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  • 51. Gripmark, M.
    et al.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University.
    Perceived subjective horizontal during eccentric rotatory testing1995In: NES, 1995, 1995Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 52.
    Hakansson, Bo
    et al.
    Chalmers Unviversity.
    Eeg-Olofsson, Mans
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Reinfeldt, Sabine
    Chalmers Unviversity.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Granstrom, Gosta
    University of Gothenburg.
    Percutaneous Versus Transcutaneous Bone Conduction Implant System: A Feasibility Study on a Cadaver Head2008In: Otology and Neurotology, ISSN 1531-7129, E-ISSN 1537-4505, Vol. 29, no 8, p. 1132-1139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Percutaneous bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) is an important rehabilitation alternative for patients who have conductive or mixed hearing loss. However, these devices use a percutaneous and bone-anchored implant that has some drawbacks reported. A transcutaneous bone conduction implant system (BCI) is proposed as an alternative to the percutaneous system because it leaves the skin intact. The BCI transmits the signal to a permanently implanted transducer with an induction loop system through the intact skin. The aim of this study was to compare the electroacoustic performance of the BAHA Classic-300 with a full-scale BCI on a cadaver head in a sound field. The BCI comprised the audio processor of the vibrant sound bridge connected to a balanced vibration transducer (balanced electromagnetic separation transducer).

    Methods: Implants with snap abutments were placed in the parietal bone (Classic-300) and 15-mm deep in the temporal bone (BCI). The vibration responses at the ipsilateral and contralateral cochlear promontories were measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer, with the beam aimed through the ear canal.

    Results: Results show that the BCI produces approximately 5 dB higher maximum output level and has a slightly lower distortion than the Classic-300 at the ipsilateral promontorium at speech frequencies. At the contralateral promontorium, the maximum output level was considerably lower for the BCI than for the Classic-300 except in the 1-2 kHz range, where it was similar.

    Conclusion: Present results support the proposal that a BCI system can be a realistic alternative to a BAHA.

  • 53.
    Hakansson, Bo
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Reinfeldt, Sabine
    Chalmers.
    Eeg-Olofsson, Mans
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Ostli, Per
    Chalmers.
    Taghavi, Hamidreza
    Chalmers.
    Adler, Johannes
    Chalmers.
    Gabrielsson, John
    Chalmers.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Granstrom, Gosta
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    A novel bone conduction implant (BCI): Engineering aspects and pre-clinical studies2010In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF AUDIOLOGY, ISSN 1499-2027, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 203-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Percutaneous bone anchored hearing aids (BAHA) are today an important rehabilitation alternative for patients suffering from conductive or mixed hearing loss. Despite their success they are associated with drawbacks such as skin infections, accidental or spontaneous loss of the bone implant, and patient refusal for treatment due to stigma. A novel bone conduction implant (BCI) system has been proposed as an alternative to the BAHA system because it leaves the skin intact. Such a BCI system has now been developed and the encapsulated transducer uses a non-screw attachment to a hollow recess of the lateral portion of the temporal bone. The aim of this study is to describe the basic engineering principals and some preclinical results obtained with the new BCI system. Laser Doppler vibrometer measurements on three cadaver heads show that the new BCI system produces 0-10 dB higher maximum output acceleration level at the ipsilateral promontory relative to conventional ear-level BAHA at speech frequencies. At the contralateral promontory the maximum output acceleration level was considerably lower for the BCI than for the BAHA.

  • 54.
    Hannula, Samuli
    et al.
    University of Oulu.
    Bloigu, Risto
    University of Oulu.
    Majamaa, Kari
    University of Oulu.
    Sorri, Martti
    University of Oulu.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Audiogram configurations among older adults: Prevalence and relation to self-reported hearing problems2011In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 50, no 11, p. 793-801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective : There are only a few population-based epidemiological studies on audiogram configurations among adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of different audiogram configurations among older adults. In addition, audiogram configurations among subjects reporting hearing problems were examined. Design : Cross-sectional, population-based, unscreened epidemiological study among older adults. Study sample : The subjects (850), aged 54-66 years, were randomly sampled from the population register. A questionnaire survey, an otological examination, and pure-tone audiometry were performed. Results : The most prevalent audiogram configuration among men was high-frequency steeply sloping (65.3% left ear, 51.2% right ear) and among women, high-frequency gently sloping (33.0% left ear, 31.5% right ear). There were significantly more flat configurations among women than among men. Unclassified audiograms were common especially among women (17.5%). Subjects reporting hearing difficulties, difficulties in following conversation in noise, or tinnitus, more often had a high-frequency steeply sloping configuration than those not reporting. Conclusions : High-frequency sloping audiogram configurations were common among older adults, and a high-frequency steeply sloping configuration was common among those reporting hearing problems.

