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  • 51. Alcalde, Juan
    et al.
    Marzan, Ignacio
    Saura, Eduard
    Marti, David
    Ayarza, Puy
    Juhlin, Christopher
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Perez-Estaun, Andres
    Carbonell, Ramon
    3D geological characterization of the Hontomin CO2 storage site, Spain: Multidisciplinary approach from seismic, well-log and regional data2014In: Tectonophysics, ISSN 0040-1951, E-ISSN 1879-3266, Vol. 627, p. 6-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first Spanish Technological Development plant for CO2 storage is currently under development in Hontomin (Spain), in a fractured carbonate reservoir. The subsurface 3D geological structures of the Hontomin site were interpreted using well-log and 3D seismic reflection data. A shallow low velocity zone affects the wave propagation and decreases the coherency of the underlying seismic reflections, deteriorating the quality of the seismic data, and thus preventing a straightforward seismic interpretation. In order to provide a fully constrained model, a geologically supervised interpretation was carried out. In particular, a conceptual geological model was derived from an exhaustive well-logging analysis. This conceptual model was then improved throughout a detailed seismic facies analysis on selected seismic sections crossing the seismic wells and in consistency with the regional geology, leading to the interpretation of the entire 3D seismic volume. This procedure allowed characterizing nine main geological levels and four main fault sets. Thus, the stratigraphic sequence of the area and the geometries of the subsurface structures were defined. The resulting depth-converted 3D geological model allowed us to estimate a maximum CO2 storage capacity of 5.85 Mt. This work provides a 3D geological model of the Hontomin subsurface, which is a challenging case study of CO2 storage in a complex fractured carbonate reservoir. 

  • 52.
    Aleklett, Kjell
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Physics, Department of Nuclear and Particle Physics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Physics, Department of Nuclear and Particle Physics. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics. Kärnfysik.
    Campbell, Colin
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Physics, Department of Nuclear and Particle Physics. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics. Kärnfysik.
    The Peak and Decline of World Oil and Gas Production2003In: Minerals & Energy, ISSN 1404-1049, Vol. 18, p. 5-20Article in journal (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 53. Alfsen, K. H.
    et al.
    Bonifazi, C.
    Pedersen, A.
    Lindqvist, Per-Arne
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Space and Plasma Physics.
    Electric field and plasma observations near the magnetopause and bow shock during a rapid compression.1984In: Achievements of the International Magnetospheric Study (IMS), p. 99-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A fast compressional motion of the magnetopause resulting from the interaction of an interplanetary shock and the Earth's magnetosphere is discussed. The ISEE-1 and 2 satellites were in the frontside magnetosphere before the shock. A magnetosonic wave front, the magnetopause, and the bow shock passed them in a very short time. By a combination of electric and magnetic field data it is possible to determine the magnetosonic and the magnetopause velocity. -from STAR, 23(14), 1985

  • 54. ALFSEN, KH
    et al.
    BONIFAZI, C
    PEDERSEN, A
    Lindqvist, Per-Arne
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Space and Plasma Physics.
    INTERACTION BETWEEN AN INTERPLANETARY SHOCK AND THE EARTHS MAGNETOSPHERE ON AUGUST 27, 1978 - ISEE-1 ELECTRIC-FIELD AND ISEE-2 PLASMA OBSERVATIONS1984In: JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-SPACE PHYSICS, Vol. 89, no NA10, p. 8863-8871Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Alling, Vanja
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Porcelli, D.
    Mörth, Carl-Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences. Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Baltic Nest Institute.
    Anderson, L. G.
    Sanchez-Garcia, L.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Örjan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Andersson, P. S.
    Humborg, Christoph
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM). Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Baltic Nest Institute.
    Degradation of terrestrial organic carbon, primary production and out-gassing of CO2 in the Laptev and East Siberian Seas as inferred from delta C-13 values of DIC2012In: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, ISSN 0016-7037, E-ISSN 1872-9533, Vol. 95, p. 143-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cycling of carbon on the Arctic shelves, including outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere, is not clearly understood. Degradation of terrestrial organic carbon (OCter) has recently been shown to be pronounced over the East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS), i.e. the Laptev and East Siberian Seas, producing dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). To further explore the processes affecting DIC, an extensive suite of shelf water samples were collected during the summer of 2008, and assessed for the stable carbon isotopic composition of DIC (delta C-13(DIC)). The delta C-13(DIC) values varied between -7.2 parts per thousand to +1.6 parts per thousand and strongly deviated from the compositions expected from only mixing between river water and seawater. Model calculations suggest that the major processes causing these deviations from conservative mixing were addition of (DIC) by degradation of OCter, removal of DIC during primary production, and outgassing of CO2. All waters below the halocline in the ESAS had delta C-13(DIC) values that appear to reflect mixing of river water and seawater combined with additions of on average 70 +/- 20 mu M of DIC, originating from degradation of OCter in the coastal water column. This is of the same magnitude as the recently reported deficits of DOCter and POCter for the same waters. The surface waters in the East Siberian Sea had higher delta C-13(DIC) values and lower DIC concentrations than expected from conservative mixing, consistent with additions of DIC from degradation of OCter and outgassing of CO2. The outgassing of CO2 was equal to loss of 123 +/- 50 mu M DIC. Depleted delta C-13(POC) values of -29 parts per thousand to -32 parts per thousand in the mid to outer shelf regions are consistent with POC from phytoplankton production. The low delta C-13(POC) values are likely due to low delta C-13(DIC) of precursor DIC, which is due to degradation of OCter, rather than reflecting terrestrial input compositions. Overall, the delta C-13(DIC) values confirm recent suggestions of substantial degradation of OCter over the ESAS, and further show that a large part of the CO2 produced from degradation has been outgassed to the atmosphere.

  • 56. Alm, L.
    et al.
    Farrugia, C. J.
    Paulson, K. W.
    Argall, M. R.
    Torbert, R. B.
    Burch, J. L.
    Ergun, R. E.
    Russell, C. T.
    Strangeway, R. J.
    Khotyaintsev, Y. V.
    Lindqvist, Per-Arne
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Space and Plasma Physics.
    Marklund, Göran
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Space and Plasma Physics.
    Giles, B. L.
    Differing Properties of Two Ion-Scale Magnetopause Flux Ropes2018In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 123, no 1, p. 114-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present results from the Magnetospheric Multiscale constellation encountering two ion-scale, magnetopause flux ropes. The two flux ropes exhibit very different properties and internal structure. In the first flux rope, there are large differences in the currents observed by different satellites, indicating variations occurring over sub-d(i) spatial scales, and time scales on the order of the ion gyroperiod. In addition, there is intense wave activity and particle energization. The interface between the two flux ropes exhibits oblique whistler wave activity. In contrast, the second flux rope is mostly quiescent, exhibiting little activity throughout the encounter. Changes in the magnetic topology and field line connectivity suggest that we are observing flux rope coalescence.

  • 57.
    Alm, Love
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    André, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vaivads, Andris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Khotyaintsev, Yuri V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Torbert, R. B.
    Univ New Hampshire, Ctr Space Sci, Durham, NH 03824 USA;Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA.
    Burch, J. L.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA.
    Ergun, R. E.
    Univ Colorado, Atmospher & Space Phys Lab, Campus Box 392, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Lindqvist, P. -A
    Russell, C. T.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, IGPP EPSS, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Giles, B. L.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.
    Mauk, B. H.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Appl Phys Lab, Laurel, MD USA.
    Magnetotail Hall Physics in the Presence of Cold Ions2018In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 45, no 20, p. 10941-10950Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the first in situ observation of cold ionospheric ions modifying the Hall physics of magnetotail reconnection. While in the tail lobe, Magnetospheric Multiscale mission observed cold (tens of eV) E x B drifting ions. As Magnetospheric Multiscale mission crossed the separatrix of a reconnection exhaust, both cold lobe ions and hot (keV) ions were observed. During the closest approach of the neutral sheet, the cold ions accounted for similar to 30% of the total ion density. Approximately 65% of the initial cold ions remained cold enough to stay magnetized. The Hall electric field was mainly supported by the j x B term of the generalized Ohm's law, with significant contributions from the del center dot P-e and v(c) x B terms. The results show that cold ions can play an important role in modifying the Hall physics of magnetic reconnection even well inside the plasma sheet. This indicates that modeling magnetic reconnection may benefit from including multiscale Hall physics. Plain Language Summary Cold ions have the potential of changing the fundamental physics behind magnetic reconnection. Here we present the first direct observation of this process in action in the magnetotail. Cold ions from the tail lobes were able to remain cold even deep inside the much hotter plasma sheet. Even though the cold ions only accounted for similar to 30% of the total ions, they had a significant impact on the electric fields near the reconnection region.

