Change search
Refine search result
12345 51 - 100 of 227
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Ebadzadeh Semnani, Sedigheh Sarah
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Trust in Different Types of Organizational Relationships: A Social Capital Perspective2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this thesis is to expand the understanding about the concepts of trust and social capital, and to explore their role in achieving desired organizational outcomes. The research followed a multiple case study approach, focusing on Iranian service providers. The reason for this focus is the insufficient scholarly contribution about social capital in developing countries. Moreover, considering the significant role of trust in social capital generation according to many scholars, this study seeks to understand how the issue of lack of trust in developing countries can influence social capital generation in these nations. In order to address the criticisms in the literature, this research first attempts to study the concepts of trust and social capital in different types of organizational relationships separately. There are, therefore, different levels of analysis in this study. The three types of organizational relationships which are the focus of this research are intra-organizational, organization-customer and business cluster.

    An intensive literature review was carried out on trust and social capital to build an overall theoretical picture of the problem at hand. The next step was to analyse the findings of this study by engaging both empirical and theoretical findings simultaneously. This was carried out with the aim of achieving answers to the research questions through theory matching and elaboration.

    The result of this study, in general, supports both the positive role of trust and social capital in achieving desired organizational outcomes. The empirical data and literature, therefore, seem to be in line with one another to a large extent. However, in several cases of this study the issue of lack of trust at the Iranian companies did in fact hinder the achievement of their desired outcomes. Moreover, the findings from the organization-customer and business cluster relationships showed that several of these Iranian companies are indeed already benefiting from social capital. However, they mostly benefit from the type of social capital arising from information flows. What they are missing, and are in fact in great need of, is the type of social capital associated with the benefits of trust. In other words, they were unsuccessful in bringing forward the benefits of the relational dimension of social capital. The study has also contributed towards refining the literature by showing that there are differences in the connotation of both “trust” and “social capital” when they are studied under different types of organizational relationships. Simply using these terms without specifying the type of relationship, or level of analysis, does not bring forward a clear understanding. Furthermore, the findings had pointed out the important difference between a contributing factor to a phenomenon and the phenomenon itself, which in this case were trust and social capital, respectively.

    Last but not least, the results of the cross-case analysis identified certain patterns and differences in the role of trust and social capital in different relationship types. These findings were summarized in the form of  a proposed model and a matrix. The proposed model started with the development of trust in organizational interpersonal relationships, and ended with the creation of two different types of social capital that can benefit both the organization and its customers. The matrix, on the other hand, emphasizes the importance of keeping a balance between different types of social capital, depending on the organizational requirement, in order to achieve the best desired outcomes.

  • 52.
    Ebadzadeh Semnani, Sedigheh Sarah
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dadfar, Hossein
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brege, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The role of export clusters in export performance of SMEs: the case of Iranian energy industry2015In: Quality Innovation Prosperity, ISSN 1335-1745, E-ISSN 1338-984X, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 137-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study was carried out with the aim of exploring the effects of export clusters formation on export performance of SMEs in Iranian energy industry. 

    Methodology/Approach: The study was undertaken through having three case studies, each on a different export cluster currently active within Iranian energy industry. The data was collected through semi-structured interviews with both managers and members of each export cluster as well as study of their archival documents.  

    Findings: The results confirmed that all three export clusters managed to successfully identify their members’ needs and undertook certain measures within their own authority and control, to mitigate these risks. Moreover, the secondary data showed positive growth rate of export level after the establishment of these export clusters. Interestingly, the strong suits of all three export clusters were mainly related to communication and relationship aspects. These three factors were: ability to create Informal Network within members, Public Relations and Training/Consultation.  

    Research Limitation/implication: This study was limited to the export clusters in Iranian energy industry, and on a cross-sectional time horizon basis. It therefore cannot be generalized to all industries and we might witness certain changes in findings if the study is undertaken at different point in time. However, the study shed light on certain important aspects such as nature of relationships within the members of each cluster, the role of trust management and social power as well as the need to place more focus on SMEs in export clusters. 

    Originality/Value of paper: Even though there are recently many studies on the concept of export clusters and their positive impacts on the growth in export of various countries throughout the world; but so far, there had been no similar study undertaken with a focus on Iran and not enough empirical evidence had previously been provided on export clusters performance in a developing country.

  • 53.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Department of Marketing, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Strandvik, Tore
    Department of Marketing, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Voima, Päivi
    Department of Marketing, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Negative critical waves in business relationships: an extension of the critical incident perspective2014In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 284-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    This study aims to extend understanding of business-to-business relationship dynamics by introducing and discussing the phenomenon of a ‘negative critical wave’ (NCW), defined as a disturbance in a relationship that emerges and develops within or beyond individual working relationships.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The dynamics of working relationships in two manufacturing firms in Finland and Sweden were studied by analysing the narratives of unstructured personal interviews with 16 middle managers and 14 operational executives, who recalled experiences of relevant situations over three years, with emphasis on unexpected disturbances, challenges and problems.

    Findings

    Respondents discussed 77 NCWs, the development and effect of which proved to depend upon the original ‘locus’, ‘magnitude’ and ‘amplitude’, and embedded ‘energy’. Waves could be distinguished as: ‘silent compact’, ‘silent extensive’, ‘intense compact’ or ‘intense extensive’.

    Research limitations/implications

    The wave metaphor for relationships dynamics, consistent with but distinct from established notions of ‘critical time’ and ‘critical incidents’ and the associated classification system are a useful starting point for further research into the phenomenon. Though the qualitative methodology achieved richness, the small sample and restricted scope place limits on the objectivity and generalisability of the findings.

    Practical implications

    The NCW framework offers strategists and managers a holistic understanding of the dynamic process of criticality, synthesising the complexities of relationship dynamics and pointing to ways in which to absorb the energy of negative waves.

    Originality/value of the paper

    More is now known about the domino effects of critical incidents in internal and external business-to-business relationships.

  • 54.
    Ellström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Open Book Accounting with Fixed Returns in an Outsourcing Implementation2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore open book accounting with fixed returns in the context of an outsourcing implementation. We look to identify circumstances in which open book accounting with fixed returns takes place, how failures can be avoided and what kinds of benefits can be achieved by the accounting method.

    Design/methodology/approach – This paper is based on a case study involving a builders’ merchant in a wood manufacturer in the UK. The builders’ merchant has recently outsourced part of its production to the wood manufacturer, using open book accounting with fixed returns. Interviews have been conducted with multiple people from both parties in the agreement.

    Findings – It was found that open book accounting with fixed returns can exist despite low initial competence trust, and that only one party has to see a benefit of using open book accounting. Failures in the implementation of open book accounting may be avoided by promoting understanding of the agreement among the people involved, and by making thorough calculations of the supplier’s costs. The benefits of open book accounting with fixed returns identified in this paper are cost savings, closer cooperation and interorganizational learning, lock-in effects, and decreased supplier risk.

    Originality/Value – This paper provides the first study of open book accounting where the parties have agreed to fix the returns of the supplier and where the agreement was made as a result of an outsourcing decision. It adds to the developing literature on open book accounting, in particular, and on interorganizational cost management, in general.

  • 55.
    Ellström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Proactive Range Management: A Timber Supplier’s Efforts to Influence the Product Assortment of Builders’ Merchants2013Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Different builders’ merchants demand a variety of products, and no effort has yet been made to coordinate these demands. Therefore, suppliers of timber to builders’ merchants are facing a problem in terms of requirements for a product range that is too extensive. Timber is a commodity product that is sold at low margins, which means that the costs of keeping such a wide range threaten the economies of scale in timber suppliers’ operations. A suggested solution to this problem is for timber suppliers to use proactive range management (PRM), meaning that the supplier influences the product assortments offered by the builders’ merchants. The purpose of this thesis is therefore to explore the concept of PRM in the dyad between a timber supplier and a builders’ merchant. To fulfil this purpose, research questions are formulated regarding the drivers and prerequisites for PRM, and how suppliers can use it.

    A broad theoretical perspective that considers roles, exchanges and power is used to explore PRM. Data has been collected through a single case study of a timber supplier, its builders’ merchant customers, and the customers of the builders’ merchants.

    The driver for PRM is the timber suppliers’ potential knowledge about costs and demand in the supply chain. The knowledge can be used to coordinate the supply chain, and thus increase efficiency and effectiveness; it also creates a power base for the suppliers, enabling them to increase the share of value gained from the dyads between themselves and the builders’ merchants.

    There are several prerequisites for PRM to be realised. The suppliers must possess a power base in the form of knowledge about costs and demand in the supply chain, and be able to communicate the value of this knowledge. The suppliers and builders’ merchants are also required to have close relationships. Further, the builders’ merchants must trust the suppliers and be open to influence from them.

    When using PRM, different degrees of influence can be exerted depending on the extent to which the prerequisites for PRM are fulfilled. In addition, suggestions on how to manage the product assortment can be either individualised for the builders’ merchant, or take the form of a more general suggestion, depending on which builders’ merchant is approached. The degree of influence and the individualisation of the suggestion create a 2x2 matrix, in which four different ways of using PRM are proposed.