  • 55.
    Hannula, Samuli
    et al.
    University of Oulu, Finland .
    Bloigu, Risto
    University of Oulu, Finland .
    Majamaa, Kari
    University of Oulu, Finland .
    Sorri, Martti
    University of Oulu, Finland .
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ear diseases and other risk factors for hearing impairment among adults: An epidemiological study2012In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 51, no 11, p. 833-840Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of ear diseases, other otological risk factors potentially affecting hearing, and noise exposure among adults. Furthermore, subject-related factors possibly associated with hearing impairment (HI), i.e. handedness, eye color, and susceptibility to sunburn, were studied. Design: A cross-sectional, unscreened, population-based, epidemiological study among adults. Study sample: The subjects (n = 850), aged 54-66 years, were randomly sampled from the population register. A questionnaire survey, an otological examination, and pure-tone audiometry were performed. Results: Chronic middle-ear disease (both active and inactive) was the most common ear disease with a prevalence of 5.3%, while the prevalence of otosclerosis was 1.3%, and that of Menieres disease, 0.7%. Noise exposure was reported by 46% of the subjects, and it had no effect on hearing among those with no ear disease or other otological risk factors for HI. Dark eye color and non-susceptibility to sunburn were associated with HI among noise-exposed subjects. Conclusions: Common ear diseases and other otological risk factors constitute a major part of the etiologies of HI among adults. Contrary to previous studies, noise exposure turned out to have only marginal effect on hearing among those with no otological risk factors.

  • 56.
    Hannula, Samuli
    et al.
    University of Oulu.
    Bloigu, Risto
    University of Oulu.
    Majamaa, Kari
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sorri, Martti
    University of Oulu.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Self-Reported Hearing Problems among Older Adults: Prevalence and Comparison to Measured Hearing Impairment2011In: JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF AUDIOLOGY, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 22, no 8, p. 550-559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There are not many population-based epidemiological studies on the association between self-reported hearing problems and measured hearing thresholds in older adults. Previous studies have shown that the relationship between self-reported hearing difficulties and measured hearing thresholds is unclear and, according to our knowledge, there are no previous population-based studies reporting hearing thresholds among subjects with hyperacusis. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanPurpose: The aim was to investigate the prevalence of self-reported hearing problems, that is, hearing difficulties, difficulties in following a conversation in noise, tinnitus, and hyperacusis, and to compare the results with measured hearing thresholds in older adults. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResearch Design: Cross-sectional, population-based, and unscreened. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanStudy Sample: Random sample of subjects (n = 850) aged 54-66 yr living in the city of Oulu (Finland) and the surrounding areas. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanData Collection and Analysis: Otological examination, pure tone audiometry, questionnaire survey less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: The prevalence of self-reported hearing problems was 37.1% for hearing difficulties, 43.3% for difficulties in following a conversation in noise, 29.2% for tinnitus, and 17.2% for hyperacusis. More than half of the subjects had no hearing impairment, or HI (BEHL[better ear hearing level](0.5-4 kHz) andlt; 20 dB HL) even though they reported hearing problems. Subjects with self-reported hearing problems, including tinnitus and hyperacusis, had significantly poorer hearing thresholds than those who did not report hearing problems. Self-reported hearing difficulties predicted hearing impairment in the pure-tone average at 4, 6, and 8 kHz, and at the single frequency of 4 kHz. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: The results indicate that self-reported hearing difficulties are more frequent than hearing impairment defined by audiometric measurement. Furthermore, self-reported hearing difficulties seem to predict hearing impairment at high frequencies (4-8 kHz) rather than at the frequencies of 0.5-4 kHz, which are commonly used to define the degree of hearing impairment in medical and legal issues.

