/EGFR(high) and CD44(low) cells, respectively, were collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The CD44(high)/EGFR(low) population showed a spindle-shaped EMT-like morphology, while the CD44(low) population was dominated by cobblestone-shaped cells. The CD44(high)/EGFR(low) population was enriched with cells in G0/G1 and showed a relatively low proliferation rate and a high plating efficiency. Using a real time PCR array, 27 genes, of which 14 were related to an EMT phenotype and two with stemness, were found to be differentially expressed in CD44(high)/EGFR(low) cells in comparison to CD44(low) cells. Moreover, CD44(high)/EGFR(low) cells showed a low sensitivity to radiation, cisplatin, cetuximab and gefitinib, and a high sensitivity to dasatinib relative to its CD44(high)/EGFR(high) and CD44(low) counterparts. In conclusion, our results show that the combination of CD44 (high) and EGFR (low) cell surface expression can be used to identify a treatment resistant subpopulation with an EMT phenotype in HNSCC cell lines.

  • 74.
    Laplante-Levesque, Ariane
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Knudsen, Line V
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Preminger, Jill E
    University of Louisville, USA.
    Jones, Lesley
    University of York, UK.
    Nielsen, Claus
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hickson, Louise
    University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Naylor, Graham
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Kramer, Sophia E
    VU University Medical Center, EMGO+ Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation: Perspectives of adults with hearing impairment2012In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 93-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    This study investigated the perspectives of adults with hearing impairment on hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation.

    DESIGN:

    Individual semi-structured interviews were completed.

    STUDY SAMPLE:

    In total, 34 adults with hearing impairment in four countries (Australia, Denmark, UK, and USA) participated. Participants had a range of experience with hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation, from never having sought help to being satisfied hearing-aid users.

    RESULTS:

    Qualitative content analysis identified four main categories ('perceiving my hearing impairment', 'seeking hearing help', 'using my hearing aids', and 'perspectives and knowledge') and, at the next level, 25 categories. This article reports on the densest categories: they are described, exemplified with interview quotes, and discussed.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    People largely described hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation in the context of their daily lives. Adults with hearing impairment rarely described clinical encounters towards hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation as a connected process. They portrayed interactions with clinicians as isolated events rather than chronologically-ordered steps relating to a common goal. Clinical implications of the findings are discussed.

  • 75.
    Laplante.Lévesque, Ariane
    et al.
    Eriksholms Research Centre, Denmark.
    Brännström, Jonas
    Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Ingo, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Månsson, Kristoffer
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    An online information transfer support system for audiologists and their first-time hearing aid clients2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Working memory capacity and lexical access in speech recognition in noise2012In: Speech perception and auditory disorders, 2012 / [ed] T. Dau, M. L. Jepsen, J. C. Dalsgaard, T. Poulsen, Nyborg, Danmark: The Danavox Jubilee Foundation , 2012, p. 95-102Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Levén, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Andersson, Jan
    The Swedish Defence Research Agency.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The relationship between prospective memory, working memory and self-rated memory performance in individuals with intellectual disability2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 207-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, prospective memory, working memory and self-rated memory performance were assessed in five individuals with intellectual disability and 10 individuals without intellectual disability. Prospective memory was taxed by means of a video-based procedure and a more naturalistic task, working memory was taxed by means of digit and picture span tasks, and a questionnaire was used to measure self-rated prospective and retrospective memory. The spread of performance was wide on prospective memory and working memory tasks, foremost for individuals with intellectual disability. Self-rated memory did not differ between the two groups, although there were large differences in memory performance on the other memory tasks. The results are interpreted in terms of how limitations in working memory contribute to prospective memory failures among individuals with intellectual disability. To remember ‘when to’ perform a prospective memory task seems to be more difficult to master than remembering ‘what to do’ for individuals with intellectual disability.

  • 78.
    Lindgren, Stefan
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Brannstrom, Thomas
    Umeå University.
    Hanse, Eric
    University of Gothenburg.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Nilsson, Gunnar
    Karolinska Institute.
    Sandler, Stellan
    Uppsala University.
    Tidefelt, Ulf
    University of Örebro.
    Donner, Jakob
    Lund University.
    Medical education in Sweden2011In: Medical teacher, ISSN 0142-159X, E-ISSN 1466-187X, Vol. 33, no 10, p. 798-803Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Undergraduate medical education in Sweden has moved from nationally regulated, subject-based courses to programmes integrated either around organ systems or physiological and patho-physiological processes, or organised around basic medical science in conjunction with clinical specialities, with individual profiles at the seven medical schools. The national regulations are restricted to overall academic and professional outcomes. The 51/2 year long university undergraduate curriculum is followed by a mandatory 18 months internship, delivered by the County Councils. While quality control and accreditation for the university curriculum is provided by the Swedish National Agency for Higher Education, no such formal control exists for the internship; undergraduate medical education is therefore in conflict with EU directives from 2005. The Government is expected to move towards 6 years long university undergraduate programmes, leading to licence, which will facilitate international mobility of both Swedish and foreign medical students and doctors. Ongoing academic development of undergraduate education is strengthened by the Bologna process. It includes outcome (competence)-based curricula, university Masters level complying with international standards, progression of competence throughout the curriculum, student directed learning, active participation and roles in practical clinical education and a national assessment model to assure professional competence. In the near future, the dimensioning of Swedish undergraduate education is likely to be decided more by international demands and aspects of quality than by national demands for doctors.