  • 56.
    Ellström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Resource alignment in the category management of builders’ merchants2014In: Proceedings of the IMP conference, 30th Annual Industrial Marketing and Purchasing Conference, 1st-6th September 2014, Bordeaux, France, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research on collaborations within networks report both positive and negative outcomes of collaborations. Resource alignment, or how resources of collaborating actors affect each other, has consequences for the utilization of the resources in a network. More research is however needed to determine how resource alignment works. Retailers’ category management includes activities that span several actors and where the resources of the network become important. The main actors that contribute to category management are the central organization of the retailer, the individual stores and the suppliers of the products in the category. An interesting sector for understanding how resources contribute to the success of category management is the builders’ merchants sector, where mainly professional builders buy the products they need for performing their trade. The aim of this paper is therefore to explore resource alignment among actors involved in the category management of builders’ merchants. The paper is based on an interview study of top managers in four Swedish builders’ merchants. Three propositions are formulated that suggest explanations for how supplementary and complementary resources are interrelated and how the network influences the need for supplementary resources. 

  • 57.
    Ellström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Supplier Integration in Category Management: A case study of the situational impact on relationship performance and interdependence2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Supplier integration in category management means that a supplier takes part in the activities that are traditionally performed by retailers. These activities are the selection of which products to sell, decisions on how to price and market the products, and making sure that the products are delivered to the stores in a timely manner. Depending on the situation, an integration of suppliers in these activities can be more or less suitable.

    As more research is needed to understand when supplier integration in category management is suitable, the purpose of this thesis is to describe and analyze how situational factors affect the relationship consequences of supplier integration in category management. Specifically, the relationship consequences are expressed in terms of relationship performance and interdependence between the firms.

    The study builds on empirical data about British and Swedish builders’ merchants and their suppliers, with a particular focus on timber suppliers. Data has mainly been collected through participative observations and interviews.

    Five situational factors that improve the relationship performance of supplier integration in category management are identified: large retailer firms, supplier product knowledge, homogeneity of market demands for the supplier’s products, mutual trust and a shared view on customer value between the supplier and retailer. Three situational factors are identified that affect the interdependence between the retailer and the supplier when supplier integration in category management is implemented: supplier product knowledge, whether the supplier or the retailer initiates the integration and whether coercive or non-coercive power has to be used in the implementation.

    This thesis contributes to retail literature by highlighting the need to include situational factors in the analysis of supplier integration, clarifying which activities are comprised by category management and suggesting a theoretical foundation based on the resource-based view and the transaction cost framework to analyse relationship performance in retailer-supplier dyads. When making decisions on integration, managers of retailers and their suppliers are advised to consider the fit with their overall strategy, the fit with the surrounding situation and the effects both in terms of interdependence and relationship performance.

  • 58.
    Ellström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Supplier integration in the assortment management of builders’ merchants2015In: International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, ISSN 0959-0552, E-ISSN 1758-6690, Vol. 43, no 7, p. 634-651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore supplier integration in the assortment management of builders’ merchants (BMs) by identifying potential factors enabling supplier integration and potential factors mediating the success of supplier integration.

    Design/methodology/approach – A qualitative case study method was used, in which interviews and participative observations were conducted with a timber supplier and BMs in the UK.

    Findings – The likelihood that a supplier and a retailer will implement supplier integration is positively affected by the retailer’s format as a large chain with several product categories represented in its stores and the retailer’s trust in the supplier. Effectiveness and efficiency of supplier integration is mediated by the number of different retail formats represented by the retailers, the ability of the supplier to determine cost drivers in its operations and a homogeneous market, meaning that local circumstances have limited effect on demand.

    Research limitations/implications – The findings are exploratory and further testing of the propositions, using a wider empirical sample, is required. The paper extends theories relating to resource complementarity and suggests that a resource complementarity framework can be applied in relationships other than alliances.

    Practical implications – This paper suggests when incorporation of supplier resources is possible to implement and when it is likely to succeed.

    Originality/value – This paper uses a contingency perspective to explore supplier integration and targets individual buyer-supplier relationships. It uses a dyadic perspective and considers how supplier integration affects the dyad, rather than only the buyer.

  • 59.
    Ellström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The dynamic effects of power in buyer-seller relations – the process of gaining and using power to increase share of profitabilityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This conceptual study contributes with an understanding of the dynamic effects of power in buyer-seller relations and how power can be used to increase share of profitability from a buyer-seller relation. It is concluded that coercive and non-coervice power bases can be used for fundamentally different purposes, but at the same time they are closely related to each other. Non-coercive power is used for achieving changes which are unresisted by the influencee, meaning that the change is welcomed by the influenced actor. As no resistance is overcome the influencer is not losing any power – it is only redistributed to other power sources. A change caused by a non-coercive power base may therefore create a coercive power base for the influencer. A coercive power base is used for achieving resisted changes, meaning that the change is unwanted by the other actor. One type of resisted change is a change in how value is shared. With this reasoning, it is concluded that an increased share of profitability is achieved through exerting power from a coercive power base. This power base can have appeared from changes caused by exertions of non-coercive power bases. By understanding the mechanisms behind how power can be used, managers are aided in their decision making and analyses of negotiating situations.

  • 60.
    Ellström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rehme, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Implementing proactive range management – requirements on timber suppliers from a business model perspectiveManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A supplier to a retailer that influences what products customers are buying, with the aim to achieve an increased cost-efficiency in the distribution channel, can be said to have a proactive range management (PRM) offering. In implementing this offering, new requirements appear for the supplier as new responsibilities appear that are usually unfamiliar for passive product suppliers. By applying a business model perspective, an effort is made to identify these new requirements. The ARA model is then used for structuring the requirements. It is concluded that the transition from being a traditional product supplier to implementing a PRM offering implies significant changes in what activities to perform, what resources to hold and what actors, or customers, to approach with the new offering. The business model construct has also appeared as useful for identifying these requirements. The managerial implication is that the decision of implementing a PRM offering and influencing the product range of customers implies major changes for the business and has to be supported by the overall structure of the firm.

  • 61.
    Ellström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rehme, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Resource alignment in the category management of builders’ merchants2016In: International Review of Retail Distribution & Consumer Research, ISSN 0959-3969, E-ISSN 1466-4402, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 55-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous retailer-supplier research reports both positive and negative collaboration outcomes. Resource alignment, or how collaborating actors’ resources affect each other, is a concept that has been brought forward to explain when collaboration increases performance. As the category management of builders’ merchants involves actors with different sets of resources, the resource alignment framework can be used to better understand the outcomes of collaboration in category management. The aim of this paper is to explore resource alignment among actors involved in the category management of builders’ merchants. The paper is based on interviews with top managers in Swedish builders’ merchants. Complementary and supplementary resources held by the involved actors are identified for four  distinguished category management activities. Resources needed to further improve the business are also identified. Three propositions are formulated, explaining how supplementary and complementary resources are interrelated and how the situation influences the need for supplementary resources. The description of resource alignment supports retailers and their suppliers concerning how to assign roles and responsibilities in category management activities. While the retailers themselves are often well equipped to manage pricing and inventory management, the supplier can support assortment and marketing management.

  • 62.
    Eriksson, Emelie
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Patterns of corporate visual selfrepresentation in accounting narratives2017Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation deals with firms’ visual and pre-visual self-representations in accounting narratives. Self-representations are those descriptions about the company that firms include in accounting narratives to convey the current standings and their identity. External stakeholders increasingly expect non-numerical information about firms to be disclosed, and accounting narratives are a key medium for firms to account for their activities and maintain legitimacy as social actors. The question of which reporting conventions exist for legitimating selfrepresentations, especially from a visual perspective, remains unexplored. The purpose of this study is therefore to explore the empirical phenomenon of self-representations in accounting narratives in relation to legitimation rhetoric.

    The study is based on three research papers dealing with different patterns of self-representations in accounting-related narratives, including corporate reporting and business model diagrams. The examples are viewed through the theoretical lenses of semiotics and institutional theory, particularly legitimation theory. The study combines visual methods (visual content analysis and visual taxonomy) with other methods (interviews, text analysis) to conceptualize and exemplify what is meant by self-representations in accounting narratives. The study finds that there may be multiple parallel pre-visual self-representations at play to influence representations of the self, that visual self-representations are becoming more common in accounting narratives, and that several rhetorical strategies for legitimation are observable in these representations. By showing how diagrams can serve a legitimating purpose in accounting narratives, it is argued that diagrams should be considered on par with graphs and photographs as visual rhetorical devices in accounting narratives, and that they could be used as key communicative elements in the accounting process.