  • 58.
    Almqvist, Bjarne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Biedermann, Andrea
    Klonowska, Iwona
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics.
    Misra, Santanu
    Petrofabric development during experimental partial melting and recrystallization of a mica-schist analogue2015In: Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems, ISSN 1525-2027, E-ISSN 1525-2027, Vol. 16, no 10, p. 3472-3483Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 59.
    Almqvist, Bjarne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Björk, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. CSIRO, Mineral Resources, Bradfield Road, West Lindfield, NSW 2070, Australia.
    Mattsson, Hannes B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics.
    Hedlund, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Gunnarsson, Klas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Malehmir, Alireza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Högdahl, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics.
    Bäckström, Emma
    Nordic Iron Ore, Ludvika, Sweden.
    Marsden, Paul
    Nordic Iron Ore, Ludvika, Sweden.
    Magnetic characterisation of magnetite and hematite from the Blötberget apatite-iron-oxide deposits (Bergslagen), south-central Sweden2019In: Canadian journal of earth sciences (Print), ISSN 0008-4077, E-ISSN 1480-3313, Vol. 56, no 9, p. 948-957Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rock magnetic measurements were carried out on drill core material and hand specimens from the Blötberget apatite-iron oxide deposit in the Bergslagen ore province, south-central Sweden, to characterise their magnetic properties. Measurements included several kinds of magnetic susceptibility and hysteresis parameters. Petrographic and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to independently identify and quantify the amount and type of magnetite and hematite. Two hematite-rich samples were studied with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to quantify the trace element chemistry in hematite and investigate the potential influence of trace elements on magnetic properties. Three aspects of this study are noteworthy. 1) Hematite-rich samples display strong anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility, which is likely to affect the appearance and modelling of magnetic anomalies. 2) The magnitude-drop in susceptibility across Curie and Néel temperature transitions show significant correlation with the respective weight percent (wt%) of magnetite and hematite. Temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements can therefore be used to infer the amounts of both magnetite and hematite. 3) observations of a strongly depressed Morin transition at ca -60 to -70 C (200 to 210 K) are made during low-temperature susceptibility measurements. This anomalous Morin transition is most likely related to trace amounts of V and Ti that substitute for Fe in the hematite. When taken together, these magnetic observations improve the understanding of the magnetic anomaly signature of the Blötberget apatite-iron oxide deposits and may potentially be utilised in a broader context when assessing similar (Paleoproterozoic) apatite-iron oxide systems.

  • 60.
    Almqvist, Bjarne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Henry, Bernard
    Jackson, Mike
    Werner, Tomasz
    Lagroix, France
    Methods and applications of magnetic anisotropy: A special issue in recognition of the career of Graham J. Borradaile2014In: Tectonophysics, ISSN 0040-1951, E-ISSN 1879-3266, Vol. 629, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Almqvist, Bjarne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Hirt, Ann
    Herwegh, Marco
    Ebert, Andreas
    Walter, Jens
    Leiss, Bernd
    Burlini, Luigi
    Seismic anisotropy in the Morcles nappe shear zone: Implications for seismic imaging of crustal scale shear zones2013In: Tectonophysics, ISSN 0040-1951, E-ISSN 1879-3266, Vol. 603, p. 162-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microstructures and textures of calcite mylonites from the Morcles nappe large-scale shearzone in southwestern Switzerland develop principally as a function of 1) extrinsic physical parameters including temperature, stress, strain, strain rate and 2) intrinsic parameters, such as mineral composition. We collected rock samples at a single location from this shear zone, on which laboratory ultrasonic velocities, texture and microstructures were investigated and quantified. The samples had different concentration of secondary mineral phases (<5 up to 40 vol.%). Measured seismic P waveanisotropy ranges from 6.5% for polyphase mylonites (similar to 40 vol.%) to 18.4% in mylonites with <5 vol.% secondary phases. Texture strength of calcite is the main factor governing the seismic P wave anisotropy. Measured S wave splitting is generally highest in the foliation plane, but its origin is more difficult to explain solely by calcite texture. Additional texture measurements were made on calcite mylonites with low concentration of secondary phases (<= 10 vol.%) along the metamorphic gradient of the shear zone (15 km distance). A systematic increase in texture strength is observed moving from the frontal part of the shear zone (anchimetamorphism: 280 degrees C) to the higher temperature, basal part (greenschist facies: 350-400 degrees C). Calculated P wave velocities become increasingly anisotropic towards the high-strain part of the nappe, from an average of 5.8%in the frontal part to 13.2% in the root of the basal part. Secondary phases raise an additional complexity, and may act either to increase or decrease seismic anisotropy of shear zone mylonites. Inlight of our findings we reinterpret the origin of some seismically reflective layers in the Grone-Zweisimmen line in southwestern Switzerland (PNR20 Swiss National Research Program). We hypothesize that reflections originate in part from the lateral variation in textural and microstructural arrangement of calcite mylonites in shear zones. 

  • 62.
    Almqvist, Bjarne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Koyi, Hemin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics.
    Bulk strain in orogenic wedges based on insights from magnetic fabrics in sandbox models2018In: Geology, ISSN 0091-7613, E-ISSN 1943-2682, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 483-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) analysis is used as a petrofabric indicator for a set of four identical-setup sandbox models that were shortened by different amounts and simulate contraction in a fold-and-thrust belt. During model shortening, a progressive reorientation of the initial magnetic fabric occurs due to horizontal compaction of the sand layers. At the early stages of shortening, magnetic lineation (k(1) axis) rotates parallel to the model backstop with subhorizontal orientation, whereas the minimum susceptibility (k(3) axis) is subvertical, which indicates a partial tectonic overprint of the initial fabric. With further shortening, the k(3) axis rotates to subhorizontal orientation, parallel to shortening direction, marking the development of a dominant tectonic magnetic fabric. A near-linear transition in magnetic fabric is observed from the initial bedding to tectonic fabric in all four models, which reflects a progressive transition in deformation from foreland toward hinterland. Model results confirm a long-held hypothesis where the AMS pattern and degree of anisotropy have been suggested to reflect the amount of layer-parallel shortening, based on field observations in many mountain belts. Results furthermore indicate that grain rotation may play a significant role in low-grade compressive tectonic regimes. The combination of analogue models with AMS enables the possibility to predict magnetic fabrics in different tectonic settings and to develop quantitative links between AMS and strain.