  • 57.
    Hannula, Samuli
    et al.
    University of Oulu.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology .
    Majamaa, Kari
    University of Oulu.
    Sorri, Martti
    University of Oulu.
    Hearing in a 54-to 66-year-old population in northern Finland2010In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF AUDIOLOGY, ISSN 1499-2027, Vol. 49, no 12, p. 920-927Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are only a few large, population-based epidemiological studies on hearing impairment (HI) in adults. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of HI and possible differences between ears in older adults. The subjects (n = 850), aged 54-66 years, were randomly sampled from the population register. A questionnaire survey, an otological examination, and pure-tone audiometry were performed. Another questionnaire was mailed to collect information on non-participants. The prevalence of HI averaged over the frequencies of 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz for the better ear andgt;= 20 dB HL was 26.7% (men: 36.8%, women: 18.4%). There was no difference between left and right ear pure-tone averages over the frequencies 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz (PTA (0.5-4 kHz)), but a significant difference of -0.8 dB HL was found for the low frequencies 0.125, 0.25, and 0.5 kHz (PTA (0.125-0.5 kHz)), and 4.4 dB HL for the high frequencies over 4, 6, and 8 kHz (PTA (4-8 kHz)). In conclusion, HI was a highly prevalent finding in this age group.

  • 58.
    Harder, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Norrköping.
    Speech-perception in elderly implant recipients2010In: 11th International Conference on Cochlear Implants and Other Implantable Auditory Technologies, 2010, p. 339-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Hato, Naohito
    et al.
    Ehime University.
    Gyo, Kiyofumi
    Ehime University.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Welsh, Joe
    Stanford University.
    Goode, Richard
    Stanford University.
    Time delay of acoustic transmission in human middle ear2004In: Middle Ear Mechanics in Research and Otology / [ed] K. Gyo, H. Wada, N. Hato, and T. Koike, Singapore: World Scientific Publishing Co. , 2004, p. 51-55Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book aims to facilitate the exchange of ideas between otosurgeons and engineers on common topics such as middle ear function, tympanoplasty, implantable hearing devices and ear prostheses. Due to recent advances in technology, gene-therapy and tissue-engineering procedures will also be important issues in the treatment of middle ear

  • 60.
    Hato, Naohito
    et al.
    Stanford University.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Goode, Richard
    Stanford University.
    Three-dimensional stapes footplate motion in human temporal bones2003In: Audiology & neuro-otology, ISSN 1420-3030, E-ISSN 1421-9700, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 140-152Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Hato, Naohito
    et al.
    Stanford University.
    Welsh, Joe
    Stanford University.
    Goode, Richard
    Stanford University.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Acoustic role of the buttress and posterior incudal ligament in human temporal bones2001In: Otolaryngology and head and neck surgery, ISSN 0194-5998, E-ISSN 1097-6817, Vol. 124, no 3, p. 274-278Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Hellgren, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology .
    Analysis of feedback cancellation in hearing aids with Filtered-X LMS and the direct method of closed loop identification2002In: IEEE transactions on speech and audio processing, ISSN 1063-6676, E-ISSN 1558-2353, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 119-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Feedback cancellation in hearing aids based on Filtered-X LMS is analyzed. The data used for identification of the feedback path is the output and input signals of the hearing aid. The identification is thus done in closed loop. Tracking characteristics and bias of the optimal estimate are discussed. The optimal estimate can be biased when the identification is performed in closed loop and the input signal to the hearing aid is not white. It is shown that the bias could be avoided if the spectrum of the input signal was known and the data used to update the internal feedback is prefiltered. The effects of different choices of the design variables of the Filtered-X LMS are discussed. Three alternatives of the fixed filter were evaluated on feedback paths of hearing aids on human subjects and with alternative spectra of the input signal. The optimal estimate of the Filtered-X LMS with an individually adjusted fixed filter showed the best agreement with the desired estimate.

  • 63.
    Hergils, Leif
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Some clinical applications for travelling wave velocity measurements in Ménièr's disease - preliminary studies1995In: Ménièr's Disease, 1995 / [ed] Vesterhauge S, Katholm M, Mikines P,, 1995, p. 229-234Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 64.
    Hesser, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Tore
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lundén, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Henrikson, Oskar
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fattahi, Kidjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnsson, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Westin Zetterqvist, Vendela
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kaldo, Viktor
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatric Section, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A Randomized Controlled Trial of Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in the Treatment of Tinnitus2012In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, ISSN 0022-006X, E-ISSN 1939-2117, Vol. 80, no 4, p. 649-661Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Our aim in this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effects on global tinnitus severity of 2 Internet-delivered psychological treatments, acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), in guided self-help format. Method: Ninety-nine participants (mean age = 48.5 years; 43% female) who were significantly distressed by tinnitus were recruited from the community. Participants were randomly assigned to CBT (n = 32), ACT (n = 35), or a control condition (monitored Internet discussion forum; n = 32), and they were assessed with standardized self-report measures (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; Quality of Life Inventory; Perceived Stress Scale; Tinnitus Acceptance Questionnaire) at pre-, posttreatment (8 weeks), and 1-year follow-up. Results: Mixed-effects linear regression analysis of all randomized participants showed significant effects on the primary outcome (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory) for CBT and for ACT compared with control at posttreatment (95% CI [-17.03, -2.94], d = 0.70, and 95% CI [-16.29, -2.53], d = 0.68, respectively). Within-group effects were substantial from pretreatment through 1-year-follow-up for both treatments (95% CI [-44.65, -20.45], d = 1.34), with no significant difference between treatments (95% CI [-14.87, 11.21], d = 0.16). Conclusions: Acceptance-based procedures may be a viable alternative to traditional CBT techniques in the management of tinnitus. The Internet can improve access to psychological interventions for tinnitus.