    Second, based on the longitudinal and comparative examples of self-representations, it is suggested that self-representations increasingly refer to abstract rather than concrete referents. This change is discussed in terms of the increasingly digital and service-based knowledge economy, where material referents give way to “amaterial” values. The contribution of this study is to describe selfrepresentations through several empirical examples, and to thereby increase awareness among practitioners and researchers of how visuals serve as communicative resources with legitimating functions in accounting narratives. Four concepts are proposed as tools for explaining the observed developments, and for improving visual literacy with regard to accounting narratives: inclusive perspective on accounting narratives, amateriality, self-representation, and diagrams.

  • 63.
    Eriksson, Per-Erik
    et al.
    Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, Hållbar samhällsbyggnad.
    Nord, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Östman, Birgit
    Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, Hållbar samhällsbyggnad.
    Kartläggning av brandincidener i flervåningshus med trästomme: Erfarenhet av 20 års brukande2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The analysis in this project shows that modern multi-story wooden buildings for housing exhibit a lower fire incident rate than the rest of the multi-family housing stock. This is not surprising since the studied buildings are relatively new. Only one of the incidents in the total of more than 10,000 homes have any connection to the structural material.

    In recent years, the question of fire safety of modern wood construction has been raised from new perspectives. The applied technology for 20 years has been based on the fire safety requirements in the national building code (based on EU:s Construction Products Directive), largely validated through laboratory tests. When the construction technology is now recognized and is expected to increase significantly, the requirement for an evaluation of its function in the real world comes from many actors. This report presents the experiences from built projects in use.

    Modern wood construction is defined in this project as apartment buildings higher than two storeys, where the load-bearing structural material is wood, according to the revised Swedish building regulations in 1994 or later versions. All apartment buildings, including student housing and assisted living, have been included. The project has completed and analysed a total inventory of these homes.

    Data has been collected directly from the component manufacturing companies, developers and contractors who manufactured and erected apartment buildings with more than two stories since 1994. The Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency (MSB) has delivered extracts from its incident database of fire incidents for all of these buildings.

    Data is thus available on more than 10,000 apartments from 188 construction project, which is estimated to represent more than 95 % of completed projects. Respondents in the industry is reporting a total of 3 cases of fire incidents for the years from 1998 to 2014 and the MSB data expands the number with minor incidents to a total of 22 cases for these years, three of which were in separate garbage buildings.

  • 64.
    Eriksson, Sanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wennerstål, Rebecka
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hållbart varumärke: En fallstudie på Vattenfall om hur kommunikationen av hållbarhetsarbetet påverkar varumärket2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Corporate social responsibility is a highly relevant subject discussed in media and business. Larger companies are expected to deal with sustainability questions and the corporate brand is highly affected by their sustainability work. The development of new communication channels, such as the internet, mobile broadband and social media, has led to increased demands for transparency and companies who do not communicate their responsibility externally are seen with suspiciousness. The difficulty with sustainability communications is to communicate to the public what the company is doing in terms of sustainability. The communication must create an image of the company that is as close to reality as possible and not being perceived as a manipulating PR trick. The purpose of this study is to understand the link between sustainability work, sustainability communication and corporate brand. It also aims to identify success factors for creating a sustainable corporate brand. The study was conducted as a qualitative case study of the project One Tonne Life, conducted by Vattenfall in collaboration with several other partners in 2009-2011. The One Tonne Life project is seen by Vattenfall as a good example of a successful sustainability communication, which makes it an interesting case to study in order to develop theories about how a company should work.

    A corporate brand is not limited to its logo and graphic profile, but consists of identity and personality. The corporate brand can be seen as a combination of several different identities. In this study we have chosen to focus on seven identities: actual-, communicated-, conceived-, covenanted-, cultural-, ideal- and desired identity. An analytical model was developed to describe the relationship between sustainability, sustainability communications and corporate branding. When sustainability is fully integrated into the company’s strategy and when it is communicated by involving stakeholders in the communication, the work and communications are inseparable. It is only with this approach that the corporate brand can be built for sustainability.

    This study shows that the corporate brand is influenced by all the company’s activities, which means that the company’s sustainability efforts and sustainability communications must be indistinguishable in order to be used to build a strong corporate brand. Findings fromthe case study concludes the importance of 1) working with a relevant sustainability issue, 2) making the work visible and put in context, 3) working with others to solve complex issues and improve the credibility, 4) involving the recipient in the communication, 5) communicating the same message through multiple channels, 6) packaging the sustainability efforts into an interesting story, and 7) gaining support for sustainability efforts internally. When following these factors, the sustainability work can be integrated into the corporate brand.

  • 65.
    Ernstig, Anton
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics.
    Magron, Hazir
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics.
    Olajos, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering.
    Persson, Rebecca
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering.
    Thorell, Douglas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering.
    William-Olsson, Victor
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering.
    Ågren, Gabrielle
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering.
    En studie om utvecklingen av webbapplikationen AnteckningsBlocket2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 12 credits / 18 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This report describes the work and result of developing the web application AnteckningsBlocket. AnteckningsBlocket is an e-shop and a platform where students can buy, sell and share self-written study aids. Based on a market survey, the work has focused on developing a usable online shop to help answer the question “How can an e-shop for study aids connected to courses at Linköping university be formed to create a usable gathering point for relevant study aids?” The report aims to account for the implementation of the functionality that such an application requires. It also aims to explain the structure of the system and to discuss the result of the technical choices that have been made during the development. The report describes the work process of the Scrum method, which has been used to continuously emphasize and prioritize functions in the different phases of the development. With a strong fundamental functionality, a clear focus on usability and an attractive design the team has succeeded in creating a web application where students can meet and share their knowledge.

  • 66.
    Erskérs, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Boman, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hållbarhet och affärsmodeller: Strategiskt hållbarhetsarbete på operativ nivå inom byggbranschen2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the largely unexplored area regarding how a business model framework can be used as a strategic tool to help companies enable sustainable value creation. The construction industry is highly relevant from a sustainability perspective, as it is characterized by both significant environmental impact and a close interdependence with the community. Thus, it is critical for construction companies to succeed with the implementation of more sustainable operations in order to enable an increased sustainable value creation and thereby ensure their competitiveness over time. A more sustainable development will benefit both businesses and the surrounding community. However, it has been proven difficult for companies to succeed with the implementation of their sustainability agendas at the operational level. Addressing this challenge, the study aims to facilitate the realization of a sustainable value creation at operational level in the construction industry. This is done by combining the broad value perspective of the sustainability field with the business model framework’s ability to implement strategy in an efficient way.

    The research objective of the study is to "Describe and explain how business models can be used as a strategic tool to improve corporate sustainability at the operational level within the construction industry". In order to address this, a case study has been conducted at a building project within Skanska, one of the leading players within the Swedish construction industry. Sustainable initiatives during the project have been identified through interviews with all parties involved in the project. These initiatives were then analyzed with two theoretical analytical models developed to represent a business model framework based on sustainable value creation. Furthermore, challenges and critical success factors within the fields of business models and sustainability have been taken into account.

    Based on the case study analysis, the research objective is fulfilled in two stages. First, the different uses of business models as strategic tools are explained. Second, critical success factors for the improvement of corporate sustainability at the operational level within the construction industry are identified. The business model's main applications can be summarized as (1) Facilitate the implementation of sustainability strategies, (2) Be a dynamic tool that drives change, (3) Act as a communication tool, (4) Contribute with network perspective, and (5) Enable competitive, sustainable value creation. By applying the business model framework as a strategic tool the following critical success factors could be identified for developing corporate sustainability efforts at the operational level within the construction industry; (1) Shift from a product focus to a business model perspective, (2) Invest in long-term relationships within the value based network, (3) Clarify sustainability responsibilities within the value based network, (4) Translate sustainable value into economical value, (5) Market and promote sustainable initiatives, (6) Integrate a strategic sustainability agenda in daily operations, and (7) Prioritize sustainability issues at a management level.

    By utilizing a business model based on sustainable value creation and working with the critical success factors listed above, companies within the construction industry can move from reactive sustainability agendas focusing mainly on legal requirements and production efficiency, to more proactive and innovative sustainability agendas that take both the internal and external aspects of the business into account. The realization of competitive corporate sustainability at the operational level enables an increased sustainable value creation in the short and the long term, a value creation that will benefit both the construction industry and the surrounding community - completely aligned with the fundamental notions of sustainability.

  • 67.
    Falk, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petri, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Roy, Jan
    Mittuniversitetets forskningsgrupp Etour.
    Walldius, Åke
    Kungliga Tekniska högskolan, Stockholm.
    Att beskriva en organisations strategi som en karta2016In: Strategisk ekonomistyrning: med dialog i fokus / [ed] Fredrik Nilsson, Carl-Johan Petri, Alf Westelius, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2016, p. 23-61Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Falk, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petri, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Roy, Jan
    Mitthögskolan, Sweden.
    Walldius, Åke
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Illustrating an organisation's strategy as a map2016In: Strategic management control: with focus on dialogue / [ed] Fredrik Nilsson, Carl-Johan Petri, Alf Westelius, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2016, p. 27-65Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 69.
    Fogelberg, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering.
    Gesar, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics.
    Kundvärdesdriven affärsmodellsinnovation: En studie om att anpassa Geodesigns affärsmodell utifrån kunders värdepreferenser2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study has been carried out at Geodesign Latitud 57 AB and its purpose is to present possibilities of how the company’s business model can be adapted in order to deliver additional customer value. The study presents the importance of adapting businesses according to customer needs and not having presumptions of what customers’ value in a company’s value offering. In order to conduct the study properly, the two concepts of business models and customer value were investigated thoroughly, as well as methods of how customer value can be measured and how a company’s business model can be adapted according to customers’ value preferences.

