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  • 51.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    De Angelis, Massimo
    University of east London .
    Anthropocene: Victims, Narrators, and Revolutionaries2017In: The South Atlantic Quarterly, ISSN 0038-2876, E-ISSN 1527-8026, South Atlantic Quarterly, Vol. 116, no 2, p. 345-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The absence of a reflection on revolutionary practices and subjects is the main weakness of the radical critique of the Anthropocene. The risk is to envision the Anthropocene as a space for villains and victims but not for revolutionaries. It is crucial to challenge the (in)visibility and (un)knowability of the Anthropocene beyond geological strata and planetary boundaries. As the Capitalocene, the Anthropocene has left its traces in the bodies of people upon which the new epoch has been created. The traces of the Capitalocene are not only in geological strata but also in the biological and genetic strata of human bodies; exploitation, subordination, and inequalities are inscribed into the human body and experienced, visible and knowable by subalterns without the mediation of—many times actually in opposition to—mainstream scientific knowledge. This essay inflects the concept of Capitalocene with what we call Wasteocene, to stress the contaminating nature of capitalism and its perdurance within the sociobiological fabric, its accumulation of externalities inside both the human and the earth's body. The essay envisions the Wasteocene as a feature of the Capitalocene, especially adapted to demystify the mainstream narratives of the Anthropocene. To enhance these arguments, the essay builds on the findings of the Environmental Justice Organisations, Liabilities and Trade (EJOLT) atlas of environmental conflicts and on in-depth research on the struggles against toxic contamination in Campania, Italy.

  • 52.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    De Rosa, S. P.
    Political effluvia: Smells, revelations, and the politicization of daily experience in Naples, Italy2016In: Methodological Challenges in Nature-Culture and Environmental History Research, Taylor & Francis, 2016, p. 173-186Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Fava, Anna
    Of Humans, Sheep, and Dioxin: A History of Contamination and Transformation in Acerra, Italy2016In: Capitalism, Nature, Socialism, ISSN 1045-5752, E-ISSN 1548-3290, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 67-82Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Graf von Hardenberg, WilkoUniversity of Wisconsin, Madison .
    Nature and Nation in Modern Europe2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Royal Institute of Technology (KTH).
    Gravagno, Filippo
    Universita di Catania.
    Pappalardo, Giusy
    Università di Catania .
    FERRARA, ALESSIA DENISE
    Università di Catania .
    The Nature of Mafia: An Environmental History of the Simeto River Basin, Sicily2019In: Environment and History, ISSN 0967-3407, E-ISSN 1752-7023Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article builds upon a rich scholarship that has proposed, though with different shades, the concept of socionatures, meaning by this the inextricable hybrid of ecological and social facts. In this article, we aim to explore how the Mafia produces particular socionatural formations, entering into landscapes, becoming rivers and cities, penetrating into the bodies of humans and nonhumans. We will develop our argument by exploring a specific geographical area, the Simeto River, and how the Mafia has become intertwined with its ecologies. We will analyse the appropriation of the river since the 1950s, illustrating various ways in which the Mafia has blended with its ecologies: the control of water, the touristification of the river’s mouth and the placement of waste facilities. We argue that one crucial feature of Mafia socionatures is the attack against commons, i.e. the attempt to subdue the (re)productive properties of human and more-than-human communities to Mafia economic interests. Therefore, we will propose the practices of commons and commoning – that is, the making of commons – as one of the possible strategies against the Mafia

  • 56.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sedrez, LiseInstituto de História (IH-UFRJ) Brazil.
    A History of Environmentalism: Local Struggles, Global Histories2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Think globally, act locally’ has become a call to environmentalist mobilization, proposing a closer connection between global concerns, local issues and individual responsibility. A History of Environmentalism explores this dialectic relationship, with ten contributors from a range of disciplines providing a history of environmentalism which frames global themes and narrates local stories.Each of the chapters in this volume addresses specific struggles in the history of environmental movements, for example over national parks, species protection, forests, waste, contamination, nuclear energy and expropriation. A diverse range of environments and environmental actors are covered, including the communities in the Amazonian Forest, the antelope in Tibet, atomic power plants in Europe and oil and politics in the Niger Delta. The chapters demonstrate how these conflicts make visible the intricate connections between local and global, the body and the environment, and power and nature. A History of Environmentalism tells us much about transformations of cultural perceptions and ways of production and consuming, as well as ecological and social changes. More than offering an exhaustive picture of the entire environmentalist movement, A History of Environmentalism highlights the importance of the experience of environmentalism within local communities. It offers a worldwide and polyphonic perspective, making it key reading for students and scholars of global and environmental history and political ecology.

