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  • 351. Bostan, I.
    et al.
    Buruk, O. T.
    Canat, Mert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Tezcan, M. O.
    Yurdakul, C.
    Göksun, T.
    Özcan, O.
    Hands as a controller: User preferences for hand specific on-skin gestures2017In: DIS 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 1123-1134Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hand-specific on-skin (HSoS) gestures are a trending interaction modality yet there is a gap in the field regarding users' preferences about these gestures. Thus, we conducted a user-elicitation study collecting 957 gestures from 19 participants for 26 commands. Results indicate that (1) users use one hand as a reference object, (2) load different meanings to different parts of the hand, (3) give importance to hand-properties rather than the skin properties and (4) hands can turn into self-interfaces. Moreover, according to users' subjective evaluations, (5) exclusive gestures are less tiring than the intuitive ones. We present users' subjective evaluations regarding these and present a 33-element taxonomy to categorize them. Furthermore, we present two user-defined gesture sets; the intuitive set including users' first choices and natural-feeling gestures, and the exclusive set which includes more creative gestures indigenous to this modality. Our findings can inspire and guide designers and developers of HSoS.

  • 352.
    Boustedt, Tova
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction.
    Klinikintern statistik: en fallstudie kring behov av och möjligheter till framtagandet av ett statistikverktyg2014Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The health care sector is one of the most information-intensive institutions in Sweden. Big investments in information technology have been made to ensure efficiency and quality within organisations in health care. This has led to high requirements in documentation and resulted in an increase in administration which gradually more often is done by nurses and doctors. A major problem is that it is difficult to gain access to the information recorded in all the different systems, which is their objective. This causes double documentation instead of being a support in follow-up performance.  

    This study investigates the use of a central warehouse to enhance how people work with statistics at a clinic. The purpose of the project was to identify need and issues surrounding the clinical internal statistic of the Department of Neurosurgery and then give an improvement proposal in the form of a prototype software tool. During the project a requirement analysis in the form of interviews and observations in the clinic was carried out and the project team could identify users, systems, artefacts and information needs were identified.

    The result of this work is a prototype which was developed in a user-centered process, where contact with the IT-department (e-Hälsa) provided opportunities for access to data. The project has contributed a survey of the clinic where information- and functional needs about administrative statistics have been compiled and are the basis for a prototype that demonstrates a possible concept for recording and monitoring.

  • 353.
    Bowers, John
    et al.
    KTH / University of Manchester , U.K.
    Hellström, Sten-Olof
    KTH.
    Jää-Aro, Kai-Mikael
    KTH.
    Making Lightwork: The Algorithmic Performance of Virtual Environments1998In: Constructing and Manipulating the Virtual: Gesture Transformation, Soundscaping and Dynamic Environments for Extended Artistic Performance, Stockholm: NADA, Tekniska högskolan , 1998, , p. 14p. 5-19Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 354.
    Bowers, John
    et al.
    KTH.
    Hellström, Sten-Olof
    KTH.
    Jää-Aro, Kai-Mikael
    KTH.
    Supporting Event Management by Sonifying Participant Activity1999In: Production Tools for Electronic Arenas: Event Management and Content Production : eRENA : Deliverable D4.3/4.4, 1999, p. 80-98Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 355.
    Bowers, John
    et al.
    KTH.
    Jää-Aro, Kai-Mikael
    KTH.
    Blink: Exploring and Generating Content for Electronic Arenas1999In: Production Tools for Electronic Arenas: Event Management and Content Production : eRENA : Deliverable D4.3/4.4, 1999, p. 109-128Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 356.
    Bowers, John
    et al.
    KTH.
    Jää-Aro, Kai-Mikael
    KTH.
    Hellström, Sten-Olof
    KTH.
    Carlzon, Malin
    KTH.
    Event Management in Electronic Arenas by Visualising Participant Activity and Supporting Virtual Camera Deployment1999In: Production Tools for Electronic Arenas:: Event Management and Content Production : eRENA : Deliverable D4.3/4.4, 1999, , p. 22p. 58-79Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 357.
    Bowers, John
    et al.
    KTH.
    Jää-Aro, Kai-Mikael
    KTH.
    Hellström, Sten-Olof
    KTH.
    Hoch, Michael
    ZKM, Karlsruhe, Germany.
    Whitfield, Greg
    University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
    Production Support Tools for Electronic Arenas: Using Tangible Interfaces for Media Editing2000In: Production and Management of Events in Electronic Arenas: eRENA ESPRIT Project 25379 Workpackage 4 Deliverable D4.5, Stockholm: NADA, Tekniska högskolan , 2000, , p. 29p. 41-69Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 358.
    Bradley, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication: Services and Infrastucture, Software and Computer Systems, SCS.
    Collaboration between people for sustainability in the ICT society2007In: Human Interface and the Management of Information: Interacting in Information Environments, Pt 2, Proceedings / [ed] Smith, MJ; Salvendy, G, BERLIN: SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN , 2007, Vol. 4558, p. 703-712Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the present Net Work Period of the IT history deep changes are taken place in collaboration between people and human communication, its structure, quantity, and quality. A dominating steering factor for the design and structure of work life as well as private life is the convergence of three technologies, computer technology, tele technology and media technology (ICT). Telecommunication technology has come to play a more a more dominant role in this convergence, especially internet and web technology. Embedded (ubiquitous) computer technology is making the process invisible, and media technology converges within itself (multimedia or cross media). Well functioning organizational and psychosocial communication are an important prerequisite for successful industrial and social change in the ICT society. Managing and working in an organization organized as a network, involves communication between people, groups, units, other organisations, and various combinations of these entities. ICT applications together with deep knowledge and insights in organisational design and management (ODAM) are the keys to social change. The author describes her convergence theory on ICT and Psychosocial Life Environment with special emphasis on psychosocial communication and sustainability in the Net Era of the ICT society.