    Geodesign Latitud 57 AB is a Swedish company which develops and sells temporary flood barrier systems. The market for the company’s products has only just started to develop and the company’s primary customers are currently Swedish and international administrative authorities, communes and larger electrical power companies. Geodesign have been active on the market for over 20 years but it is not until recently that flood fighting has received increased attention. The difficulties of getting their products sold has created a need for the company to further understand what customers value when they purchase temporary flood barrier systems and how the company’s business model can be adapted to better suit customer needs.

    This study has both a qualitative and a quantitative approach. The authors of the study have taken into account previously conducted studies regarding the identification of customer value preferences and adaptation of business models. Geodesign’s business model was mapped by interviewing the company’s employees. The customers’ value preferences were identified by using an analytical hierarchy process (AHP), supported by qualitative questions in order to fully understand what customers value in a temporary barrier system offering.

    The study presents a model for business model adaptation according to customer value preferences, Step by step, the model specifies how to understand what customers value in a company’s offering, how to map the company’s current business model, how to analyse how the current business model is suitable for delivering the customers’ needs, and finally how to generate ideas of how the company can adapt its current business model in order to create additional customer value. The model for business model adaptation is generalizable and useful for other companies that wish to create additional customer value.

    The study resulted in a number of ways in which Geodesign can adapt their current business model in order to create additional customer value. The authors of the study suggest four ways in which Geodesign can adapt its current business model:

    1. Improve the usability of the temporary barrier systems
    2. Offer training and education on site in the customers’ geographical areas and make use of the company’s key resources.
    3. Emphasize valuable information in marketing channels.
    4. Introduce routines for continuous evaluation after the temporary barrier systems have been used during floods.

    By adapting the company’s business model in these ways, the company will improve relations to their customers and users, receive continuous input regarding what the customers and users value, and create additional value through their value offerings.

  • 70.
    Fogelberg, T.
    et al.
    Power Transformers ABB AB Sweden.
    Sjöberg, D.
    Power Transformers ABB AB Sweden.
    Swiatkowski, M.
    Power Transformers, ABB Sp. z o. o. Poland.
    Mortensen, E.
    N1 Denmark.
    Pradhan, M. K.
    Corporate Research, ABB AB Sweden.
    Pettersson, L. A. A.
    Corporate Research, ABB AB Sweden.
    Dahlgren, M.
    Corporate Research, ABB AB Sweden.
    Rehme, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nordigården, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Energy Efficient Transformers and Reactors: Some incentive models and case studies to show the long term profitability of such designs2012In: CIGRE 2012 Proceedings: The Council on Large Electric Systems, Paris, France: CIGRE (International Council on Large Electric Systems), 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During the coming decades energy efficiency will be a critical factor in reducing carbon emissions and fighting global warming. The power generation industry and transmission and distribution industries (T&D) contribute to a large part of energy losses in the society. The losses in T&D systems alone are total 10 % of a global average of the T&D energy transferred. One-third of these T&D losses have their origin in transformers and shunt reactors.This report emphasizes the need to bring in appropriate financial incentives and directives to utilities, in order to encourage investment in energy efficient electrical power systems. A critical financial parameter is the internal interest rate. In some countries there are directives from the authorities that internalinterest rates shall be 5 %. If this is to be applied together with the current prevailing electricityprices in Europe, capitalized cost of total transformer losses should increase by 2-3times of the average value used in the European market today. It isshown that the capitalized cost of losses may vary from 8,000 to 17,000 €/kW today or even higherin the future.This paper highlights cases where low and high capitalized costs of losses are used and the implications for cost related factors of transformer and shunt reactor are analyzed. It isshown that the transformer losses and total ownership cost (TOC) can be substantially reduced with an increase in price(first cost) of the transformers or shunt reactors. With increased value of losses, accuracy of loss measurement will play a much more important business role and require action to improve International Standards. New energy efficientsolutions to combat network losses will require further research and development. Different focus and strategies regarding interest rates and electricityprices in transmission companies lead to very different investment decisions. Without clear regulations promoting reductions in power loss, there might notbe enough incentive for more aggressive innovation in the field of transformer and electrical system technology and efficiency.

  • 71.
    Forkmann, Sebastian
    et al.
    University of Alabama, AL USA.
    Henneberg, Stephan C.
    Queen Mary University of London, England.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Driver Configurations for Successful Service Infusion2017In: Journal of Service Research, ISSN 1094-6705, E-ISSN 1552-7379, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 275-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturers across many industries use service infusion to address the changing customer demands and improve their competitive position. However, understanding the drivers of successful service infusion is a complex process. Using business model and configuration theories, this study conceptualizes and analyzes the interplay of different driver domains for suppliers, customers, and their business relationships. In particular, we analyze how service offering, service pricing, service capabilities, and the service infusion process interact in affecting service infusion success and failure. 137 interviews relating to 25 business relationships are analyzed via configuration analysis, particularly fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA). Results show that different equifinal configurations exist (i.e., different ways to succeed with service infusion). We also find that more is not always better. For example, service infusion success can be achieved without fully developed service capabilities. In addition, successful configurations are often very similar to those leading to failure. A dyadic analysis demonstrates that customer service capabilities are overall more important than those of suppliers. From these findings, we derive priorities for future research. In particular, our study points toward the need to better understand the interplay between service infusion drivers. Second, we advocate the augmentation of research perspectives in service infusion by taking into account the supplier, customer, and dyadic perspectives. Lastly, the importance of understanding drivers of service infusion failure is highlighted. For managers, our study shows the importance of relational audits as a starting point to deciding on how to infuse services in a business relationship.

  • 72.
    Franklin, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    How to handle deviations caused by unit interdependence: A case study at Scania CV2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The thesis purpose is to contribute with understanding about managers’ opinions about how to handle deviations caused by unit interdependence.

    Methodology

    Qualitative data has been gathered to this exploratory study by semi-structured interviews with 14 managers within the R&D, purchasing and production units at Scania, Södertälje. The result has been interpreted and analyzed by dividing the managers in five smaller groups. 

    Result from analyzing empirical findings

    It is found in the analysis that the largest part of the managers in this study seem not to believe it is worth striving for excellence through procedural justice. Reoccurring similarities in opinion between managers is that visualization, dialogue, clear responsibility and less tolerance towards deviations are needed for handling and preventing deviations. Differences in opinion are primarily related to how costs occurred from deviations should be allocated and the purpose with such reallocation. Most managers express a strong concern about undesired behavior developed by a control system where a causing unit always should take the effect from a deviation. However, all managers state that costs occurred from deviations due to interdependence with a external supplier should be invoiced to the supplier. 

    Conclusion

    The concern about undesired behavior that may be developed by the way of handling and preventing deviation is strongly mediated by the managers. Instead of handling deviations by justly reallocating effects according to the controllability principle it is perceived as more important to extend the areas of responsibility and increase consciousness between interdependent units through improved dialogue and cross-functional transparency. One should therefore not seek equitable allocation of impacts and cost of devices in dealing with anomalies of this type.

  • 73.
    Fristedt, Mårten
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rehme, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sandberg, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Describing hybrid purchasing organizations - the case of a Swedish industrial firm2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 74.
    Frost, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics.
    Understanding the Problems in Volume Production and their Connections to Management of New Product Introduction Projects: A Case Study of the Project Management Factors and the Appurtenant Production Effects from Ramp-Up of New Product in Production for Contract Electronics Manufacturing2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The ongoing globalization of companies has resulted in a highly competitive business climate where companies have to be cost-effective but still flexible with fast response to customer feedback and present in the international scene. In order to meet the fast paced technological development from the competition and changing demand of the customers, companies focus on creating new products and reducing their time-to-market with an early product launch to gain profits from increased market shares. However, in order to maintain profitability of the new product, it becomes even more important for the company to quickly deploy a full-scale production of the product, also known as the production ramp-up phase.

    Despite being known as a major cost driver in new product development projects, production ramp-up is a research area which have yet received sparse attention compared to research on product launch and time-to-market in new product development projects. However, with shorter product life-cycles and higher market competition it has resulted in a need to shorten the length of a new product’s ramp-up time without making any trade-off to the cost-effectiveness of the ramp-up project and the end product’s final quality.