  • 63.
    Almqvist, Bjarne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Mainprice, David
    Seismic properties and anisotropy of the continental crust: Predictions based on mineral texture and rock microstructure2017In: Reviews of geophysics, ISSN 8755-1209, E-ISSN 1944-9208, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 367-433Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Almqvist, Bjarne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Misra, Santanu
    Klonowska, Iwona
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics.
    Mainprice, David
    Majka, Jaroslaw
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics.
    Ultrasonic velocity drops and anisotropy reduction in mica-schist analogues due to melting with implications for seismic imaging of continental crust2015In: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, ISSN 0012-821X, E-ISSN 1385-013X, Vol. 425, p. 24-33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 65. Amanda Collaboration, -
    et al.
    Pohl, Arvid
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Optical Properties of Deep Glacial Ice at the South Pole2006In: Journal of Geophysical Research, ISSN 0148-0227, E-ISSN 2156-2202, Vol. 111, no D13, p. D13203-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have remotely mapped optical scattering and absorption in glacial ice at the South Pole for wavelengths between 313 and 560 nm and depths between 1100 and 2350 m. We used pulsed and continuous light sources embedded with the AMANDA neutrino telescope, an array of more than six hundred photomultiplier tubes buried deep in the ice. At depths greater than 1300 m, both the scattering coefficient and absorptivity follow vertical variations in concentration of dust impurities, which are seen in ice cores from other Antarctic sites and which track climatological changes. The scattering coefficient varies by a factor of seven, and absorptivity (for wavelengths less than ∼450 nm) varies by a factor of three in the depth range between 1300 and 2300 m, where four dust peaks due to stadials in the late Pleistocene have been identified. In our absorption data, we also identify a broad peak due to the Last Glacial Maximum around 1300 m. In the scattering data, this peak is partially masked by scattering on residual air bubbles, whose contribution dominates the scattering coefficient in shallower ice but vanishes at ∼1350 m where all bubbles have converted to nonscattering air hydrates. The wavelength dependence of scattering by dust is described by a power law with exponent −0.90 ± 0.03, independent of depth. The wavelength dependence of absorptivity in the studied wavelength range is described by the sum of two components: a power law due to absorption by dust, with exponent −1.08 ± 0.01 and a normalization proportional to dust concentration that varies with depth; and a rising exponential due to intrinsic ice absorption which dominates at wavelengths greater than ∼500 nm.

  • 66.
    Amin, Hadi
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Lars
    Division of Geodesy and satellite positioning, KTH.
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences.
    A global vertical datum defined by the conventional geoid potential and the Earth ellipsoid parameters2019In: Journal of Geodesy, ISSN 0949-7714, E-ISSN 1432-1394, Vol. 93, no 10, p. 1943-1961Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The geoid, according to the classical Gauss–Listing definition, is, among infinite equipotential surfaces of the Earth’s gravity field, the equipotential surface that in a least squares sense best fits the undisturbed mean sea level. This equipotential surface, except for its zero-degree harmonic, can be characterized using the Earth’s global gravity models (GGM). Although, nowadays, satellite altimetry technique provides the absolute geoid height over oceans that can be used to calibrate the unknown zero-degree harmonic of the gravimetric geoid models, this technique cannot be utilized to estimate the geometric parameters of the mean Earth ellipsoid (MEE). The main objective of this study is to perform a joint estimation of W0, which defines the zero datum of vertical coordinates, and the MEE parameters relying on a new approach and on the newest gravity field, mean sea surface and mean dynamic topography models. As our approach utilizes both satellite altimetry observations and a GGM model, we consider different aspects of the input data to evaluate the sensitivity of our estimations to the input data. Unlike previous studies, our results show that it is not sufficient to use only the satellite-component of a quasi-stationary GGM to estimate W0. In addition, our results confirm a high sensitivity of the applied approach to the altimetry-based geoid heights, i.e., mean sea surface and mean dynamic topography models. Moreover, as W0 should be considered a quasi-stationary parameter, we quantify the effect of time-dependent Earth’s gravity field changes as well as the time-dependent sea level changes on the estimation of W0. Our computations resulted in the geoid potential W0 = 62636848.102 ± 0.004 m2 s−2 and the semi-major and minor axes of the MEE, a = 6378137.678 ± 0.0003 m and b = 6356752.964 ± 0.0005 m, which are 0.678 and 0.650 m larger than those axes of GRS80 reference ellipsoid, respectively. Moreover, a new estimation for the geocentric gravitational constant was obtained as GM = (398600460.55 ± 0.03) × 106 m3 s−2.

  • 67.
    Amini, Samar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Roberts, Roland
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Raeesi, Mohammad
    SeisAnalysis AS, Bergen, Norway.
    Shomali, Zaher Hossein
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Lund, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Zarifi, Zoya
    Univ Western Ontario, Dept Earth Sci, London, ON, Canada.
    Fault slip and identification of the second fault plane in the Varzeghan earthquake doublet2018In: Journal of Seismology, ISSN 1383-4649, E-ISSN 1573-157X, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 815-831Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An intraplate earthquake doublet, with 11-min delay between the events, devastated the city of Varzeghan in northwestern Iran on August 11, 2012. The first Mw 6.5 strike-slip earthquake, which occurred after more than 200 years of low seismicity, was followed by an Mw 6.4 oblique thrust event at an epicentral separation of about 6 km. While the first event can be associated with a distinct surface rupture, the absence of a surface fault trace and no clear aftershock signature makes it challenging to identify the fault plane of the second event. We use teleseismic body wave inversion to deduce the slip distribution in the first event. Using both P and SH waves stabilize the inversion and we further constrain the result with the surface rupture extent and the aftershock distribution. The obtained slip pattern shows two distinct slip patches with dissimilar slip directions where aftershocks avoid high-slip areas. Using the estimated slip for the first event, we calculate the induced Coulomb stress change on the nodal planes of the second event and find a preference for higher Coulomb stress on the N-S nodal plane. Assuming a simple slip model for the second event, we estimate the combined Coulomb stress changes from the two events on the focal planes of the largest aftershocks. We find that 90% of the aftershocks show increased Coulomb stress on one of their nodal planes when the N-S plane of the second event is assumed to be the correct fault plane.

  • 68.
    Andersson, Christer
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Regional strukturgeologisk tolkning av fjärranalysdata1985Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 69.
    Andersson, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    3D Structure and Emplacement of the Alnö Alkaline and Carbonatite Complex, Sweden: Integrated Geophysical and Physical Property Investigations2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbonatites are carbonate-rich magmatic rocks that are rare and of great relevance for our understanding of crustal and mantle processes. Although found on all continents and in settings ranging from Archaean to present-day, their deeper plumbing system is still poorly understood. Therefore, the main goal of this thesis is to broaden the existing knowledge of carbonatite systems, often limited to surface geological observations, by providing depth constraints using a number of geophysical methods and petrophysical measurements. The Alnö alkaline and carbonatite complex in central Sweden was chosen for this purpose. Data from three reflection seismic lines, ground gravity and magnetic measurements are presented. These data are complemented by a series of petrophysical measurements, including ultrasonic velocities, density, magnetic bulk susceptibility, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), and magnetic remanence, to aid in the interpretation of the geophysical data. The reflection seismic data indicate a solidified saucer-shaped fossil magma chamber at about 3 km depth. Caldera-style volcanism, constrained by surface geological observations, provides a plausible scenario to explain the emplacement of the complex, suggesting that carbonatite magmas have been stored, transported and erupted in a similar manner to known emplacement mechanisms for silicic calderas, although these are compositionally different. The AMS data from most of the carbonatite sheets in Alnö show a strong degree of anisotropy and oblate-shaped susceptibility ellipsoids. A set of syn- and post-emplacement processes that may control the AMS signature is evaluated based on the dataset. Overprinting of the primary flow patterns by processes related to sheet closure at the terminal stage of magma transport may explain the AMS observations. A complementary study using 3D inversion of ground gravity and aeromagnetic data was then carried out to better delineate the 3D internal architecture of the complex. Resulting models indicate a depth extent of the complex to about 3-4 km, consistent with the interpretation of the reflection seismic data. The modelling results of a ring-shaped magnetic anomaly observed in the Klingefjärden bay adjacent to Alnö Island further suggest that the complex may extend laterally about 3 km towards the north.