  • 359.
    Brage, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Speech dysfluency effects on working memory in otherwise fluent adults2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 12 credits / 18 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Using Delayed Auditory Feedback can be used to induce Stutterlike dysfluencies, causing an individual to lose speech fluency. Little is known about the effect of speech dysfluency on working memory and phonological coding. The present study focuses on finding a method that can be used to measure these effects in otherwise fluent adults. 7 adults who normally speak fluently are subjected to Delayed Auditory Feedback during a Reading Span Task. The method proved too weak to induce speech dysfluency in a majority of participants, indicating that the phenomenon is more complex than anticipated.

  • 360.
    Brandao, Ligia C
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Department of Software Engineering and Computer Science.
    Lennartsson, Ewonne
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Department of Software Engineering and Computer Science.
    Elektroniska signaturer- säker identifiering?2001Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Problem:I dag finns det ett stort behov av säkra identifierings metoder på Internet. Traditionellt sätt är en handskriven namnteckning en form av identifiering och vad som behövs är en elektronisk motsvarighet. Hypotes: "Elektroniska signaturer leder till ökad integritet och säkerhet vid identifiering på Internet" Syfte: Målet och syftet med denna uppsats är att studera och analysera huruvida elektroniska signaturer kommer att bidra till ökad integritet och säkerhet vid identifiering på Internet. Slutsats:Genom att jämföra praktiska erfarenheter (fallstudie) och teoretiska kriterier kunde vi analysera oss fram till att vår hypotes är sann.

  • 361.
    Bratt, Jesper
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Designing an interactive handlebar infotainment system for light vehicles2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis studies what the crucial aspects are when designing and developing an in-vehicle infotainment system for light vehicles that should both extend functionality and improve safety. In order to ground the research, innovations made in automotive infotainment systems are examined and a design for a light vehicle infotainment system that utilizes optical gesture based touch interaction is proposed. This is done with the goal to provide drivers of light vehicles with the same safety and usability improvements that drivers of cars can enjoy. A research through design approach together with heuristics and cognitive walkthrough enabled rapid design iterations to be made in order to produce a prototype to be tested. In the end, a design proposal was presented which showed that there are several similar ways of thinking that can be applied to light vehicle infotainment designs compared to its automotive counterparts. During the design process, the importance of a simple menu; animations to convey spatial connections; and notifications to lower the overall visual clutter were identified as key aspects of a safe and usable infotainment system. 

  • 362.
    Bratteteig, Tone
    et al.
    Design av informasjonssystemer, Universitet i Oslo.
    Wagner, Ina
    Institut für Gestaltungs- und Wirkungsforschung ,Technische Universität Wien.
    Morrison, Andrew
    Intermedia, Universitetet i Oslo.
    Stuedahl, Dagny
    Institutt for medier og kommunikasjon, Universitetet i Oslo.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Design av informasjonssystemer, Universitet i Oslo.
    Research practices in digital design2010In: Exploring digital design: multi-disciplinary design practices / [ed] Wagner, Ina, Bratteteig, Tone, Stuedahl, Dagny, London: Springer London, 2010, p. 17-54Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the twenty-first century, we are literally surrounded by digital things and things that turn out to be digital – or have some digital parts or are parts of a larger system in which there are digital elements. We carry around mobile phones and watches; many also have additional music players, PDAs or PCs. We live in houses filled with digital networks and artefacts; we depend on infrastructures that are partly digital and have digital systems attached to them; we use public and private services that are digital, are based on digital infrastructures and have other digital systems attached to them; and we experience embedded, ubiquitous computing as we live in digitally enhanced environments that support our activities with or without our conscious control. The digital layer(s) in the world constitute a real world.

  • 363.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Real-time visualization of musical expression2004In: Proceedings of Network of Excellence HUMAINE Workshop "From Signals to Signs of Emotion and Vice Versa", Santorini, Greece, Institute of Communication and Computer Systems, National Technical University of Athens, 2004, p. 19-23Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A system for real-time feedback of expressive music performance is presented.The feedback is provided by using a graphical interface where acoustic cues arepresented in an intuitive fashion. The graphical interface presents on the computerscreen a three-dimensional object with continuously changing shape, size,position, and colour. Some of the acoustic cues were associated with the shape ofthe object, others with its position. For instance, articulation was associated withshape, staccato corresponded to an angular shape and legato to a rounded shape.The emotional expression resulting from the combination of cues was mapped interms of the colour of the object (e.g., sadness/blue). To determine which colourswere most suitable for respective emotion, a test was run. Subjects rated how welleach of 8 colours corresponds to each of 12 music performances expressingdifferent emotions.

  • 364.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    SMC Sweden 2014: Sound and Music Computing: Bridging science, art, and industry2014Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 365.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    What is the color of that music performance?2005In: Proceedings of the International Computer Music Conference - ICMC 2005, Barcelona, 2005, p. 367-370Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The representation of expressivity in music is still a fairlyunexplored field. Alternative ways of representing musicalinformation are necessary when providing feedback onemotion expression in music such as in real-time tools formusic education, or in the display of large music databases.One possible solution could be a graphical non-verbal representationof expressivity in music performance using coloras index of emotion. To determine which colors aremost suitable for an emotional expression, a test was run.Subjects rated how well each of 8 colors and their 3 nuancescorresponds to each of 12 music performances expressingdifferent emotions. Performances were playedby professional musicians with 3 instruments, saxophone,guitar, and piano. Results show that subjects associateddifferent hues to different emotions. Also, dark colorswere associated to music in minor tonality and light colorsto music in major tonality. Correspondence betweenspectrum energy and color hue are preliminary discussed.