    The study identifies the common problems in volume production of a contract electronics manufacturer and their sources of disturbances from the new product introduction process. It also identifies the factors influencing the new product introduction process at the company and how these factors are connected different sources of disturbances. To identify these findings, a single case study was designed and performed at Orbit One AB, a contract electronics manufacturer with a low-volume production of products. The data collection course was executed in an iterative manner over a period of four months through interviews, observation and internal documentation and was backed up and analyzed with a literature study. The data collection through interviews was carried out in two separate rounds, where the first round of interviews was focused on identifying the common problems in volume production and the second round was focused on the factors influencing the output from the new product introduction process. The discoveries from the interviews were analyzed together with the other sources of collected data to reach a conclusive analysis.

    The results of the study showed that the most common problems in volume production of the company could be traced to six different sources of disturbances: Product, Production System, Design-Production Interface, Quality, Resource Management, and Personnel. The most common problems could also be summarized as: Problems with manufacturability of product; High variation of process performance, Poor correctness of information, Quality issues with products, and High workload on resources. The factors identified in the findings of the study shows that there are multiple and connected factors which affects the final output of the new product introduction process which corroborates with earlier studies and research in the area of production ramp-up. The study did identify two factors which has not been identified by other ramp-up studies, these were: Lack of organizational project culture and customer flexibility.

  • 75.
    Furusköld, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics.
    Hall, Emma
    Profitable negotiations: A case study regarding purchase-, transport- and inventory costs at ABB2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    ABB is a global company with a leading position in power and automation technologies. Being active on a global market creates a high pressure to always develop the business and reduce costs in order to stay competitive. The purchasing function at ABB ́s unit Control Products is divided into a strategic- and an operative purchase department. The negotiated setups the strategic purchasers establish with the suppliers have been shown to affect the transport- and inventory costs that are charged to the operative purchase department. In order to determine whether more beneficial setups could be negotiated by including transport- and inventory costs when they are evaluated, this case study has been requested. Two master students from Linköping University have conducted the study and by investigating different setups, conclusions to answer the study ́s purpose could be drawn. The purpose is presented below.

    The study’s purpose is to recommend future guidelines for the strategic purchasers at ABB’s unit Control Products that can be applied when negotiating with suppliers, by evaluating purchase-, transport- and inventory costs.

    In order to investigate how the purchase-, transport- and inventory costs were affected by different setups, four different cases were defined. Each case included a specific article, which was chosen based on its properties and its current and alternative setups. The conducted literature reviews and interviews with employees at Control Products resulted in the two sub- criteria lead time and net price were defined as the most important ones when negotiating and evaluating suppliers. A combination of these sub-criteria was therefore used to choose suitable articles. Once the cases had been defined, the purchase-, transport- and inventory costs could be calculated for both their current situation and alternative setup scenarios. Theories from relevant researches were used to strengthen and criticised the cases’ results.

    Each case's result provided information regarding how the purchase-, transport- and inventory costs were affected by specific setups. By comparing the alternative scenarios with the setup currently used, the alternatives ́ profitability could be determined. The cases showed that by only studying one of the three cost posts, only a limited insight was gained. Even if the purchase cost was to increase for an alternative setup, it could still be profitable to implement due to decreased transport- and inventory costs. Furthermore, an alternative setup that showed significant potential to reduce inventory costs was proven to not be profitable because of its effect on the net price. Neglecting to take transport- and inventory costs into account when a potential supplier is evaluated can make a deal look more profitable than it is.

    The final recommendation is that purchase-, transport- and inventory costs all have to be taken into consideration in order to determine which setups that are economically preferable. If the strategic purchasers at Control Products includes these when they negotiate with suppliers, more profitable deals can be obtained. 

  • 76.
    Granath, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Information Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Axelsson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Information Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stakeholders’ views on ICT and sustainable development in an urban development project2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ICT potentially plays an important part in achieving sustainable urban development. Subsequntly, ICT could be expected to have a central role in the general discourse of urban development, and in specific development projects, both as a means in the planning process itself and as an end product, i.e. smart city solutions. By exploring a case study of a local urban development project (Urb@n) in Sweden, we explore different characteristics given to ICT and how they can be understood as different discourses of sustainable development. By studying how ICT is spoken of in the planning phase of urban development we can understand how different stakeholders interpret and incorporate (or not) the technology in the design and development of urban areas, and how they collaborate in order to achieve goals. Our findings show that there are discrepancies between how ICT is spoken of on a policy level and in practice. A conclusion is that technology is both taken for granted and black-boxed at the same time. This indicates rather naïve conceptions and understandings among stakeholders of what characterizes ICT and how it can be used for different purposes to support sustainable development.

  • 77.
    Grundström, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sjöström, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Effect of Inbound OI on Performance in Manufacturing SMEs2014In: Proceedings Of ISPIM Conferences / [ed] Huizingh, K.R.E, Conn, S. Torkkeli, M. and Bitran, I., 2014, Vol. 25Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With many manufacturing SMEs underperforming, the purpose of this paper is to evaluate which aspects of Open Innovation (OI) are applied and how these affect the performance of manufacturing SMEs. Using a set of 132 Swedish manufacturing SMEs, internal and external aspects affecting OI application were evaluated with regard how they affect OI performance. Two clusters were identified. One cluster had higher values on all variables except from supporting organizational structures, where the other group had the higher value. However, the variable with the strongest differentiating impact was by far strategic orientation. There was no significant difference in financial performance between the two clusters but several significant differences could be established regarding innovation performance measurements. 

  • 78.
    Göbel, Hannes
    et al.
    University of Borås.
    Nordigården, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rehme, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Chicksand, Daniel
    Aston Business School.
    Cronholm, Stefan
    University of Borås.
    Towards Innovation & Relationship Enabling Processes - an IT Outsourcing Perspective2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 79.
    Hall, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics.
    Fraenkel, Patrick
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics.
    STRATEGISK STYRNING AV PORTFÖLJER MED UTVECKLINGSPROJEKT: EN MODELL SOM GENOM STRATEGISKA STYRMEDEL OCH PROJEKTPARAMETRAR KOPPLAR SAMMAN PROJEKTPORTFÖLJHANTERING MED STRATEGI2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of the thesis is to develop a model to valuate and prioritize development projects to ensure that the project portfolio is in line with strategy. To reach the goal the report was given the purpose to explain a process and which management control instruments and valuation parameters that creates a project portfolio management process that is connected to strategy. The background is based both in theory and empirically, which was ensured during the pre-study. The empirical background can be summed up in four main points: a) Businesses experience a lack of overview regarding how projects contribute strategy. b) Businesses wish for increased transparency regarding how strategic valuations and prioritization are being made. c) When external factors incorporated in strategy is changing it does not mean the all projects are re-valuated. d) When projects grow to be gradually more complex there is a tendency of not revaluating, hence resulting in trouble allocating resources for the project.A pre-study was conducted which showed that research finds a gap between strategy and how project portfolios are managed and that gap needs to be further examined. To fill the gap and answer to the empirical challenges a theoretically developed model has been developed combined with a model of analysis which was the foundation of the analysis of empirical data. The empirical data was collected through qualitative interviews from three different companies on corporate level as well from business level in one of the companies.This report has resulted in a process, management control components and parameters to be able to evaluate and prioritize project in a portfolio. The process consists of the steps identifying, clustering, balancing, selecting, prioritizing, optimizing, sequencing, deciding and evaluating. Meanwhile, guidelines, budget, performance measurement with goals and strategic perspectives are suitable formats for transferring strategy into the project portfolio management process.To handle point a) and b) above the study suggests that the process steps identifying, Clustering and balancing are used to place the projects in the appropriate portfolio and by that facilitate balance between projects and initiatives. To ensure transparency and enable overview the process needs to be formal and followed by the users. Regarding point c) and d) it is suggested that the project portfolio management process need to be adjusted for compatibility with the strategy development process and that projects.

  • 80.
    Hallquist, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Johansson, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Avgörande faktorer vid införskaffandet av affärssystem i små företag: En studie av svenska affärssystemsprojekt2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 300 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Most large companies today use an ERP system, for example to integrate differentfunctional areas of the organization and automate business processes. This has mademany suppliers increase their sales focus on smaller companies. These companiesrealize the need for ERP systems (Iskanius et al., 2009) and statistics also show that theusage is increasing in smaller companies (SCB, 2013). However, small enterprisescannot be seen as smaller versions of large companies (Malhotra and Temponi, 2010;Welsh and White, 1981) as these differ, for example in more stringent resourceconstraints, which means that ERP projects also differ from those of large companies.For this reason, it is important for suppliers and consultants to understand what affectssmall companies during the process of acquiring an ERP system. This report aims to, insmall Swedish companies, identify factors that affect the decision to acquire an ERPsystem and examine how these affect important factors later in the process.Based on a literature review and an initial empirical data collection, a theory wascreated in the form of hypotheses about how the determinants of the aquiring processinitialization phase affects important factors during the acquisition and implementationphases. Through a case study method, in which six companies that has acquired an ERPsystem in recent years were studied, the developed theory was analyzed and tested.Our results highlight the importance of the existing knowledge of involved persons, afactor that influences, for example, the ability to develop a good requirementsspecification and the project structure. Furthermore, we identified significantdifferences in the openness to changing and improving the work flow of the companyand a view of resource constraints that often leads to insufficient time being spared forthe project. Although ERP system in small enterprises often are used only for financialmanagement and sometimes logistics the study shows that the acquisition can add largevalue to the organization through more efficient work processes.

