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  • 451.
    Nyström, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Ahn, Song Ee
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Sandberg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Utvärdering av Nordiskt Nätverk för Vuxnas Lärande 2015-20162016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the evaluation is to gather knowledge concerning the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and challenges of the organization Nordic Network for Adult Learning (NVL). More specifically, it puts emphases on the activities, distribution of the results and the organizations contributions in the Nordic region, with specific attention on the undertakings of the networks. Another aspect addressed in the evaluation are the effects of NVL’s work regarding adding value to the Nordic region and its contributions to quality and innovation, as well as policy and practice development in Scandinavia. The evaluation is based on individual interviews with coordinators, the web editor and external experts. Focus group interviews were conducted with network members. The results show that NVL is managed and run by knowledgeable and committed members. Their work is characterized by flexibility and independence while at the same time being governed by shared and general objectives formulated by NVL. The network consists of members from all of the Nordic countries, which makes possible contribution to both individual learning as well as a collective knowledge development and dissemination. Thus, NVL contributes to a regional learning in the Nordic region. One of the future challenges is to manage the members time constraints and to ensure that there is a sustainable development of the networks. Furthermore, there is a need for a stronger link between the networks result and policy development in the Nordic countries in relation to issues of adult learning.

  • 452.
    Nyström, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Edelbring, Samuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hult, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Continuing professional development: pedagogical practices of interprofessional simulation in health care2017In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 303-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing complexity of health care practice makes continuing professional development (CPD) essential for health care professionals. Simulation-based training is a CPD activity that is often applied to improve interprofessional collaboration and the quality of care. The aim of this study is to explore simulation as a pedagogical practice for the CPD of health care professionals. Specifically, the study focuses on how a professional development activity, the simulation, is enacted to support interprofessional collaboration and learning. A practice theory perspective is used as the theoretical framework. In this, the professional practice is conceptualised as being embodied, relational and situated in sociomaterial arrangements. Ten introduction and reflection sessions following interprofessional full-scale manikin-based simulations with professionals were video-recorded. The recordings were analysed following a stepwise qualitative collaborative approach developed for the purpose. The key findings suggest that the professional competence activity is enacted and interconnected with and governed by historical traditions of institutional teaching practices as well as simulation practices. Despite the intentions of team and interprofessional training, the institutional teaching and simulation practices constrain and hinder the intended outcomes of professional development in interprofessional collaboration.

  • 453.
    Nyström, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Edelbring, Samuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hult, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Debriefing practices in interprofessional simulation with students: A sociomaterial perspective2016In: BMC Medical Education, ISSN 1472-6920, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 16, no 148, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The debriefing phase is an important feature of simulation activities for learning. This study applies a sociomaterial perspective on debriefing in interprofessional simulation with medical and nursing students. Sociomaterial perspectives are increasingly being used in order to understand professional practice and learning in new ways, conceptualising professional practice as being embodied, relational and situated in sociomaterial relations. The aim of the study is to explore how debriefing is carried out as a practice supporting students’ interprofessional learning.

    Methods: Eighteen debriefing sessions following interprofessional full-scale manikin-based simulation with nursing and medical students from two different universities were video-recorded and analysed collaboratively by a team of researchers, applying a structured scheme for constant comparative analysis.

    Results: The findings show how debriefing is intertwined with, and shaped by social and material relationships. Two patterns of enacting debriefing emerged. Debriefing as algorithm was enacted as a protocol-based, closed inquiry approach. Debriefing as laissez-faire was enacted as a loosely structured collegial conversation with an open inquiry approach.

    Conclusion: The findings indicate that neither an imposed structure of the debriefing, nor the lack of structure assured interprofessional collaboration to emerge as a salient topic for reflection, even though that was an explicit learning objective for the simulation. 