  • 366.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    de Witt, Anna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Papetti, Stefano
    University of Verona.
    Civolani, Marco
    University of Verona.
    Fontana, Federico
    University of Verona.
    Expressive sonification of footstep sounds2010In: Proceedings of ISon 2010: 3rd Interactive Sonification Workshop / [ed] Bresin, Roberto; Hermann, Thomas; Hunt, Andy, Stockholm, Sweden: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2010, p. 51-54Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we present the evaluation of a model for the interactive sonification of footsteps. The sonification is achieved by means of specially designed sensored-shoes which control the expressive parameters of novel sound synthesis models capable of reproducing continuous auditory feedback for walking. In a previousstudy, sounds corresponding to different grounds were associated to different emotions and gender. In this study, we used an interactive sonification actuated by the sensored-shoes for providing auditory feedback to walkers. In an experiment we asked subjects to walk (using the sensored-shoes) with four different emotional intentions (happy, sad, aggressive, tender) and for each emotion we manipulated the ground texture sound four times (wood panels, linoleum, muddy ground, and iced snow). Preliminary results show that walkers used a more active walking style (faster pace) when the sound of the walking surface was characterized by an higher spectral centroid (e.g. iced snow), and a less active style (slower pace) when the spectral centroid was low (e.g. muddy ground). Harder texture sounds lead to more aggressive walking patters while softer ones to more tender and sad walking styles.

  • 367.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Delle Monache, Stefano
    University of Verona.
    Fontana, Federico
    University of Verona.
    Papetti, Stefano
    University of Verona.
    Polotti, Pietro
    University of Verona.
    Visell, Yon
    McGill University.
    Auditory feedback through continuous control of crumpling sound synthesis2008In: Proceedings of Sonic Interaction Design: Sound, Information and Experience. A CHI 2008 Workshop organized by COST Action IC0601, IUAV University of Venice , 2008, p. 23-28Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A realtime model for the synthesis of crumpling sounds ispresented. By capturing the statistics of short sonic transients which give rise to crackling noise, it allows for a consistent description of a broad spectrum of audible physical processes which emerge in several everyday interaction contexts.The model drives a nonlinear impactor that sonifies every transient, and it can be parameterized depending on the physical attributes of the crumpling material. Three different scenarios are described, respectively simulating the foot interaction with aggregate ground materials, augmenting a dining scenario, and affecting the emotional content of a footstep sequence. Taken altogether, they emphasize the potential generalizability of the model to situations in which a precise control of auditory feedback can significantly increase the enactivity and ecological validity of an interface.

  • 368.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Falkenberg Hansen, Kjetil
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Månsson, Lisa
    Tardat, Bruno
    Musikcyklarna/Music bikes: An installation for enabling children to investigate the relationship between expressive music performance and body motion2014In: Proceedings of the Sound and Music Computing Sweden Conference 2014, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2014, p. 1-2Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 369.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Friberg, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Emotion rendering in music: Range and characteristic values of seven musical variables2011In: Cortex, ISSN 0010-9452, E-ISSN 1973-8102, Vol. 47, no 9, p. 1068-1081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many studies on the synthesis of emotional expression in music performance have focused on the effect of individual performance variables on perceived emotional quality by making a systematical variation of variables. However, most of the studies have used a predetermined small number of levels for each variable, and the selection of these levels has often been done arbitrarily. The main aim of this research work is to improve upon existing methodologies by taking a synthesis approach. In a production experiment, 20 performers were asked to manipulate values of 7 musical variables simultaneously (tempo, sound level, articulation, phrasing, register, timbre, and attack speed) for communicating 5 different emotional expressions (neutral, happy, scary, peaceful, sad) for each of 4 scores. The scores were compositions communicating four different emotions (happiness, sadness, fear, calmness). Emotional expressions and music scores were presented in combination and in random order for each performer for a total of 5 x 4 stimuli. The experiment allowed for a systematic investigation of the interaction between emotion of each score and intended expressed emotions by performers. A two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), repeated measures, with factors emotion and score was conducted on the participants' values separately for each of the seven musical factors. There are two main results. The first one is that musical variables were manipulated in the same direction as reported in previous research on emotional expressive music performance. The second one is the identification for each of the five emotions the mean values and ranges of the five musical variables tempo, sound level, articulation, register, and instrument. These values resulted to be independent from the particular score and its emotion. The results presented in this study therefore allow for both the design and control of emotionally expressive computerized musical stimuli that are more ecologically valid than stimuli without performance variations.

  • 370.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Friberg, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Evaluation of computer systems for expressive music performance2013In: Guide to Computing for Expressive Music Performance / [ed] Kirke, Alexis; Miranda, Eduardo R., Springer, 2013, p. 181-203Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, we review and summarize different methods for the evaluation of CSEMPs. The main categories of evaluation methods are (1) comparisons with measurements from real performances, (2) listening experiments, and (3) production experiments. Listening experiments can be of different types. For example, in some experiments, subjects may be asked to rate a particular expressive characteristic (such as the emotion conveyed or the overall expression) or to rate the effect of a particular acoustic cue. In production experiments, subjects actively manipulate system parameters to achieve a target performance. Measures for estimating the difference between performances are discussed in relation to the objectives of the model and the objectives of the evaluation. There will be also a section with a presentation and discussion of the Rencon (Performance Rendering Contest). Rencon is a contest for comparing the expressive musical performances of the same score generated by different CSEMPs. Practical examples from previous works are presented, commented on, and analysed.

  • 371.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Friberg, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Influence of Acoustic Cues on the Expressive Performance of Music2008In: Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition, Sapporo, Japan, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 372.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Dahl, Sofia
    The Radio Baton as configurable musical instrument and controller2003In: Proc. Stockholm Music Acoustics Conference, 2003, Vol. 2, p. 689-691Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Max Mathews radio baton (RB) has been produced in about 40 pieces until today. It has usually been applied as an orchestra conducting system, as interactive music composition controller using typical percussionist gestures, and as a controller for sound synthesis models. In the framework of the Sounding Object EU founded project, the RB has found new applications scenarios. Three applications were based on this controller. This was achieved by changing the gesture controls. Instead of the default batons, a new radio sender that fits the fingertips was developed. This new radio sender allows musicians’ interaction based on hand gestures and it can also fit different devices. A Pd model of DJ scratching techniques (submitted to SMAC03) was controlled with the RB and the fingertip radio sender. This controller allows DJs a direct control of sampled sounds maintaining hand gestures similar to those used on vinyl. The sound model of a bodhran (submitted to SMAC03) was controlled with a traditional playing approach. The RB was controlled with a traditional bodhran double beater with one fingertip radio sender at each end. This allowed detection of the beater position on the RB surface, the surfaced corresponding to the membrane in the sound model. In a third application the fingertip controller was used to move a virtual ball rolling along the elastic surface of a box placed over the surface of the RB. The DJ console and the virtual bodhran were played in concerts.