  • 57.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Tucker, R.
    Environmental history of modern migrations2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the age of climate change, the possibility that dramatic environmental transformations might cause the dislocation of millions of people has become not only a matter for scientific speculation or science-fiction narratives, but the object of strategic planning and military analysis. Environmental History of Modern Migrations offers a worldwide perspective on the history of migrations throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and provides an opportunity to reflect on the global ecological transformations and developments which have occurred throughout the last few centuries. With a primary focus on the environment/migration nexus, this book advocates that global environmental changes are not distinct from global social transformations. Instead, it offers a progressive method of combining environmental and social history, which manages to both encompass and transcend current approaches to environmental justice issues. This edited collection will be of great interest to students and practitioners of environmental history and migration studies, as well as those with an interest in history and sociology.

  • 58.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    von Hardenberg, Wilko Graf
    University of Wisconsin, Madison.
    Green Rhetoric in Blackshirts: Italian Fascism and the Environment2013In: Environment and History, ISSN 0967-3407, E-ISSN 1752-7023, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 283-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In comparison with the significant historiographical work on the German case, specifically on Nazi environmental policies and ideology, studies on such issues for other Fascist regimes are still rather rare. This article attempts partially to fill this gap, at least as regards the Italian case, offering a general overview of the Fascist regime and its environmental politics and narratives. Analysing how Fascists appropriated Italian landscapes through both discourses and concrete policies, this paper examines the construction of a Fascist nature as a rhetorical, symbolic and geographical space. In particular, this essay explores the combined process of appropriation and expropriation through the analysis of two diverse but intertwined issues: firstly, Fascist rural ideology as a narrative on the mutual constituency of nature and people and secondly, the creation of the first Italian national parks, their successes and failures as institutions of nature conservation and their role as symbols of the nature/society divide. While blending the ideas of race, landscape, history, modernity and ruralism, Fascists shaped both the national environment and general ideas about nature in a narrative which affected the very object of the narration that is, nature itself.

  • 59.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    von Hardenberg, Wilko Graf
    On History, Nature and Nation An Interview with David Blackbourn2014In: Environment and History, ISSN 0967-3407, E-ISSN 1752-7023, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 143-159Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 60.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    von Hardenberg, Wilko Graf
    special issue: Nature and Nation Introduction2014In: Environment and History, ISSN 0967-3407, E-ISSN 1752-7023, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Arnold, Erik
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Farla, K
    Kolarz, P
    Mahieu, B
    Nielsen, K
    Review of the Research Excellence Framework: Evidence Report2018Report (Other academic)
  • 62.
    Arnold, Erik
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Borrás, Susana
    Mora Ruiz, José-Ginés
    The Latvian Research Funding System2018Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 63.
    Arnold, Erik
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Åström, Tomas
    Glass, Charlotte
    de Scalzi, Marika
    How should we evaluate complex programmes for innovation and socio-technical transitions?2018Report (Other academic)
  • 64.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Univ Aberdeen, Scotland.
    The socialist way of life in Siberia: transformation in Buryatia2017In: Slavonica, ISSN 1361-7427, E-ISSN 1745-8145, Vol. 22, no 1-2, p. 106-107Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 65.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    ‘American Dreams’ of Early Soviet Ethnography: Some Reflections on Bogoras’s Legacy2020In: Ab Imperio: Theory and History of Nationalities and Nationalism in the post-Soviet Realm, ISSN 2166-4072, E-ISSN 2164-9731, no 1, p. 75-89Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 66.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    ‘Dvoĭnoe poslanie’ ėtnosa: kommentariĭ k stat’e akademika V.A. Tishkova2020In: Ėtnograficheskoe obozrenie, no 2, p. 102-106Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Department of Siberian Ethnography, Peter the Great Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography (Kunstkamera), Universitetskaya nab. 3, 199034 Saint Petersburg, Russia.
    Environmental Encounters: Woolly Mammoth, Indigenous Communities and Metropolitan Scientists in the Soviet Arctic2019In: Polar Record, ISSN 0032-2474, E-ISSN 1475-3057, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 142-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article investigates how in the Soviet Arctic researchers and indigenous communities searched and understood the mammoth before and during the Cold War. Based on a vast number of published and unpublished sources as well as interviews with scholars and reindeer herders, this article demonstrates that the mammoth as a paleontological find fusing together features of extinct and extant species, plays an in-between role among various environmental epistemologies. The author refers to moments of interactions among these different actors as “environmental encounters,” which comprise and engagement with the physical, political, social and cultural environments of the Arctic. These encounters shape the temporal stabilisations of knowledge which enable the mammoth to live its post-extinct life. The article combines approaches from environmental history and anthropology, history of science and indigenous studies showing the social vitality of a “fossil object”.