  • 454.
    Nyström, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hult, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Enacting simulation: A sociomaterial perspective on students’ interprofessional collaboration2016In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 441-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Full-scale simulation exercises are becoming more common as an educational feature of the under- graduate training of health professionals. This study explores how interprofessional collaboration is enacted by the participating students. Practice theory is used as the theoretical framework for a field study of two naturalistic educational settings, when medical and nursing students come together to practice in a simulated emergency situation, where a manikin is replacing the patient. Eighteen sessions of simulations were observed, and data were collected through standardised video recordings that were analysed collaboratively. To ensure transparency and scientific rigour, a stepwise constant comparative analysis was conducted, in which individual observations within and across single video recordings were compared, negotiated and eventually merged. The findings show that the student teams relate to the manikin as a technical, medical, and human body, and that interprofessional knowings and enactments emerge as a fluid movement between bodily positioning in synchrony and bodily positioning out of synchrony in relation to the sociomaterial arrangements. The findings are related to contemporary theorisations of practice comprising an integrated view of body and mind, and it is discussed how the findings can be used in simulation exercises to support participants’ learning in new ways. 

  • 455.
    Nyström, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hult, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Observing of interprofessional collaboration in simulation: A socio-material approach2016In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 710-716Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation exercises are becoming more common as an educational feature of the undergraduate training of health professionals. Not all students participate in these activities, but are assigned as observers of the actual simulation. This article presents a study that explored how social-material arrangements for observation of interprofessional collaboration in a simulated situation are enacted and how these observations are thematised and made relevant for learning. The empirical data consisted of 18 standardised video recordings of medical and nursing students observing their peer students simulate. Practice theory is used to show how observation is embodied, relational, and situated in social-material relations. The findings show two emerging ways of enacting observation—proximate observation and distant observation. The enactments are characterised by different socio-material arrangements concerning the location where the simulation took place and its material set-up as well as embodied “doings” and “relatings” between the observing students and instructors. The observing students are participating in a passive, normative position as an audience and as judges of what is correct professional behaviour.

  • 456.
    Olsen, Ole Johnny
    et al.
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Persson-Thunqvist, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hallqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Building and construction: a critical case for the future of vocational education2018In: Vocational education in the nordic countries: learning from diversity / [ed] Christian Helms Jurgensen, Ole Johnny Olsen, Daniel Persson Thunqvist, Abingdon: Routledge, 2018, 1, p. 136-155Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 457.
    Olson, Maria
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna, Sweden.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Sandberg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    The formation of the willing citizen: Tracing reactive nihilism in late capitalist adult education2018In: Educational Philosophy and Theory, ISSN 0013-1857, E-ISSN 1469-5812, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 95-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of education in citizen training has been well mapped out in youth education. What has been less studied is how this role comes into being in adult education. By providing illustrative empirical examples from a recently completed study of adult students enrolled in adult education, this article aims to offer a theoretical response to the question of the role of adult education in adult student citizen subjectivity formation. Taking on Diken’s concept of ‘reactive nihilism’, we wish to make the following arguments. First, that citizen formation in adult education, when students are asked about it, is actualised as processes of re(dis)covery of will in order to be(come) a successful and happy citizen in society. Secondly, that these processes point towards a role of adult education as one where these formation processes work in tandem with those of the reactive nihilists. This means that the citizen formation processes made possible in this educational site are those marked out by the desire to mobilise one’s will formation so that it adapts to the prevailing societal situation—that of late capitalism, which is a situation not considered by the adult students as possible to change.

  • 458.
    Olson, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nicoll, Katherine
    University of Stirling, UK.
    Citizenship discourses: production and curriculum2015In: British Journal of Sociology of Education, ISSN 0142-5692, E-ISSN 1465-3346, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 1036-1053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores citizenship discourses empirically through upper secondary school students understandings, as these emerge in and through their everyday experiences. Drawing on a post-structuralist theorisation inspired by the work of Michel Foucault, a discourse analysis of data from interviews with students is carried out. This analysis characterises three discourses of the active citizen a knowledgeable citizen, a responsive and holistic citizen, and a self-responsible freecitizen. The analysis raises questions over the implications of contemporary efforts for the intensification of standardising forces through citizenship education. It also stresses the notion that engaging students actively does always also involve discourses other than those stressed through the curriculum, which nurtures the body and nerve of democracy itself.