  • 70.
    Andersson, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Berggrund och Kvicklera mäts med vibrationer2011In: HUSBYGGAREN, Vol. 6, p. 24-25Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 71.
    Andersson, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Magma transport in sheet intrusionsArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 72.
    Andersson, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Unravelling internal architecture of the Alnö alkaline and carbonatite complex (central Sweden) by 3D modelling of gravity and magnetic dataManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Almqvist, Bjarne S. G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Burchardt, Steffi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics.
    Troll, Valentin R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics.
    Malehmir, Alireza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Snowball, Ian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Kubler, Lutz
    Geol Survey Sweden, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Magma transport in sheet intrusions of the Alnö carbonatite complex, central Sweden2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 27635Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Magma transport through the Earth's crust occurs dominantly via sheet intrusions, such as dykes and cone-sheets, and is fundamental to crustal evolution, volcanic eruptions and geochemical element cycling. However, reliable methods to reconstruct flow direction in solidified sheet intrusions have proved elusive. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) in magmatic sheets is often interpreted as primary magma flow, but magnetic fabrics can be modified by post-emplacement processes, making interpretation of AMS data ambiguous. Here we present AMS data from cone-sheets in the Alno carbonatite complex, central Sweden. We discuss six scenarios of syn- and post-emplacement processes that can modify AMS fabrics and offer a conceptual framework for systematic interpretation of magma movements in sheet intrusions. The AMS fabrics in the Alno cone-sheets are dominantly oblate with magnetic foliations parallel to sheet orientations. These fabrics may result from primary lateral flow or from sheet closure at the terminal stage of magma transport. As the cone-sheets are discontinuous along their strike direction, sheet closure is the most probable process to explain the observed AMS fabrics. We argue that these fabrics may be common to cone-sheets and an integrated geology, petrology and AMS approach can be used to distinguish them from primary flow fabrics.

  • 74.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Malehmir, Alireza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Internal architecture of the Alnö alkaline and carbonatite complex (central Sweden) revealed using 3D models of gravity and magnetic data2018In: Tectonophysics, ISSN 0040-1951, E-ISSN 1879-3266, Vol. 740-741, p. 53-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Alnö Complex in central Sweden is one of the largest alkaline and carbonatite ring-shaped intrusions in the world. Presented here is the 3D models of ground gravity and aeromagnetic data that confirm some of the previous ideas about the 3D geometry of the complex but also suggest that the complex may continue laterally further to north than previously expected. The data show the complex as (i) a strong positive Bouguer anomaly, around 20 mGal, and (ii) a strong positive magnetic anomaly, exceeding 2000 nT. Magnetic structures are clearly discernible within the complex and surrounding area. Both gravity and magnetic inversion models suggest that dense (> 2850 kg/m(3)) and magnetic ( > 0.05 SI) rocks extend down to about 3.5-4 km depth. Previous studies have suggested a solidified magma reservoir at this approximate depth. The inversion models further suggest that two apparently separate regions within the complex are likely connected at depth, starting from 800 to 1000 m, implying a common source for the rocks observed in these two regions. Modelling of the aeromagnetic data indicates that a > 3 km wide ring-shaped magnetic high situated in the sea north of Alnö Island may be a part of the complex. This could link a smaller satellite intrusion in Soraker on mainland to the larger intrusion on Alnö Island. While the rim of the ring must consist of highly magnetic rocks to support the anomaly, the centre has relatively low magnetisation and is probably made up of low-magnetic wall-rocks or metasomatised wall-rocks down to about 2 km depth. Below this depth the 3D susceptibility model suggests higher magnetic susceptibility values. Worldwide alkaline and carbonatite complexes are the main resources for rare earth elements (REEs), and owing to the size of the Alnö Complex, it can be highly prospective for REEs at depth.

  • 75.
    Andersson, Rina A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Meyers, Philip A.
    Effect of climate change on delivery and degradation of lipid biomarkers in a Holocene peat sequence in the Eastern European Russian Arctic2012In: Organic Geochemistry, ISSN 0146-6380, E-ISSN 1873-5290, Vol. 53, p. 63-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lipid biomarkers from a peat plateau profile from the Northeast European Russian Arctic were analyzed. The peat originated as a wet fen ca. 9 ka BP and developed into a peat bog after the onset of permafrost ca. 2.5 ka BP. The distributions and abundances of n-alkanols, n-alkanoic acids, n-alkanes, n-alkan-2-ones and sterols were determined to study the effect of degradation on their paleoclimate proxy information. Plant macrofossil analysis was also used in combination with the lipid distributions. The n-alkanol and n-alkanoic acid distributions in the upper part of the sequence generally correspond to compositions expected from plant macrofossil assemblages. Their carbon preference index (CPI) values increase with depth and age, whereas those of the n-alkanes decrease. The different CPI patterns suggest that n-alkanoic acids and n-alkanols deeper in the sequence may be produced during humification through alteration of other lipids. Excursions in the n-alkanoic acid content also suggest an important contribution of invasive roots to the lipid biomarker composition. The CPIs associated with these compounds show that under permafrost conditions organic material from Sphagnum is better preserved than material from vascular plants. Increasing stanol/stenol ratio values and decreasing n-alkane CPI values indicate progressive degradation of organicmatter (OM) with depth. The n-alkan-2-one/n-alkane and n-alkan-2-one/n-alkanoic acid ratioswere shown to be useful proxies that can reflect the degree of OM preservation and suggest that both microbial oxidation of n-alkanes and decarboxylation of n-alkanoic acids produce n-alkan-2-ones in this peat sequence.

  • 76.
    Andersson, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
     b-Value Variations Preceding the Devastating, 1999 Earthquake, near Izmit, Turkey2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The potential of temporal b-value variations as an intermediate-term (weeks to months) earthquake precursor was investigated in the western portion of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ), between January 1982 to December 2004. The focus of the study is on the devastating, 1999 earthquake, near Izmit. Lists of events were provided from two teleseismic catalogues, ISC and NEIC, which are complete for threshold magnitude 3.7, comprising 287 and 224 events, respectively. To determine b-values, a technique of sliding overlapping time-windows was applied, using a fixed number of events in each window. Deduced b-values reveal large temporal variations in a broad range, 0.75-1.7 (ISC) and 0.5-1.6 (NEIC). There are statistically significant drops in b-value observed for both catalogues, preceding the occurrence of the Izmit earthquake. Also, present results reveal promising b(t)-characteristics of another large earthquake that occurred in the vicinity of Duzce, about 3 months after the Izmit shock. The stability of results is examined using different threshold magnitudes, different window sizes and step increments, declustering and a test through magnitude conversion. Observed correlation between low b and the occurrence of large earthquakes suggests that b(t) has a potential to act as an intermediate-term precursor in earthquake predictions.

  • 77.
    Andersson, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Temporala och spatiala egenskaper i makroseismiska katalogdata 1375-20002011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    I Sverige uppmäts årligen runt 700 jordskalv, men ytterst få skalv är av ansenlig styrka. Andelen skalv som vi människor har förmåga att känna av är därav relativt liten. Denna studie är baserad på makroseismisk katalogdata över svenska jordskalv mellan åren 1375-2000. Att studien är makroseismisk innebär att den är icke-instrumentell och därmed baserad på mänskliga observationer i de jordbävningsdrabbade områdena. Katalogen som legat till grund för undersökningen består av 883 fall och innehåller information om tid för skalvet, utbredning och styrka. All erhållen data har sorterats i Matlab efter egenkomponerade sorteringsprogram. Resultaten har redovisats i diagramform, varav vissa sedan plottats i ArcGIS för geografisk visualisering. Syftet med undersökningen har varit att analysera erhållen katalogdata och om möjligt finna förklaringar till varför jordskalvsfrekvensen tett sig som den gjort genom tiden. Framförallt har fokus legat på tidsberoende variationer och att försöka tolka koncentrationen av jordskalv kring januari, vilken kan skådas i majoriteten av rapportens diagram. Teorier som frostknäppar, årstidscykler, och veckodag tas upp för diskussion i rapporten och analyseras huruvida dessa kan utgöra möjliga faktorer till resultatet.