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  • 68.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Norra ishavets gåva2020In: Arktiska spår: Natur och kultur i rörelse / [ed] Lotten Gustafsson Reinius, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 2020Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 69.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Order Out of Chaos: Anthropology and Politics of Sergei M. Shirokogoroff2019In: Life Histories of Etnos Theory in Russia and Beyond / [ed] Anderson, David; Arzyutov, Dmitry; Alymov, Sergei, Cambridge: Open Book Publishers, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 70.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom.
    Voices of the Land, Samizdat, and Visionary Politics: On the Social Life of Altai Narratives2018In: Anthropology & Archeology of Eurasia, ISSN 1061-1959, E-ISSN 1558-092X, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 38-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the social life of narratives within the contemporary Ak-Jang [Ak-Çaŋ] movement of the Altai people of Southern Siberia, based on periodic fieldwork from 2009-2012, with recent updates using the Internet and short trips. The author argues that the Ak-Jang movement, while it has roots and commonalities in the Burkhanist “new religion” of the turn of the twentieth century, also has divergences. While both were politically oppositionist, Ak-Jang members today mobilize against formal, official Buddhism and against outsiders, including tourists. Focus of the article is on written texts, often defending the ecology of sacred lands, stemming from cosmic “messages” received by Ak-Jang members.

  • 71.
    Avango, Dag
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Acting artefacts: on the meanings of material culture in Antarctica." In Antarctica and the Humanities2016In: Antarctica and the Humanities / [ed] Peder Roberts, Adrian Howkins and Lize-Marie Van der Watt, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, p. 159-179Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remains of human activity in Antarctica are generally treated in two different ways – either as unwanted imprints polluting a pristine natural environment, objects alien to the continent which must be removed, or as cultural heritage which needs to be preserved. For this reason artefacts of potentially great importance for understanding and explaining the history of Antarctica are removed, while sites of arguably lesser universal value are preserved as heritage. The objective of this article is to argue for greater caution when assessing what should be treated as trash or heritage in the Antarctic. Before decisions are made to remove remains of human activities there, greater attention should be paid to the fact that these remains may acquire value in the future. Building on theoretical approaches within the fields of industrial heritage studies, history of technology and archaeology, my point of departure is an understanding that material culture can be connected with a multitude of meanings and values, depending on who is reading it and when. Remains of human activities can be ascribed values if there are actors who want to include them as part of their networks and in a historical context that works in their favor.

  • 72.
    Avango, Dag
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Att konstruera naturresurser: industriella framtidsvisioner om Svalbard 1870-19302016In: Ottar, ISSN 0030-6703, Vol. 131, no 2, p. 41-49Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Constructing Svalbard and its natural resources Industrial futures in a contested Arctic space2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Arctic is often envisioned as a future supply area for fossil energy and shipping, a development bound to occur because of the decreasing Arctic Ocean sea ice. In the Assessing Arctic Futures project we have challenged this deterministic future vision, arguing that natural resources are social constructions, constructed within networks of actors who ascribe value to them. Based on a theoretical model developed in this project, I will present cases on the construction of resources in the Svalbard coal mining industry (1898-present). How and why have actors envisioned Svalbard as a place for settlement and extraction? How did they build influence for their visions and why were some of those visions realized? The paper will suggest that explanations of why resource utilization in the Arctic occur (or not) is far more complex than the relative amount of sea ice on the Arctic Ocean.