  • 459.
    Olson, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nicoll, Katherine
    University of Stirling, Scotland, UK.
    Citizenship production beyond the curriculum2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 460.
    Paldanius, Sam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Ahn, Song Ee
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Andersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Vuxnas val av studier: Att välja utbildning eller inte2012In: Resultatdialog 2012 / [ed] Vetenskapsrådet, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2012, p. 124-130Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kapitlet ger en översikt över projektet Vuxnas val att studera. Projektet innefattar tre delstudier: en av synen på utbildning bland lågutbildade yrkesverksamma, en om 25:4-systemets betydelse för rekrytering till högskolan, och en om deltagande i utbytesstudier inom ramen för högskoleutbildning.

  • 461.
    Pastuhov, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Adult Education and the Formation of Citizens: A Critical Interrogation2019In: Adult Education Quarterly, ISSN 0741-7136, E-ISSN 1552-3047, Vol. 69, no 2, p. NP14-NP15Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 462.
    Pastuhov, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Den svårfångade fria bildningen – om folkbildning i 2000-talets Finland2013In: Årsbok om folkbildning. Forskning & utveckling 2013, Stockholm: Föreningen för folkbildningsforskning , 2013Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 463.
    Pastuhov, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Folkbildningens medborgarskap - reflektioner utgående från etnografiska studier i folkbildande verksamhet2017In: Folkbildning & forskning. Årsbok 2017, Stockholm: Föreningen för folkbildningsforskning , 2017Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 464.
    Pastuhov, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    The Ideals and Practices of Citizenship in Nordic Study Circles2018In: The Palgrave International Handbook on Adult and Lifelong Education and Learning / [ed] Marcella Milana, Sue Webb, John Holford, Richard Waller & Peter Jarvis, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 797-815Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 465.
    Pastuhov, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Lövgren, Johan
    Grenland folkehøgskole, Porsgrunn, Norway.
    Nordvall, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Forskning om nordisk folkhögskola: En översikt 1998–2018 med sammanfattningar2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Mimer – Nationellt program för folkbildningsforskning inrättades 1990 vid Linköpings universitet till följd av ett riksdagsbeslut som gav universitetet ett särskilt ansvar för forskning om folkbildning. Mimer har till uppdrag att stödja folkbildningsforskning oavsett inom vilken disciplin den bedrivs eller vid vilket lärosäte. En viktig del av uppdraget är att skapa överblick över forskning om folkbildning i vid bemärkelse.

    I denna översikt är det forskning om folkhögskolan som står i fokus. Mer precist omfattas doktorsavhandlingar och vetenskapliga artiklar om folkhögskolor i de nordiska länderna som publicerats på svenska, norska, danska, finska och engelska från 1998 till och med 2018. Tack vare författargruppens breda nordiska förankring har förutsättningarna varit mycket goda när det gäller att överblicka den forskning som finns. Inte minst forskning publicerad på finska tenderar på grund av språkbarriären att förbli okänd i de andra nordiska länderna.

    Vår förhoppning är att denna skrift ska vara en resurs både för forskare med intresse för folkhögskolan och för forskningsintresserade inom folkhögskolans värld. Dessutom hoppas vi att den kan vara ett verktyg för alla som har ett intresse av att fördjupa sig i forskning om denna nordiska utbildningsform.

    Linköping i oktober 2019

    Andreas Fejes

    Mimers ordförande

    Henrik Nordvall

    Föreståndare för Mimer

  • 466.
    Persson Thunqvist, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hallqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    The current state of the challenges for VET in Sweden2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present report is based on a review of previous research and it expands an earlier report2(Olofsson & Persson Thunqvist, 2014). By highlighting the various forms of initial VET that havebeen established in Sweden during the last decades (1991 and onwards), the present report willilluminate how different challenges have been tackled in various ways. What are the experiencesof different VET-tracks in providing access to higher education as well as work-based learningand skilled employment? In addition, in accounting for these VET-forms, we will point out thepossibilities for change within the existing educational model. The ambition is to go beyond astatic description of the “theoretically school-based regime” in Sweden and explore the potentialsfor institutional change.

  • 467.
    Popov, Oleg
    et al.
    Umeå Universitet, Umeå, Sverige.
    Ödmark, Krister
    Umeå Universitet, Umeå, Sverige.
    Muhrman, Karolina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Samverkans roll i utveckling av matematikundervisning2015Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna text belyser vi några aspekter av samverkan och dess roll i matematikundervisning-en på yrkesprogram. Ett av argumenten i texten är att samverkan behövs för att skapa yr-kesrelevanta lärandekontexter och problemlösningssituationer. Vi har i första hand valt att fokusera på sådan samverkan, som kan ske på den enskilda lärarens nivå. Diskussionen om allmän betydelse av samverkan på skolnivå presenteras utförligt i Skolverkets skrifter (t.ex. Skolverket, 2002) och andra myndighetsdokument (Skolinspektionen, 2013).

  • 468.
    Pätäri, Jenni
    et al.
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Turunen, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Sivenius, Ari
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Johdanto2015In: Vapaa, vallaton ja vangittu sivistystyö. Sivistystyön vapaus ja vastuu -pamfletti 2015. / [ed] Jenni Pätäri, Annika Turunen & Ari Sivenius, Helsinki: Vapaa sivistystyö ry , 2015, p. 6-10Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 469.
    Pätäri, Jenni
    et al.
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Turunen, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Sivenius, Ari
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Pari painavaa pointtia päätteeksi2015In: Vapaa, vallaton ja vangittu sivistystyö. Sivistystyön vapaus ja vastuu -pamfletti 2015 / [ed] Jenni Pätäri, Annika Turunen & Ari Sivenius, Helsinki: Vapaa sivistystyö ry , 2015, p. 103-105Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 470.
    Pätäri, Jenni
    et al.
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Turunen, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Sivenius, Ari
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Tutkivat SVV-opintokerhot ja myönteisen kehityksen mahdollisuus – tule mukaan ja pysy tolkuissasi2015In: Vapaa, vallaton ja vangittu sivistystyö. Sivistystyön vapaus ja vastuu -pamfletti 2015. / [ed] Jenni Pätäri, Annika Turunen & Ari Sivenius, Helsinki: Vapaa sivistystyö ry , 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 471.
    Pätäri, Jenni
    et al.
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Turunen, AnnikaLinköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.Sivenius, AriUniversity of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Vapaa, vallaton ja vangittu sivistystyö. Sivistystyön vapaus ja vastuu -pamfletti 2015.2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 472.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Arbetarrörelsen och datorn2019In: Fronesis, ISSN 1404-2614, Vol. 6Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 473.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Data Politics and Popular Education: Sweden in the 1970s2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 474.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Den digitala medborgarens genealogi: En historia om folkbildningsförhoppningar2019In: Vägval i skolans historia, ISSN 2002-0147, Vol. 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Diskussioner kring utbildning om datorn hänger förstås samman med vad den specifika maskinen vid en viss tid kan, eller inte kan, göra. Men kanske ännu högre utsträckning och särskilt i relation till utbildning, handlar den om vad en fiktiv föreställd framtida dator kan, eller inte kan, och vad denna framtidsbild i sin tur genererar för beskrivningar av hot och möjligheter. Utbildning är ett av de främsta verktygen staten förfogar över för att skapa önskad framtid. Vilken framtid som ska skapas hänger nära samman med hur man tänker sig den tekniska utvecklingen. Datorer handlar således om mycket mer än kiselplattor, minnen och algoritmer – de handlar också i hög grad om samhället och hur dess medborgare ska organiseras och styras. Därför behöver vi undersöka hur vi pratar, och har pratat, om datorer – vilka idéer eller föreställningar om framtiden som ligger bakom de olika, ofta tidsförankrade, beskrivningarna av dessa maskiner, och inte minst, vilka utbildningssatsningar som följt i dess spår.

  • 475.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Digitizing Sweden: discourses on computerization and citizenship2016In: Politics of Education and Education Policy StudiesCitizenship education, democracy and the market, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 476.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dystopia for the Unprepared, Utopia for the Prepared: Why zombies are no promise of monsters2014In: ImmediacyArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 477.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Educational imaginaries: a genealogy of the digital citizen2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis makes use of a genealogical approach to map out and explainhow and why computers and citizenship have become so closely connected.It examines the historical continuities and disruptions, and the role thatpopular education has played in this interrelation. Drawing on previousresearch in the overlap between Swedish popular education history andhistorical computer politics, this thesis adds knowledge about howimaginaries of popular education, operating as silver bullet solutions toproblems with computerization, have had important functions as governingtools for at least 70 years. That is, Swedish popular education has since the1950s been imagined as a central solution to problems with computerization,but also to realize the societal potentials associated with computers.

    Specifically, this thesis makes two contributions: 1) Empirically, the thesisunearths archived, and in many ways forgotten, discourses around thehistorical enactment of the digital citizen, and the role of popular education,questioning assumptions that are taken for granted in current times; 2)Theoretically, the thesis proposes a conceptual model of educationalimaginaries, and specifically introduces the notion (and method) of‘problematizations’ into these imaginaries.

  • 478.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Educational Imaginaries of Technology2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 479.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    From fear of ‘Computer Force’ to ‘Digital Inclusion’2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Popular education is often described as particularly suitable for various projects related to digital inclusion. For example, the popular education guiding principle: "free and voluntary” has been described as an important prerequisite for effectively digitizing Sweden. From this we can be (mis)led to understand that the mission of public education to promote the digital citizen is a new quest (or at least beginning in the early 2000s). However, popular education has played a central role in the digitization of citizens for over 40 years now. This genealogy aims to shed light on the role of popular education in the history of digitalization.

  • 480.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Föreställningar om folkbildning: En genealogi över den digitala medborgaren2019In: Presentation av tre nya doktorsavhandlingar, Linköping, 2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 481.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Learning to compute: A genealogy of the digitally literate2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 482.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Mot kyliga apparater tar man inte till knytnävarna: En historia om arbetarrörelsen och datorn2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 483.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    ”One wouldn't use ones fists against cold machines”.2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 484.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Popular education and the digital citizen2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 485.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Preparing for the future: Governance by educational films2017In: Worker's Education, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 486.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    The Educational Imaginaries of Digital Citizenship2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 487.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    The Ironies of Digital Citizenship: Educational Imaginaries and Digital Losers AcrossThree Decades2018In: Digital Culture & Society, ISSN 2364-2122, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 39-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our everyday use of digital technologies, platforms and infrastructures is often portrayed as an autonomous technical development, guided by clever and independent innovations, rather than broad sociotechnical imaginaries that inspire parliamentary support and governance. This article will consequently shed the light on the often-overlooked structural and societal efforts that have historically shaped the digital citizen of today. For the past 70 years or so, non-formal adult education about computers and computing has been a key part of political ambitions to create a desirable future. Over time, digital technologies have also become a precondition for the enactment of citizenship. That is, ‘digital citizenship’ is increasingly positioned as a fundamental requirement for democratic participation. The purpose of this paper is to trace how the digital citizen, and its accompanying problems, has been construed over time, particularly through educational imaginaries. What problems is the digital citizen a solution to? Who has been presented as problematic, and who, subsequently, has become the primary target for educational solutions? What skills have been described as indispensable for the digital citizen during different periods in history? By using Sweden as a vantage point this paper provides both concrete examples as well as perspectives on transnational discourses. In focus for the study are discourses concerning non-formal adult education, in the form of awareness campaigns, social programmes and adult liberal education about computers aimed at the general citizenry, during three periods in time: the 1950s, the 1980s, and today. The contribution is a critical take on how the citizen has increasingly become connected to digital technologies, and how this convergence has at the same time created digital exclusion.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-08-28 15:29
  • 488.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Utbildning som universalmedel mot teknologins faror och förhoppningar2019In: Skola & Samhälle [S.O.S], ISSN 2001-6727Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 489.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Who needs computerknowledge?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 490.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Who Will Survive?: On Bodies and Boundaries after the Apocalypse2013In: Gender Forum, ISSN 1613-1878, Vol. 45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preppers and Survivalists are commonly described as people who believe in abrupt, imposing and near-in-time disasters and who are actively and practically preparing to survive this imminent apocalypse. This paper examines how the body, and the closely connected analytical categories of gender and sexuality, are used to define survivalism. In other words, how does corporeality structure survivalism – who gets to be a survivalist and who does not? In an attempt to answer these questions the paper turns to a theoretical framework that combines the notion of trans-corporeality with the performance of gender, sexuality and embodiment in virtual digital space. To bring focus the paper specifically concentrates on a recent online discussion about “if, how, and to what extent one, as a survivalist, should or would help a woman with small children alone in a forest with no survival equipment after TEOTWAWKI (The End Of The World As We Know It)” (Swedish Survivalist Forum, 2013). This particular discussion is relevant since it, as we shall see, puts analytical categories, such as gender and sexuality up front, pointing to their retained importance as objects of study. The results show a desire to protect the body from change – change that often emanates from other bodies. As such, the desire to remain bodily untouched or unaffected emerges as a foundation for survivalism

  • 491.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Workers to conquer the new technology: The Swedish labour movement, popular education and the computer2016In: Workers’ Education: Importance and Implications for the Labour Movement / [ed] Jenny Jansson, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early on, the unions, and their respective study associations, became important actors in passing on knowledge about computers. The 1975 Social Democratic Party congress made a decision to work with the Swedish blue-collar union in order to draw up an action program for computer education. The congress did express a fear in that stakeholders who control capital as well as means of production will safeguard technology to primarily cater to their interests. That is, under the current conservative regime there was a risk that the computer would instead become an oppressive force. As such, the labour movement was described as an important force to counter this fear and to, instead, "democratically" control the use of computers as tools in the service of the people. Through common struggle and education, citizens would become a driving force in the practical design of this potentially liberating technology. Thus, computers, as they were conceptualized in the labour movement in the 1970s, held a promise to become a liberating technology with a subsequent promotion of equality and solidarity, but importantly, its potential positive impacts could only be realized in an economic democracy.

  • 492.
    Rahm, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Digital media and citizenship in adult education2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on an on-going case study, drawing on interviews with adult students. The research question is: what narratives of citizenship are actualized in the everyday practices of adult students and how is citizenship enacted (or prevented from being enacted)? More specifically, this paper addresses the importance of interactive media in narratives of citizenship in the everyday practises of adult students. The study builds on 37 interviews with students enrolled at Folk high schools in Sweden. The students have, based on their own definition of the terms, been asked to participate in interviews about (and photo-document) their notions of citizenship and citizenship activities. The results of interest to this paper are statements about what we may refer to as ubiquitous computing (i.e. ever-present media technologies). It would seem that an important basis for students’ notions of citizenship is the practice of ‘living in media’. That is, students’ narratives continuously return to the entanglement of the Internet (and other new media) and notions of citizenship.

  • 493.
    Rahm, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Educating the digital citizen: a genealogy of computer skills in Swedish popular education2015In: Citizenship in the Making – Adult and Popular Education as Bunkers of failures, computers and recognition, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 494.
    Rahm, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Popular education and the digital citizen: a genealogical analysis2017In: European Journal for Research on the Education and Learning of Adults, ISSN 2000-7426, E-ISSN 2000-7426, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 21-36, article id rela9113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper historicises and problematises the concept of the digital citizen and how it is constructed in Sweden today. Specifically, it examines the role of popular education in such an entanglement. It makes use of a genealogical analysis to produce a critical ‘history of the present’ by mapping out the debates and controversies around the emergence of the digital citizen in the 1970s and 1980s, and following to its manifestations in contemporary debates. This article argues that free and voluntary adult education (popular education) is and has been fundamental in efforts to construe the digital citizen. A central argument of the paper is that popular education aiming for digital inclusion is not a 21st century phenomenon; it actually commenced in the 1970s. However, this digitisation of citizens has also changed focus dramatically since the 1970s. During the 1970s, computers and computerisation were described as disconcerting, and as requiring popular education in order to counter the risk of the technology “running wild”. In current discourses, digitalisation is constructed in a non-ideological and post-political way. These post-political tendencies of today can be referred to as a post-digital present where computers have become so ordinary, domesticized and ubiquitous in everyday life that they are thereby also beyond criticism

  • 495.
    Rahm, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Ubiquitous computing, digital failure and citizenship learning in Swedish popular education2015In: Citizenship Teaching and Learning, ISSN 1751-1917, E-ISSN 1751-1925, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 127-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do adult students enact citizenship, and what discursive and material conditions make certain enactments more or less possible? This article draws on 37 interviews with adult students at Swedish Folk High Schools and focuses on the everyday material-discursive enactments of interactive media in adult students’ statements about citizenship. Drawing on a post-constructional perspective, the analysis illustrates how students’ statements about citizenship are made possible by ever-present media technologies and the associated practices of ‘living in media’. Students’ statements continuously reiterate how notions of citizenship are entangled with the Internet (and other new media). However, while new media are deeply embedded in the everyday lives of citizens and enables important citizenship enactments, they are also a source of discomfort, giving rise to ambiguous statements. These double-edged statements refer on the one hand to negative implications on physical health, distraction from important tasks and an over-reliance on the Internet as an everyday need, and on the other hand to improved access to information, convivial communities and empowered citizenship.

  • 496.
    Rahm, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Skågeby, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Making change: produsing hybrid learning products2014In: Hybrid Pedagogy: a digital journal of learning, teaching, and technology, ISSN 2332-2098Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Too often, we demand from our students written proof of learning in the form of academic text. This is perhaps especially true within the humanities and the social sciences. We have, however, previously argued for the importance of installing an agency for change in students. For us, this agency seems unlikely to come only from producing a text that will at worst only be read by an examiner and at best also by a few classmates. This feeling of agency and efficacy (the capacity to produce an effect) rather comes with produsing hybrid learning products belonging to new/other genres than the ’pure’ critically reflecting text (or hardcore exams). We do not oppose critical reflection as being a foundation stone of any education, but as Laurillard, we argue that further inspiration could be taken from engineering, architecture, computer science and medicine in encouraging more of a ”design thinking” in (digital) humanities students. On a more general scale this is an approach that would combine critical reflection and experiential learning, and imbue students with an agency to make change and, quite literally, push things forward.

  • 497.
    Rahm, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Skågeby, Jörgen
    Stockholms universitet, Sweden.
    Prepare for Monsters!: Governance by Popular Culture2016In: The Irish Journal of Gothic and Horror Studies, ISSN 2009-0374, Vol. 1, no 12, p. 76-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, various stakeholders have applied the pop-cultural metaphor of the zombie in efforts that seek to aware and prepare citizens for potential threats and disasters. But what are the cultural and political consequences of applying this very specific metaphor in what are, essentially, attempts to govern populations? By studying how and why the zombie is used in civil defence courses, government information campaigns and popular science TV shows, this paper identifies five patterns to its cultural-political operation: (1) it emphasizes a world-view where complexity has become too overwhelming to handle and that we therefore need to go back to a more simple model of the world; (2) the solution to complexity is the application of an anthropocentric metaphor that makes specific what was previously unknown through arbitrary ruling and othering; (3) once complexity is reduced, the metaphor is easily overgeneralized to contexts far beyond its initial reach; (4) however, as such rules and generalizations are applied the metaphor comes to legitimize certain agencies and limit others in what is basically an attempt to maintain power differentials in the future; (5) and finally, the metaphor is being protected from falsification by relying on pseudo-scientific explanations. Conclusively, this cultural ambition to send every monster on a path towards comfortable transparency becomes limiting and by making the zombie the metaphor we prepare by (in order to make familiar what are irreducible social, cultural and political intricacies) we effectively foreclose many options for a more inclusive futur

  • 498.
    Rooney, Donna
    et al.
    University of Technology, Sydney, Australia.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Simulation: A complex pedagogical space2018In: Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 1449-3098, E-ISSN 1449-5554, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 53-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation is a pedagogy that has been widely used in a number of educational settings (e.g., aviation, transport, social work, nursing education). While it can take numerous forms, it often involves an assortment of high-tech equipment (e.g., flight simulators, manikins) that seek to replicate real settings. Specifically, this paper provides an empirically driven exploration of how simulation laboratories, used in the professional education of nurses, and medical and other health professionals in higher education settings, are practised. Informed by sociomaterial understandings, the paper problematises and disrupts homogeneous understandings of the simulation space as found in much of the health sciences literature. This is done by providing a number of layers ranging from accounts of simulation in literature and empirically driven accounts of simulation in action through to more abstract discussion. The paper is attentive to both the distinct materiality of the spaces involved and the human activities the spaces engender. This dual focus enables the consideration of spatial injustices as well as new directions for the development of simulation pedagogics.

  • 499.
    Rusanganwa, Joseph
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Enhancing Physics Learning through Instruction, Technical Vocabulary and ICT: A Case of Higher Education in Rwanda2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overarching aim of this thesis is to explore how teaching and learning in tertiary education is performed in times of change both in language policy and learning approaches. The study takes social constructivist and socio-cultural theories as its major points of departure. These theories are combined with cognitive theory of learning with multimedia.

    The four studies comprising this thesis are born out of a new situation demanding the mastery of a scientific language in English and new ways of teaching and learning backed with ICT. The studies set out to investigate (i) how students and teachers adapt to a change of medium of instruction (ii) what teachers and students of physics learn when constructing a multimedia vocabulary learning instrument (iii) the impact of two methods of teaching vocabulary on students’ test performance and (iv) how teachers reflect on the use of ICT in Physics teaching.

    To attain these targets, the study employed a blend of qualitative and quantitative designs to gather relevant data. In three studies, data were gathered from classroom practices in tertiary education. The fourth study included teacher interviews on their experiences with ICT. Findings indicate that the understanding of physics was facilitated by a variation in language use in different classroom spaces, students and teachers’ collaborative selection of technical vocabulary and a multimedia tool of technical vocabulary software constructed by two teachers and the researcher. According to the teachers, the quality of physics teaching would be enhanced further by adopting learner-centred teaching methods and the integration of more advanced ICT. The studies show that teachers and students are on their way to develop ICT tools for teaching and learning. Given adequate support, this can pave the way for transforming teaching and allowing for further quality development in innovative and creative ways of learning with ICT.

  • 500.
    Ruschkowski, Andreas
    et al.
    Hagabergs folkhögskola, Sweden.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Shaping the democratic, relational, and reflective youth recreation leader2019In: International Journal of Lifelong Education, ISSN 0260-1370, E-ISSN 1464-519X, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 632-643Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Youth recreation centres have been a key institution in providing young people with meaningful activity after school, going back to the mid- twentieth century in Sweden. These centres have been the focus of research, but very few studies have paid attention to the youth recreation leader, the person working in these centres. In this article, we direct our focus towards youth recreation leaders by analysing how a discourse on the ideal youth recreation leader takes shape through policy, how it operates, and with what effect. We are inspired by the work of Foucault in understanding discourse, power, and subjectivity. Our analysis illus- trates how a democratic, relational, and reflective ideal youth recreation leader is shaped and fostered through current policy discourses in Sweden. Such a subjectivity emerges through technologies of power and the self, of which the confession is one. Through the confession, the youth recreation leader is simultaneously governed and governs others – the conduct of conduct. The case presented here can tell us more about the way in which governing operates in contemporary society.

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