  • 79.
    Lundeborg Hammarström, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Influence of adenotonsillar hypertrophy on /s/-articulation in children-effects of surgery2011In: Logopedics, Phoniatrics, Vocology, ISSN 1401-5439, E-ISSN 1651-2022, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 100-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tonsillar hypertrophy is common in young children and affects several aspects of the speech such as distortions of the dento-alveolar consonants. The study objective was to assess s-articulation, perceptually and acoustically in children with tonsillar hypertrophy and compare effects of two types of surgery, total tonsillectomy and tonsillotomy. Sixty-seven children, 50-65 months, on waiting list for surgery, were randomized to tonsillectomy or tonsillotomy. The speech material was collected pre-operatively and six months post-operatively.  Two groups of age-matched children were controls. /S/-articulation was affected acoustically with lower spectral peak locations and perceptually with less distinct /s/-production before surgery, in comparison to controls.  After surgery /s/-articulation was normalized perceptually, but acoustic differences remained. No significant differences between surgical methods were found.

  • 80.
    Lundeborg Hammarström, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Acoustic and perceptual aspects of vocal function in children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy —effects of surgery2012In: Journal of Voice, ISSN 0892-1997, E-ISSN 1873-4588, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 480-487Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate outcome of two types of tonsil surgery (tonsillectomy+adenoidectomy or tonsillotomy +adenoidectomy) on vocal function perceptually and acoustically.

    Study Design: Sixty-seven children, aged 50-65 months, on waiting list for tonsil surgery were randomized to tonsillectomy (n=33) or tonsillotomy (n=34). Fifty-seven age and gender matched healthy pre-school children were controls. Twenty-eight of them, aged 48-59 months, served as control group before surgery, and 29, aged 60-71 months, after surgery

    Methods: Before surgery and six months postoperatively, the children were recorded producing three sustained vowels (/A, u, i/) and 14 words. The control groups were recorded only once.

    Three trained speech and language pathologists performed the perceptual analysis using Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) for eight voice quality parameters. Acoustic analysis from sustained vowels included average fundamental frequency, jitter percent, shimmer percent, noise-to-harmonic ratio and the centre frequencies of formants 1-3

    Results: Before surgery the children were rated to have more hyponasality and compressed/throaty voice (p<0,05) and  lower mean pitch (p<0,01) in comparison to the control group. They also had higher perturbation measures and lower frequencies of the second and third formant. After surgery there were no differences perceptually. Perturbation measures decreased but were still higher compared to the control group’s, p<0, 05. Differences in formant frequencies for /i/ and /u/ remained. No differences were found between the two surgical methods.

    Conclusion: Voice quality is affected perceptually and acoustically by adenotonsillar hypertrophy. After surgery the voice is perceptually normalized but acoustic differences remain. Outcome was equal for both surgical methods.

  • 81.
    Lundeborg Hammarström, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wiman, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Voice onset time in Swedish children and adults2012In: Logopedics, Phoniatrics, Vocology, ISSN 1401-5439, E-ISSN 1651-2022, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 117-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Voice onset time (VOT) is a temporal acoustic parameter, which reflects the timing of speech motor control. The objective of the work was to obtain normative VOT data in Swedish children. Thus, 150 children aged 8-11 years old and 36 adults were audio-recorded when producing the plosives in minimal pairs. Measures were made using waveforms and spectro-grams. Results show that Swedish children developed adult-like VOT values between 9 and 10 years. By the age of 10 years prevoicing was also found to be completely adultlike in length. The results indicate that all Swedish adults do not produce voiced plosives with prevoicing. No evident gender differences were found. The obtained VOT values can be used as normative data when assessing children with speech and language disorders.

  • 82.
    Lundeborg, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Different techniques of pediatric tonsil surgery - Effects on oral motor function, speech and language behavior and quality of life2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 83.
    Lundin, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Wikkelsø, C.
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Leijon, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Postural Function in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Before and After Shunt Surgery: A Controlled Study Using Computerised Dynamic Posturography (EquiTest)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Postural dysfunction is one of the major features of idiopathic Normal Hydrocephalus (iNPH). With computerised dynamic posturography (CDP) balance can be assessed objectively. The primary aim of this study was to describe the postural function in iNPH patients pre- and post-operatively in comparison with healthy individuals (HI) using CDP.