  • 74.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Constructing Svalbard and its natural resources: industrial futures in a contested Arctic space2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Arctic is often envisioned as a future supply area for fossil energy and shipping, a development bound to occur because of the decreasing Arctic Ocean sea ice. In the Assessing Arctic Futures project we have challenged this deterministic future vision, arguing that natural resources are social constructions, constructed within networks of actors who ascribe value to them.

    Based on a theoretical model developed in this project, I will present cases on the construction of resources in the Svalbard coal mining industry (1898-present). How and why have actors envisioned Svalbard as a place for settlement and extraction? How did they build influence for their visions and why were some of those visions realized? The paper will suggest that explanations of why resource utilization in the Arctic occur (or not) is far more complex than the relative amount of sea ice on the Arctic Ocean.

  • 75.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Constructing the pasts for Arctic futures2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 76.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Constructing the pasts of competing Spitsbergen futures: Russian heritage in action2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Constructing the pasts of polar futures: the Janus face of polar heritage2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 78.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Creating sustainable development in the Arctic: abandoned extraction sites as assets for new Arctic futures2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impacts of climate change on polar cultural heritage have received an increasing attention in recent years within the field of heritage research. Less attention has been place on other processes of global change affecting the Arctic, where cultural heritage plays an important role – industrialization and de-industrialization. In recent years the circumpolar Arctic has been affected by a global mining boom, triggered by high world market prices on minerals as well as notions of the Arctic as a future arena for resource extraction in the wake of climate change. This mining boom is affecting communities in much of the Arctic region and holds a central place in debates about sustainable development there. A central item of these discussions focus on the question of how to handle the physical remains of mining sites once the boom is over and the activities have seized. The attitudes to abandoned mining sites differ across the Arctic. In some cases they have been perceived as unwanted legacies of problematic pasts, making land reclamation a preferred strategy. In other cases abandoned mines and associated infrastructures have been re-defined as cultural heritage and have become anchor points for local identities and a resource for new economies.

    The objective of this paper is to present a research project aiming to explain these differences in order to understand under which circumstances abandoned large-scale resource extraction sites can be turned into resources for new futures in post-industrial Arctic communities. The focus is on the European Arctic, but in a circumpolar and bi-polar comparative perspective. The main questions are: how have different groups of actors interpreted and used physical remains of abandoned resource extraction operations, and why? Which policies are needed to turn abandoned resource extraction sites into resources for constructing new futures in the Arctic? By addressing these questions, the field of heritage studies can make an important contribution to the discussion on sustainable futures in the Arctic.

  • 79.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Creating sustainable development in the Arctic: abandoned extraction sites as assets for new futures2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impacts of climate change on polar cultural heritage have received an increasing attention in recent years within the field of heritage research. Less attention has been place on other processes of global change affecting the Arctic, where cultural heritage plays an important role – industrialization and de-industrialization. In recent years the circumpolar Arctic has been affected by a global mining boom, triggered by high world market prices on minerals as well as notions of the Arctic as a future arena for resource extraction in the wake of climate change. This mining boom is affecting communities in much of the Arctic region and holds a central place in debates about sustainable development there. A central item of these discussions focus on the question of how to handle the physical remains of mining sites once the boom is over and the activities have seized. The attitudes to abandoned mining sites differ across the Arctic. In some cases they have been perceived as unwanted legacies of problematic pasts, making land reclamation a preferred strategy. In other cases abandoned mines and associated infrastructures have been re-defined as cultural heritage and have become anchor points for local identities and a resource for new economies.

    The objective of this paper is to present preliminary results from a research project aiming to explain these differences in order to understand under which circumstances abandoned large-scale resource extraction sites can be turned into resources for new futures in post-industrial Arctic communities. The focus is on the European Arctic, but in a circumpolar and bi-polar comparative perspective. The main questions are: how have different groups of actors interpreted and used physical remains of abandoned resource extraction operations, and why? Which policies are needed to turn abandoned resource extraction sites into resources for constructing new futures in the Arctic? By addressing these questions, the field of industrial heritage studies can make an important contribution to the discussion on sustainable futures in the Arctic.