     

    Makroseismiska undersökningar innehar alltid stora osäkerheter eftersom de baseras på källor vars tillförlitlighet i många fall kan ifrågasättas. Denna rapport har därför huvudsakligen baserats på analys av tre tidsintervall, där hänsyn tagits till samhällets utveckling och därmed källmaterialets homogenitet och trovärdighet. Med tanke på de osäkerheter som en makroseismisk undersökning innebär är det möjligt att någon händelse av icke-seismiskt ursprung är inkluderad i katalogen. Svårigheten är bara att avgöra hur omfattande mängd av katalogdata dessa händelser utgör. 

  • 78.
    Andrews, David J.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Cowley, S. W. H.
    Dougherty, M. K.
    Lamy, L.
    Provan, G.
    Southwood, D. J.
    Planetary period oscillations in Saturn's magnetosphere: Evolution of magnetic oscillation properties from southern summer to post-equinox2012In: Journal of Geophysical Research, ISSN 0148-0227, E-ISSN 2156-2202, Vol. 117, p. A04224-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the evolution of the properties of planetary period magnetic field oscillations observed by the Cassini spacecraft in Saturn's magnetosphere over the interval from late 2004 to early 2011, spanning equinox in mid-2009. Oscillations within the inner quasi-dipolar region (L <= 12) consist of two components of close but distinct periods, corresponding essentially to the periods of the northern and southern Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR) modulations. These give rise to modulations of the combined amplitude and phase at the beat period of the two oscillations, from which the individual oscillation amplitudes and phases (and hence periods) can be determined. Phases are also determined from northern and southern polar oscillation data when available. Results indicate that the southern-period amplitude declines modestly over this interval, while the northern-period amplitude approximately doubles to become comparable with the southern-period oscillations during the equinox interval, producing clear effects in pass-to-pass oscillation properties. It is also shown that the periods of the two oscillations strongly converge over the equinox interval, such that the beat period increases significantly from similar to 20 to more than 100 days, but that they do not coalesce or cross during the interval investigated, contrary to recent reports of the behavior of the SKR periods. Examination of polar oscillation data for similar beat phase effects yields a null result within a similar to 10% upper limit on the relative amplitude of northern-period oscillations in the south and vice versa. This result strongly suggests a polar origin for the two oscillation periods.

  • 79.
    Andriopoulou, Maria
    et al.
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, Graz, Austria.
    Nakamura, Rumi
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, Graz, Austria.
    Wellenzohn, Simon
    Karl Franzens Univ Graz, Inst Geophys Astrophys & Meteorol, Graz, Austria.
    Torkar, Klaus
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, Graz, Austria.
    Baumjohann, Wolfgang
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, Graz, Austria.
    Torbert, R. B.
    Univ New Hampshire, Dept Phys, Durham, NH 03824 USA;Univ New Hampshire, Ctr Space Sci, Durham, NH 03824 USA.
    Lindqvist, Per-Arne
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Space & Plasma Phys, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Khotyaintsev, Yuri V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Dorelli, John
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.
    Burch, James L.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA.
    Plasma Density Estimates From Spacecraft Potential Using MMS Observations in the Dayside Magnetosphere2018In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 123, no 4, p. 2620-2629Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using spacecraft potential observations with and without active spacecraft potential control (on/off) from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, we estimate the average photoelectron emission as well as derive the plasma density information from spacecraft potential variations and active spacecraft potential control ion current. Such estimates are of particular importance especially during periods when the plasma instruments are not in operation and also when electron density observations with higher time resolution than the ones available from particle detectors are necessary. We compare the average photoelectron emission of different spacecraft and discuss their differences. We examine several time intervals when we performed our density estimations in order to understand the strengths and weaknesses of our data set. We finally compare our derived density estimates with the plasma density observations provided by plasma detectors onboard MMS, whenever available, and discuss the overall results. The estimated electron densities should only be used as a proxy of the electron density, complimentary to the plasma moments derived by plasma detectors, especially when the latter are turned off or when higher time resolution observations are required. While the derived data set can often provide valuable information about the plasma environment, the actual values may often be very far from the actual plasma density values and should therefore be used with caution.

  • 80.
    André, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Cully, Christopher M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Low-energy ions: A previously hidden solar system particle population2012In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 39, p. L03101-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ions with energies less than tens of eV originate from the Terrestrial ionosphere and from several planets and moons in the solar system. The low energy indicates the origin of the plasma but also severely complicates detection of the positive ions onboard sunlit spacecraft at higher altitudes, which often become positively charged to several tens of Volts. We discuss some methods to observe low-energy ions, including a recently developed technique based on the detection of the wake behind a charged spacecraft in a supersonic flow. Recent results from this technique show that low-energy ions typically dominate the density in large regions of the Terrestrial magnetosphere on the nightside and in the polar regions. These ions also often dominate in the dayside magnetosphere, and can change the dynamics of processes like magnetic reconnection. The loss of this low-energy plasma to the solar wind is one of the primary pathways for atmospheric escape from planets in our solar system. We combine several observations to estimate how common low-energy ions are in the Terrestrial magnetosphere and briefly compare with Mars, Venus and Titan.

  • 81.
    André, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Li, Wenya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Toledo-Redondo, S.
    European Space Agcy ESAC, Madrid, Spain..
    Khotyaintsev, Yuri V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vaivads, Andris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Graham, Daniel B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Norgren, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Burch, J.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Lindqvist, P. -A
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Marklund, G.
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ergun, R.
    Univ Colorado, LASP, Boulder, CO 80309 USA..
    Torbert, R.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA.;Univ New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 USA..
    Magnes, W.
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, Graz, Austria..
    Russell, C. T.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Earth & Space Sci, Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA..
    Giles, B.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Moore, T. E.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Chandler, M. O.
    NASA, Marshall Space Flight Ctr, Huntsville, AL USA..
    Pollock, C.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Young, D. T.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Avanov, L. A.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Dorelli, J. C.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Gershman, D. J.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.;Univ Maryland, Dept Astron, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Paterson, W. R.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Lavraud, B.
    Univ Toulouse, Inst Rech Astrophys & Planetol, Toulouse, France.;CNRS, UMR 5277, Toulouse, France..
    Saito, Y.
    Inst Space & Astronaut Sci, JAXA, Chofu, Tokyo, Japan..
    Magnetic reconnection and modification of the Hall physics due to cold ions at the magnetopause2016In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 43, no 13, p. 6705-6712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Observations by the four Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft are used to investigate the Hall physics of a magnetopause magnetic reconnection separatrix layer. Inside this layer of currents and strong normal electric fields, cold (eV) ions of ionospheric origin can remain frozen-in together with the electrons. The cold ions reduce the Hall current. Using a generalized Ohm's law, the electric field is balanced by the sum of the terms corresponding to the Hall current, the vxB drifting cold ions, and the divergence of the electron pressure tensor. A mixture of hot and cold ions is common at the subsolar magnetopause. A mixture of length scales caused by a mixture of ion temperatures has significant effects on the Hall physics of magnetic reconnection.

  • 82.
    Antonatos, Georgios
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Near Surface Investigations using Reflection Seismic and VSP Measurements in the Ekeby District, Southern Sweden2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Ekeby district is located in Östergötland County in south – central Sweden. In October 2012 both Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) and surface seismic data were acquired simultaneously in three boreholes (BH1B, GH2,RL1) under pressure from gas. A weight drop was used as the source with 24 single components geophones, 2 m apart on the surface and 24 hydrophones, 1m apart, at 3 different depths in the boreholes. The acquired records were processed using Claritas software in order to obtain an image of the geologicalstructure in the vicinity of the boreholes. Surface and VSP data were separated from each other and different processing flows were adopted for each data set. The seismic images obtained from two of the surface profiles and the VSP profiles are providing information for the top 10m – 20m below the surface. The seismic sections are in agreement with thelocal geology and correlate very well with the borehole logs. The surface data from profile BH1B indicate a planar or nearly planar interface at depth 25m with velocity above the interface at 2200 m/s while the RL1 profile suggests a planar interface at 11m depth with formation velocity above at 2000 m/s. The seismic image for the VSP profile BH1B indicates an interface at 24m depth. The velocity for the formation above the interface ranges from 1600 m/s to 1900 m/s. Furthermore, the VSP profile RL1 identifies the water level at 18m from the surface and below a formation with velocity 4000 m/s.

