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  • 51.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Carl Wiman and the foundation of Mesozoic vertebrate palaeontology in Sweden2016In: 5th Triennial Mosasaur Meeting, May 16–20, 2016, Museum of Evolution, Uppsala University, Sweden: A global perspective on Mesozoic marine amniotes / [ed] Kear, B.P., Lindgren, J, & Sachs, S., 2016, p. 7-8Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1908, Carl Wiman of Uppsala University, Sweden, discovered rich horizons with Triassic vertebrate remains in Spitsbergen on Svalbard, Norway. This marked the beginning ofvertebrate palaeontology as a science in Sweden, subsequently developed mainly through the collection and study of non-Swedish fossil remains. Wiman’s accomplishments, resolute personality and a tight network of influential friends and supporters enabled him to becomethe first person in Sweden to hold a university chair in Palaeontology and Historical Geology. He also managed to amass large numbers of unique fossil vertebrate specimens culminating inan extensive Chinese collection of both world famous dinosaurs and Neogene mammalsdeposited at Uppsala University. Joint scientific Sino-Swedish collaboration and a  deliberate Swedish scientific agenda ensured this unprecedented situation in an opportune moment.Governmental support and initiative allowed Uppsala University and Carl Wiman’sPalaeontological Institute to erect a museum building dedicated foremost to the Chinese material, now known as the Lagrelius Collection in recognition of the patron behind Wiman’s ambitious endeavours. In addition, the museum served as a permanent repository for seminal collections of Mesozoic fossils from Svalbard and North America. Collectively, these represent a landmark research and teaching resource that remains of intense scientific interest eventoday.

  • 52.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Carl Wiman and the foundation of Mesozoic vertebrate palaeontology in Sweden2016In: Mesozoic Biotas Of Scandinavia And Its Arctic Territories, Geological Society, 2016, p. 15-29Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1908, Carl Wiman of Uppsala University, Sweden, discovered rich horizons with Triassic vertebrate remains in Spitsbergen on Svalbard, Norway. This marked the beginning of vertebrate palaeontology as a science in Sweden, subsequently developed mainly through the collection and study of non-Swedish fossil remains. Wiman's accomplishments, resolute personality and a tight network of influential friends and supporters enabled him to become the first person in Sweden to hold a university chair in Palaeontology and Historical Geology. He also managed to amass large numbers of unique fossil vertebrate specimens culminating in an extensive Chinese collection of both world famous dinosaurs and Neogene mammals deposited at Uppsala University. Joint scientific Sino-Swedish collaboration and a deliberate Swedish scientific agenda ensured this unprecedented situation in an opportune moment. Governmental support and initiative allowed Uppsala University and Carl Wiman's Palaeontological Institute to erect a museum building dedicated foremost to the Chinese material, now known as the Lagrelius Collection in recognition of the patron behind Wiman's ambitious endeavours. In addition, the museum served as a permanent repository for seminal collections of Mesozoic fossils from Svalbard and North America. Collectively, these represent a landmark research and teaching resource that remains of intense scientific interest even today.

  • 53.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Gastropoda, Tergomya and Paragastropoda (Mollusca) from the Lower Ordovician Fezouata Formation, Morocco2016In: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, ISSN 0031-0182, E-ISSN 1872-616X, Vol. 460, p. 87-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gastropoda, Tergomya, and Paragastropoda (GTP) are a small but recognizable part of the collective Fezouata biota from the Lower Ordovician (Tremadocian-Floian) Fezouata Formation in Morocco. GTP range through the sequence but become more abundant and diverse in the stratigraphically higher and shallower marine parts of the succession. About 200 rock samples in existing collections have GTP but usually each slab contains several specimens so the number of individual is many times higher. A total of seven species are recognized of which four were known earlier. Gastropods are represented by the planispiral bellerophontoid Sinuites sp., recognized for the first time in the Tremadocian part of the succession, and the anisostrophic, nearly planispiral Lesueurilla prima (Barrande in Perner). Tergomyans are most abundant, dominated by the genus Carcassonnella with Carcassonnella courtessolei Horny and Peel, Carcassonnella vizcainoi Horny and Peel, and Carcassonnella sp. The latter encompass several specimens from different localities and stratigraphical levels, and may represent one of the named species or new varieties. Carcassonnella is for the first time recorded in the Tremadocian part of the succession. A second tergomyan is Thoralispira laevis (Thoral), while paragastropoda are represented byPelecyogyra fezouataensis Ebbestad and Lefebvre. In the peri-Gondwana area Carcassonnella, Thoralispira, and Lesueurilla are considered signature taxa, and the Fezouata GTP compare closely with those of Montagne Noire, France, both in composition and distribution. The Bohemian fauna is slightly younger (Floian-Darriwilian) with different species, except for Lesueurilla prima. The latter may have a wider distribution, being tentatively recognized in the Lower Ordovician of Argentina and Spain.

  • 54.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Paleobiologi.
    Gastropods of the Pentland Hills2007In: Silurian fossils of the Pentland Hills, Scotland, The Palaeontological Association, London , 2007, p. 109-122Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 55.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Museum of Evolution. Past, Present and Future2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Paleontologins början i Sverige2013In: Litofilen, ISSN 1651-6117, Vol. 1:2013, p. 34-38Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 57.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Sagan om ringen2016In: Hälleflinta, Vol. 1, p. 6-13Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 58.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Tremadoc (early Ordovician) trilobites from Norway1992In: / [ed] Geirsdóttir, Á., Norðdahl, H. & Helgadóttir, G., 1992, p. 34-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Berg-Madsen, Vivianne
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Mannen som samlade på fossil2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 60.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Berg-Madsen, Vivianne
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Wiman’s legacy: 100 years of palaeontology in Sweden2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 61.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Carlos Gutierrez-Marco, Juan
    UCM, CSIC, Inst Geociencias, Spain.
    First occurrence of Pterotheca (Gastropoda) from the Silurian (Aeronian) of Spain2017In: Geobios, ISSN 0016-6995, E-ISSN 1777-5728, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 97-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pterotheca hispanica nov. sp. is described from the basal beds (Stimulograptus sedgwickii graptolite Zone) of the Formigoso Fm., in the Cantabrian Zone of the Iberian Massif, north-western Spain. This specialized bellerophontoid gastropod is for the first time recorded in the Silurian of peri-Gondwana; it is the only Aeronian species known so far. Its most closely allied relatives are from higher beds placed in the Telychian of Scotland. Pterotheca is considered a highly derived genus within the Pterothecinae of the Carinaropsidae, with the strongly reduced to absent coiling and the growth of the septum being synapomorphies. In the present work it is shown that not only the apical angle of the septum can be used to distinguish species, but also the relative length and width of the septum. In some cases, the slit may extend as far back as the anterior part of the internal septum. Silurian species were hitherto only found in marginal Laurentian and Eastern Avalonian settings. Pterotheca is absent from central Laurentia and Baltica, where it could be expected to be present based on its wide Ordovician distribution. In the light of this, the occurrence of the genus in the Aeronian of Spain seems difficult to explain, albeit the genus was present in peri-Gondwana prior to the end-Ordovician extinction. The extreme scarcity of described taxa recorded from Avalonia, Baltica and Iberia during the Early Silurian may explain this patchy distribution.