  • 373.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Dahl, Sofia
    Rath, Mathias
    Marshall, Mark
    Moynihan, Breege
    Devices for manipulation and control of sounding objects: the Vodhran and the Invisiball2003In: The Sounding Object / [ed] Rocchesso, Davide; Fontana, Federico, Mondo Estremo , 2003, p. 271-295Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 374.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Karjalainen, Matti
    Helsinki University of Technology.
    Mäki-Patola, Teemu
    Helsinki University of Technology.
    Kanerva, Aki
    Helsinki University of Technology.
    Huovilainen, Antti
    Helsinki University of Technology.
    Jordá, Sergi
    University Pompeu Fabra.
    Kaltenbrunner, Martin
    University Pompeu Fabra.
    Geiger, Günter
    University Pompeu Fabra.
    Bencina, Ross
    University Pompeu Fabra.
    de Götzen, Amalia
    University of Padua.
    Rocchesso, Davide
    IUAV University of Venice.
    Controlling sound production2008In: Sound to Sense, Sense to Sound: A state of the art in Sound and Music Computing / [ed] Polotti, Pietro; Rocchesso, Davide, Berlin: Logos Verlag , 2008, p. 447-486Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 375.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Hermann, T.
    Hunt, A.
    Interactive sonification2012In: Journal on Multimodal User Interfaces, ISSN 1783-7677, E-ISSN 1783-8738, Vol. 5, no 3-4, p. 85-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In October 2010, Roberto Bresin, Thomas Hermann and Andy Hunt launched a call for papers for a special issue on Interactive Sonification of the Journal on Multimodal User Interfaces (JMUI). The call was published in eight major mailing lists in the field of Sound and Music Computing and on related websites. Twenty manuscripts were submit- ted for review, and eleven of them have been accepted for publication after further improvements. Three of the papers are further developments of works presented at ISon 2010— Interactive Sonification workshop. Most of the papers went through a three-stage review process.

    The papers give an interesting overview of the field of Interactive Sonification as it is today. Their topics include the sonification of data exploration and of motion, a new sound synthesis model suitable for interactive sonification applications, a study on perception in the everyday periphery of attention, and the proposal of a conceptual framework for interactive sonification. 

  • 376.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Hermann, ThomasBielefeld University, Bielefeld, Germany.Hunt, AndyUniversity of York, York, UK.
    Proceedings of ISon 2010 - Interactive Sonification Workshop: Human Interaction with Auditory Displays2010Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    These are the proceedings of the ISon 2010 meeting, which is the 3rd international Interactive Sonification Workshop. The first ISon workshop was held in Bielefeld (Germany) in 2004, and a second one was held in York (UK) in 2007.These meetings:

    • focus on the link between auditory displays and human‐computer interaction
    • bring together experts in sonification to exchange ideas and work‐in‐progress
    • strengthen networking in sonification research

    High quality work is assured by a peer‐reviewing process, and the successful papers were presented at the conference and are published here.

    ISon 2010 was supported by COST IC0601 Action on Sonic Interaction Design (SID) (http://www.cost‐sid.org/).

     

    About Interactive Sonification

    Sonification & Auditory Displays are increasingly becoming an established technology for exploring data, monitoring complex processes, or assisting exploration and navigation of data spaces. Sonification addresses the auditory sense by transforming data into sound, allowing the human user to get valuable information from data by using their natural listening skills.

    The main differences of sound displays over visual displays are that sound can:

    • Represent frequency responses in an instant (as timbral characteristics)
    • Represent changes over time, naturally
    • Allow microstructure to be perceived
    • Rapidly portray large amounts of data
    • Alert listener to events outside the current visual focus
    • Holistically bring together many channels of information

    Auditory displays typically evolve over time since sound is inherently a temporal phenomenon. Interaction thus becomes an integral part of the process in order to select, manipulate, excite or control the display, and this has implications for the interface between humans and computers. In recent years it has become clear that there is an important need for research to address the interaction with auditory displays more explicitly. Interactive Sonification is the specialized research topic concerned with the use of sound to portray data, but where there is a human being at the heart of an interactive control loop. Specifically it deals with:

    • interfaces between humans and auditory displays
    • mapping strategies and models for creating coherency between action and reaction (e.g. acoustic feedback, but also combined with haptic or visual feedback)
    • perceptual aspects of the display (how to relate actions and sound, e.g. cross‐modal effects, importance of synchronisation)
    • applications of Interactive Sonification
    • evaluation of performance, usability and multi‐modal interactive systems including auditory feedback

    Although ISon shines a spotlight on the particular situations where there is real‐time interaction with sonification systems, the usual community for exploring all aspects of auditory display is ICAD (http://www.icad.org/).

     

    Contents

    These proceedings contain the conference versions of all contributions to the 3rd International interactive Sonification Workshop. Where papers have audio or audiovisual examples, these are listed in the paper and will help to illustrate the multimedia content more clearly.

    We very much hope that the proceedings provide an inspiration for your work and extend your perspective on the new emerging research field of interactive sonification.