  • 83.
    Appel, Peter W.Uitterdijk
    et al.
    Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland.
    Abrahamsen, Niels
    Geophysical Laboratory, Aarhus University.
    Rasmussen, Thorkild Maack
    Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland.
    Unusual features caused by lightning impact in West Greenland2006In: Geological Magazine, ISSN 0016-7568, E-ISSN 1469-5081, Vol. 143, no 5, p. 737-741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two lightning impacts are described from an area near the Inland Ice in West Greenland. The first lightning blasted an outcrop of metacherts. It subsequently split into two branches, which traversed rock outcrops and boulders, leaving behind two white almost straight lines, 30 m and 14 m long, respectively, where all lichens and plants were burned away. On the white lines the upper few millimetres of the traversed boulders were melted to a glass which subsequently peeled off by thermal expansion to leave a rough surface. Magnetic investigation of an amphibolite boulder found on the white line showed that a strong electric current indeed traversed the boulder. A few years later a second lightning impacted on a mountaintop close to the first impact. The second lightning left a trail on the rock surface covered by a thin layer of glass. The glass displays spectacular colours ranging from metallic blue to red, yellow and green.

  • 84.
    Applegate, Patrick
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Alley, Richard B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Challenges in the Use of Cosmogenic Exposure Dating of Moraine Boulders to Trace the Geographic Extents of Abrupt Climate Changes: The Younger Dryas Example2011In: Abrupt Climate Change: Mechanisms, Patterns, and Impacts / [ed] Rashid, H; Polyak, L; MosleyThompson, E, Washington DC: American Geophysical Union (AGU), 2011, p. 111-122Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cosmogenic exposure dating has sometimes been used to identify moraines associated with short-lived climatic events, such as the Younger Dryas (12.9-11.7 ka). Here we point out two remaining challenges in using exposure dating to identify moraines produced by abrupt climate changes. Specifically, (1) a commonly applied sampling criterion likely yields incorrect exposure dates at some sites, and (2) geomorphic processes may introduce bias into presently accepted nuclide production rate estimates. We tit a geomorphic process model that treats both moraine degradation and boulder erosion to collections of exposure dates from two moraines that were deposited within a few thousand years of the Younger Dryas. Subsampling of the modeled distributions shows that choosing boulders for exposure dating based on surface freshness yields exposure dates that underestimate the true age of the moraine by up to several thousand years. This conclusion applies only where boulders do not erode while buried but do erode after exhumation. Moreover, one of our fitted data sets is part of the global nuclide production rate database. Our fit of the moraine degradation model to this data set suggests that nuclide production rates at that site are several percent higher than previously thought. Potential errors associated with sampling strategies and production rate estimates are large enough to interfere with exposure dating of moraines, especially when the moraines are associated with abrupt climate changes. We suggest sampling strategies that may help minimize these problems, including a guide for determining the minimum number of samples that must be collected to answer particular paleoclimate questions.

  • 85.
    Archer, W. E.
    et al.
    Univ Saskatchewan, Dept Phys & Engn Phys, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
    Gallardo-Lacourt, B.
    Univ Calgary, Dept Phys & Astron, Calgary, AB, Canada.
    Perry, G. W.
    Univ Calgary, Dept Phys & Astron, Calgary, AB, Canada;New Jersey Inst Technol, Ctr Solar Terr Res, Newark, NJ 07102 USA.
    St-Maurice, J. P.
    Univ Saskatchewan, Dept Phys & Engn Phys, Saskatoon, SK, Canada;Univ Western Ontario, Dept Phys & Astron, London, ON, Canada.
    Buchert, Stephan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Univ Western Ontario, Dept Phys & Astron, London, ON, Canada.
    Donovan, E.
    Univ Calgary, Dept Phys & Astron, Calgary, AB, Canada.
    Steve: The Optical Signature of Intense Subauroral Ion Drifts2019In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 46, no 12, p. 6279-6286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is currently known about the optical phenomenon known as Steve. The first scientific publication on the subject suggests that Steve is associated with an intense subauroral ion drift (SAID). However, additional inquiry is warranted as this suggested relationship as it is based on a single case study. Here we present eight occurrences of Steve with coincident or near-coincident measurements from the European Space Agency's Swarm satellites and show that Steve is consistently associated with SAID. When satellite observations coincident with Steve are compared to that of typical SAID, we find the SAID associated with Steve to have above average peak ion velocities and electron temperatures, as well as extremely low plasma densities.

  • 86. Argall, M. R.
    et al.
    Paulson, K.
    Alm, L.
    Rager, A.
    Dorelli, J.
    Shuster, J.
    Wang, S.
    Torbert, R. B.
    Vaith, H.
    Dors, I.
    Chutter, M.
    Farrugia, C.
    Burch, J.
    Pollock, C.
    Giles, B.
    Gershman, D.
    Lavraud, B.
    Russell, C. T.
    Strangeway, R.
    Magnes, W.
    Lindqvist, Per-Arne
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Space and Plasma Physics.
    Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.
    Ergun, R. E.
    Ahmadi, N.
    Electron Dynamics Within the Electron Diffusion Region of Asymmetric Reconnection2018In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 123, no 1, p. 146-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the agyrotropic nature of electron distribution functions and their substructure to illuminate electron dynamics in a previously reported electron diffusion region (EDR) event. In particular, agyrotropy is examined as a function of energy to reveal detailed finite Larmor radius effects for the first time. It is shown that the previously reported approximate to 66eV agyrotropic "crescent" population that has been accelerated as a result of reconnection is evanescent in nature because it mixes with a denser, gyrotopic background. Meanwhile, accelerated agyrotropic populations at 250 and 500eV are more prominent because the background plasma at those energies is more tenuous. Agyrotropy at 250 and 500eV is also more persistent than at 66eV because of finite Larmor radius effects; agyrotropy is observed 2.5 ion inertial lengths from the EDR at 500eV, but only in close proximity to the EDR at 66eV. We also observe linearly polarized electrostatic waves leading up to and within the EDR. They have wave normal angles near 90 degrees, and their occurrence and intensity correlate with agyrotropy. Within the EDR, they modulate the flux of 500eV electrons travelling along the current layer. The net electric field intensifies the reconnection current, resulting in a flow of energy from the fields into the plasma. Plain Language Summary The process of reconnection involves an explosive transfer of magnetic energy into particle energy. When energetic particles contact modern technology such as satellites, cell phones, or other electronic devices, they can cause random errors and failures. Exactly how particles are energized via reconnection, however, is still unknown. Fortunately, the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission is finally able to detect and analyze reconnection processes. One recent finding is that energized particles take on a crescent-shaped configuration in the vicinity of reconnection and that this crescent shape is related to the energy conversion process. In our paper, we explain why the crescent shape has not been observed until now and inspect particle motions to determine what impact it has on energy conversion. When reconnection heats the plasma, the crescent shape forms from the cool, tenuous particles. As plasmas from different regions mix, dense, nonheated plasma obscures the crescent shape in our observations. The highest-energy particle population created by reconnection, though, also contains features of the crescent shape that are more persistent but appear less dramatically in the data.