  • 62.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Fortey, Richard A.
    Natural History Museum, London.
    Stratigraphy and trilobite biofacies of the Late Ordovician (Katian) of the Taimyr Peninsula, Arctic Russia2018In: International Conference on Arctic Margins, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The thick Late Ordovician (Katian) succession on the Taimyr Peninsula, Arctic Russia is divided into three regions showing a transition from a southern carbonate dominated facies, a central transitional facies, and a siliciclastic dominated northern facies. All regions are rich in trilobites but hitherto only the southern fauna was described. New collections have been added to this and allow a division into two very different biofacies for the Katian succession. Black limestone and shales have taxa similar to those of the peripheral Laurentian Scoto-Appalachian belt (Ampyxella, Ampxyina, Failleana, Pararemopleurides, Raymondella, Remopleurides, Robergia, Stygina, Taimyraspis, Telephina, and Toernquistia), and is termed the raphiophorid association. Further subdivisions may be possible, but the small number of new collections does not allow this at the moment. From shelf limestone a contrasting fauna contains monorakine trilobites (Carinopyge, Ceratevenkaspis, Elasmaspis, Evenkaspis, and Monorakos) endemic to the Siberian platform. Trilobites such as isotelines, Calyptaulax, Xylabion, and Cheirurus otherwise typical of inshore Laurentia co-occur with this fauna. This biofacies is termed the monorakine-cheirurid-illaenid association. Our results show that the Taimyr Peninsula, as an open shelf marginal to the Siberian Platform, typically would have the endemic monorakine-cheirurid-illaenid association, while similar conditions to those on the eastern fringes of the Iapetus Ocean permitted a short lived establishment of comparable faunas of the raphiophorid association.

  • 63.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Frisk, Åsa M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Paleobiologi.
    Högström, Anette E.S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Paleobiologi.
    Current oriented nautiloids from the O/S boundary at Osmundsberget, Siljan District, Dalarna, Sweden2007In: Lundadagarna i Historisk Geologi & Paleontologi X, Abstracts with Programme, 19, 2007, p. 44-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 64.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Frisk, Åsa M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Paleobiologi.
    Högström, Anette E.S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Paleobiologi.
    Mass concentration of nautiloids and associated fauna in the Late Ordovician at Osmundsberget, Siljan District, Dalarna, Sweden2007In: WOGOGOB 2007, 9th meeting of the WOrking Group on Ordovician Geology Of Baltoscandia: Fieldguide and Abstracts, 2007, p. 110-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 65.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Frýda, Jiri
    Czech Geological Survey, Czech Republic.
    Biogeography of Ordovician – Devonian tergomyans and gastropods: outline of project.2009In: Absolutely final meeting of IGCP 503: Ordovician palaeogeography and palaeoclimate - Copenhagen 2009 - August 31 – September 4, Copenhagen: Geological Museum, Natural History Museums , 2009, p. 7-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analyses of distribution and occurrences of both trilobites and brachiopods have been pivotal for the current understanding of Lower Palaeozoic biogeography. A fruitful coupling with palaeomagnetic studies has recently produced highly accurate palaeomaps for the Ordovician and Silurian. Tergomyan molluscs and gastropods represent abundant and diverse marine benthos with a huge potential for further detailing of Lower Palaeozoic biogeography. In the present project we aim at analysis of Ordovican – Devonian members of these groups, on a stage by stage level. The analysis will be at the generic level, because very few species seem to be common between the various palaeo terranes. This is especially true for the Ordovician. Although a number of important contributions on diversity and distribution exist, these molluscs have never been subjected to a large-scale numerical analysis. In the literature, Ordovican taxa such as Peelerophon (Tergomya), Tritonophon (Gastropoda), and the widespread macluritid gastropods have been recognized as useful for biogeographical studies. For Silurian, and particularly Devonian taxa, a much better understanding of biogoeographical distribution exists. Devonian gastropods have for instance been used to formalize distinct biogeographical realms. The current project involves several experts, with the two authors as principal coordinators.

  • 66.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Frýda, Jiri
    Czech Geological Survey.
    Wagner, Peter
    Department of Paleobiology, Smithsonian Institution.
    Horný, Radvan
    Department of Palaeontology, National Museum, Czech Republic.
    Isakar, Mare
    The Museum of Geology of the University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Stewart, Sarah
    National Museum of Scotland.
    Bertero, Verònica
    CICTERRA-CONICET, Centro de Investigaciones Paleobiológicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Físicas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina.
    Rohr, David M.
    Department of Earth and Physical Sciences, Sul Ross State University, Alpine, TX 79832, USA.
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Blodgett, Robert B.
    2821 Kingfisher Drive, Anchorage, AK 99502, USA.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Biogeography of Ordovician and Silurian gastropods, monoplacophorans and mimospirids2013In: Memoir Geological Society of London, Vol. 38, p. 199-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The biogeographical distribution of Ordovician and Silurian gastropods, monoplacophorans and mimospirids has beenanalysed on a generic level. The dataset contains 334 genera and 2769 species, yielding 1231 records of genera with 2274 occurrencesworldwide. There is a bias towards eastern Laurentia, Baltica and Perunica records. Some 53.1% of the records are Ordovician. The study demonstrates that these molluscs are well suited to being used to improve understanding of Ordovician and Silurian biogeographicalprovinciality. Specific points are that: a Lower Ordovician assemblage is evident in Laurentia; the fauna of the Argentinean Precordillera is Laurentian until the Darriwilian, when taxa are shared with North China; Late Silurian gastropods from the Alexander terrane (SE Alaska) are unknown in Laurentia, but support a rift origin of this terrane from NE Siberia; Perunica, Ibero-Armorica and Morocco cluster together throughout the Ordovician but Perunica and Morocco are closer; Darriwilian–Sandbian deep-water Bohemian taxaoccur in Baltica; a Laurentian–Baltica proximity is unsupported until the Silurian; Siberia clusters with North China and eastern Laurentia during the Tremadocian–Darriwilian; during the Gorstian–Pridoli Siberia clusters with the Farewell and Alexander terranes; North China may have been close to Laurentia and the Argentinean margin of Gondwana; and the affinity of Tarim taxa is problematic.

  • 67.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Hogstrom, Anette E. S.
    Frisk, Åsa M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Martma, Tonu
    Kaljo, Dimitri
    Kroger, Bjorn
    Parnaste, Helje
    Terminal Ordovician stratigraphy of the Siljan district, Sweden2015In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 137, no 1, p. 36-56Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Integration of new isotopic data and earlier biostratigraphic information from eight sections through the terminal Ordovician (Pirgu and Porkuni stages) of the Siljan district, Sweden, allows a more precise correlation of sections in terms of biostratigraphy and carbon isotope dating. Four levels with positive delta C-13 excursions are identified (from bottom) - the Moe, an unnamed excursion, Paroveja and Hirnantian Carbon Isotope Excursion (HICE). The delta C-13 values through the Boda Limestone are 1-2 parts per thousand higher than usual in Baltica, only the values for the HICE remains within what is expected. Background values increase from 1.5 parts per thousand in the bottom of the core of the Boda Limestone up to 3 parts per thousand in the top of it. The HICE is identified in five of eight sections and the main peak falls according to inferred correlation within the Metabolograptus persculptus Biozone, at or close to the Hindella beds in the Upper Boda Member. The late Katian (Pirgu) age of Holorhynchus in the Siljan district is clear and its co-occurrence with the chitinozoan Belonechitina gamachiana in Estonia supports a Katian age for this zone. The base of the Ozarkodina hassi Biozone may occur within units B-C of the Upper Boda Member and in the upper part of the Loka Formation and most likely is correlated with the M. persculptus Biozone. The Hirnantia-Dalmanitina faunas reported from the lowermost part of the Loka Formation and units B-D of the Upper Boda Member seem to range through all the Hirnantian, but detailed morphological studies allow to distinguish an older (=extraordinarius) and a younger (=persculptus) fauna.