  • 65.
    Huyghe, Jeroen R
    et al.
    University of Antwerp.
    Fransen, Erik
    University of Antwerp.
    Hannula, Samuli
    University of Oulu.
    Van Laer, Lut
    University of Antwerp.
    Van Eyken, Els
    University of Antwerp.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Aikio, Pekka
    University of Oulu.
    Sorri, Martti
    University of Oulu.
    Huentelman, Matthew J
    Translat Genom Research Institute, Phoenix.
    Van Camp, Guy
    University of Antwerp.
    A genome-wide analysis of population structure in the Finnish Saami with implications for genetic association studies2011In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF HUMAN GENETICS, ISSN 1018-4813, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 347-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The understanding of patterns of genetic variation within and among human populations is a prerequisite for successful genetic association mapping studies of complex diseases and traits. Some populations are more favorable for association mapping studies than others. The Saami from northern Scandinavia and the Kola Peninsula represent a population isolate that, among European populations, has been less extensively sampled, despite some early interest for association mapping studies. In this paper, we report the results of a first genome-wide SNP-based study of genetic population structure in the Finnish Saami. Using data from the HapMap and the human genome diversity project (HGDP-CEPH) and recently developed statistical methods, we studied individual genetic ancestry. We quantified genetic differentiation between the Saami population and the HGDP-CEPH populations by calculating pair-wise F-ST statistics and by characterizing identity-by-state sharing for pair-wise population comparisons. This study affirms an east Asian contribution to the predominantly European-derived Saami gene pool. Using model-based individual ancestry analysis, the median estimated percentage of the genome with east Asian ancestry was 6% (first and third quartiles: 5 and 8%, respectively). We found that genetic similarity between population pairs roughly correlated with geographic distance. Among the European HGDP-CEPH populations, F-ST was smallest for the comparison with the Russians (F-ST=0.0098), and estimates for the other population comparisons ranged from 0.0129 to 0.0263. Our analysis also revealed fine-scale substructure within the Finnish Saami and warns against the confounding effects of both hidden population structure and undocumented relatedness in genetic association studies of isolated populations.

  • 66.
    Hyden, Dag
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Möller, C
    Linköping University.
    Ödkvist, LM
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Ekvall, Lars
    Linköping University.
    Rotatory and caloric findings in patients with acustic neuromas.1987In: In: Graham MD, Kemink JL, editors. The Vestibular System: Neurophysiologic and clinical research. New York: Raven Press; 1987. p. 351-357. / [ed] Graham MD, Kemink JL, 1987, p. 351-357Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Hydén, Dag
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The VOR frequency and velocity dependence1991In: Vestibular Diagnosis and Neuro-Otosurgical Management of the Skull Base / [ed] Claes Toni Haid, Demeter Verlag , 1991, p. 64-66Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Hydén, Dag
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thell, Jan
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Möller, Claes
    Linköping University.
    Rotatory test results in patients with acoustic tumours before and after surgery1987In: / [ed] Pirodda E, Pompeiano O., 1987, p. 118-118Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 69.
    Hydén, Dag
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Clinical value of the broad spectrum rotatory test1995In: NES,1995;10, 1995, p. 303-309Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 70.
    Hydén, Dag
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Objective measurement of vestibular compensation1993In: NES, 1993, 1993Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 71.
    Hydén, Dag
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Möller, Claes
    Linköping University.
    Visual Suppression Tests in Aucustic Neuroma Patients1988Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 72.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hearing and cognition in speech comprehension. Methods and applications2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Central auditory processing is complex and can not be evaluated by a single method. This thesis focuses on assessment of some aspects of central auditory functions by the use of dichotic speech tests and cognitive tests that tax functions important for speech processing.