  • 87. Artyushkov, E V
    et al.
    Mörner, Nils-Axel
    Tarling, D H
    The cause of loss of lithospheric rigidity in areas far from plate tectonic activity2000In: Geophysical Journal International, ISSN 0956-540X, E-ISSN 1365-246X, Vol. 143, no 3, p. 752-776Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Significant losses of lithospheric strength are generally considered to be almost entirely associated with abnormal heating or steep lithospheric bending and/or stretching near to active plate boundaries. Several areas-the western Greater Caucasus, the North Crimean basin, the Carpathian foredeep, the Peri-Caspian basin and the Trans-Caspian areas-are shown to have steep basement slopes, usually comprising a difference in height of several kilometres over lateral distances of only 20-30 km, corresponding to very low, similar to 3-5 km, effective elastic thicknesses of the lithosphere. Each of these areas is shown to have undergone rapid steepening of the basement slope, usually within 1-2 Myr but in up to 10 Myr in some areas. At such times, these localities were far from active plate boundaries and in positions where bending forces could not have been transmitted to them from far-distant plate activities. Surface and/or subsurface loading can similarly be excluded as mechanisms for such steepening, and there is no apparent outflow of crustal materials into adjacent regions. It is suggested that such rapid subsidence far from plate tectonic activity is caused by rapid increases in the local density of the lithosphere. This could occur as a result of, for example, a gabbro-eclogite transformation in the lower crust, catalysed by the infiltration of volatiles from the asthenosphere. The resultant contraction of the mafic rocks would be non-uniform in space and produce high deviatory stresses, reducing the viscosity in the lower crust to similar to 10(23) Pa s. This would result in the rapid subsidence of the top of this layer, accompanied by steep ductile bending of the overlying upper crust. Such steer downwarping of the basement would be accompanied by a similar steepening of the underlying weakened mantle. The formation of such steep slopes thus indicates a weakening of the entire lithospheric layer, most probably due to the infiltration of volatiles from the asthenosphere, and unrelated to coeval plate tectonic activity.

  • 88.
    Arvidsson, Mimmi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Dahlin, T.
    Fernlund, Joanne
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Geoelectrical imaging for aggregate quality investigations2008In: Near Surface 2008 - 14th European Meeting of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics, European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the aggregate industry the use of geophysical measuring is rare. The aim of this project is to investigate how geophysical instruments can be a tool in prospecting for rock quarries, and also how they can be a help in which direction they should expand in. To have control over the quality of the aggregates is important and therefore to know when the rock mass is changing is of interest for the production. Three quarries, with different properties, were investigated with different geophysical methods, of which only the result from the resistivity and IP measurement is presented here. The fracture frequency was measured as well for comparison. The depth to the bedrock is visible in the inverted resistivity sections for the three sites, and an estimation of the quantity of the till is possible to make from the 3D-inversions. It is also shown that the fracture frequency affects the resistivity of the bulk mass. The results also show that the resistivity imaging is well suited for detecting anomalies in the rock mass, which might affect the production. This is especially clear in one of the quarries where a dolerite dyke is clearly visible in the combined resistivity and IP results.

  • 89.
    Ask, Daniel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Methodology for determination of the complete stress tensor and its variation versus depth based on overcoring rock stress data2017In: Rock Mechanics and Engineering: Volume 1: Principles, CRC Press, 2017, p. 245-265Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a methodology for evaluating the complete stress field and its variation versus depth. The validity of the protocol is visualized in the case study at the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), south-eastern Sweden, a site predominantly sampled using the overcoring method. Overcoring data involve explicit (measurementrelated) as well as implicit uncertainties. The former include for example uncertainties regarding determination of the location of the test sections in physical space and of the value of elastic parameters, as well as uncertainties in strain-/displacement measurements, etc. The explicit types of uncertainties are fairly straightforward to analyze and correct for during the stress calculation procedure. The implicit uncertainties, on the other hand, such as the assumption of homogeneity and linear-elasticity, are much more difficult to appreciate and correct for, if possible at all. Yet, as for explicit errors, they may render an individual test or a series of tests completely meaningless, and it is therefore crucial that both categories of uncertainties are identified, understood, and properly considered within the process of stress field determinations. The proposed methodology follows the directions outlined by ISRM for rock stress estimation using overcoring methods (Sjöberg et al., 2003; Sjöberg & Klasson, 2003). In addition, we pay particular attention on avoiding, identifying, and correcting for various potential sources of error, the sampling strategy, and considerations of the continuity hypothesis.

  • 90.
    Ask, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Ask, Daniel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Rosberg, Jan Erik
    Lund University.
    Exploration for deep enhanced geothermal systems with Riksriggen and the LTU downhole stress measurement system2017In: 4th Sustainable Earth Sciences Conference and Exhibition 2017, Held at Near Surface Geoscience Conference and Exhibition 2017, European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers, 2017, p. 21-25Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent developments in drilling technology have resulted in about five to ten times faster penetration rates compared to penetration rates of conventional diamond drilling. The increased penetration rates open up for affordable drilling of deep boreholes in regions with cold crust, such as in Scandinavia, allowing for geothermal energy generation in enhanced geothermal systems. We present two infrastructures for downhole sampling and testing, Riksriggen and the LTU downhole stress measurement system. Riksriggen produces a borehole that allows in-situ sampling and testing to 2.5 km depth. Furthermore, highly relevant data for geothermal energy production is produced, for example fracture geometries and frequencies, as well as depth of zones with elevated transmissivity zones and their in-situ hydraulic conductivities. The LTU downhole stress measurement system allows determination of the three-dimensional stress tensor and its spatial variation with depth in a scientific unambiguously way. Thus, Riksriggen and the LTU downhole stress measurement system provide data needed for planning most stable borehole trajectory with depth and to determine optimal pattern of production and injection wells (e.g. hydraulic stimulation by fraccing), as well as for assessing the risk of induced seismicity.

  • 91. Aunai, N.
    et al.
    Retino, A.
    Belmont, G.
    Smets, R.
    Lavraud, B.
    Vaivads, Andris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    The proton pressure tensor as a new proxy of the proton decoupling region in collisionless magnetic reconnection2011In: Annales Geophysicae, ISSN 0992-7689, E-ISSN 1432-0576, Vol. 29, no 9, p. 1571-1579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cluster data is analyzed to test the proton pressure tensor variations as a proxy of the proton decoupling region in collisionless magnetic reconnection. The Hall electric potential well created in the proton decoupling region results in bounce trajectories of the protons which appears as a characteristic variation of one of the in-plane off-diagonal components of the proton pressure tensor in this region. The event studied in this paper is found to be consistent with classical Hall field signatures with a possible 20% guide field. Moreover, correlations between this pressure tensor component, magnetic field and bulk flow are proposed and validated, together with the expected counterstreaming proton distribution functions.

  • 92. Aunai, N.
    et al.
    Retino, A.
    Belmont, G.
    Smets, R.
    Lavraud, B.
    Vaivads, Andris
    Uppsala universitet, Institutet för rymdfysik, Uppsalaavdelningen.
    The proton pressure tensor as a new proxy of the proton decoupling region in collisionless magnetic reconnection2011In: Annales Geophysicae, ISSN 0992-7689, E-ISSN 1432-0576, Vol. 29, no 9, p. 1571-1579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cluster data is analyzed to test the proton pressure tensor variations as a proxy of the proton decoupling region in collisionless magnetic reconnection. The Hall electric potential well created in the proton decoupling region results in bounce trajectories of the protons which appears as a characteristic variation of one of the in-plane off-diagonal components of the proton pressure tensor in this region. The event studied in this paper is found to be consistent with classical Hall field signatures with a possible 20% guide field. Moreover, correlations between this pressure tensor component, magnetic field and bulk flow are proposed and validated, together with the expected counterstreaming proton distribution functions.