  • 68.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Hybertsen, Frida
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Jensen, Sören
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Høyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.
    Agic, Heda
    Department of Earth Science, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, USA.
    Palacios, Teodor
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Distribution of Sabellidites (Annelida?) in the Ediacaran-Cambrian succession on the Digermulen Peninsula, Arctic Norway2018In: 5th International Palaeontological Conference, 2018, p. 321-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Högström, Anette
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Frisk, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Gastropods and tergomyans from the Upper Ordovician (Viru–Harju) of the Fågelsång area, Scania, southern Sweden2013In: Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, ISSN 1477-2019, E-ISSN 1478-0941, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 295-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A diverse tergomyan and gastropod assemblage is described from the Global Boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP)section of the Sandbian Stage, Upper Ordovician, in the Fågelsång area, Scania, southern Sweden. Deep water graptolitic mudstone and shale comprise the succession, and previously only one gastropod species was known. The new material spans the Sularp Formation through the Lindegård Mudstone (Nemagraptus gracilisDicellograptus complanatus biozones). Fourteen species are described: two tergomyan, five bellerophontoid gastropods, and seven anisostrophically coiled gastropods.Three species are new: Peelerophon hodites, Tetranota scanica and Lophospira sandbiana. Three taxa (Tritonophon subtrilobatus,Tetranota scanica and Holopea mobergi) are found high in the Lindegård Mudstone (Vormsi–Pirgu stages). Cyrtodiscus, Peelerophon and Tritonophon are recorded for the first time in Baltoscandia. Some taxa may have been transportedfrom shallower water settings, whereas species of Peelerophon, Joleaudella, Mestoronema and Sinuites may have been partof the local benthos. Except for Bucania erratica, no species are shared with the fauna of the coeval Dalby Limestone in Sweden. Deaechospira elliptica, common in the Dalby Limestone, is not recorded at Fågelsång, although two closely relatedspecies are found (Deaechospira rotunda and Deaechospira? sp.). The Fågelsång assemblage has more in common with the older to coeval fauna of the Elnes and Arnestad formations in the Oslo Region, Norway (e.g. sharing Joleaudella, Sinuites, Mestoronema and Pararaphistoma). The Sandbian fauna of Fågelsång includes peri-Gondwanan taxa, e.g. Cyrtodiscus,Peelerophon and Deaechospira. Nevertheless, cluster analysis reveals that the faunas of Baltica and Laurentia were most similar, whereas faunas from Perunica and Baltica remained distinct and separated during the Darriwilian–Sandbian. The few similarities may result from spread of a temperate fauna supplementing rather than replacing taxa in deep water assemblages.The main Fåagelsång assemblage coincides both with the Baltoscandian Middle Caradoc Faunal Turnover and the Gutenberg Carbon Isotope Excursion.

  • 70.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Högström, Anette
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Frisk, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Tergomyans, gastropods, and biogeography in the Upper Ordovician of the Fågelsång district, southern Sweden2009In: Absolutely final meeting of IGCP 503: Ordovician palaeogeography and palaeoclimate - Copenhagen 2009 - August 31 – September 4, Copenhagen: Geological Museum, Natural History Museums , 2009, p. 24-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During the Ordovician, deep-water graptolitic mudstone and shale formed in what is now the classical succession at Fågelsång, southern Sweden. Previously, only one gastropod species was described from the succession, but during this study diverse tergomyan and gastropod assemblages have been recognized both from outcrop and drill-core collections. The material spans the Sularp Shale through the Lindegård Mudstone (Nemagraptus gracilis − Dicellograptus complanatus Zones; Sandbian − Katian, Viru − Harju regional stages). Altogether 14 species are described; two tergomyan, five bellerophontoid gastropods, and six anisostrophically coiled gastropods. Three taxa (Tritonophon, Tetranota and Holopea) are found in the Lindegård mudstone. The first record of Tritonophon in the Ordovician of Baltoscandia occurs in the Fågelsång and nearby Röstånga area. The remaining taxa are from the Sularp, Skagen, and Mossen formations. Specimens may have been transported into the area from shallower settings, while species of Peelerophon, Cyrtodiscus, Joleaudella, and Sinuites, are interpreted as having been part of the local benthos. With the exception of Bucania and Deaechospira, no other taxa are common to the hitherto described gastropod fauna of the coeval Dalby Limestone in other parts of Sweden. The Fågelsång assemblages have more in common with the slightly older or coeval fauna of the Elnes to Arnestad formations in the Oslo Region (e.g. Joleaudella, Sinuites, Mestoronema, Pararaphistoma). The Sandbian taxa show similarities with peri-Gondwanan faunas (e.g. Peelerophon, Cyrtodiscus). Both Peelerophon and Cyrtodiscus are for the first time recorded from Baltoscandia. The hitherto endemic Baltoscandian taxon Deaechospira may also be recognized in Bohemia and Morocco.

  • 71.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Högström, Anette
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Frisk, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Upper Ordovician gastropods of the Fågelsang area, Southern Sweden2009In: Lundadagarna i Historisk Geologi och paleontology XI, 11-12 March, 2009, Abstracts with programme, 2009, p. 12-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Ordovician succession of the Fågelsång area in southern Sweden is classical geology embodied. A deeper water setting and graptolitic mudstones and shales has allowed an almost unprecedented level of stratigraphical detail. Moreover, with the establishment of the international stratotype (GSSP) for the Sandbian Stage, marking the base of the Upper Ordovician, the sections here now serve as global references.  The present project documents for the first time the diverse tergomyan and gastropod fauna in the Upper Ordovician of the Fågelsång area. Altogether 13 species are described, including two tergomyan species, five  bellerophontoid gastropods and sixanisostrophic ally coiled gastropods. The specimens come from both outcrop and drill core collections, spanning the Sularp Shale through the Lindegård Mudstone (Nemagraptus gracilis to the Dicellograptus complanatus graptolite zones; Sandbian-Katian stages, Viru-Harju regional stages). Three taxa (e.g. Tritonophon, Tetranota and Haplospira?) are found in the youngest strata - the Lindegård mudstone, while the remaining forms are from the deeper facies of the Sularp, Skagen, and Mossen formations. Many of the taxa may have been transported into the area from shallower settings, and only Sinuites may have been part of the local benthic community. Besides the taphonomy, the fauna recorded is interesting from both a taxonomic and palaeobiogeographic point of view. However, the emphasis in this presentation is on the latter aspect. With the exception of Bucania, Haplospira, and Deaechospira, no other taxa are common to the hitherto described gastropod fauna of the coeval Dalby Limestone in other parts of Sweden. The Fågelsång fauna have more in common with the slightly older and coeval fauna of the Elnes to Arnestad formations in the Oslo Region (e.g. Joleaudella, Sinuites, Mesteronema, Pararaphistoma), but significant similarities with peri-Gondwanan faunas are also evident (e.g. Peelerophon, Cyrtodiscus, Tritonophon). Both Peelerophon and Cyrtodiscus are for the first time recorded in Baltoscandia while the Fågelsång Tritonophon is stratigraphically the oldest in Baltoscandia.