    Roberto Bresin, Thomas Hermann, Andy Hunt, ISon 2010 Organisers

  • 377.
    Bretzner, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Laptev, Ivan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Lindeberg, Tony
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Hand-gesture recognition using multi-scale colour features, hierarchical features and particle filtering2002In: Fifth IEEE International Conference on Automatic Face and Gesture Recognition, 2002. Proceedings, IEEE conference proceedings, 2002, p. 63-74Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents algorithms and a prototype systemfor hand tracking and hand posture recognition. Hand posturesare represented in terms of hierarchies of multi-scalecolour image features at different scales, with qualitativeinter-relations in terms of scale, position and orientation. Ineach image, detection of multi-scale colour features is performed.Hand states are then simultaneously detected andtracked using particle filtering, with an extension of layeredsampling referred to as hierarchical layered sampling. Experimentsare presented showing that the performance ofthe system is substantially improved by performing featuredetection in colour space and including a prior with respectto skin colour. These components have been integrated intoa real-time prototype system, applied to a test problem ofcontrolling consumer electronics using hand gestures. In asimplified demo scenario, this system has been successfullytested by participants at two fairs during 2001.

  • 378.
    Bretzner, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Laptev, Ivan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Lindeberg, Tony
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Biology, CB.
    Lenman, S.
    Sundblad, Y.
    A Prototype System for Computer Vision Based Human Computer Interaction2001Report (Other academic)
  • 379.
    Bretzner, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Lindeberg, Tony
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Biology, CB.
    Use your hand as a 3-D mouse or relative orientation from extended sequences of sparse point and line correspondances using the affine trifocal tensor1998In: Computer Vision — ECCV'98: 5th European Conference on Computer Vision Freiburg, Germany, June, 2–6, 1998 Proceedings, Volume I, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 1998, Vol. 1406, p. 141-157Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the problem of computing three-dimensional structure and motion from an unknown rigid configuration of point and lines viewed by an affine projection model. An algebraic structure, analogous to the trilinear tensor for three perspective cameras, is defined for configurations of three centered affine cameras. This centered affine trifocal tensor contains 12 coefficients and involves linear relations between point correspondences and trilinear relations between line correspondences It is shown how the affine trifocal tensor relates to the perspective trilinear tensor, and how three-dimensional motion can be computed from this tensor in a straightforward manner. A factorization approach is also developed to handle point features and line features simultaneously in image sequences.

    This theory is applied to a specific problem of human-computer interaction of capturing three-dimensional rotations from gestures of a human hand. A qualitative model is presented, in which three fingers are represented by their position and orientation, and it is shown how three point correspondences (blobs at the finger tips) and three line correspondences (ridge features at the fingers) allow the affine trifocal tensor to be determined, from which the rotation is computed. Besides the obvious application, this test problem illustrates the usefulness of the affine trifocal tensor in a situation where sufficient information is not available to compute the perspective trilinear tensor, while the geometry requires point correspondences as well as line correspondences over at least three views.

  • 380.
    Brolin, Jesper
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Department of Human Work Science and Media Technology.
    Kitchen Know-How for Automation2001Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Summary This thesis consists of an ethnographic investigation of five Swedish household's everyday life in their kitchens during the spring 2001 and an analysis of this context, which for certain can be apt for the development of the smart home services of today. Finally some future opportunities on how to systematise ethnography for design use also are drawn. The focus of investigation of this thesis is to find out what actual happens in some situations in ordinary kitchens. Specific interest is showed for the articulation work, while most smart appliances of today supports only goal-oriented activity, hence evolved from the ground of the home PC interaction. The ethnographical investigation is focused on three specific events in a house hold which all are assumed to take place in the families kitchen. The events are: 1) When a family plans and books an amusement activity. 2) When a family plans it's shopping. 3) When a person solves a goal oriented task, for example details about cooking a meal.

  • 381.
    Broms, Loove
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Awareness Aspects of the RemoteHome: A concept for a remotely shared flat share2005Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The RemoteHome is a concept for the first remotely shared apartment. It is one place ofliving in two different cities: London and Berlin.This Master’s thesis revolves around the exhibit of the home at the E-cultures Fair inAmsterdam between the 23rd and the 25th of October 2003. It also looks back at previousversions of the RemoteHome in an effort to evaluate how well the home succeeds in one ofits major goals: To represent awareness on distance.The home consist of a set of interactive furniture located at two different places andwith a similar, although not identical, setup.For the exhibition one piece of furniture, the interactive wall, was modified to becomemore responsive and easy to understand. During interviews at the exhibition and the following workshop it became apparent that there was no single answer on how to improveinteractiveness and the feeling of presence. This mostly because the RemoteHome as aproject has more than one goal. It is a product for only a few friends or couple but it isdesigned to be shown for a larger audience.The solution suggested for improving interaction and awareness is to choose betweeneither the home or exhibition setting and continue the development from there.In a home setting the RemoteHome should focus on feedback, privacy and situationadaptation. At the fair it should be more self explanatory and conspicuous in order tomediate any awareness efficiently. Anonymity is one problem that should be dealt with.

  • 382.
    Broms, Loove
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Storyforming: Experiments in creating discursive engagements between people, things and environments2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis introduces and critically reflects on a design programme, Storyforming, that explores ways to design objects and places to enrich daily life narratives. Using an experimental design approach, the goal is to exemplify and explore this idea with discursive artefacts that, through their physical and temporal form, act as catalysts in the construction of meaningful experiences.

    In the current sustainability discourse, behavioural change has been pointed out as a key factor in achieving a sustainable society. Historically, design has been very effective in increasing production and consumption behaviours by creating new types of needs and, in a way, manufacturing desire (Forty, 1986). Drawing on this, the overarching aim of this thesis is the investigation of the ways design, through a suggested programme, can afford alternative types of meaningful experiences in contrast to the prevailing consumer culture.

    The empirical work reported in the thesis stems from several research projects looking into the matter of energy use in relation to design. In addition, two of the projects have been carried out in the author’s own design practice. Some concepts are explored more in-depth—involving events such as field studies, situated interviews, workshops, prototype building, design interventions in the form of domestication probes, and contextual studies ranging from a few weeks up to a year—while other concepts exist only as sketches or photo montages. The diversity of these concepts, the design experiments, helps span a design space becoming a new provisional design programme. The idea for this programme has evolved from observations and reflections made throughout the experiments presented in the thesis.