  • 93.
    Autio, U.
    et al.
    Oulu Mining School, University of Oulu.
    Smirnov, Maxim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Savvaidis, Alexandros S.
    Institute of Engineering Seismology and Earthquake Engineering, Thessaloniki.
    Suopios, Pantelis
    Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Chania.
    Bastani, Mehrdad
    Geological Survey of Sweden.
    Combining electromagnetic measurements in the Mygdonian sedimentary basin, Greece2016In: Journal of Applied Geophysics, ISSN 0926-9851, E-ISSN 1879-1859, Vol. 135, p. 261-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a novel approach where time-domain electromagnetic (TEM) data are transformed and subsequently used in two-dimensional (2-D) magnetotelluric inversion of the determinant of the impedance tensor. The main idea is to integrate TEM with magnetotelluric (MT) data to produce subsurface electrical resistivity models. Specifically, we show that 2-D MT data inversion of the determinant of the impedance tensor supported by inclusion of TEM–MT-transformed data has superior resolution at the near surface and at the same time static shift afflicting the MT data can be addressed. Thus, the approach allows for practical express integration of TEM data with MT measurements as opposed to a full combined 3-D inversion, which requires significant resources. The approach is successfully applied in the Mygdonian sedimentary basin located in Northern Greece. In addition to TEM and MT data, also controlled source — and radiomagnetotelluric data are available from the Mygdonian basin, which have been subjected to 2-D analysis previously. We have extended the analysis to a full 3-D inversion using ModEM code. All obtained models are analysed and are in a good agreement.

  • 94. Ayarza, P.
    et al.
    Martínez Catalán, J. R.
    Alvarez-Marrón, J.
    Juhlin, Christopher
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Geophysical constraints on the structure of a limited ocean-continent subduction zone at the north Iberian margin2004In: Tectonics, Vol. 23, p. 1010-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Late Cretaceous to Cenozoic convergence between Iberia and Europe led to the partial closure of the Bay of Biscay with limited southward subduction of oceanic crust below the North Iberian Margin. Inclined sub-Moho reflections and diffractions observed in deep seismic reflection profiles shot across the margin are especially well represented in two reflection profiles: ESCIN-3.2 and ESCIN-3.3. These two profiles have been chosen to test if the sub-Moho reflections correspond to true primary deep events and, provided that they are reflecting off the subduction zone, to investigate its deep structure. Spectral analysis together with travel time estimation and migration allow us to characterize a number of these sub-Moho events as deep-source, low-frequency (∼19 Hz), reflections and diffractions. Synthetic seismograms were generated by three-dimensional seismic modeling of a sub-Moho southward dipping surface, interpreted to correspond to the top of subducted oceanic crust. Comparison between the real and synthetic data show that inclined, low-frequency sub-Moho reflections in both, ESCIN-3.2 and ESCIN-3.3 profiles may correspond to reflections from southward subducted Bay of Biscay oceanic crust. Geoid, free-air gravity, and absolute topography modeling provides additional constraints on the lithospheric-scale structure of this limited ocean-continent subduction zone beneath the North Iberian Margin.

  • 95.
    Backman, Fredrick
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Från föhn till feu!: Esrange och den norrländska rymdverksamhetens tillkomsthistoria från sekelskiftet 1900 till 19662010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay is about the origin, planning and establishment of the European Space Research Organisation's (ESRO) sounding rocket base Esrange outside Kiruna in Northern Sweden. Three main questions are examined. First I show there were not just scientific and technical but also political, economical as well as military reasons to build a European rocket base. Second, I scrutinize the reasons to choose Northern Sweden as the location for the rocket base. As it turns out, the main reasons were the favourable location of Northern Sweden within the aurora oval zone, the proximity of the Kiruna Geophysical Observatory, and the possibility to use a large, although not quite uninhabited, area where the launched rockets could crash. Finally, I examine the difficulty of talking about boundaries of various kinds, such as temporal, spatial and functional. The essay also provides a discussion on possible ways to continue research on this topic.

  • 96. Bader, A.
    et al.
    Wieser, G. Stenberg
    Andre, M.
    Wieser, M.
    Futaana, Y.
    Persson, M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna, Sweden.
    Nilsson, H.
    Zhang, T. L.
    Proton Temperature Anisotropies in the Plasma Environment of Venus2019In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 124, no 5, p. 3312-3330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Velocity distribution functions (VDFs) are a key to understanding the interplay between particles and waves in a plasma. Any deviation from an isotropic Maxwellian distribution may be unstable and result in wave generation. Using data from the ion mass spectrometer IMA (Ion Mass Analyzer) and the magnetometer (MAG) onboard Venus Express, we study proton distributions in the plasma environment of Venus. We focus on the temperature anisotropy, that is, the ratio between the proton temperature perpendicular (T-perpendicular to) and parallel (T-parallel to) to the background magnetic field. We calculate average values of T-perpendicular to and T-parallel to for different spatial areas around Venus. In addition we present spatial maps of the average of the two temperatures and of their average ratio. Our results show that the proton distributions in the solar wind are quite isotropic, while at the bow shock stronger perpendicular than parallel heating makes the downstream VDFs slightly anisotropic (T-perpendicular to/T-parallel to > 1) and possibly unstable to generation of proton cyclotron waves or mirror mode waves. Both wave modes have previously been observed in Venus's magnetosheath. The perpendicular heating is strongest in the near-subsolar magnetosheath (T-perpendicular to/ T-parallel to approximate to 3/2), which is also where mirror mode waves are most frequently observed. We believe that the mirror mode waves observed here are indeed generated by the anisotropy. In the magnetotail we observe planetary protons with largely isotropic VDFs, originating from Venus's ionosphere.

  • 97.
    Bader, A.
    et al.
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, Kiruna, Sweden;Lulea Tekniska Univ, Kiruna, Sweden;Univ Lancaster, Phys, Lancaster, England.
    Wieser, G. Stenberg
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, Kiruna, Sweden.
    André, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Wieser, M.
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, Kiruna, Sweden.
    Futaana, Y.
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, Kiruna, Sweden.
    Persson, M.
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, Kiruna, Sweden;Umea Univ, Dept Phys, Umea, Sweden.
    Nilsson, H.
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, Kiruna, Sweden.
    Zhang, T. L.
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, Graz, Austria.
    Proton Temperature Anisotropies in the Plasma Environment of Venus2019In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 124, no 5, p. 3312-3330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Velocity distribution functions (VDFs) are a key to understanding the interplay between particles and waves in a plasma. Any deviation from an isotropic Maxwellian distribution may be unstable and result in wave generation. Using data from the ion mass spectrometer IMA (Ion Mass Analyzer) and the magnetometer (MAG) onboard Venus Express, we study proton distributions in the plasma environment of Venus. We focus on the temperature anisotropy, that is, the ratio between the proton temperature perpendicular (T-perpendicular to) and parallel (T-parallel to) to the background magnetic field. We calculate average values of T-perpendicular to and T-parallel to for different spatial areas around Venus. In addition we present spatial maps of the average of the two temperatures and of their average ratio. Our results show that the proton distributions in the solar wind are quite isotropic, while at the bow shock stronger perpendicular than parallel heating makes the downstream VDFs slightly anisotropic (T-perpendicular to/T-parallel to > 1) and possibly unstable to generation of proton cyclotron waves or mirror mode waves. Both wave modes have previously been observed in Venus's magnetosheath. The perpendicular heating is strongest in the near-subsolar magnetosheath (T-perpendicular to/ T-parallel to approximate to 3/2), which is also where mirror mode waves are most frequently observed. We believe that the mirror mode waves observed here are indeed generated by the anisotropy. In the magnetotail we observe planetary protons with largely isotropic VDFs, originating from Venus's ionosphere.

  • 98.
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Urban and regional planning/GIS-institute.
    Combination of seismic and an isostatic crustal thickness models using Butterworth filter in a spectral approach2012In: Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, ISSN 1367-9120, E-ISSN 1878-5786, Vol. 59, p. 240-248Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 99.
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Urban and regional planning/GIS-institute.
    Global earth isostatic model using smoothed Airy-Heiskanenand Vening Meinesz hypotheses2012In: Earth Science Informatics, ISSN 1865-0473, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 93-104Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 100.
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Urban and regional planning/GIS-institute.
    Impact of compensating mass on the topographic mass: A study using isostatic and non-isostatic Earth crustal models2012In: Acta Geodaetica et Geophysica Hungarica, ISSN 1217-8977, E-ISSN 1587-1037, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 29-51Article in journal (Refereed)
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