    Subjects and methods: Thirty-five patients (16 M, 19 F) with a mean age of 73 (range 49-81) with iNPH, and sixteen HI (7 M, 9 F) aged 73 (62-89) were included. iNPH patients were operated on with a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. Patients and HI were tested regarding motor function, balance and cognition. CDP, EquiTest (NeuroCom International, Clackamas, OR), was performed before and three months after shunt surgery and twice in HI, with a three-month interval.

    Results: Pre-operatively, the 35 patients had poorer balance measured with the Sensory Organising Test (SOT) score in every condition (p= 0.01 in SOT 1 and p<0.001 in SOT 2-6) compared to the HI. The greatest difference was in test conditions measuring mainly vestibular function, where loss of balance (LOB) was frequent. Twenty patients did undergo shunt surgery and 18/20 (90%) were considered shunt responders, with a mean improvement of motor score of 26% (range 5-67 %). There was an improvement post-operatively in the weighted composite SOT score (p<0.05) but no significant change in any of the SOT conditions. LOB was not significantly reduced in any of the test conditions.

    Conclusion: CDP showed that the patients had a poorer balance than the HI. The greatest difference was in SOT 5-6, indicating that the postural disturbance is of primarily central vestibular origin. There was a slight improvement of balance post-operatively.

  • 84.
    Lundin, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wikkelsø, C.
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Leijon, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Postural function in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus before and after shunt surgery: a controlled study using computerized dynamic posturography (EquiTest)2013In: Clinical neurology and neurosurgery (Dutch-Flemish ed. Print), ISSN 0303-8467, E-ISSN 1872-6968, Vol. 115, no 9, p. 1626-1631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Postural dysfunction is one of the major features of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH). With computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) balance can be assessed objectively. The primary aim of this study was to describe the postural function in iNPH patients pre- and post-operatively in comparison with healthy individuals (HI) using CDP.

    Subjects and methods

    Thirty-five patients (16 M, 19 F) with a mean age of 73 (range 49–81) with iNPH, and sixteen HI (7 M, 9 F) aged 73 (62–89) were included. iNPH patients were operated on with a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. Patients and HI were tested regarding motor function, balance and cognition. CDP, EquiTest (NeuroCom International, Clackamas, OR), was performed before and three months after shunt surgery and twice in HI, with a three-month interval.

    Results

    Pre-operatively, the 35 patients had poorer balance measured with the Sensory Organizing Test (SOT) score in every condition (p = 0.01 in SOT 1 and p < 0.001 in SOT 2–6) compared to the HI. The greatest difference was in test conditions measuring mainly vestibular function, where loss of balance (LOB) was frequent. Twenty patients were evaluated three months after shunt surgery and 18/20 (90%) of them were considered shunt responders, with a mean improvement of motor score of 26% (range 5–67%). There was an improvement post-operatively in the weighted composite SOT score (p < 0.05) but no significant change in any of the SOT conditions. LOB was not significantly reduced in any of the test conditions.

    Conclusion

    CDP showed that the patients had a poorer balance than the HI. The greatest difference was in SOT 5–6, indicating that the postural disturbance is of primarily central vestibular origin. There was a slight improvement of balance post-operatively.

  • 85.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Auditory stimulatin and cognitive development in deaf children2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 86.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Cognitive development and intervention in deaf children with cochlear implants2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 87.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Cognitive intervention for deaf children2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 88.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Development of working memory capacity and phonological skills in deaf and hearing-impaired children with cochlear implants and/or hearing-aids2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 89.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hörsel och kognition över livsspannet2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 90.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Kognitiv utveckling hos döva barn med CI och/eller hörapparat2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 91.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Kognitiv utveckling hos döva barn med cochleära implantat2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 92.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Reading and cognitive development in children with conchlear implants2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 93.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Språklig och kognitiv utveckling hos döva och hörselskadade barn med hörapparat och/eller cochleära implantat2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 94.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Asker-Árnason, Lena
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Henricson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elena
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hearing and cognitive development in deaf and hearing-impaired children: effects of intervention2013In: Disorders of Peripheral and Central Auditory Processing / [ed] Gastone Celesia, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2013, p. 71-80Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 95.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    CLINTEC, Karolinska institutet, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Henricson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Cognitive and communicative development in deaf and hearing-impaired children with cochlear implants and/or hearing-aids2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to examine neurophysiological, cognitive and linguistic development in deaf and hearing-impaired children (5–7 years of age) with CI and/or hearingaids and how a phonological intervention programme may influence this development. The deaf and hearing-impaired children were compared with age-matched hearing children. The results reveal that deaf and hearing-impaired children had equivalent or close to equivalent performance levels compared to hearing children for cognitive and linguistic tasks with relatively low demands on phonological processing, whereas there was a substantial and significant difference between the groups for cognitive tasks involving explicit phonological processing. The results indicate that there is a relationship between age at implant and neurophysiological, cognitive and linguistic development, where early implantation promotes faster development. The childrens´ cognitive performance increased as a function of phonological intervention.