  • 81.
    Harrius, Sofie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics.
    Engman, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics.
    Att uppmuntra kunskapsdelning: En fallstudie om styrparametrars påverkan på kunskapsdelning inom en konsultkoncern2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge management has become increasingly important in organizations and how knowledge can be developed, shared and maintained has been researched more in recent years. The question of whether knowledge is seen as a competitive advantage has gained a great deal of focus in organizations instead of reviewing knowledge management. There are earlier studies that investigate the structure and organizational culture's impact on knowledge sharing in an organization but do not say how the factors affect knowledge sharing.

    The report examines how organizational structure and culture, as well as other management control parameters in a corporate group can affect the work with knowledge sharing, in which the observational data focus on interviews with employees of the company our case study focuses on. There is an ongoing implementation of a new knowledge sharing group at the company, which is used as a basis for this survey. A method is developed from Klein and Myers seven principles for interpretivism in case studies and Eisenhardt’s principles for theory building.

    A literature study based on Malmi and Brown's MCS factors investigates which parameters that could affect knowledge sharing in our case. The categories culture management, planning, cybernetic management, reward and compensation, and administrative management were factors considered relevant for our question formulation and are used as the basis for our interview formulation, as well as the literature used in our analysis.

    Our investigation model is used as a basis for a total of 22 interviews with employees within three different affiliate companies within the case company in which the knowledge sharing group covers. The study has four different questionnaires depending on the interviewee's position on the company and if they were involved in the new knowledge sharing group. The interviews include questions about the attitude and possibility of knowledge sharing at the case company and how the case company manages knowledge sharing. The answers where then analyzed based on the literature study and compared to what the staff of the different affiliate companies said and to what their position on the companies where. Based on this, a result is made.

    The study results show that an organization where members are at different geographical locations means that the natural contact between members is missing and that makes the exchange of knowledge more difficult. Communication within organizations is also affected by the geographical spread and can affect the amount of collaborations, where lack of communication within the organization leads to fewer collaborations, and thus lesser knowledge exchange. In addition to this, the organizational structure is affected by the degree of decentralization within organizations by influencing how decision-making is taken in the organization and who are able to influence decisions. The results also show that in a culture of cooperation, where culture is open and organizers help each other, it is easier to encourage knowledge sharing. Furthermore, it shows that cultural management in the form of clans and symbols can affect knowledge sharing by creating an open and familiar culture that encourages knowledge sharing. In order to encourage knowledge sharing in an organization with rewards or compensations, they need to be based on a measurement system that in some way is linked to the knowledge sharing. We see that personal motivation, which is not linked to measurement systems or rewards and compensation, can also affect how willing members of the organization are to share knowledge. Finally, knowledge sharing within groups can be locked in the existing patterns if there are strict rules on how to organize knowledge sharing groups, while no rules can make them unfocused and ineffective. We believe our results of the study coincides with the literature used.

  • 82.
    Havemo, Emelie
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A visual perspective on value creation: Exploring patterns in business model diagrams2018In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 441-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was inspired by the diversity of styles found in the way companies represent their business model visually. Through the visual analysis of how 242 business model diagrams collected from websites and annual reports represent transformation of value, this study identifies a typology of four basic patterns of business model visualization. The typology adds to previous visualization research by proposing two new types of transformational diagram formats, namely transactive and cyclical structures. It is further argued that the typology can be used as a framework for researchers to describe, evaluate and compare the underlying logics of value creation in business model conceptualizations, and for practitioners to generate different business model designs by drawing on the benefits of visualization, such as a more holistic understanding of ideas, better buy-in and improved group communication. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 83.
    Helkkula, Anu
    et al.
    Department of Marketing, CERS—Centre for Relationship Marketing and Service Management, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Department of Marketing, CERS—Centre for Relationship Marketing and Service Management, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Department of Marketing, CERS—Centre for Relationship Marketing and Service Management, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences Elverum, Norway.
    Archetypes of Service Innovation: Implications for Value Cocreation2018In: Journal of Service Research, ISSN 1094-6705, E-ISSN 1552-7379, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 284-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service innovation is a key source of competitive differentiation across firms and markets. Despite growing attention from practitioners and academics alike, systematic scholarly inquiry into service innovation’s diverse theoretical foundations has to date been limited. This article explores different approaches to service innovation and proposes a typology of four archetypes, each informed by a distinct theoretical perspective and by different underlying assumptions. Process-based and output-based archetypes focus on value-adding phases and output value, respectively. Experiential and systemic archetypes have attracted less attention but become central for firms seeking to cocreate phenomenologically determined value within the service ecosystem. The article also contributes to service innovation research and practice by bringing together the existing archetypes, which were previously treated separately. Juxtaposing these archetypes and emphasizing value and value cocreation, the article proposes an integrative view of how novel value cocreation can be enhanced in service innovations. Finally, we develop an agenda for future research, encouraging researchers and managers to plan service innovations systematically, deploying each archetype in value cocreation, and combining them within an integrative approach.

  • 84.
    Hellbe, Simon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Leung, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION: HOW APIS DRIVE BUSINESS MODEL CHANGE AND INNOVATION2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Over the years, information technology has created opportunities to improve and extend businesses and to start conducting business in new ways. With the evolution of IT, all businesses and industries are becoming increasingly digitized. This process, or coevolution, of IT and business coming together is called digital transformation. One of the recent trends in this digital transformation is the use of application programmable interfaces (APIs). APIs are standardized digital communication interfaces, used for communication and exchange of information between systems, services and devices (such as computers, smartphones and connected machines). API communication is one of the foundational building blocks in recent disruptive technology trends such as mobile and cloud computing.

    The purpose of this study is to gain an understanding of the business impact that is created in digital transformation related to the use of APIs. To investigate this novel area, an exploratory study is performed where a frame of reference with an exploratory framework is created based on established academic literature. The exploratory framework consists of three main parts which cover the research questions, including Business Drivers, Business Model Change & Innovation and Challenges & Limitations related to API-enabled digital transformation. The framework is used to gather empirical data consisting of two types, interviews (primary data) and contemporary reports (secondary data). Interviews are performed with API-utilizing companies, consulting firms and IT solution providers and contemporary reports are published by consulting and technology research and advisory firms.

    Two main business drivers are identified in the study. The first is Understanding & Satisfying Customer Needs which is derived from companies experiencing stronger and changing demands for automated, personalized value-adding services. This requires higher degree of integration across channels and organizations. The second driver is Business Agility, which derives from higher requirements on adapting to changing environments while maintaining operational efficiency. Cost Reduction is also mentioned as a third and secondary driver, as a positive side-effect in combination with the other drivers. The identified impact on business models is that business model innovation is mostly happening in the front-end of business model towards customers. Several examples also exist of purely API-enabled businesses that sell services or manage information exchanges over APIs. The challenges and limitations identified are mostly classic challenges of using IT in businesses and not specific to use of APIs, where the general consensus is that IT and business need to become more integrated, and that strategy and governance for API-initiatives need to be established.

  • 85.
    Holmin, Tom
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Improving branding - A case study of a small, niched, management consulting firm2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The competition within the management consulting industry is increasing and many of the smaller consultancies are having trouble attracting new business and achieving company growth. In order for smaller firms to be able to compete, many choose to focus on a niche market. However, firms are still having trouble growing and attracting business from new customers. A way for these firms to increase their market share and sales is to build and maintain a strong brand by working with branding.

    Greenlight Project Management is a small management consulting company focusing on project management. The company has set a target to double its revenue within two years. For a company with such growth ambitions, branding could be considered a powerful weapon that could be used to attract new business.

    This report examines how Greenlight Project Management, a small, niched, management consulting company, can improve their branding efforts in order to strengthen the brand. The process starts with a breakdown of the concept of branding. Several areas are examined in order to construct a model of the branding concept. The model consists of six branding functions, and within each function is a set of activities. The success of the company’s branding is determined by the performance in these activities. The model is then applied to the case company and a gap analysis identifying and evaluating rooms for improvements is performed.

    The findings suggest that the constructed model could be used for assessing the case company’s current branding efforts and assess the room for improvement within each defined branding function. The report concludes which activities the case company needs to improve and gives recommendations on how to do so.