    Paper A deals with the cognitive effects in dichotic speech testing in elderly hearing-impaired subjects. It was found that different listening tasks in the dichotic tests put different demands on cognitive ability, shown by a varying degree of correlation between cognitive functions and dichotic test parameters. Age-related cognitive decline was strongly connected with problems to perceive stimuli presented to the left ear.

    Paper B presents a new cognitive test battery sensitive for functions important for speech processing and understanding, performed in text, auditory and audiovisual modalities. The test battery was evaluated in four groups, differing in age and hearing status, and has proven to be useful in assessing the relative contribution of different input-modalities and the effect of age, hearingimpairment and visual contribution on functions important for speech processing.

    In Paper C the test battery developed in Paper B was used to study listening situations with different kinds of background noise. Interfering noise at +10 dB signal-to-noise ratio has significant negative effects on performance in speech processing tasks and on the effort perceived. Hearing-impaired subjects showed poorer results in noise with temporal variations, and elderly subjects were more distracted by noise with temporal variations, especially by noise with meaningful content. In noise, all subjects, particularly those with impaired hearing, were more dependent upon visual cues than in the quiet condition.

    Hearing aid benefit in speech processing with and without background noise was studied in Paper D. The test battery developed in Paper B was used together with a standard measure of speech recognition. With hearing aids, speech recognition was improved in the background condition without noise and in the background condition of ordinary speech. Significantly less effort was perceived in the cognitive tests when hearing aids were used, although only minor benefits of hearing aid amplification were seen. This underlines the importance of considering perceived effort as a dimension when evaluating hearing aid benefit, in further research as well as in clinical practice.

    The results from the studies contribute to the knowledge about speech processing but also to the search for more specific evaluation of speech understanding, incorporating both sensory and cognitive factors.

  • 73.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dikotiska Taltest.1998In: Läkaresällskapets riksstämma 1998., 1998Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dikotiska Taltest.1998Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Diagnostiska verktyg för att bestämma auditiv profil. Rapport från EU-projektet HEARCOM.2007In: Svensk teknisk audiologisk förening (STAF), Visby, 2007., 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hearing aid benefit in noise.2003In: In: EFAS, editor. European Federation of Audiology Congress, Kreta, 28 maj-1 juni, 2003; Kreta, Greece., 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 77.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hearing aid benefit in noise.2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 78.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hearing and cognition in speech recognition in noise2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 79.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hörselscreening via Internet och telefon.2009In: In: Tema Hörsel. Jönköping, Sweden. 2009, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 80.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hörselscreening via Internet och telefon2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 81.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kognitionen påvirker taleforståelsen.2008In: NYT-VIDENCENTRET FOR DÖVBLINDBLIVNE, no 4, p. 38-39Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 82.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Speech processing in the elderly.2004In: In: NAS, editor. Hearing in the Elderly, 1st Internationell Congress on Geriatric/Gerontologic Audiology, Stockholm Sweden, June 6-9 2004;, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 83.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Översikt av EU-projektet HearCom.2008In: In: Nordisk Audiologisk Sällskaps 20. kongress, 4-7 juni 2008, pp. 49. Reykjavik, Island: NAS., 2008, p. 49-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 84.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Översikt av EU-projektet HearCom2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 85.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hearing in noise test (HINT) på svenska med kvinnlig och manlig röst.2006In: In: TEMA HÖRSEL, . Göteborg, SWEDEN, Abstract, p22, 2006, p. 22-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 86.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cognitive effects in dichotic speech testing in elderly persons2001In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 120-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of chronologic age on central auditory functions using dichotic speech tests and to study whether and how the age effect in dichotic listening is related to cognitive ability.

    DESIGN: Dichotic speech tests and cognitive tests were performed on 30 bilaterally hearing-impaired subjects, with a pure-tone average better than 50 dB HL. They were between 42 and 84 yr of age and were divided into an older and a younger group comprising 15 subjects each. The dichotic test material were digits, low-redundancy sentences and consonant-vowel syllables. The subjects reported stimuli heard in both ears (free report) or in one ear (directed report to left or right ear). The cognitive test battery comprised tests focusing on short-term memory, verbal information-processing speed and phonologic processing.

    RESULTS: A decreased overall performance in all dichotic speech tests was observed in the older group. In the syllable test the older subjects showed poorer results when focusing on the stimuli heard in the left ear, as compared with when focusing on stimuli heard in the right ear, whereas the younger group showed almost equal results for left- and right ear-focusing conditions. An age effect was also seen in reaction times recorded in the cognitive tests and in the scores of the reading span test. These cognitive parameters correlate with the results of the dichotic test when focusing to the left, but not when focusing to the right in the directed report condition. In the free report condition the overall performance showed a high correlation with cognitive test parameters.