    The general results are the suggested approach of Storyforming, which focuses on the design of artefacts supporting daily narratives that can be used to create engagement, meaning, and alternative values applicable to the discourse of sustainable behaviour.

    Specific contributions are the selection of design experiments. In the thesis, the experiments have first been examined from the perspective of stories and forming as a basis for the new programme formulation. Through this articulation of the programme, the experiments are revisited through three leitmotifs, part of the provisional programme focusing on different properties related to the aspect of forming. From the perspective of the user, these themes—seeing and accessing designs, exploring and expressing complexity, and sharing experiences and negotiating use—are finally elaborated on in relation to other theoretical concepts as well as their implications for future research.

  • 383.
    Broms, Loove
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Sustainable Interactions: Studies in the Design of Energy Awareness Artefacts2011Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis presents a collection of experimental designs that approach the problem of growing electricity consumption in homes. From the perspective of design, the intention has been to critically explore the design space of energy awareness artefacts to reinstate awareness of energy use in everyday practice. The design experiments were used as vehicles for thinking about the relationship between physical form, interaction, and social practice. The rationale behind the concepts was based on a small-scale ethnography, situated interviews, and design experience. Moreover, the thesis compares designer intention and actual user experiences of a prototype that was installed in nine homes in a residential area in Stockholm for three months. This was done in order to elicit tacit knowledge about how the concept was used in real-world domestic settings, to challenge everyday routines, and to enable both users and designers to critically reflect on artefacts and practices. From a design perspective, contributions include design approaches to communicating energy use: visualizations for showing relationships between behaviour and electricity consumption, shapes and forms to direct action, means for turning restrictions caused by energy conservation into central parts of the product experience, and ways to promote sustainable behaviour with positive driving forces based on user lifestyles. The general results indicate that inclusion is of great importance when designing energy awareness artefacts; all members of the household should be able to access, interact with, and reflect on their energy use. Therefore, design-related aspects such as placement and visibility, as well as how the artefact might affect the social interactions in the home, become central. Additionally, the thesis argues that these types of artefacts can potentially create awareness accompanied by negative results such as stress. A challenge for the designer is to create artefacts that communicate and direct energy use in ways that are attractive and can be accepted by all household members as a possible way of life.

  • 384.
    Broms, Loove
    et al.
    Interactive Institute.
    Bång, Magnus
    Interactive Institute.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Persuasive Engagement: Exploiting Lifestyle as a Driving Force to Promote Energy-aware Use Patterns and Behaviours2009In: Undisciplined! Proceedings of the Design Research Society Conference 2008, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electricity consumption has been rising significantly in the western world the last decades and this has affected the environment negatively. Efficient use and more energy conservative usage patterns could be ways to approach this problem. However, electricity has for a long time actively been hidden away and it is rarely thought of unless it ceases to exist. From the perspective of critical design, we have been working to find methods to visualise electricity and electricity consumption in everyday life to promote environmentally positive behavioural change. In this paper, we are looking at how aspects of lifestyles can be used in design as central driving forces that could lead to changed behaviour. Attempts to promote behavioural changes related to energy consumption might be successfully carried out when people are offered desirable alternatives that are engaging and that do not impose a perceived extra burden in their everyday life. This argument is exemplified through two design concepts, the AWARE Laundry Lamp and the Energy Plant, which are examples on how to increase people’s energy awareness and offer them means for reducing their energy consumption in the home. Both prototypes are inspired by current trends in lifestyle as well as actual observed user behaviour.

  • 385.
    Broms, Loove
    et al.
    Interactive Institute.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Bång, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    The Energy AWARE Clock: Incorporating Electricity Use in the Social Interactions of Everyday Life2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New interfaces to the energy system can facilitate changes of habits and provide means to control the household’s use of energy. In this paper, we look at energy use and such interfaces in the home from a socio- technical perspective. We describe how interviews and user observations can be used in combination with the theory of domestication to inform and inspire the design of interfaces to the energy system. As a result of our approach, we present the Energy AWARE Clock, an example of a new type of electricity meter that challenges the norm of how the electricity system is typically represented in the home. The Energy AWARE Clock makes use of a clock metaphor to visualise electricity-use in relation to time in everyday life. Energy-awareness products always challenge domestic social patterns and it is important to consider these aspects in the design process to find successful solutions for the future. 

  • 386.
    Broms, Loove
    et al.
    Interactive Intstitute.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    Interactive Institute.
    Bång, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Nyblom, Åsa
    Interactive Institute.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Coffee Maker Patterns and the Design of Energy Feedback Artefacts2010In: DIS '10 Proceedings of the 8th ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, 2010, p. 93-102Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart electricity meters and home displays are being installed in people’s homes with the assumption that households will make the necessary efforts to reduce their electricity consumption. However, present solutions do not sufficiently account for the social implications of design. There is a potential for greater savings if we can better understand how such designs affect behaviour. In this paper, we describe our design of an energy awareness artefact – the Energy AWARE Clock – and discuss it in relation to behavioural processes in the home. A user study is carried out to study the deployment of the prototype in real domestic contexts for three months. Results indicate that the Energy AWARE Clock played a significant role in drawing households’ attention to their electricity use. It became a natural part of the household and conceptions of electricity became naturalized into informants’ everyday language.

  • 387.
    Broms, Loove
    et al.
    Interactive Institute.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    Interactive Institute.
    Bång, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Nyblom, Åsa
    Interactive Institute.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Days in the life of the Energy Aware Clock2011In: Design Research Journal, ISSN 2000-639X, E-ISSN 2000-3080, no 1, p. 30-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a potential for greater electricity savings if we can better understand how design affects behaviour. This paper describes om design of an energy awareness artefact - the Energy AWARE Clock- and discusses it in relation to behavioural processes in the home. The Energy AWARE Clock showed to play a significant role in drawing households' attention to their electricity use. It became a natural part of the household and conceptions of electricity became natmalized into informants' everyday language.