  • 86.
    Hoshi Larsson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    SMES RISK LEAVING MONEY ON THE TABLE: EVIDENCE OF GAPS IN SME KNOWLEDGE ABOUT NEGOTIATIONS2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A great wealth of research concerning negotiations has been accumulated over the years. Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) lack resources and specialization focus needed to assimilate this knowledge and apply it in their negotiations. In addition, current negotiation literature lack in terms of prioritization of different techniques. This paper examines negotiation knowledge levels in SMEs, and analyzes how knowledge levels influence negotiation performance. The empirical foundation in this paper is a multiple interview study with representatives involved in negotiations from 12 different SMEs. An overview of existing literature on negotiations, focusing on business to business negotiations, forms the theoretical base. Empirical findings suggest that SMEs exhibit knowledge gaps in many aspects of negotiations while excelling on others. Lacking areas include tactics and structured evaluation. Problem solving and relationship management were among the stronger areas identified.

  • 87.
    Hoshi Larsson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The role of context, activities, and organization, in Value-Based Procurement2018Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores the adoption of a Value-Based Procurement Strategy. A procurement strategy is value-based when it facilitates procurement to develop attractive value propositions for both suppliers and internal stakeholders. The procurement function, including its activities and organization, and the collaboration with suppliers, are shaped to achieve this goal. SAAB, a Swedish military fighter airplane manufacturer, has been driven to adopt such a strategy by its surrounding context and market position, which demand that SAAB find new ways to attract key suppliers. SAAB responded to this demand by offering suppliers alternative benefits in terms of, for example, knowledge, intelligence, standardization, co-marketing, and prioritization. SAAB offers the empirical opportunity taken by this thesis to explore Value-Based Procurement.

    A theoretical framework built on literature on procurement in terms of procurement context, procurement activities, and procurement organization informs this study. The framework also encompasses literature on value and value propositions. A value perspective describes well both how SAAB’s procurement function has been shaped, and the work that the procurement department does. Nearly thirty hours of interviews with people of different roles within the procurement organization of SAAB and a workshop involving multiple key informants form the empirical base for this explorative, qualitative, single-case study. A thick empirical description of SAAB’s Strategic Sourcing department and its work allows the reader to assess generalizability. The analysis building thereon results in nineteen propositions for how the adoption of a Value- Based Procurement Strategy has implications for procurement activities and organization.

    This study contributes in several ways to research. It recounts an in-depth revelatory case of the adoption of a Value-Based Procurement Strategy and a customer taking a leading role in developing value propositions for suppliers and itself, thus providing insight into an unexplored area. The procurement context encourages the adoption of a Value-Based Procurement Strategy and plays a role in determining what is valuable to suppliers. The procurement activities and procurement organization play enabling roles in successfully implementing Value-Based Procurement, and act as drivers of value proposed to suppliers. Value propositions are tools for developing procurement strategy and for execution thereof through procurement. This thesis also deepens the understanding of value by promoting a parallel view of co-developed customer and supplier value. Finally, it contributes to procurement literature by showing that the buying side has value propositions to make. This thesis contributes to managers by illustrating how a Value- Based Procurement Strategy can be adopted, and possible reasons why it should. It also proposes “value actions” as possible Value-Based Procurement Strategy improvement efforts.

  • 88.
    Hoshi Larsson, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ellström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dynamic and static pricing in open-book accounting2017In: Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management/Emerald, ISSN 1176-6093, E-ISSN 1758-7654, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 21-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to understand differences between open-book accounting (OBA) using static prices and OBA using dynamic prices. The authors identify how these differences influence various aspects of customer–supplier relationships.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This paper is based on a case study involving a builders’ merchant and a wood manufacturer in the UK. The builders’ merchant under discussion has recently outsourced part of its production to the aforementioned wood manufacturer by using OBA with dynamic prices. For this case study, the authors have conducted interviews with multiple people from both parties in the agreement. Additional illustrative cases are provided through a study of other qualitative papers on OBA.

    Findings

    The authors find evidence supporting that, when dynamic prices are used in OBA, risk (unpredictability) is shifted from the supplier to the customer. Also, the customer frequently focuses on the supplier’s costs, both parties often aim for a long-term relationship and the customer becomes more dependent on the supplier, causing high interdependence. Furthermore, empirical evidence suggests that the customer finds price less important, and the reallocation of activities between the customer and supplier is easier in OBA setups in which dynamic prices are used.

    Originality/value

    This paper provides the first study of how differences between dynamic and static prices in OBA influence the customer–supplier relationship. This paper adds to the developing literature on OBA, in particular, as well as to literature on pricing, in general.

  • 89.
    Hoshi Larsson, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rehme, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A Multiple Case Study on How SMEs Negotiate2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The objective of this paper is to explore buyer-seller negotiations in Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) and highlight patterns and differences within the studied group of companies. Design/methodology/approach – This is a multiple case study based on 12 cases. Each case represents an SME in the Östergötland county of Sweden. Representatives from each case company were interviewed. A cross case analysis informs the discussion. Findings – Results indicate that SMEs’ bargaining power is highly dependent on external factors such as competition, and the negotiation strategies of SMEs are influenced by their strong relationship focus. Negotiation preparation is given low priority in favor of informal information gathering during encounters with customers. The negotiation process of SMEs is embedded and influenced by the relational context. Strong SME negotiation areas include the understanding of customer value. Weak areas include the use of negotiation teams, and negotiation performance evaluation. Research limitations/implications – SMEs have previously been treated without special attention in research concerning business negotiations. However, this study identifies multiple aspects in which SMEs approach negotiations with customers differently. Most importantly, future research concerning SME negotiations should consider the relationship aspect of negotiations. Practical implications – Practitioners in SMEs should consider how their market affects their bargaining power, possible use of negotiation teams, alignment of company ethics and negotiation strategies, and spending more time on negotiation preparation and evaluation. Social implications – Originality/value – The study contributes through its exploration and identification of patterns of SMEs’ negotiations with customers. It adds critical areas to consider, to the developing literatures on SMEs and on business negotiations.

  • 90.
    Hosseini, Mojtaba
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The Internationalization of SMEs: An Interactive Perspective of Firm-Level Entrepreneurship and Network Structure2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The positive relationship of firm-level entrepreneurship and performance has received much attention in recent years and has become an attractive title in the entrepreneurship literature. This popularity encourages researchers to study the role played by the phenomenon on other organizational outputs such as internationalization. Until now, the majority of international studies have put their attention on the conceptual explanation of the interaction, and the number of empirical studies on the subject is few. Furthermore, almost all the empirical studies have been performed in developed and emerging markets, and developing areas such as the Middle East are nearly ignored.

    In the real context of Iranian business, policymakers support entrepreneurship as a proven way to improve the internationalization of smaller companies. Following this assumption, several supportive plans have been designed and executed which aim to increase the entrepreneurial status of SMEs as a way to enhance their internationalization. A question worth answering here is: Does having a better entrepreneurial stature mean better internationalization for Iranian SMEs? To answer this question and to fill the gap in the literature on the subject, this research explains the relationship of firm-level entrepreneurship and the internationalization of Iranian SMEs.

    To resolve the current conceptualization problem of firm-level entrepreneurship and to respect a broad conceptualization of entrepreneurship, a profile measurement model was employed in which companies are classified into four different groups: non-entrepreneurial, forced entrepreneurial, latent entrepreneurial, and actual entrepreneurial. This profile model incorporates the two popular constructs of entrepreneurial orientation and corporate entrepreneurship to determine the entrepreneurial stature of a company. Surprisingly, while the literature predicted the highest level of internationalization for actual entrepreneurial companies, the forced entrepreneurial firms showed the best internationalization in reality. The only exception was when the environments became very hostile, in which the actual entrepreneurial SMEs suppressed the forced entrepreneurial, showing better internationalization. These unexpected conclusions led the researcher to consider the complementary role of business networks. A case study approach was applied. The results revealed the importance of actor type in the decision to enter a foreign market, structural holes in identifying international opportunities, and network closure in realizing the opportunities. In simpler words, the forced entrepreneurial company held a better position to receive the information about international markets because most actors who dealt with them where international companies. In addition, it enjoyed an external network rich of structural holes and a dense internal network, which respectively facilitated the exploration and exploitation of subsequent international opportunities.

    All in all, however, firm-level entrepreneurship seems an important factor of companies’ internationalization that could somehow justify why entrepreneurial companies show better international activities than nonentrepreneurial firms, it is not able to explain how different types of entrepreneurial companies could hold different levels of internationalization. This is the mutual interaction of entrepreneurial status and the network structure that presents a powerful explanation of the difference in internationalization among companies. Therefore, researchers are invited to focus more on a configurational analysis of firm-level entrepreneurship, network structure, and internationalization, and policymakers are recommended to see both entrepreneurship and business networks when they design a supportive plan to improve the internationalization of SMEs.

  • 91.
    Hugosson, Mårten
    et al.
    Department of Management and Organization, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences.
    Nord, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Customer perceived value and emerging business models in the wood building components industry – learnings from Swedish public building projects2017In: Nordic Opportunities, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the question of efficient business models in the Swedish wood-building industry, seen from the public customers’ point of view. The building industry is currently ongoing rapid development and wood is prescribed as building material in a growing number of public building projects. The industry is generally under pressure to innovate and decrease costs and the changes combined have on the one hand have created dialogs between regards how new wooden constructions on sustainable building principles can be created. From the public procurers’ point of view, crucial questions concerns what value that can be created for long term sustainable economy of the buildings and what environmental performance that can be obtained.