    CONCLUSIONS: Effects of chronologic age in dichotic speech tests in the elderly have been verified. The degree of effect is dependent on test material, way of reporting and focusing condition. The different listening tasks in dichotic tests put different demands on cognitive ability shown by a varying degree of correlations between cognitive function and dichotic test parameters. Also, the results indicate a strong connection between age-related cognitive decline in the elderly and problems to perceive stimuli presented to the left ear.

  • 87.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evaluation of a cognitive test battery in young and elderly normal-hearing and hearing-impaired persons2001In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 357-370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A cognitive test battery sensitive to processes important for speech understanding was developed and investigated. Test stimuli are presented as text or in an auditory or audiovisual modality. The tests investigate phonologic processing and verbal information processing. Four subject groups, young/elderly with normal-hearing and young/elderly with hearing impairment, each including 12 subjects, participated in the study. The only significant effect in the text modality was an age effect in the speed of performance, seen also in the auditory and audiovisual modalities. In the auditory and audiovisual modalities, the effects of hearing status and modality were seen in accuracy parameters. Interactions between hearing status and modality, both in accuracy and in reaction times, show that hearing-impaired subjects have difficulties without visual cues. Performing the test battery in noise made the tasks more difficult, especially in the auditory modality and for the elderly, affecting both accuracy and speed. Test-retest measurements showed learning effects and a modality-dependent variability. The test battery has proven useful in assessing the relative contribution of different input signals and the effects of age, hearing impairment, and visual contribution on functions important for speech processing.

  • 88.
    Håkansson, Bo
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Carlsson, Peder
    Chalmers.
    Brandt, Anders
    Chalmers.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Linearity of sound propagation through the human skull in vivo1996In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 99, no 4, p. 2239-2243Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 89.
    Håkansson, Bo
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Eeg-Olofsson, Måns
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Reinfeldt, Sabine
    Chalmers.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Granström, Gösta
    Göteborg Universitet.
    A transcutaneous bone conduction implant system – a future alternative to the percutaneous BAHA system?2008In: International Hearing Aid Conference (IHCON), Lake Tahoe, CA, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 90.
    Håkansson, Bo
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Reinfeldt, Sabine
    Chalmers.
    Eeg-Olofsson, Måns
    Göteborg University.
    Östli, Per
    Chalmers.
    Taghavi, Hamid
    Chalmers.
    Gabrielsson, J
    Chalmers.
    Adler, J
    Chalmers.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Granström, Gösta
    Göteborg Universitet.
    A novel bone conduction implant (BCI)2009In: 2nd Int Symposium on Bone Conduction Hearing – Craniofacial Osseointegration, Göteborg, Sweden, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 91.
    Janssen, Thomas
    et al.
    Technische Universität München.
    Schirkonyer, Volker
    Technische Universität München.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A short overview on criteria, methods and technologies for performing adult hearing screening2010In: Adult Hearing Screening 2010, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 92.
    Johansson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tamura, Toshiyo
    Tokyo University, Japan.
    Öberg, Åke
    Linköping University.
    Fallförebyggande sensor för äldre2005In: Svenska Läkarsällskapets riksstämma, Stockholm 2005. Abstract, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 93.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    On noise and hearing loss: Prevalence and reference data2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Noise exposure is one of the most prevalent causes of irreversible occupational disease in Sweden and in many other countries. In hearing conservation programs, aimed at preventing noise-induced hearing loss, audiometry is an important instrument to highlight the risks and to assess the effectiveness of the program. A hazardous working environment and persons affected by it can be identified by monitoring the hearing thresholds of individual employees or groups of employees over time. However, in order to evaluate the prevalence of occupational noise-induced hearing loss, relevant reference data of unexposed subjects is needed.

    The first part of this dissertation concerns the changes in hearing thresholds over three decades in two occupational environments with high noise levels in the province of Östergötland, Sweden: the mechanical and the wood processing industries. The results show a positive trend, with improving median hearing thresholds from the 1970s into the 1990s. However, the hearing loss present also in the best period, during the 1990s, was probably greater than if the occupational noise exposure had not occurred. This study made clear the need for a valid reference data base, representing the statistical distribution of hearing threshold levels in a population not exposed to occupational noise but otherwise comparable to the group under study.