  • 80.
    Avango, Dag
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Extracting the future in Svalbard2018In: Competing Arctic Futures: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives / [ed] Nina Wormbs, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 47-71Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Minerals are not resources in and of themselves, they are constructed as such through processes involving narratives about the future, produced by actors who wish to realize them. This book chapter analyzes how actors within industry successfully constructed the archipelago of Svalbard as a place for resource extraction at the turn of the century 1900. They made use of favorable historical contexts and enrolled investors and political supporters by rosy future visions about market opportunities and serving national interests. In 2018 most of these mines are abandoned, providing a fruitful point of departure for critically evaluating future visions of the Arctic as an arena for resource extraction and to consider the sustainability of communities built around resource extraction there.

  • 81.
    Avango, Dag
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Heritage in action: Historical remains in polar conflicts2016In: Science, Geopolitics and Culture in the Polar Region: Norden Beyond Borders, Taylor and Francis , 2016, p. 329-356Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 82.
    Avango, Dag
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Heritage in action: Historical remains in Polar conflicts2013In: Science, Geopolitics and Culture in the Polar Region: Norden Beyond Borders, Ashgate, 2013, p. 329-356Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 83.
    Avango, Dag
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Historical Sites and Heritage in the Polar Regions2018In: The Routledge Handbook of the Polar Regions / [ed] Mark Nuttall, Torben Røjle Christensen and Martin Siegert, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 116-133Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Polar Regions of today are marked by the imprints from thousands of years of human activities, from the first peoples who settled there in the distant past to those who arrived more recently – e.g. explorers, industrialists, militaries, scientists. This chapter gives an overview of the material historical remains of past human activities in the Arctic and Antarctic and explains under which circumstances they have been recognized as cultural heritage sites, i.e. remains which different actors for various reasons have defined, protected and managed as such. The chapter is divided into two main sections, the first presenting an overview of the archaeological record in the Arctic from 20 000 BCE until the 20th century, and in the Antarctic (including the Sub-Antarctic) from the 18th century until present days. The second section discusses how stakeholders in the Polar Regions have dealt with these archaeological sites. Under which circumstances do historical remains in the Polar Regions become heritage and why?

    The chapter shows that there is a wide variety of actors who work to protect historical remains as heritage and for different reasons – e.g. archaeologists and historians using them as sources for explaining historical change, state authorities for diversifying local economies and supporting local identity and tourism companies using them for creating new destinations. Thus the material legacies of the past in the polar areas should not only be understood as environmental problems but also as a potential resource for building sustainable futures.

  • 84.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Humanities & Social Science Research in the Polar Areas: research problems and projects2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 85.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Industrial Heritage for Geopolitics2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 86.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Industrial heritage in the polar areas as sources for historical research2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, two large research projects have sought to explain the historical development of large scale resource extraction in the polar areas, from the 17th century until present day. Both projects have combined history and archaeology through archival research and archaeological field work at abandoned industrial sites in the Arctic and Antarctic. The approach has a theoretical motivation based in Actor Network Theory; actors appropriate resources and political influence by using rhetoric and material culture, which requires the study of written sources as well as material remains. In this paper I will discuss how these research projects have addressed three of its main research problems using this theoretical-methodological approach: the interests motivating Arctic and Antarctic industry, the design of technology and settlements in polar environments, and international competition over natural resources and polar territories.

  • 87.
    Avango, Dag
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Industrins avtryck: Humanistisk och samhällsvetenskaplig forskning i Polartrakterna2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 88.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Kampen om naturresurserna2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 89.
    Avango, Dag
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Mining legacies in Arctic futures: Remediation, heritagization, re-economization2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 90.
    Avango, Dag
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Mistra Arctic Sustainable Development2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 91.
    Avango, Dag
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    När industrierna tystnat – värdeskapande i post-industriella samhällen2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 92.
    Avango, Dag
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Remains of industry in the polar regions: histories, processes, heritage2017In: Entreprises et Histoire, ISSN 1161-2770, E-ISSN 2100-9864, ISSN 1161-2770, Vol. 87, no 2, p. 133-149Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 93.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Report on the ICOMOS Advisory Mission to Mapungubwe Cultural Landscape (C1099) 18th-20th March 20142014Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The World Heritage Committee decision 37 COM 7B.43 (37th session, Phnom Penh, Cambodia, 2013) requested the State Party (Mapungubwe world heritage site, South Africa) to submit a minor boundary modification for the buffer zone of Mapungubwe Cultural Landscape, that clarifies the policies for protecting the property with respect to mining in the buffer zone and in relation to “off-set benefits”. Acting upon this request, the State Party worked on a revision of the buffer zone through 2013 and, as a part of this process, invited an ICOMOS Advisory Mission to the Mapungubwe Cultural Landscape. ICOMOS responded in favour of the invitation and sent ICOMOS expert Dr. Dag Avango to visit the proposed Mapungubwe Cultural Landscape buffer zone from 18-20 March 2014. This publication is the final report of Dag Avango's mission, describing the buffer zone of the World Heritage Site, the consequences of reducing it and reccomendations on how ICOMOS should act on the issue.