  • 72.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Frisk, Åsa
    Universität Zürich, Paläontologisches Institut und Museum, Zürich.
    Upper Ordovician gastropods of the Fågelsång area, Southern Sweden2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Högström, Anette
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Frisk, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Martma, Tõnu
    Institute of Geology at Tallinn University of Technology.
    Kaljo, Dimitri
    Institute of Geology at Tallinn University of Technology.
    Siljan revisited; regional stratigraphy of the Upper Ordovician Boda mounds2009In: Lundadagarna i Historisk Geologi och paleontology XI, 11-12 March, 2009, Abstracts with programme, 2009, p. 13-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Högström, Anette
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Frisk, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Martma, Tõnu
    Institute of Geology at Tallinn University of Technology.
    Kaljo, Dimitri
    Institute of Geology at Tallinn University of Technology.
    Upper Ordovician carbon isotope records in the Siljan district, Sweden2009In: Absolutely final meeting of IGCP 503: Ordovician palaeogeography and palaeoclimate - Copenhagen 2009 - August 31 – September 4, Copenhagen: Geological Museum, Natural History Museums , 2009, p. 23-24Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Upper Ordovician Boda Limestone and the unconformably overlying Glisstjärn Formation in the Siljan district, Sweden, were sampled for carbon isotope analysis. The aim is to combine chemo- andAbsolutely final meeting of IGCP 503: Ordovician palaeogeography and palaeoclimate - Copenhagen 2009 - August 31 – September 424biostratigraphy for detailed regional correlation. This may help further studies of the time interval spanning the two-phased end Ordovician extinction. Expanding upon the study by Schmitz & Bergström (2007), five quarries, eight sections (669 samples) were studied; two sections each in Kallholn, Osmundsberget, and Solberga, and one section each in Östbjörka and Jutjärn. The Glisstjärn Formation is exposed only in one section at Kallholn, both sections at Osmundsberget, and possibly at one section in Solberga. A cephalopod event bed is recognized in one section in Kallholn and the two sections in Osmundsberget. Additionally, a thick coquina consisting of the brachiopod Hindella is found in all quarries except Solberga. The Hirnantian Isotope Carbon Excursion (HICE) was positively identified in seven of the eight sections. The peak occurs at the Hindella bed in all sections. The beginning of the excursion in Osmundsberget is placed slightly higher than in the previous study, at about 14 m from the top of the Boda Limestone, which means it is above the level with the brachiopod Holorhynchus (identified both in Osmundsberget and Solberga). In Osmundsberget, Östbjörka and Jutjärn, sampling of the deeper parts of the Boda Limestone yielded δ13C values between + 1 and + 3 ‰, with two or three peaks higher than + 3 ‰, that may be correlated between the sections

  • 75.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Frisk, Åsa
    Universität Zürich, Paläontologisches Institut und Museum, Zürich.
    Martma, Tõnu
    Institute of Geology at Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate 5, Tallinn 19086, Estonia.
    Kaljo, Dimitri
    Institute of Geology at Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate 5, Tallinn 19086, Estonia.
    Kröger, Björn
    Finnish Museum of Natural History, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 44, FI-00014 Helsinki.
    Pärnaste, Helje
    Institute of Geology at Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate 5, Tallinn 19086, Estonia.
    Chemostratigraphy and age of the Boda Limestone (Siljan, Sweden)2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Høyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Jensen, Sören
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Palacios, Teodor
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.
    Trilobites of the Lower Cambrian Duolbasgaissa Formation, the Digermul Peninsula, northern Norway2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 77.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Høyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.
    Trilobites from the North: lower Cambrian olenelloids fromthe Digermulen Peninsula, Arctic Norway2016In: 3. Trilobiten-Tagung [Berlin, 8. und 9. Oktober 2016] - Kurzfassungen der Vortrage / [ed] Zwanzig, M., Halle, Saale: Ampyx-Verlag , 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Scandinavian lower Cambrian stratigraphy is largely trilobite based, defined by the occurrence of distincttrilobite assemblages with classic olenelloid trilobites like Holmia and Kjerulfia. Except for a few localities in Scandinavia where these taxa are fairly common, most occurrences are represented by a single or a fewincomplete specimens at the best. Since 2011 a collecting effort in the lower Cambrian strata on the Digermulen Peninsula, Arctic Norway has yielded close to 100 specimens of at least three different olenelloid trilobite taxa, including Kjerulfia lata, Kjerulfia sp. and Elliptocephalus sp., as well as an ellipsocephalid. These specimens are found in a narrow stratigraphical interval in the silty mudstone of the Duolbagaisa Formation,and are accompanied by rich material of organic walled microfossils and trace fossils. The age constraints onthe occurrence are therefore well established, placing the trilobites in the Holmia kjerulfi assemblage Zone.Compared to the classical T0mten locality in the Mjösa area, southern Norway, the Digermulen Peninsula assemblage lacks Holmia kjerulfi. Ellipsocephalids are found with the new material and also slightly higher in the succession. Although the occurrence of trilobites in the Duolbagaisa Formation have been known for along time, the new extensive trilobite material is both better preserved and more abundant, even compared tomost other places in Scandinavia. This ensures that this succession will be a major reference for lower Cambrian trilobite zonation in this part of the world.

  • 78.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Jensen, Sören
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.
    Palacios, Teodor
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Høyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Novis, Linn K.
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Ou, Zhiji
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    The Ediacaran succession and fauna of the Digermulen Peninsula, northern Norway2016In: Bulletin of the Geological Society of Finland, Special volume, 2016, p. 196-197Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 79.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Jensen, Sören
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Palacios, Teodor
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Høyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.
    Novis, Linn K.
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Ou, Zhiji
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Stratigraphy of the Ediacaran and basal Cambrian of the Digermulen Peninsula, Northern Norway2015In: Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, vol 47, 2015, Vol. 47Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The succession of the Digermulen Peninsula in Finnmark, northern Norway, is the only fossiliferous site inScandinavia with sedimentation across the Ediacaran–Cambrian transition without a significant hiatus. Geologicalinvestigations started in the 1930’s, but the Peninsula was first mapped in the 60’s. Ediacara-type fossils werefirst discovered in the late 80’s but recent discoveries will establish the Digermulen Peninsula as one of the mostsignificant Ediacaran sites in northern Europe. The parautochthonous strata are exposed in the Tanafjord areaalong the coast and in valleys on the east side of the Peninsula. The beds dip slightly to the west with the strikefollowing the coastline (ca. 045°). The Ediacaran succession is close to 1000 m thick and dominantly siliciclastic.It starts with interglacial sediments of the Nyborg Formation (tentatively the earliest Ediacaran), overlying astacked succession of diamictites of the Cryogenian Smalfjord Formation. After a hiatus follows the glaciogenicdiamictites of the Mortensnes Formation (~60 m thick), which is commonly seen to represent the ~582 Ma-oldGaskiers glaciation. Upwards, the contact to the overlying Stáhpogiedde Formation is not exposed locally, but hasbeen shown to represent a hiatus followed by transitional fluvial to marine sediments of the Lillevannet Member.Ediacaran-type fossils appear in the succeeding Innerelva Member. This is a two-cycle deepening upwardssuccession of laminated mudstone with intercalated sand bodies showing load structures. Preliminary microfossilssamples of the Member have so far proven almost barren, making dating more challenging. The basal part of thesucceeding Manndraperelva Member consists of three cycles; first a succession of reddish sandstone followed bytwo coarsening-upward cycles. Each starts with mudstone and fine sandstone and terminates in cross-beddedsandstone. The Ediacaran–Cambrian boundary is located within the third cycle, identified by the trace fossilTreptichnus pedum and associated trilobed trace fossils.The Digermulen Early Life Research Group has since2011 made significant new finds, and focused fieldwork aims to resolve tighter age constraints, provenance of thesediments and the range and diversity of the extended Ediacaran biota.