    In the second part of the dissertation, reference data for hearing threshold levels in women and men aged from 20 to 79 years are presented, based on measurements of 603 randomly selected individuals in Östergötland. A mathematical model is introduced, based on the hyperbolic tangent function, describing the hearing threshold levels as functions of age. The results show an age-related gender difference, with poorer hearing for men in age groups above 50 years.

    The prevalence of different degree of hearing loss and tinnitus is described for the same population in the third part of the dissertation. The overall prevalence of mild, moderate, severe or profound hearing loss was 20.9% collectively for women and 25.0% collectively for men. Tinnitus was reported by 8.9% of the women and 17.6% of the men. Approximately 2.4% of the subjects under study had been provided with hearing aids. However, about 7.7% were estimated to potentially benefit from hearing aids as estimated from their degree of hearing loss.

    Noise-induced hearing loss primarily causes damage to the outer hair cells of the inner ear. The fourth and last part of the dissertation evaluates the outer hair cell function, using otoacoustic emission measurements (OAE). Prevalence results from three different measuring techniques are presented: spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAE), transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE). Gender and age effects on the recorded emission levels were also investigated. Women showed higher emission levels compared to men and for both women and men the emission levels decreased with increasing age. The results from the OAE recordings were shown to be somewhat affected by the state of the middle ear. The study included tympanometry, and the relation of the outcome ofthis test to the otoacoustic emissions is described, where high middle ear compliance resulted in low emission level. Reference data for the tympanometric measurements are also presented.

    The results of this project form an essential part of the important work against noiseinduced hearing loss, which needs continuous monitoring. The reference data presented here will provide a valid and reliable data base for the future assessment of hearing tests performed by occupational health centres in Sweden. This data base will in turn prove useful for comparison studies for Sweden as a responsible fellow EU member country setting high standards for work force safety. The statistical distribution of hearing threshold levels as a function of age for men and women in tabulated form is available on the Swedish Work Environment Authority (Arbetsmiljöverket) web site: http://www.av.se/publikationer/bocker/fysiskt/h293.shtm.

  • 94.
    Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hearing threshold levels for an otologically unscreened, non-occupationally noise-exposed population in Sweden2002In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 180-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the hearing threshold levels (HTL) of an otologically unscreened population in Sweden. The results are compared to other studies of otologically unscreened populations, and a new mathematical model of hearing threshold levels as a function of age is presented. The subjects were males and females aged from 19 to 81 years, selected from the province of ╓sterg÷tland in Sweden. The test battery included otoscopy, tympanometry, pure-tone audiometry, and a questionnaire. Subjects exposed to occupational noise were excluded, and in total 603 persons were included in the analysis. The regression analysis resulted in different hyperbolic tangent functions with four parameters: HTL = A + B ╫ tanh(C ╫ age + D).

  • 95.
    Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Otoacoustic emissions and tympanometry in a general adult population in Sweden2003In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 448-464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study concerns a general adult population in Sweden, not exposed to hazardous occupational noise. Tympanometry and spontaneous (SOAE), transient evoked (TEOAE) and distortion-product (DPOAE) otoacoustic emissions were investigated in 493 randomly selected men and women aged from 20 to 79 years. Effects of gender, age, ear side and middle ear state were determined, with and without adjusting for hearing threshold level. No statistically significant effects on middle ear pressure or compliance were present. For TEOAEs and DPOAEs, the effect of gender and age was statistically significant (p < 0.01), with larger signal levels for female subjects and young subjects, even after adjusting for hearing threshold level. No effect of middle ear pressure on otoacoustic emissions was present, but high middle ear compliance was associated with low emission levels (p < 0.01). Reference data for middle ear compliance and pressure and prevalence data on SOAEs, TEOAEs and DPOAEs for male and female subjects in different age groups were determined. Mean signal levels of TEOAEs and DPOAEs are presented.

  • 96.
    Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Prevalence of hearing impairment in a population in Sweden2003In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 18-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An epidemiological study was carried out, based on 590 randomly selected subjects, aged from 20 to 80 years, in the province of Ostergötland in Sweden. The results obtained were similar to published results from other countries, with an overall prevalence of subjects with average hearing threshold levels over the frequencies 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 kHz (M4) equal to or exceeding 25 dB HL for the better ear (BE) of 16.9% (95% CI: 13.819.9%). For M4 BE > or = 35 dB HL, the prevalence was 7.7% (95% CI: 5.5-9.8%), for M4 BE > or = 45 dB HL, the prevalence was 3.3% (95% CI: 1.9-4.8%), and for M4 BE > or = 65 dB HL, the prevalence was 0.2% (95% Cl: 0.0-0.6%). The overall prevalence of reported tinnitus was 13.2% (95% CI: 10.5-16.0%). In the population under study, 7.7% of the subjects were estimated to benefit from a hearing aid, while the prevalence of hearing aid users was 2.4%.