  • 96.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Linneaus Centre; Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Henricson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Cognitive and communicative development in deaf and hearing-impaired children with cochlear implants and/or hearing-aids2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to examine neurophysiological, cognitive and linguistic development in deaf and hearing-impaired children (5–7 years of age) with CI and/or hearingaids and how a phonological intervention programme may influence this development. The deaf and hearing-impaired children were compared with age-matched hearing children. The results reveal that deaf and hearing-impaired children had equivalent or close to equivalent performance levels compared to hearing children for cognitive and linguistic tasks with relatively low demands on phonological processing, whereas there was a substantial and significant difference between the groups for cognitive tasks involving explicit phonological processing. The results indicate that there is a relationship between age at implant and neurophysiological, cognitive and linguistic development, where early implantation promotes faster development. The childrens´ cognitive performance increased as a function of phonological intervention.

  • 97.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Asker-Arnason, Lena
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Development of cognitive and reading skills in deaf children with CIs2011In: Cochlear Implants International, ISSN 1467-0100, E-ISSN 1754-7628, Vol. 12, no Suppl 1, p. 98-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 98.
    Löfkvist, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almkvist, Ove
    Stockholm University / Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Tallberg, Ing-Mari
    Karolinska University Hospital / Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lexical and semantic ability in groups of children with cochlear implants, language impairment and autism spectrum disorder2014In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 78, no 2, p. 253-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Lexical-semantic ability was investigated among children aged 6–9 years with cochlear implants (CI) and compared to clinical groups of children with language impairment (LI) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) as well as to age-matched children with normal hearing (NH). In addition, the influence of age at implantation on lexical-semantic ability was investigated among children with CI.

    Methods

    97 children divided into four groups participated, CI (n = 34), LI (n = 12), ASD (n = 12), and NH (n = 39). A battery of tests, including picture naming, receptive vocabulary and knowledge of semantic features, was used for assessment. A semantic response analysis of the erroneous responses on the picture-naming test was also performed.

    Results

    The group of children with CI exhibited a naming ability comparable to that of the age-matched children with NH, and they also possessed a relevant semantic knowledge of certain words that they were unable to name correctly. Children with CI had a significantly better understanding of words compared to the children with LI and ASD, but a worse understanding than those with NH. The significant differences between groups remained after controlling for age and non-verbal cognitive ability.

    Conclusions

    The children with CI demonstrated lexical-semantic abilities comparable to age-matched children with NH, while children with LI and ASD had a more atypical lexical-semantic profile and poorer sizes of expressive and receptive vocabularies. Dissimilar causes of neurodevelopmental processes seemingly affected lexical-semantic abilities in different ways in the clinical groups.

  • 99.
    Löfkvist, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Division of Speech and Language Pathology, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almkvist, Ove
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Tallberg, Ing-Mari
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Predictions of Grammatical Sentence Understanding in Children with CI(s)2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 100.
    Löfkvist, Ulrika
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almkvist, Ove
    Stockholm University, Sweden and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Tallberg, Ing-Mari
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Word fluency performance and strategies in children with cochlear implants: age-dependent effects?2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 53, no 6, p. 467-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lofkvist, U., Almkvist, O., Lyxell, B. andamp; Tallberg, I.-M. (2012). Word fluency performance and strategies in children with cochlear implants: age-dependent effects? Scandinavian Journal of Psychology 53, 467-474. Word fluency was examined in 73 Swedish children aged 69 years divided into two age groups, 67 and 89 years; 34 deaf children with cochlear implants (CI) (15 girls/19 boys) and 39 age-matched children with normal hearing (NH) (20 girls/19 boys). One purpose was to compare the ability to retrieve words in two different word fluency tasks; one phonemically based (FAS letter fluency) and one semantically based (animal fluency). A second purpose was to examine retrieval strategies in the two tasks by conducting an analysis of clustering and switching of word sequences. In general we found that age was an important factor for word fluency ability, in both the CI and the NH groups. It was also demonstrated that children with CI aged 89 years retrieved significantly fewer words and used less efficient strategies in the retrieval process, especially on the phonemically based task compared to children with NH of the same ages, whereas children 67 years performed similarly in both groups regarding number of retrieved words and use of strategies. The results are discussed with respect to factors such as age differences in performance for children with CI, especially for the phonemically based task.

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