  • 80.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Palacios, Teodor
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Jensen, Sören
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Meinhold, Guido
    University of Keele, School of Geography, Geology and Environment.
    Høyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Agic, Heda
    Department of Earth Science, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, USA.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.
    Biostratigraphy and palaeontology of the lower Cambrian Duolbagáisá Formation on the Digermulen Peninsula, Arctic Norway2018In: International Conference on Arctic Margins, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lower Cambrian sequence on the Digermulen Peninsula (Finnmark, Arctic Norway) is the northernmost extension of the Cambrian deposits along the Caledonian front. It is exceedingly thick compared to cratonal successions typical of most of Baltica. The Duolbagáisá Formation represents the youngest lower Cambrian unit on the peninsula with the first trilobite-bearing strata, a plethora of trace fossils including diverse arthropod traces and Plagiogmus arcuatus, and abundant and wellpreserved organic walled microfossils (OWM). Extensive field work by the Digermulen Early Life Research Group allows for the first time a detailed appreciation of the age and faunal composition of the unit. The lower member is ~250 m thick with thin-bedded siltstone, sandstone and mudstone. A single unidentifiable holmiid thorax region occurs alongside arthropod trace fossils. OWM indicate the S. ornata-F. membranacea Zone. The upper member is ~390 m thick and consist of several upward shallowing parasequences with fine-grained sandstone, siltstone and mudstone followed by thick mature quartzite. The trace fossil Syringomorpha occurs throughout the upper member and Cruziana and Rusophycus are especially abundant in the upper parts. The first identifiable olenellid trilobites occur in a thick mudstone/siltstone interval at the middle of the member, along with an elliptocephalid trilobite and other arthropods. Abundant OWM indicate the H. dissimilare-S. ciliosa Zone with the higher levels belonging to the Volkovia-Liepaina Zone. The entire sequence thus span the Cambrian Series 2, stages 3–5.

  • 81.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Högström, Anette S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Frisk, Åsa M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Gastropods from the Upper Ordovician (Viru-Harju) of the Fågelsång area, Scania, southern SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 82.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Høyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Jensen, Sören
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.
    Palacios, Teodor
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Holmiid trilobites from the lower Cambrian of the Digermulen Peninsula, Arctic Norway2017In: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives. Tallinn, Estonia, 7-10 July 2017 / [ed] Helje Pärnaste, Tallinn: Libris Est OU , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lower Cambrian holmiid olenelloids are used for biozonation of lower Cambrian (Series 2) strata in Baltoscandia. About a dozen species have been named since the description of Holmia kjerulfi (Linnarsson, 1868), but except for the classical area in Mjøsa, Norway, the species traditionally occur in small numbers, are variably preserved, occur at one or a few localities only and usually with only one taxon present. Definitions of the biozones are therefore still problematic. One level in the lower Cambrian Duolbasgáissá Formation of the Digermulen Peninsula, Arctic Norway, has yielded more than 50 new specimens of holmiids, preliminarily assigned to Elliptocephala n. sp. and Kjerulfia n. sp. Acritarchs indicate the Heliosphaeridium dissimilareSkagia ciliosa acritarch Zone which corresponds to the traditional Holmia kjerulfi Assemblage Zone. Elliptocephala n. sp. is known from about a dozen specimens. It is characterized by very long palpebral lobes, a parallel-sided glabella, a short anterior glabellar lobe and short genal spines. A node is developed on the occipital ring. Semi-complete specimens show up to 10 thoracic segments, but the full number of thoracic segments and the pygidium is unknown. The slightly older E. lundgreni (Moberg, 1892), known from the Schmidtiellus mickwitzi Zone of southern Sweden, differs in the proportions of the glabella, the length of the palpebral lobes and definition of the cephalic border. Both H. mobergi and H. sulcata from Sweden show similarities to Elliptocephala n. sp. in the weakly developed lateral border with an effaced anterior border furrow. Nikolaisen & Henningsmoen (1987) described Kjerulfia lata Kiær, 1917 from two fragmentary specimens from this locality in Digermulen. More than 20 new specimens from this site shows that the species differs from Kjerulfia lata from the type area in southern Norway in proportions and features of the glabella, the width of the genal field and the possession of a stout and high spine on the occipital ring, and it is tentatively assigned to Kjerulfia n. sp. The material from the Digermulen Peninsula adds to the diversity of the Baltoscandian holmiids and is tightly constrained stratigraphically.

  • 83.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Lefebvre, Bertrand
    Laboratoire de Géologie de Lyon, UMR CNRS 5276, bât. Géode, Université Lyon 1, Campus de la Doua, 2, rue Dubois, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex, France.
    An unusual onychochilid mollusc from the Ordovician (Tremadocian) Fezouata Formation, Morocco2015In: Geobios, ISSN 0016-6995, E-ISSN 1777-5728, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 427-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pelecyogyra fezouataensis nov. gen., nov. sp. is described from the Lower Ordovician (Tremadocian, A. murrayi Biozone) Fezouata Formation at Oued Beni Zoli (locality Z-F5), in the central Anti-Atlas, Morocco. This is the first Onychochilidae Koken in Koken and Perner, 1925 reported from the Ordovician of Morocco. Its stratigraphical position bridges the gap between the late Cambrian and Middle to Upper Ordovician records. This new taxon draws together large specimens, reaching 27 mm in the greatest diameter, with 3 rapidly expanding whorls. All specimens are invariably preserved as dorsoventrally compressed moulds although preservation suggests that the degree of compaction was not great and that the species was generally low spired. A characteristic axe-shaped apertural lip and an ornamentation consisting of fine and dense lirae serve to distinguish the new genus from other onychochilids. The species appears to have been gregarious. In some specimens, small scalloped injuries are preserved along the apertural margins but these are not considered to reflect failed predation. Up to now, twenty-two species and eight genera of Ordovician onychochilids have been documented, being distributed in eight different terranes. The composition of the Onychochilidae is briefly reviewed and updated from the literature, to include Helicotis? Koken in Koken and Perner, 1925, Hyperstrophema Horný, 1964, Invertospira Horný, 1964, Kobayashiella Endo, 1937, Laeogyra Perner, 1903, Matherella Walcott, 1912, Matherellina Kobayashi, 1937, Onychochilus Lindström, 1884, Pelecyogyra nov. gen., Pervertina Horný, 1964, Scaevogyra Whitfield, 1878, Sinistracirsa Cossmann, 1908, Versispira Perner, 1903, and Voskopiella Frýda, 1992. Onychochilidae and Clisospiridae are placed in Mimospirida Dzik, 1983, regarding Hyperstrophina Linsley and Kier, 1984 as a junior synonym.

  • 84.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Lindström, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Predation on bellerophontiform molluscs in the Palaeozoic2009In: Lethaia: an international journal of palaeontology and stratigraphy, ISSN 0024-1164, E-ISSN 1502-3931, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 469-485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shell repair assumed to result from failed predation is documented in 66 specimens of Ordovician-Carboniferous bellerophontiform tergomyan and gastropod molluscs to examine the relationship between the distribution and appearance of injuries, shell morphology and the internal anatomy of the molluscs, as well as the attack strategies of the presumed predators. Furthermore, the distribution of repaired injuries from failed attacks along the apertural margin as a reflection of the nature of the margin and emarginations is investigated. Bellerophontiform molluscs are ideal for this study because of their distinctive isostrophic morphology and the possibility to directly compare broad and narrow conchs with either deep or shallow medial emarginations. The results show that taxa with a deep medial emargination in the form of a slit have significantly more medial injuries than lateral ones. Near-equal frequencies of lateral and medial injuries in specimens with a shallow emargination (slit or sinus) suggest random distribution. Shell form (narrow or broad) does not exert overall control on the distribution of injuries except, perhaps, in some broad explanate shells with an insignificant medial emargination. While this suggests that it is the type of medial emargination that governs distribution of injuries in these forms, it is not clear if this is a result of passive selection due to structural geometry or preferential targeting by predators (i.e. site-specific mode of attack). Predation strategies on bellerophontiform molluscs thus seem to be dependent on the morphological features of the shells rather than their interpretation as tergomyan or gastropod.

  • 85.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Peel, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Cederström, Peter
    Axelvoldsvägen 27, SE-241 35 Eslöv, Sweden.
    Ahlgren, John
    Gärdesvägen 10, SE-542 43 Mariestad.
    Helcionelloid mollusks from the Lower Cambrian of Southern Sweden2009In: Lundadagarna i Historisk Geologi och paleontology XI, 11-12 March, 2009, Abstracts with programme, 2009, p. 7-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1879 Linnarsson described a diverse shelly fauna from the Exsulans Limestone at Kiviks Esperöd in Scania. A single ‘monoplacophoran’ mollusc was identified -  Metoptoma barrandei - and Linnarsson noted that von Schmalensee had found a closely related form at Gislöf further to the south, albeit as fragmentary material. Reinvestigation of the locality at Gislövshammar by PC and JA has yielded close to 500 specimens of a diverse helcionelloid fauna. The material comes from a 40 cm interval of laminated siltstone with intercalated calcareous nodules in the Lower Cambrian Gislöv Formation (Holmia kjerulfi assemblage Zone). The specimens are mostly preserved as internal moulds but also impressions of the external surfaces are seen. A second, smaller collection from a loose block of more compact siltstone near Brantevik yielded two helcionelloid taxa of slightly different affinity to those from Gislövshammar. Altogether seven taxa can be recognized including Pelagiella, Marocella?, Latouchella?, Stenotheca? and two forms of Helcionella? The taxonomic identification of the various forms is preliminary at this stage. The only record of comparable or coeval helcionelloid molluscs from Scandinavia, beside that by Linnarsson (1879), is from the Tømten Member of the Ringsaker formation (Holmia kjerulfi assemblage Zone) in the Mjøsa district in Norway. Kiær (1918) recognised four taxa from this locality: two new species of Scenella and two species of Helcionella. The former he compared with Linnarsson’s form and with material from Newfoundland. Species of the latter genus were considered conspecific with North American material. In the Gislöv fauna only Marocella? enters into close comparison with Linnarsson’s and Kiær’s species, while the Helcionella species from the Brantevik block is most comparable to Kiær’s material. However, close comparison of the new Scanian material with material from eastern North American is pivotal to the taxonomic discussion at this stage. In particular, comparison with Avalonian faunas from south-eastern Newfoundland and New Brunswick described by C.D. Walcott and G.F. Matthews seem profitable. Within a wider scope, the new helcionelloid material opens up possibilities for improving both regional and intercontinental biostratigraphical correlation

  • 86.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    An unusual trochiform gastropod from the Upper Ordovician of Sweden2001In: Palaeontology, Vol. 44, p. 375-387Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 87.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Pour, Mansoureh Ghobadi
    Natl Museum Wales, Dept Geol, Cathays Pk, Cardiff CF10 3NP, S Glam, Wales.;Golestan Univ, Dept Geol, Fac Sci, Gorgan, Iran..
    Bassett, Michael G.
    Natl Museum Wales, Dept Geol, Cathays Pk, Cardiff CF10 3NP, S Glam, Wales..
    Popov, Leonid E.
    Natl Museum Wales, Dept Geol, Cathays Pk, Cardiff CF10 3NP, S Glam, Wales..
    First occurrence of Lesueurilla prima (Gastropoda) from the Middle Ordovician (Darriwilian) of Iran2016In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 138, no 4, p. 510-518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The near planispiral euomphaloid gastropod Lesueurilla prima (Barrande in Perner) is a typical part of the cold water Mediterranean fauna in the Lower and Middle Ordovician. It is a signature species in strata of this age in the Prague Basin in the Czech Republic, Montagne Noire in France, and Central Morocco. The species is reported for the first time from the Darriwilian of Iran where it occurs in the upper part of the Shirgesht Formation of the Derenjal Mountains north of Tabas in east Central Iran. It occurs with a small species of the bellerophontoid gastropod Sinuites sp., as well as the calymenid trilobite Neseuretinus birmanicus (Reed) and the pliomerid trilobite Ovalocephalus kanlingensis (Zhang). The biogeographic distribution of Lesueurilla suggests that the genus had its origin in cold water, high-latitude peri-Gondwana areas during the Lower Ordovician, spreading to other peri-Gondwana areas and low-latitude areas of North China, Tarim, and finally Baltica, Laurentia and Australia in the late Middle and Upper Ordovician.

  • 88.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Rhebergen, Freek
    Slenerbrink 178, NL-7812 HJ Emmen, Netherlands..
    Gubanov, Alexander P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Late Ordovician rostroconchs (Mollusca) from fluvial erratics in northwestern Europe2017In: Bulletin of Geosciences, ISSN 1214-1119, E-ISSN 1802-8225, Vol. 92, no 4, p. 405-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes 3 species of ribeirioid and 2 species of conocardiid rostroconchs from fluvially transported erratics in the Dutch-German border area. The material probably stems from Ordovician deposits of the North Estonian Confacies Belt. The ribeirioid specimens from the flaljala group of erratics (Sandhian 2) are represented by Tolmachovia subliratu sp. nov., Beukeria plicata gen. nov. sp. nov. and Ischyrinia viator sp. nov. The single specimen of Tohnachovia is hitherto the youngest occurrence of this genus and the first in Baltica. The presence of subordinate radial ornamentation is added to the emended diagnosis of the genus. The new genus Beukeria is an ischyriniid rostroconch with an elongated conch, two thick pegmas and a plicate shell posterior to vertical axis. Ischyrinia viator is similar to the coeval. I. notTegica Soot-Ryon, 1960 but this has a ventrolateral sinus that is subparallel to the dorsal axis. Conocardild specimens from the Pirgu Ojlemyr chert (Katian 4) are represented by Bitrigonocardia lindstroemi (Isberg) and Pojetaconcha costulata sp. nov. The identification of Bitrigonocardia lindstroemi is circumstantial as the type specimens are missing, but as understood here new details of morphology and ornamentation are given. Pojetaconcha is for the first time recognized outside Laurentia and Australia. Pojetaconcha costulata sp. nov. is distinguished by 14 or 15 broad and flat-topped radial ribs on the body and snout and compares closely with the Chazyan P. alabamensis (Pojeta & Runnegar, 1976), USA. Ischyriniids occur mainly in Baltica with Ischyrinia migrating into Laurentia. A general exchange of Bitrigonocardia and Pojetaconcha is seen between Laurentia and Baltica.

  • 89.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Rushton, Adrian W. A.
    Stein, Martin
    Weidner, Thomas
    A paradoxidid moult ensemble from the Cambrian of Sweden2013In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 135, no 1, p. 18-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A mass aggregation of 148 paradoxidid trilobites and associated specimens of the agnostoid Pentagnostus praecurrens is preserved on a surface of a split orsten lens from the Middle Cambrian Series 3 Acadoparadoxides pinus-P. praecurrens Zone in Jamtland, Sweden. Most specimens are complete or nearly complete, lying parallel to the sediment surface and seem unaffected by currents or sorting. The association is interpreted as a moult ensemble. Paradoxidid specimens are represented by two taxa, identified as paradoxidid sp. 1 (n=28 specimens) and Eccaparadoxides sp. 2 (n=45 specimens). The species are preserved both dorsum up and dorsum down, in about equal number, which may reflect a natural tendency to moult in either posture. They probably moulted by opening the cephalic sutures along the wide rostrum. The dorsal sutures are invariably open and the librigenae are very often displaced, commonly backwards in relation to the cranidium, but not symmetrically in relation to the axial shield. The glabella of the paradoxidids is often crushed, so that sometimes the underlying hypostome is outlined. Very few examples show the joint between the cranidium and the trunk being broken. Facies interpretation suggests deposition below storm wave base. Rapid burial, possibly by blanketing from hypopycnal flows followed by an extended period of slow sediment input (Type 1 facies of Brett et al. 2012) may explain the unusual preservation. The animals may have lived in an ex-aerobic environment, but evidence to support this is at the moment insubstantial.

  • 90.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Paleobiologi.
    Stott, Christopher A.
    Gastéropodes à la carte: durophagy on Ordovician gastropods from Manitoulin Island, Canada2007In: 51st Palaeontological Association Annual Meeting December 16-19, 2007: Programme with Abstracts, 2007, p. 31-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Shell repairs resulting from presumed failed predation were found in gastropods from the Late Ordovician (Cincinnatian; Richmondian) mid to upper Kagawong Submember, Georgian Bay

    Formation, on Manitoulin Island, Ontario, Canada. The bryozoan-mollusc biota and lithology of this unit suggest nearshore, shallow (<10 m), low energy (lagoonal) conditions which by

    analogy with relatively recent faunas and carbonates of similar character may point to a mesotrophic to eutrophic nutrient regime. Division of the number of individual shells with at

    least one scar by the total number of shells in each sample, yielded a shell repair frequency of 4.8% for 207 (total) specimens of Lophospira trilineata and 35.7% in 28 specimens (total) of

    Trochonemella sp. Repairs in Trochonemella occur primarily in the largest size class, suggesting that a size refuge was achieved by this species. The low repair frequencies observed in L. trilineata suggest that this species experienced a higher predation success rate or a lower level of predation pressure. This is the only case study to date which documents Ordovician shell repair frequencies in consistent, homogenous sample sets collected from the same stratigraphic unit, evaluated against standardized analytical approaches. The results suggest that the paradigm of a standardized low level of shell repair in Ordovician and Silurian gastropods is oversimplistic, and that a range of frequency rates can be expected.

  • 91.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Weidner, Thomas
    Ravnholtvej 23, DK-7130 Juelsminde, Denmark..
    Extreme Protomeric Development In A Burlingiid Trilobite From Cambrian Glacial Erratics Of Denmark2017In: Palaeontology, ISSN 0031-0239, E-ISSN 1475-4983, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 233-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pengia Geyer & Corbacho is a Cambrian burlingiid trilobite with fused trunk segments devoid of any articulation in the anamorphic and epimorphic phases of development. The type species is Pengia fusilis (Peng etal.) from the Wanshania wanshanensis Zone of China. Here we describe a second species, Pengia palsgaardia sp. nov., from the Lejopyge laevigata Zone of the Paradoxides forchhammeri Superzone. It comes from a glacial erratic in Denmark which probably originated in the Alum Shale Formation of Vastergotland, Sweden. Pengia palsgaardia is a large burlingiid (similar to 10mm in length), with 14 fused segments in the trunk whose boundaries are marked by ridges. The axis is narrow, with the axial furrows faintly indicated or effaced across the median. Laterally along the axis and the tapering glabella, symmetrical globular lobes are developed that are pinched at their base. During ontogeny the glabellar furrows are pit-like adaxially but shallow towards the axial furrow as the globular lobes develop. Their pit-like appearance in Pengia palsgaardia and some other burlingiid species is not considered similar to the condition seen in oryctocephalid trilobites. A median preglabellar ridge resembling that of Schmalenseeia Moberg develops late in ontogeny but in early ontogeny the preglabellar field resembles that of Burlingia Walcott, Alumenella Geyer & Corbacho and Niordilobites Geyer & Corbacho. This gives Pengia a more basal position in the schmalenseeid lineage, outside the derived Schmalenseeia. In mature specimens the facial sutures in P.palsgaardia are fused, but an ocular suture may have been present. During ontogeny Pengia would have gone through the anamorphic and protomeric protaspid segmental conditions, but articulation between either the cephalon and pygidium, or pygidium and thoracic segments of the trunk never developed so it did not progress beyond the protaspid phase. This extreme protomeric development is considered to be a derived feature in Pengia.

  • 92.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Wickström, Linda M.Högström, Anette E.S.Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Paleobiologi.
    WOGOGOB 2007, 9th meeting of the WOrking Group on Ordovician Geology Of Baltoscandia: Fieldguide and Abstracts2007Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 93.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Stott, Christopher
    Failed predation in Late Ordovician gastropods (Mollusca) from Manitoulin Island, Ontario, Canada2008In: Canadian journal of earth sciences (Print), ISSN 0008-4077, E-ISSN 1480-3313, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 231-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shell repairs resulting from presumed failed predation are documented in gastropods from the Late Ordovician (Cincinnatian; Richmondian) mid-to-upper Kagawong Submember of the Georgian Bay Formation on Manitoulin Island, Ontario, Canada. The bryozoan-mollusc biota and associated sediments generally suggest nearshore, shallow (<10m), low energy (lagoonal), and perhaps mesotrophic to eutrophic conditions. Two sample sets from this unit have been studied for shell repair. One of the more commonly applied estimates of shell repair frequencies involves division of the number of individuals with at least one scar by the total number of individuals in the sample (the Individuals with scars method). Using this calculation, 207 specimens ofLophospira trilineata Ulrich and Scofield yielded a shell repair frequency of 4.8%; in 28specimens of Trochonemella sp. the shell repair frequency was 35.7%. Repairs in Trochonemella occur primarily in the larger size class, suggesting that a size refuge was achieved by this species. Low repair frequencies in L. trilineata suggest predation with a higher success rate or fewer encounters. This study demonstrates that the paradigm of a standardized low level of shell repair in Ordovician and Silurian gastropods is oversimplistic and a range of frequency rates can be expected.

  • 94. Egenhoff, Sven
    et al.
    Cassle, Chris
    Maletz, Jörg
    Frisk, Åsa M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Stübner, Konstanze
    Sedimentology and sequence stratigraphy of a pronounced Early Ordovician sea-level fall on Baltica - The Bjorkasholmen Formation in Norway and Sweden2010In: Sedimentary Geology, ISSN 0037-0738, E-ISSN 1879-0968, Vol. 224, no 1-4, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Bjorkasholmen Formation consists of interbedded carbonates, shales, and glauconitic beds and is characterized by heavy bioturbation and few preserved sedimentary structures. The unit shows five facies shale, glauconitic packstone, and three predominantly mud-dominated carbonate facies. Carbonates and shales are arranged in small-scale deepening-upward cycles. A minimum of fourteen of these small-scale cycles are recognized in the Bjorkasholmen Formation. They are arranged in stacks of 3 to 5, forming a total of four medium-scale cycles separated by decimeter-thick shale units. Based on the predominance of mud-rich facies the succession is interpreted to have been deposited in an overall tranquil setting during one mayor sea-level fall and subsequent initial rise of third order. Time-estimates suggest that the 14 small-scale cycles fall into the Milankovitch band of precessional forcing, and the overriding medium-scale cycles likely represent short eccentricity. The sequence stratigraphic interpretation shows that the Bjorkasholmen Formation is characterized by failing stage, lowstand and initial transgressive systems tracts. Consequently, the contact between the Bjorkasholmen and the underlying Alum Shale Formation represents the basal surface of forced regression. The maximum regressive surface is defined by a hiatus in the Oland sections and by shallow-marine packstones within mud-rich distal ramp carbonates in Norway. The top of the Bjorkasholmen Formation represents a flooding surface at the base of the transgressive systems tract. A comparison of time-equivalent successions worldwide suggests that the Bjorkasholmen Formation represents a tectonically-enhanced lowstand with two overriding short-term Milankovitch eustatic signals. Although deposition of the Bjorkasholmen Formation coincides with the initiation of a foreland basin in the Caledonides of Norway it remains unclear how these tectonic movements may have lead to the widespread Bjorkasholmen lowstand during the Early Ordovician. It is Suggested in this Study that a combination of compressional forces from Avalonia and the Caledonian margin may have acted in concert to produce an uplift of larger parts of the Baltica plate for a time-span of approximately 0.5 Myr.