  • 97.
    Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The development of noise-induced hearing loss in the Swedish County of Östergötland in the 1980s and the 1990s2001In: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, Vol. 3, no 10, p. 15-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This retrospective cross-sectional study of median hearing threshold levels of males employed in two specific occupations shows that the trend with decreasing noise-induced hearing loss in Sweden during the 1970s and 1980s continues into the 1990s. In the occupational categories mechanical work and wood processing men in age groups 30-39, 40-49 and 50-59 years old examined during the time period 1971-76, 1981-86 and 1991-96 were compared. Possible explanations to the improvement might be a wider use of hearing protectors at work and less exposure to noise during military service. The results show that the awareness of noise-induced occupational hearing loss has improved but the hearing conservation programs are still necessary as hearing threshold levels in these occupational groups continue to be poorer than expected in relation to age.

  • 98.
    Kilman, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. ENT/audiology, VU University Medical Center, the Netherlands.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The effects of native and non-native target and distractor language on speech perception are modulated by non-native proficiency2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying speech in noisy conditions requires both native and non-native listeners to cope with decreased intelligibility and thereby an increased cognitive load. The current study examined in four speech reception threshold (SRT) conditions how energetic (stationary, fluctuating) and informational (two-talker babble Swedish, two-talker babble English) maskers interfered with target speech in Swedish (native language) and English (non-native language). The participants also performed standardized tests in English proficiency, nonverbal reasoning and working memory capacity; the latter in both Swedish and English. Twenty-three normal-hearing native Swedish listeners participated, 13 females and 10 males, age-range between 28 and 64 years.The main result was that the target language, masker type and English proficiency all affected speech perception. The SRT’s were better when the target language was Swedish. The informational maskers were interfering more with perception than energetic maskers, specifically in the non-native language. High English proficiency was beneficial in three out of four conditions when the target language was English. The findings suggest that English proficiency is essential regarding automaticity in perceiving this non-native language

  • 99.
    Kjems, Ulrik
    et al.
    Oticon AS, Smørum, Denmark .
    Boldt, Jesper B
    Oticon AS, Smørum, Denmark .
    Pedersen, Michael S
    Oticon AS, Smørum, Denmark .
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Oticon Research Centre Eriksholm, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Wang, DeLiang
    Ohio State University, Columbus, USA.
    Role of mask pattern in intelligibility of ideal binary-masked noisy speech2009In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 126, no 3, p. 1415-1426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intelligibility of ideal binary masked noisy speech was measured on a group of normal hearing individuals across mixture signal to noise ratio (SNR) levels, masker types, and local criteria for forming the binary mask. The binary mask is computed from time-frequency decompositions of target and masker signals using two different schemes: an ideal binary mask computed by thresholding the local SNR within time-frequency units and a target binary mask computed by comparing the local target energy against the long-term average speech spectrum. By depicting intelligibility scores as a function of the difference between mixture SNR and local SNR threshold, alignment of the performance curves is obtained for a large range of mixture SNR levels. Large intelligibility benefits are obtained for both sparse and dense binary masks. When an ideal mask is dense with many ones, the effect of changing mixture SNR level while fixing the mask is significant, whereas for more sparse masks the effect is small or insignificant.

  • 100.
    Kollmeier, B
    et al.
    Hörzentrum Oldenburg GmbH, D- Oldenburg.
    Wagener, K. C.
    Hörzentrum Oldenburg GmbH, D- Oldenburg.
    Buschermöhle, M.
    Hörzentrum Oldenburg GmbH, D- Oldenburg.
    Vorman, M
    Hörzentrum Oldenburg GmbH, D- Oldenburg.
    Zokoll, M
    Hörzentrum Oldenburg GmbH, D- Oldenburg.
    Lutman, Mark
    University of Southampton, UK-Southampton.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lyzenga, J
    VU Medical Center, NL- Amsterdam .
    van Esch, T
    Academic Medical Center, NL-Amsterdam.
    Dreschler, W. A.,
    Academic Medical Center, NL-Amsterdam.
    MULTILINGUAL HEARING DIAGNOSTICS FOR EUROPE2009Conference paper (Refereed)
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