    For assessing the perceived value of effects of three different business models a comparative case study were conducted. The cases were analysed deploying business model theory and construction management theory on perceived values. As regards the business models there was a particular focus on the degree of prefabrication, services and potential partnering options in creating offerings and undertaking production and erection of wooden bearing constructions. The cases were chosen due to that they differed with respect to the types of contracting applied, mirroring three business models and degrees of “in-house” involvement.

  • 92.
    Hurmekoski, Elias
    et al.
    European Forest Institute (EFI), Joensuu, Finland.
    Jonsson, Ragnar
    European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC),Ispra, Italy .
    Nord, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Context, drivers, and future potential for wood-frame multi-story construction in Europe2015In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 99, p. 181-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Compared to many manufacturing industries, there have been few major improvements over the past few decades in the productivity, profitability, or the environmental impact of construction. However, driven by institutional changes, promotion campaigns, and technological development in the 1990s, novel industrial wood-frame multi-story construction (WMC) practices have been emerging in some European countries. The aim of the study is to explore the WMC market potential in Europe by combining two complementary approaches: Top-down scenario analysis and bottom-up innovation diffusion analysis. The results show that the WMC diffusion is heavily dependent on the regulatory framework and the structure of the construction industry. The risk-averse nature of the construction value chain resisting the uptake of new practices appears to be a more significant hindrance for the future market potential of WMC, compared to the possible competition from alternative construction practices. It would require both increasing competition within the WMC sector and increasing co-operation between wood product suppliers and the construction sector to attract investments, to reduce costs, and to make the WMC practices more credible throughout the construction value chain.

  • 93.
    Håkansson Modin, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics.
    Olofsson, Gustaf
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics.
    The International Market Selection Process of Multinational Enterprises Expanding to Transition Economy Markets2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 94.
    Imre, Özgün
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Adopting Information Systems in a Small Company: A Longitudinal Study.2016In: Journal of Applied Economics and Business Research, ISSN 1927-033X, E-ISSN 1927-033X, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 269-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For some time there has been an increase in adoption of enterprise systems by small companies. With welldocumented potential benefits, there are a lot of reasons to adopt them. In this study however the choice to adopt smaller pieces of information systems by a small organization is investigated to provide a counter example to the integrated-solution literature. With the intention to adopt an enterprise system at the beginning, the case provides a dynamic story of a small organization and how various factors impacted on the intention and resulted in an assemblage of information systems instead. By adoption the technology-organisation-environment framework and a single case study design, the case indicates that in addition to the oft-cited factors such as organisational size and IT readiness, social norms and the characteristics of a central individual, such as the owner, play a prominent role in information systems adoption, and highlights how these factors are connected to each other. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

  • 95.
    Imre, Özgün
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Adopting Information Systems Perspectives from Small Organizations2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Why do organizations adopt information systems? Is it just because of financial reasons, of concerns for efficiency? Or is it due to external pressures, such as competitor pressure, that an organization adopts an information system?

    And, how does the adoption take place? Is it a linear process, or is the process one of  conflicts? Does a specific person govern this process, or do we have multiple parties involved? What happens if these conflicts occur among those involved? How does the organization move on and achieve a successful information system adoption?

    By investigating two organizations, one international academic journal and one South American manufacturing company, this thesis aims to investigate the whys and hows of information system adoption, and aims to contribute to the discourse on information system adoptions in small organizations – an often underrepresented segment in information system adoption literature.

    By adopting different theoretical lenses throughout the five research papers included, this body of work suggests that even when seemingly simple, information system adoptions can become rather complex. The cases reveal that the role of information systems and issues related to information system adoptions are often not well thought-out in the early days of the organization. The actors’ understandings of adoption and consequences mature and the information systems become more intertwined.

    Common use of stakeholder theory introduces general stakeholders and their interaction with the focal organization. The cases reveal that the adoption process involves multiple actors, even within what would initially appear as a stakeholder, and that those actors can be in conflict with each other. These conflicts often lead to negotiations, and the cases reveal that these negotiations are opportunities of learning; the actors engage with the information system and with each other, gaining new knowledge about the issues at hand.

    The dissertation argues that there are various social worlds in information system adoptions, and various factors – ranging from organizational structure to social norms – that often affect why and how the organization undergoes an adoption process. The multiple power relations and divergent interests of stakeholders in these adoption processes, and how information systems affect other parts of the organization, reinforce the need for a well thought-out, flexible and reflexive approach to information system adoptions.

  • 96.
    Imre, Özgün
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Constructing an open source ERP sales pitch - In search for interpretative repertoires2014In: / [ed] Mola, L. Carugati, A. Kokkinaki, A. Pouloudi, N., 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Open source enterprise resource planning (OS-ERP) systems have been gaining recognition in the last few years. However while the research has focused on the implementation phase of OS-ERP systems, there is scant research done on the adoption process of such systems. This paper looks at an early paper on an OS-ERP system, targeting both practitioners and researchers, to identify the repertoires used to argue for the adoption of the said system. To achieve this aim the paper is evaluated by using a strain of discourse analysis - interpretative repertoires. Three distinct repertoires are identified that are used to argue for the unique value gained by adopting the OS-ERP in question, by both highlighting positive aspects of the system, as well as alluding the pitfalls of other systems. These repertoires are also mapped to the existing literature on diffusion of innovations and resource based view to highlight how the existing ideas are reformulated in the identified repertoires.

  • 97.
    Imre, Özgün
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Learning by negotiation – Implementing a journal management system2015In: / [ed] Lambrinoudakis, K., Morabito, V., Themistocleous, M., 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates how an international academic journal invests in an information system. Following the criticism that learning in an organisation is not conflict free the study sketches the decision making around the information system as a series of negotiations. The case shows that during these negotiations, the information system played the role of a boundary object that resulted in the editorial team understanding the system in different ways than previously. These negotiations paved the way for learning in the organisation, with the information system highlighting differences among the participants involved with the journal.

  • 98.
    Imre, Özgün
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Learning by Negotiation: Stake and Salience in Implementing a Journal Management System2017In: FINANCIAL ENVIRONMENT AND BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, SPRINGER INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING AG , 2017, Vol. 4, p. 369-383Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research investigates how an international academic journal implements a new journal management system to overcome their knowledge management issues. By adopting a case study approach, the stakeholders involved within the project are identified, and their salience for the organization is mapped. By providing an account of how these stakeholders negotiated each other, the case highlights how these negotiations are learning processes, showing that learning process is not a conflict-free process. The case also shows that the stakeholder salience changes throughout the project, thus raising the importance of viewing these negotiations as learning platforms rather than just arenas of power struggles, to use them as opportunities to identify possible future stakeholders.

  • 99.
    Imre, Özgün
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Reshaping The Stakeholder Model: Insights From Negotiated Order Theory2016In: Research Papers, Association for Information Systems, 2016, article id 26Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The need to complement the existing stakeholder theory with more dynamic perspectives has been acknowledged for some time. This article uses the insight from negotiated order theory to provide a more actor oriented and dynamic illustration of the stakeholder understanding by adapting the classic Freeman model, strengthening its pedagogical value. Adopting a hermeneutic approach, the model is built by drawing from the extant literature and applied in a case to highlight how particularities of the case can be presented differently. By providing some factors that influence the dynamic process and how the actors affected the negotiations, the model presents the dynamism in stakeholder management and the temporality of the situation, as well as how the roles the individuals play within stakeholder management should be kept in focus while conducting a stakeholder analysis.

  • 100.
    Imre, Özgün
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Talking to the students : Repertoires of a syllabus2014In: Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference Social Communication in the Real and Virtual World / [ed] Kowal, J.; Kuzio, A.; Wawrzak-Chodaczek, M., University of Wrocław, Poland; Linköping University, Sweden; College of Management "Edukacja" Wrocław, Poland , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    • Purpose: The aim of this paper is to identify the repertoires that the teachers draw from when writing a course syllabus.

    • Design/Methodology: To achieve this a syllabus of a course is scrutinised by using discourse analysis, namely interpretative repertoires.

    • Results: Two distinct repertoires are identified which the teacher draw from. By employing these repertoires the opposing demands from the students and regulatory bodies as well as the traditional role of the teacher, the teachers maintain their position. By using language the teachers are able to maintain the traditional roles of teacher and student, thus reinforce the existing system.

    • Limitations: The study uses only one syllabus as its data, thus limiting the potential generalizability of the findings.

    • Research/Practical Implications: Results show how the teachers use rather paradoxical repertoires to maintain their position and reinforce the existing system.

    • Originality/Value: The results show that even on a syllabus the teachers have to maintain their position when confronted with demands from students and regulatory bodies, and employ paradoxical repertoires to do so.

12345 51 - 100 of 227
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf