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  • 401.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Bare bones: Zooarchaeology and Greek sacrificial ritual2017In: Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world / [ed] S. Hitch & I. Rutherford, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press , 2017, p. 15-47Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 402.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Between bronze and clay: The origin of an Argive, Archaic votive shape2013In: Forgerons, élites et voyageurs d'Homère à nos jours: Hommages en mémoire d’Isabelle Ratinaud-Lachkar / [ed] Marie-Claire Ferriès, Maria Paola Castiglioni och Françoise Létoublon, Grenoble: Presses universitaires de Grenoble , 2013, p. 63-77Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 403.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Brauron2016In: Routledge Encyclopedia of Ancient Mediterranean Religions / [ed] E.M. Orlin, New York & London: Routledge, 2016, p. 148-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 404.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Castration, cult and agriculture: Perspectives on Greek animal sacrifice2014In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 7, p. 153-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The castration of most male animals seems to have been the rule in ancient Greece when rearing cattle, sheep, goats, and pigs; only very few adult males are needed for breeding purposes and flocks of bulls, rams, billy-goats and boars are difficult to keep, since they are too aggressive. Castrated males yield more and fattier meat, and, in the case of sheep, more wool. Still, sacred laws and sacrificial calendars stipulate the sacrifice of uncastrated victims, and vase-paintings frequently represent bulls, rams and billy-goats in ritual contexts. This paper will discuss the role of uncastrated male animals in Greek cult in the Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic periods, both from a religious and an agricultural perspective. Of particular interest are the relations between the practical, economic reality and the theological perception of sacrifice. These issues will be explored using epigraphical, literary, iconographical and zooarchaeological evidence.

  • 405.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Daimon2016In: Routledge Encyclopedia of Ancient Mediterranean Religions / [ed] E.M. Orlin, New York & London: Routledge, 2016, p. 229-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 406.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    "Don't throw any bones in the sanctuary!": on the handlings of sacred waste at ancient Greek cult places2017In: Ritual matters: material remains and ancient religion / [ed] Claudia Moser, Jennifer Knust, Philadelphia: Michigan Publishing , 2017, p. 33-55Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 407.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    "Don't throw bones in the sanctuary!": On the handling of sacred waste at ancient Greek cult places2016In: Ritual matters: Material residues and ancient religions / [ed] J. Knust & C. Moser, Rome: American Academy in Rome , 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 408.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Forelegs in Greek cult2013In: Perspectives on ancient Greece: Papers in celebration of the 60th anniversary of the Swedish Institute at Athens / [ed] Ann-Louise Schallin, Stockholm: Svenska institutet i Athen , 2013, p. 113-134Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 409.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Hades, Homer and the Hittites: The cultic-cultural context of Odysseus’ ‘round trip’ to the Underworld2018In: Round trip to Hades inthe Eastern Mediterranean tradition: Visits to the Underworldfrom antiquity to Byzantium / [ed] Gunnel. Ekroth; I. Nilsson, Leiden: Brill , 2018, p. 37-56Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    "The possibility of visiting the realms of the dead and yet returning alive is an idea that has fascinated people throughout time and across cultures. The European tradition goes back to Greek and Roman antiquity, represented by such famous round trips to Hades as those undertaken by Odysseus and Aeneas, but it is clear that the Graeco-Roman tradition had older Mesopotamian antecedents."--

  • 410.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Hero cult2016In: Routledge Encyclopedia of Ancient Mediterranean Religions / [ed] E.M. Orlin, New York & London: Routledge, 2016, p. 416-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 411.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Hero cult2013In: The Encyclopedia of Ancient History / [ed] R.S. Bagnall, K. Brodersen, C.B. Champion, A. Erskine & S.R. Huebner, Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013, p. 3173-3174Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 412.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Heroes: living or dead?2015In: Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion / [ed] E. Eidinow & J. Kindt, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015, p. 383-396Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 413.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Holocaust2013In: The Encyclopedia of Ancient History / [ed] R.S. Bagnall, K. Brodersen, C.B. Champion, A. Erskine & S.R. Huebner, Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013, p. 3279-3280Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 414.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Holocaustic sacrifices in ancient Greek religion and the ritual relations to the Levant2018In: Change, continuity, and connectivity: North-EasternMediterranean at the turn of the Bronze Age and in the early Iron Age / [ed] L. Niesiolowski-Spanò; M. Wecowski, Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2018, p. 308-326Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 415.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Holocaustic sacrifices in ancient Greek religion: Some comments on practice and theory2017In: Animal sacrifice in ancient Greece: Proceedings of the first international workshops in Kraków / [ed] Bielawski, Krzysztof, Warsawa: Wydawnictwo Naukowe Sub Lupa , 2017, p. 45-66Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 416.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Homeric echoes?: Archaizing language in Greek religious inscriptions2014In: Öffentlichkeit-Monument-Text: XIV congressus internationalis epigraphiae graecae et latinae 27.-31. Augusti MMXII. Akten / [ed] W. Eck & P. Funke, Berlin: De Gruyter , 2014, p. 619-621Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 417.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Libations, Greek2013In: The Encyclopedia of Ancient History / [ed] R.S. Bagnall, K. Brodersen, C.B. Champion, A. Erskine & S.R. Huebner, Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013, p. 4051-4052Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 418.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Meat for the gods2011In: Nourrir les dieux?: Sacrifice et répresentation du divin, actes de la VIe rencontre du Groupe de recherche européen "Figura, représentation du divin dans les sociétés grecque et romaine" / [ed] V. Pirenne-Delforge & F. Prescendi, Liège: Centre International d'Étude de la Religion Grecque Antique , 2011, p. 15-41Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Homer, the practice of giving the gods cooked meat is evidenced by Eumaios’ sacrifice in Odyssey XIV, while at this and other sacrifices pieces of raw meat from the animal victim were placed on top of the thighbones, which were then burnt in the altar fire as a part of the god’s portion, a procedure labelled omothetein. In the Classical period, gifts of meat for the gods are well attested in the epigraphical evidence, in the form of trapezomata or theoxenia, but also in literary sources and iconography. This paper will discuss when the practice of meat offerings came into being and how it develops, what the gods may have been thought of actually receiving on these occasions and why meat was given. It will be argued that the gifts of meat for the gods may have arisen from the honouring of kings and exceptional individuals with choice portions of meat, and that their growing importance in cult can be linked to the significance of banquets in Archaic society as a means for expressing status and hierarchies, perhaps under the influence of Near Eastern ritual practices. The gods were never perceived as craving or eating the meat and the central concept of meat offerings was the bestowing of honour, time. Still, by offering the gods something, which both could and was consumed by man, the meat offerings may have created possibilities for a different and closer interaction between mortals and immortals, in particular by evoking a context of xenia.

  • 419.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Men vad håller kentauren i handen?: Avbildningar av och attityder till köttkonsumtion i antikens Grekland2018In: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademiens årsbok, ISSN 0083-6796, p. 165-182Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 420.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Mytologiska matkrig: Ett ganska okänt rödfigurigt vasmotiv2013In: Institutionens historier: En vänbok till Gullög Nordquist / [ed] Erika Weiberg, Susanne Carlsson, Gunnel Ekroth, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet , 2013, p. 51-60Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 421.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Nora Brüggemann, Tiryns XVIII. Kult im archaischen Tiryns. Eine Analyse neuer Befunde und Funde, Reichert Verlag, Wiesbaden 20152018In: Gnomon. Kritische Zeitschrift für die gesamte klassische Altertumswissenschaft, ISSN 0017-1417, Vol. 90, p. 539-545Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 422.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Pelops joins the party: Transformations of a hero-cult within the festival at Olympia2012In: Greek and Roman festivals: Content, Meaning, and Practice / [ed] J.R. Brandt & J.W. Iddeng, Oxford: Oxford University Press , 2012, p. 95-137Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 423.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Response to Göran Eidevall2013In: Svensk Exegetisk Årsbok, ISSN 1100-2298, Vol. 78, p. 47-55Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 424.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Round trip to Hades in the Eastern Mediterranean tradition: Visits to the underworld from antiquity to Byzantium2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Round Trip to Hades in the Eastern Mediterranean Tradition explores how the theme of visiting the Underworld and returning alive has been treated, transmitted and transformed in the ancient Greek and Byzantine traditions. The journey was usually a descent (katabasis) into a dark and dull place, where forgetfulness and punishment reigned, but since ‘everyone’ as there, it was also a place that offered opportunities to meet people and socialize. Famous Classical round trips to Hades include those undertaken by Odysseus and Aeneas, but this pagan topic also caught the interest of Christian writers. The contributions of the present volume allow the reader to follow the passage from pagan to Christian representations of Hades–a passage that may seem surprisingly effortless.

  • 425.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Sacred meals in ancient Greece?: Dining in domestic settings as compared to sanctuaries2017In: The Eucharist - its origins and context.: Sacred Meal, Communal Meal, TableFellowship in Late Antiquity, Early Judaism and Early Christianity / [ed] D. Hellholm & D. Sänger, Mohr Siebeck, 2017, p. 1389-1411Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 426.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    The crocodile on Samos or Africa in the Aegean2018In: The resilience of heritage: Cultivating a future ofthe past. Essays in honour of professor Paul J.J. Sinclair / [ed] A. Ekblom; Ch. Isendahl; K.-J. Lindholm, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet , 2018, p. 61-68Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 427.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Ull, pengar och sex: Tolkningar av ett attiskt, rödfigurigt vasmotiv2011In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 1-12Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 428.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Vernant et les os: Théorie et practique du sacrifice grec2016In: Relire Jean-Pierre Vernant / [ed] S. Georgoudi et al., Paris: Centre ANHIMA , 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 429.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Vernant et les os: Théorie et pratique du sacrufuce grec2018In: Relire Vernant / [ed] S. Georgoudi; F. de Polignac, Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 2018, p. 83-115Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [fr]

    "Jean-Pierre Vernant (1914-2007), philosophe et helléniste d'exception, a révolutionné la compréhension de la Grèce antique et la réflexion sur la place des cultures anciennes dans le monde contemporain. Plus de dix ans après sa disparition, le moment est venu de porter un regard distancié sur le parcours d'un homme qui a toujours entrelacé sa vie de chercheur et sa vie de citoyen. Car Vernant s'est nourri en permanence des débats de son époque pour faire de l'étude des anciens Grecs une force intellectuelle libératrice. Mais avec le temps, l'écart se creuse avec les conditions originelles de la création de son oeuvre. Le risque existe que la diversité de cette pensée ne soit réduite aux approximations d'une vulgate appauvrie. Les auteurs sollicités pour ce volume représentent des pays, des disciplines et des courants de pensée divers, de la science politique à l'archéologie, de la philologie à l'histoire de l'art ou l'histoire des religions. Ils mènent une réflexion qui entrecroise les considérations sur l'action de Vernant citoyen, l'analyse approfondie de son oeuvre et la mise en perspective de la réception de cette oeuvre dans différents pays et institutions. En se focalisant sur l'étude du religieux, sur le politique et la question de la cité, enfin sur le rayonnement international de Vernant, ils reconsidèrent une pensée multiforme, la replacent dans son contexte et montrent par quelles voies elle a exercé son influence, bref ressaisissent ce qui en fit l'originalité, la puissance; et le rayonnement."--Page 4 of cover.

  • 430.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    What we like the bones to tell us: a sacrificial wish list2013In: Bones, behaviour and belief: The zooarchaeological evidence as a source for ritual practice in ancient Greece and beyond / [ed] Gunnel Ekroth & Jenny Wallensten, Stockholm: Svenska institutet i Athen , 2013, p. 15-30Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Animal bones comprise the only category of evidence for Greek cult which is constantly significantly increasing. The use of ever more sophisticated excavation methods demonstrates the importance of the zooarchaeological material for the study of Greek religion and how such material can throw light on texts, inscriptions and images, as the animal bones constitute remains of actual ritual actions and not mere descriptions or representations. This paper outlines some areas where the zooarchaeological evidence may be of particular pertinence, for example, in elucidating the complex and idiosyncratic religious terminology of shares of sacrificial victims mentioned in sacred laws and sacrificial calendars, or in providing a context for a better understanding of the representations of animal parts on Attic vases. The role of meat within ancient Greek society, the choice of sacrificial victims and the handling of “non-sacrificable” animals such as game, dogs and equids within Greek cult can also be clarified by comparisons with the animal remains. 

  • 431.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Why does Zeus care about burnt thighbones from sheep?: Defining the divine and structuring the world through animal sacrifice in ancient Greece2019In: History of Religions, ISSN 0018-2710, E-ISSN 1545-6935, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 225-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gunnel Ekroth, in “Why Does Zeus Care about Burnt Thighbones from sheep?  Defining the Divine and Structuring the World Through Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greece,” sets the plate for this volume by reassessing the historical backdrop against which nascent Christian traditions related to animal sacrifice emerge.  Animal sacrifice was the central ritual action of ancient Greek religion, as well as in most religions of the eastern Mediterranean in antiquity.  Although modern scholars have studied this religious practice for more than 100 years, animal sacrifice has always posed something of a problem, as it is so fundamentally alien to western European Christian culture. In order to understand animal sacrifice in the ancient world, one needs to encounter it in its own historical setting.  This means not only exploring its role in what moderns more narrowly construe as the religious sphere, but also in social and political orderings as well. Of central importance, to archaeologists of sacrifice like Ekroth, is the practical execution of the rituals.

    Ekroth introduces readers to a relatively new wealth of material evidence about animal sacrifice in the pre-Christian, Greek world.  Ekroth’s critical contribution is to assess the results of recent research on the archaeology of sacrifice.  Her main concern is with historical animal sacrifice as it was actually performed, primarily, in the thysia ritual, which occurred across ancient Greek sanctuaries between the 8th and 1st centuries BCE.  At these events, mainly domesticated animals along with the fruit of agricultural labor and libations, after being dedicated to a deity, were sacrificed and shared – with butchered portions ostensibly going to gods like Zeus who preferred thighbones, while the rest of the animal, in particular the meat, was given to the human participants.  Ekroth encounters in the material handling, treatment, and distribution of meat derived from ritualized animal sacrifice an ancient structuring of the world.  Analysis of these sacrificial rituals provides us with windows to the cosmologies, hierarchies of social power, and group identities associated with those who participated.    

  • 432.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Heroes, ancestors or just any old bones?: Contextualizing the consecration of human remains from the Mycenaean shaft graves at Lerna in the Argolid2016In: Metaphysis. Ritual, myth and symbolism in the Aegean Bronze Age: Proceedings of the 15th international Aegean conference, Vienna, 22-25 April 2014 / [ed] E. Alram-Stern et al., Leuven: Peeters Publishers, 2016, p. 235-243Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 433.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Nilsson, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Introduction2018In: Round trip to Hades inthe Eastern Mediterranean tradition: Visits to the Underworldfrom antiquity to Byzantium / [ed] G. Ekroth; I. Nilsson, Leiden: Brill , 2018, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 434.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Wallensten, JennySvenska institutet i Athen.
    Bones, behaviour and belief: The zooarchaeological evidence as a source for ritual practice in ancient Greece and beyond2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of the osteological evidence as a source for ritual practices in ancient Greece is gradually becoming widely recognized. Animal bones form the only category of evidence for Greek cult which is constantly increasing, and they can complement and elucidate the information provided by texts, inscriptions and images. This volume brings together sixteen contributions exploring ritual practices and animal bones from different chronological and geographical perspectives, foremost ancient Greece in the historical period, but also in the Bronze Age and as early as the Neolithic period, as well as Anatolia, France and Scandinavia, providing new empirical evidence from a number of major sanctuaries and cult-places. On a methodological level, the complexity of identifying ritual activity from the osteological evidence is a recurrent theme, as is the prominence of local variation visible in the bone material, suggesting that the written sources and iconography may offer simplified or idealized versions of the rituals actually performed. Although osteology needs to and should be integrated with other kinds of sources, the independent study of the bones in an unbiased manner is of utmost importance, as the bones can provide a different “reality” than that encountered in our other sources.

  • 435.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Wallensten, Jenny
    Svenska institutet i Athen.
    Introduction: Bones of contention?2013In: Bones, behaviour and belief: The zooarchaeological evidence as a source for ritual practice on ancient Greece and beyond / [ed] Gunnel Ekroth & Jenny Wallensten, Stockholm: Svenska institutet i Athen , 2013, p. 9-13Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 436.
    Ekstedt, Julia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Genus och arkeologi- en studie av forskning med fokus på vikingatida kvinnor2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Research on Viking Age society is a recurrent subject within the scientific literature, and todays modern views of Vikings might not always have been the same as we think, especially when Viking people and who they were and what they did are discussed. Viking Age women are mentioned in scientific literature throughout history up until today, but have they always been studied in the same way? And why did scientists in the past choose to study, highlight or just mention the Viking Age women in the literature? The focus of this essay are directed to the Viking Age women and how they are presented in scientific literature and how archaeologists choose to study them, which also brings in questions about gender research. By focusing on recent research on Viking Age women, the aim is to get an insight on how gender research has influenced archaeology. This study focuses especially on which impact women studies had on research recently, and which perspectives are important today. The starting point of this study is based on an assertion that Viking Age women studies have been affected by the introduction of gender research to archaeology. Also that recent studies, just as older studies, have been affected by contemporary societal norms.

  • 437.
    El Shazly, Amina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    An Historical Ecology of the Baladi Dog in Egypt2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Dogs have a long but neglected history as companion species in Egypt history. From the most valued companion in ancient Egypt the relationship between dogs and humans has changed over time. However, in the present day the Egyptian baladi dog has been abused, neglected, unwanted for centuries. In this thesis, I investigate the nature and relationships between humans and dogs in Egypt in the past and present drawing on archeological, historical and genetic information. I will dig deeper into dog genetics to better understand the distinction between the baladi dog in relation to other breeds. Using online surveys, I interview baladi and non-baladi dog owners to understand how Egyptians perceive the baladi dog today exploring also how and why this perception is changing. Moreover, through interviews with rescuers and veterinarians I examine further the general perception of baladi dogs in Egypt from their perspectives. As I show, perceptions of the baladi dog have changed positively over the recent years both in Egypt and abroad, though there is still a long way to go. The better status of the perceptions of the baladi dog has also meant thatthe baladi is increasingly seen as a ‘breed’ or a particular dog type. The changing perceptions of the baladi dog and the debates around them is discussed and scrutinized in relation to urban planning and policy.

  • 438.
    Elgh, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Den arkeologiska kunskapsprocessen: Ett exempel hämtat från arkeologiska undersökningar i Mälardalen 1992-951995In: Tor: meddelanden från Uppsala universitets museum för nordiska fornsaker, ISSN 0495-8772, Vol. 28, p. 153-174Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 439.
    Ellen, Lindblom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Ice on midsummersday: -A qualtitative study on national, regional and local level of the extreme weather years and following harvest failure in 1867-68 Sweden, with focus on Gävleborgs County.2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on two extreme weather years in 1867-1868 that led to crop failure and subsistence crisis in parts of Sweden. Specifically it focus on Gävleborgs County and one parish, Hanebo Parish, in south west Hälsingland. The study presents contemporary examples from original sources on the national, regional and local level and one secondary source. With a qualitative approach, the study investigates the social impacts of sudden extreme weather and following harvest failure and assess signs of a possible subsistence crisis on regional and local level in the years of 1867-68. The empirics are analyzed trough demographic methodology often used to evaluate ”famine-like” situations, theories on famine and its causes and the three concepts: vulnerability, resilience and exchange entitlement. The result of the study shows a subsistence crisis in Gävleborg county and Hanebo Parish, in the years of 1867-68. These indications included poor harvest, demographic impact on parochial level and visible mitigating strategies for coping with the situation. Social hierarchies which are making impact on attitudes within the contemporary context of crisis are also discovered in the empiric material. The study also shows that state incentives and publically organised incentives can mitigate disaster both over short and long term.

  • 440.
    Engblom, Mathias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Vallen i Västergarn2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    In the small town of Västergarn on Gotland lies a rather impressive rampart, circa one kilometre long. Excavations of the area inside of the rampart, as well as excavations of the rampart itself, have yielded no conclusive answers regarding the dating and main purpose of the rampart and the settlement that supposedly lies within. This paper aims to shed some light on the date and purpose of the Västergarn rampart. This will mainly be done by a comparative study, where the Västergarn Rampart will be compared to other ramparts, one in Waterford and one in Birka. In this analysis the construction, mainly of the core construction of the ramparts, will be taken into consideration but aspects such as terrain and building material will also be considered. The results of earlier research in and around the Västergarn area will also be used to then come to a comprehensive theory regarding the dating and purpose of the Västergarn rampart.

  • 441.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Differential object marking in Coptic2008Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 442.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    La parenté des Nectanébo2006In: Chronique d'Égypte, Vol. 81, p. 62-70Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 443.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    La reconstitution du verbe en égyptien de tradition 400–30 avant J.-C.2003Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Two variants of ancient Egyptian were used for different categories of written communication during the last millennium B.C. The vernacular, known as Demotic, served as the written language for administrative, legal and literary documents. Traditional Egyptian (égyptien de tradition), written in the hieroglyphic script and with linguistic structures that are purported to imitate those of the Classical Egyptian, was still used to compose mainly religious documents.

    The present work treats the verbal system of Traditional Egyptian using texts dated to the period 400-30 B.C. These documents include royal stelae and priestly decrees, among these the Rosetta Stone, as well as biographical inscriptions. After a general introduction, and a presentation of morphological characteristics, the study takes up the basic verbal patterns. The suffix conjugations, the sDm=f and sDm.n=f , in its various meanings and combinations, affirmative and negative, are dealt with, as is the pseudoparticiple. The infinitive, as it appears in e.g. pseudoverbal constructions and the sDm pw ir.n=f is examined in a separate section, with an additional chapter covering the passive forms of the suffix conjugation.

    A summary of the conclusions that are reached by this study are presented in the final chapter. Graphic variations show that morphemes formerly used to distinguish verbal classes are largely ignored. Only a few irregular verbs still display, at times, writings that retain the old inflections, often, however, without corresponding to the category that would be expected given the context. These writings are unevenly distributed among the documents, testifying to the existence of local, or perhaps rather individual, grammatical systems. Similarly, the co-existence in Traditional Egyptian of the two forms of the suffix conjugation sDm.n=f and sDm=f, both used to express a completed event, is best understood when each document is studied separately. There is a general avoidance of forms and expressions that parallel those found in Demotic. This appears to have been of greater importance than following the rules of Classical Egyptian. The use of the conjunctive and infinitival constructions, under certain conditions, confirms this observation.

  • 444.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    La reconstitution du verbe en égyptien de tradition 400-30 avant J.-C.2002Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Two variants of ancient Egyptian were used for different categories of written communication during the last millennium B.C. The vernacular, known as Demotic, served as the written language for administrative, legal and literary documents. Traditional Egyptian (égyptien de tradition), written in the hieroglyphic script and with linguistic structures that are purported to imitate those of the Classical Egyptian, was still used to compose mainly religious documents.

    The present work treats the verbal system of Traditional Egyptian using texts dated to the period 400-30 B.C. These documents include royal stelae and priestly decrees, among these the Rosetta Stone, as well as biographical inscriptions. After a general introduction, and a presentation of morphological characteristics, the study takes up the basic verbal patterns. The suffix conjugations, the sDm=fand sDm.n=f , in its various meanings and combinations, affirmative and negative, are dealt with, as is the pseudoparticiple. The infinitive, as it appears in e.g. pseudoverbal constructions and the sDm pw ir.n=f is examined in a separate section, with an additional chapter covering the passive forms of the suffix conjugation.

    A summary of the conclusions that are reached by this study are presented in the final chapter. Graphic variations show that morphemes formerly used to distinguish verbal classes are largely ignored. Only a few irregular verbs still display, at times, writings that retain the old inflections, often, however, without corresponding to the category that would be expected given the context. These writings are unevenly distributed among the documents, testifying to the existence of local, or perhaps rather individual, grammatical systems. Similarly, the co-existence in Traditional Egyptian of the two forms of the suffix conjugation sDm.n=fand sDm=f, both used to express a completed event, is best understood when each document is studied separately. There is a general avoidance of forms and expressions that parallel those found in Demotic. This appears to have been of greater importance than following the rules of Classical Egyptian. The use of the conjunctive and infinitival constructions, under certain conditions, confirms this observation.

  • 445.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    On the Verge of Ptolemaic Egyptian: Graphical Trends in the 30th Dynasty2006In: Abgadiyat, Vol. 1, p. 35-41Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract
  • 446.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. egyptologi.
    Philologische Bemerkungen zu spätzeitlichen Texten2005In: Lingua Aegyptia, Vol. 13, p. 39-48Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 447.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. egyptologi.
    Zenon è vero? Zur Lesung eines frühptolemäischen Personennamens2006In: Göttinger Miszellen, Vol. 208, p. 13-18Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 448.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. Egyptology.
    Über die Markierung des direkten Objekts im Koptischen2006In: Lingua Aegyptia, Vol. 14, p. 199-222Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 449.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. egyptologi.
    Über die Mendesstele Augen machen2001In: Göttinger Miszellen, Vol. 180, p. 51-55Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 450.
    Engström, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Hegardt, Johan
    Wilson, Lars
    Mössebergs fornborg1986In: Västergötlands Fornminnesförenings Tidskrift, p. 160-167Article in journal (Refereed)
6789101112 401 - 450 of 2752
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