  • 94.
    Avango, Dag
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Resource extraction and sustainability in the Arctic2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 95.
    Avango, Dag
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Resource Extraction and Sustainable Arctic Communities2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 96.
    Avango, Dag
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Spetsbergen och sveriges roll i den globala resurskolonialismen2015In: Ymer, ISSN 0044-0477, Vol. 135, p. 151-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den västerländska kolonialismen nådde sin höjdpunkt under perioden 1870-1930. Under denna period etablerades stora delar av Europa och Nordamerika som industriella centrum, och flera av dess stater tillskansade sig kolonier i syfte att få tillgång till naturresurser och exportmarknader. Vilken roll hade Sverige i denna globala resurskolonialism? En vanligt förekommande berättelse är att landet aldrig egentligen medverkade. Kolonialismen var de stora imperiernas arena – Storbritannien, Frankrike, Tyskland, Ottomanska imperiet, Ryssland och USA – medan Sverige höll sig på sidan om. Att även svenska aktörer medverkade på den koloniala arenan, utanför Sveriges gränser, har visserligen länge varit känt, men deras verksamhet har ofta skrivits in romantiserande berättelser om enskilda äventyr, snarare än som delar av en större berättelse om kolonialism. I projektet Sverige och den globala resurskolonialismen har vi ifrågasatt denna bild av Sveriges plats i världen genom att studera tre områden där svenska aktörer var verksamma i ett kolonialt sammanhang – Afrika, Centralasien och Arktis. Syftet med föreliggande artikel är att bidra till en ny förståelse av Sveriges roll i den globala kolonialismen (utanför landets gränser) kring förra sekelskiftet, genom att undersöka hur och varför svenska aktörer agerade på den Arktiska ögruppen Spetsbergen. Artikeln fokuserar på två större svenska försök att etablera gruvkolonier där under perioden 1870-1930 – Kap Thordsen och Sveagruvan. Vilka svenska aktörer ledde och medverkade i dessa projekt, hur och varför? Hur utvecklades projekten och varför? Vilka konsekvenser fick de svenska Arktiska gruvkolonierna? Vilka slutsatser kan vi dra om Sveriges roll i den globala kolonialismen utifrån de svenska kolonierna i Arktis?

    Exemplen från Spetsbergen visar att den svenska medverkan på den koloniala arenan drevs av ett nätverk av aktörer inom vetenskap, politik och industri. De hade olika men överlappande intressen – en önskan att nyttiggöra svensk polarforskning för ekonomisk utveckling, att försörja nationen med svensk istället för importerad energi och att ge Sverige en ledande ställning i skandinavisk utrikespolitik. Med dessa motiv möjliggjorde aktörerna satsningarna genom ett intimt samarbete. De svenska gruvkolonierna avvecklades dock efter relativt kort tid. Detta berodde dels på problem med själva gruvdriften, dels på ogynnsamma marknadsförhållanden, dels på skiftande prioriteringar i svensk energi- och utrikespolitik. De svenska gruvkolonierna på Spetsbergen visar att svenska aktörer hade såväl ambitioner som förmåga att etablera kolonier utanför landets gränser, men endast på platser som de stora koloniala imperierna inte intresserade sig för. Detta gav ett fönster för aktörer från mindre stater som Sverige och Norge att ta land och resurser i anspråk. 

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  • 97.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sustainable Communities and the Legacies of Mining in the Nordic Arctic2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 98.
    Avango, Dag
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sustainable Communities and the Legacies of Mining in the Nordic Arctic2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 99.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Greening of Arctic Mining Landscapes: The Politics of Industrial Heritage at Svalbard2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 100.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The industrialisation of Svalbard 1870-1925: Science, coalmining and international politics in a no mans land2004Conference paper (Other academic)
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