     

  • 95. Egenhoff, Sven
    et al.
    Cassle, Christopher
    Maletz, Jörg
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Frisk, Åsa M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Tectonically-Induced Lowstand on an Ordovician Ramp – the Björkåsholmen Formation of Scandinavia2008In: 2008 Houston Annual Meeting (5–9 October 2008).: Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, Geological Society of America , 2008, p. 393-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Tremadoc Björkåsholmen Formation is an approximately one meter thick unit consisting of several carbonate beds with intercalated shales and some glauconite content in its upper part. It is underlain by the Cambrian-Ordovician Alum Shale Formation throughout Scandinavia, and in Norway and westernmost Sweden overlain by the Lower- to Middle Ordovician Tøyen Formation. The Björkåsholmen Formation is remarkably widespread in Scandinavia with relatively little variation in thickness or faunal composition. Internally, the unit consists of thin beds at the base with thicker ones in the center and again thinner beds towards the top. Thin beds are generally mud-rich while thicker ones display packstones. In the Norwegian sections the grain-rich facies have been mostly diagenetically overprinted, whereas eastern Swedish localities are characterized by much better facies preservation regardless of lithology. The overall mud-rich facies of the Björkåsholmen Formation reflects deposition on a low-inclined ramp environment. Coarse-grained sediments represent the proximal facies while increasing mud content shows deeper water middle to outer ramp deposition. Facies trends indicate that the Björkåsholmen Formation consists of at least five regressions and successive transgressions with a maximum lowstand represented by its coarse-grained central portion. As the Björkåsholmen Formation is sandwiched between two prominent outer shelf shales in the Norwegian and westernmost Swedish localities it also represents the most pronounced sea-level lowstand in the Early Ordovician of Scandinavia.This lowstand is within the upper part of the Aorograptus victoriae Biozone and the basal Kiaerograptus supremus Biozone. Deposition of the Björkåsholmen Formation therefore likely represents a fairly short time-span. However, this remarkably strong lowstand in Scandinavia is not paralleled by base-level falls in Bolivia, China or Newfoundland. It is therefore suggested that the Björkåsholmen Formation reflects a tectonic rather than a eustatic event which is restricted exclusively to Baltoscandia.

  • 96.
    Egenhoff, Sven
    et al.
    Colorado State Univ, Dept Geosci, Ft Collins, CO 80523 USA.
    Maletz, Jörg
    Free Univ Berlin, Inst Geowissensch, Berlin, Germany.
    Ahlberg, Per
    Lund Univ, Dept Geol, Lund, Sweden.
    Mast, Allison
    Colorado State Univ, Dept Geosci, Ft Collins, CO 80523 USA.
    Frisk, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Newby, Warren
    Colorado State Univ, Dept Geosci, Ft Collins, CO 80523 USA;Total Oil & Gas, Houston, TX 77010 USA.
    Sedimentology of the Lower Ordovician (upper Tremadocian) Bjørkasholmen Formation at Flagabro, southern Sweden2018In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 140, no 1, p. 55-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Lower Ordovician Bjørkasholmen Formation at Flagabro, Scania, southern Sweden, consists of a 0.8m thick succession of carbonates with three siliciclastic mudstones, 5, 1 and 100mm thick, intercalated in the central part of the unit. Carbonate and siliciclastic mudstone beds show both normal and inverse grading. The carbonates are mud-rich and subdivided into a mudstone, a wackestone and a packstone facies. Grain types in the carbonates are mostly shells and shell fragments of brachiopods and trilobites. The carbonate rocks are strongly bioturbated seen as in roundish burrows filled with mud and a clear cement; additionally, bioturbation is reflected in the random orientation of shells. The siliciclastic mudstones are subdivided into two facies; one contains large amounts of shells and is in part grain-supported, the other is matrix-dominated and laminated to massive. The succession reflects sedimentation on a low-inclined shelf equivalent to a mid-ramp to basinal setting. Most mud- and wackestones (facies 3 and 4) represent fair-weather sedimentation, and the intercalated wacke- and packstones (facies 4 and 5) represent concentration of shell debris during high-energy storm. The siliciclastic mudstones in the central part of the succession reflect deposition in a basinal setting. The entire BjOrkasholmen Formation at Flagabro is equivalent to a lowstand of third (?) order without a well-developed internal cyclicity and is in that respect similar to the Bjørkasholmen Formation of oland, but different from the age-equivalent Norwegian sections.

  • 97.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Bacidia rosellizans, a new lichen species from the taiga belt2009In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 41, no Part 5, p. 481-487Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacidia rosellizans S. Ekman is described as new to science. Morphologically, the newspecies is similar to the type species of the genus, B. rosella (Pers.) De Not., particularly in the pale pinkand pigment-deficient apothecia and in having the proper exciple and upper part of the hymeniuminspersed with minute crystals that consist at least partly of atranorin. Bacidia rosellizans, however,differs in having a thin whitish thallus, smaller apothecia and a thinner apothecial margin, a dense layerof crystals along the excipular rim, shorter and narrower ascospores with fewer septa, and septateconidia. Whereas B. rosella is a species occurring in the nemoral zone of Europe and possiblynorthernmost Africa and parts of Asia (but not North America), B. rosellizans is found mainly onPopulus and Salix in taiga. This species is currently known from Sweden, Russia, Canada and the USA.It was erroneously treated as Bacidia rosella in a monograph of North American corticolous species ofBacidia and Bacidina by Ekman (in Opera Botanica 127, 1996).

  • 98.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Bestämningslitteratur till svenska lavar2011In: Svensk Botanisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0039-646X, Vol. 105, p. 315-320Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 99.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Fellhaneropsis almquistiorum sp nov from Europe (Pilocarpaceae, lichenized Ascomycota)2015In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 641-645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fellhaneropsis almquistiorum S. Ekman, a lichenized ascomycete in the family Pilocarpaceae (Lecanorales, Lecanoromycetes) is described as new to science. It is characterized by the thin and filmy crustose thallus, small photobiont, apothecia with a yellowish to black disk and well developed black margin that becomes excluded with age, dark green and brown pigmentation in the proper exciple and hypothecium, a hymenium without pigment or with some green and brown pigment, more or less fusiform and 3-septate ascospores, abundant black pycnidia, and long and filiform conidia. The species is currently known from central Sweden and central Germany, where it inhabits shaded and acid to neutral rocks with few competing lichens. Historical records were all misidentified as Bacidia coprodes or any of its synonyms or misapplied names. Some specimens of F. almquistiorum contain a previously unrecorded pigment, tentatively named here Almquistiorum-yellow. This pigment is intensely golden yellow in water, does not react with KOH and fades with the addition of HCl or HNO3. A key to all known, pycnidiate members of Fellhaneropsis is provided.

  • 100.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    I döda lavars sällskap - Cresponea premnea nygammal för Sverige2010In: Lavbulletinen, ISSN 1651-6435, no 3, p. 151-156Article in journal (Other academic)
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