  • 388.
    Bronge, Erica
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Visualization of Feature Dependency Structures: A case study at Scania CV AB2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As many automotive companies have moved towards a higher degree of variability in the product lines they offer their customers, a necessary need has emerged for so called feature dependency structures that are used to describe product feature dependencies and verify order validity. In this study, the possibility of using a node-link graph representation to visualize such a feature dependency structure and the associated affordances and limitations were investigated by the implementation of a case study at the Swedish automotive company Scania CV AB. Qualitative data gathering methods such as contextual inquiry and semi-structured interviews with employees were used to identify key tasks and issues involved in maintenance and analysis of Scania’s in-house feature dependency structure. These findings were used together with user-supported iterative prototyping to create a few visualization prototypes intended to provide support with performance of some of the identified tasks. User evaluation of the prototypes showed that a node-link graph representation was a viable solution to support users with structure maintenance, exhibiting the following affordances: structure exploration, overview and context. Furthermore, the major limitations of the tested representation were found to be lookup of specific information and access to detail. The findings of this study are expected to be of use for other automotive companies that employ a high degree of feature variability in their product lines through the use of complex feature dependency structures.

  • 389. Browall, C.
    et al.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Petterson, F.
    Camelot - Rundabordssamtal och seminarier kring framtidens boende (A workshop serie about domestic technologies)2002Book (Other academic)
  • 390. Brown, B.
    et al.
    Bodker, S.
    Hook, K.
    Does HCI scale?: Scale hacking and the relevance of HCI2017In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 28-33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 391.
    Brown, Barry
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Laurier, Eric
    The Trouble with Autopilots: Assisted and Autonomous Driving on the Social Road2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 416-429Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As self-driving cars have grown in sophistication and ability, they have been deployed on the road in both localised tests and as regular private vehicles. In this paper we draw upon publicly available videos of autonomous and assisted driving (specifically the Tesla autopilot and Google self-driving car) to explore how their drivers and the drivers of other cars interact with, and make sense of, the actions of these cars. Our findings provide an early perspective on human interaction with new forms of driving involving assisted-car drivers, autonomous vehicles and other road users. The focus is on social interaction on the road, and how drivers communicate through, and interpret, the movement of cars. We provide suggestions toward increasing the transparency of autopilots' actions for both their driver and other drivers.

  • 392.
    Brudfors, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Seitel, Alexander
    University of British Columbia.
    Rasoulian, Abtin
    University of British Columbia.
    Lasso, Andras
    Queens University, Canada.
    Lessoway, Victoria
    Woman's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada.
    Osborn, Jill
    St Pauls Hospital, Vancouver, Canada.
    Maki, Atsuto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP.
    Rohling, Robert
    University of British Columbia.
    Abolmaesumi, Purang
    University of British Columbia.
    Towards real-time, tracker-less 3D ultrasound guidance for spine anaesthesia2015In: International Journal of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery, ISSN 1861-6410, E-ISSN 1861-6429, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 855-865Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Epidural needle insertions and facet joint injections play an important role in spine anaesthesia. The main challenge of safe needle insertion is the deep location of the target, resulting in a narrow and small insertion channel close to sensitive anatomy. Recent approaches utilizing ultrasound (US) as a low-cost and widely available guiding modality are promising but have yet to become routinely used in clinical practice due to the difficulty in interpreting US images, their limited view of the internal anatomy of the spine, and/or inclusion of cost-intensive tracking hardware which impacts the clinical workflow. Methods: We propose a novel guidance system for spine anaesthesia. An efficient implementation allows us to continuously align and overlay a statistical model of the lumbar spine on the live 3D US stream without making use of additional tracking hardware. The system is evaluated in vivo on 12 volunteers. Results: The in vivo study showed that the anatomical features of the epidural space and the facet joints could be continuously located, at a volume rate of 0.5 Hz, within an accuracy of 3 and 7 mm, respectively. Conclusions: A novel guidance system for spine anaesthesia has been presented which augments a live 3D US stream with detailed anatomical information of the spine. Results from an in vivo study indicate that the proposed system has potential for assisting the physician in quickly finding the target structure and planning a safe insertion trajectory in the spine.

  • 393.
    Brunnström, Kjell
    et al.
    Acreo AB, Kista, Sweden.
    Sedano, Iñigo
    Tecnalia Research & Innovation, Bilbao, Spain.
    Wang, Kun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Barkowsky, Markus
    IRCCyN, Nantes; France.
    Kihl, Maria
    Lund University.
    Andrén, Börje
    Acreo AB, Kista, Sweden.
    Le Callet, Patrick
    IRCCyN, Nantes; France.
    Sjöström, Mårten
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Aurelius, Andreas
    Acreo AB, Kista, Sweden.
    2D no-reference video quality model development and 3D video transmission quality2012In: Proceedings of the Sixth International Workshop on Video Processing and Quality Metrics for Consumer Electronics VPQM-2012, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation will target two different topics in video quality assessment. First, we discuss 2D no-reference video quality model development. Further, we discuss how to find suitable quality for 3D video transmission. No-reference metrics are the only practical option for monitoring of 2D video quality in live networks. In order to decrease the development time, it might be possible to use full-reference metrics for this purpose. In this work, we have evaluated six full-reference objective metrics in three different databases. We show statistically that VQM performs the best. Further, we use these results to develop a lightweight no-reference model. We have also investigated users' experience of stereoscopic 3D video quality by performing the rating of two subjective assessment datasets, targeting in one dataset efficient transmission in the transmission error free case and error concealment in the other. Among other results, it was shown that, based on the same level of quality of experience, spatial down-sampling may lead to better bitrate efficiency while temporal down-sampling will be worse. When network impairments occur, traditional error 2D concealment methods need to be reinvestigated as they were outperformed switching to 2D presentation.

  • 394.
    Brunnström, Kjell
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Systems and Technology. Acreo Swedish ICT AB.
    Wang, Kun
    Acreo Swedish ICT AB.
    Tavakoli, Samira
    Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain.
    Andrén, Börje
    Acreo Swedish ICT AB.
    Symptoms analysis of 3D TV viewing based on Simulator Sickness Questionnaires2017In: Quality and User Experience, ISSN 2366-0147, Vol. 2, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stereoscopic 3D TV viewing puts different visual demands on the viewer compared to 2D TV viewing. Previous research has reported on viewers' fatigue and discomfort and other negative effects. This study is to investigate further how severe and what symptoms may arise from somewhat longish 3D TV viewing.

    The MPEG 3DV project is working on the next-generation video encoding standard and in this process, MPEG issued a call for proposal of encoding algorithms. To evaluate these algorithms a large scale subjective test was performed involving Laboratories all over the world[1, 2]. For the participating Labs, it was optional to administer a slightly modified Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ) before and after the test. One of the SSQ data sets described in this article is coming from this study. The SSQ data from the MPEG test is the largest data set in this study and also contains the longest viewing times. Along with the SSQ data from the MPEG test, we have also collected questionnaire data in three other 3D TV studies. We did two on the same 3D TV (passive film pattern retarder) as in the MPEG test, and one was using a projector system. As comparison SSQ data from a 2D video quality experiment is also presented. 

    This investigation shows a statistically significant increase in symptoms after viewing 3D TV primarily related to the visual or Oculomotor system. Surprisingly, 3D video viewing using projectors did not show this effect.

  • 395.
    Brändström, Magnus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Dueso Tejero, Albert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    How to encourage stretching and breaks at work: Understanding long term usage of a behaviour change support system2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    We are spending more and more time seated at work, which increases the risk for health problems. Behaviour change support systems that encourage breaks and stretching at work have been used as interventions to try to reduce these problems. No previous studies had looked at how these systems were used for long periods of time. In this qualitative study based on ten interviews, we aimed for expanding our understanding of long-term usage of such systems by studying one called ‘Efons’. The results indicate that the main factors influencing long-term usage are timely reminders, the impact that the stretching exercises has on the users’ health and the education of the user about health recommendations. We also found elements we argue have the ability to influence long-term usage and currently do not exist in the system studied or its context of use, such as adapt the system to the needs of the user or provide education about why these systems are useful.

  • 396.
    Budgifvars, Clara
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Teamarbete på förlossningsavdelningar: En studie ur ett teamkognitivt perspektiv2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 12 credits / 18 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna kandidatuppsats är att skapa en bättre förståelse för hur teamarbetet fungerar för personalen på förlossningsavdelningar. Beställaren för detta projekt är det Internationella Medicinska Programmet (IMP), Region Östergötland. Metoden som användes var semistrukturerade intervjuer där svaren sedan analyserades med en tematisk analys. De teman som identifierades var team, information, hälsa, träning, mål och system. Dessa teman diskuterades och kopplades till olika teamteorier. Resultatet pekar på att teamarbetet är viktigt för förlossningsvården och att det påverkas av ett flertal faktorer, exempelvis kommunikation, gemensamma mål etc. De teman som identifierades påverkar teamarbetet på olika sätt, när de fungerar bra fungerar även teamarbetet bra, det försämras dock när de fungerar dåligt. Det är av denna anledning viktigt att få en bättre förståelse för teamarbete, speciellt inom vården, där teamarbetet kan påverka liv och död.

  • 397.
    Buisman, Jacco
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Department of Software Engineering and Computer Science.
    Game Theory and Bidding for Software Projects An Evaluation of the Bidding Behaviour of Software Engineers2002Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The conception phase is one of the most important phases of software projects. In this phase it is determined which software development company will perform a software project. To obtain a software project, companies can have several bidding strategies. This thesis investigates if and how game theory can be a helpful tool to evaluate bidding for software projects. This thesis can be divided into two different parts: a theoretical and a practical. The theoretical part investigates the applicable parts of game theory in this thesis, explains what software projects are, explains the difference between costing and bidding and provides results of a literature survey about bidding behaviour. The practical part introduces a study to investigate strategies and bidding behaviour of software engineers, explains the experimental design that found the study, provides the results of the performed study and a discussion of the results. This thesis concludes that game theory contains some concepts that make it possible to evaluate bidding for software projects.

  • 398.
    Bukhari, Syed Asif Abbas
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Hussain, Sajid
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Computing.
    Intelligent Support System for Health Monitoring of elderly people2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The use of information and communications technology (ICT) to provide medical information, interaction between patients and health-service providers, institution-to-institution transmission of data, in known as eHealth. ICT have become an inseparable part of our life, it can integrate health care more seamlessly to our everyday life. ICT enables the delivery of accurate medical information anytime anywhere in an efficient manner. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the single leading cause of death, especially in elderly people. The condition of heart is monitor by electrocardiogram (ECG). The Electrocardiogram (ECG) is widely used clinical tool to diagnose complex heart diseases. In clinical settings, resting ECG is used to monitor patients. Holter-based portable monitoring solutions capable of 24 to 48-hour ECG recording, they lack the capability of providing any real-time feedback in case of alarming situation. The recorded ECG data analyzed offline by doctor. To address this issue, authors propose a functionality of intelligence decision support system, in heart monitoring system. The proposed system has capability of generate an alarm in case of serious abnormality in heart, during monitoring of heart activity.

  • 399.
    Burell, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Personas – ett sätt att lyfta fram krav på offentliga e-tjänster utifrån användare med särskilda behov2006Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Magister), 20 points / 30 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    I den offentliga sektorn sker idag en genomgripande övergång till att erbjuda service via Internet genom elektroniska tjänster, e-tjänster. Få tjänster utvecklas utifrån ett användarperspektiv och många brister i tillgänglighet. Funktionshindrade, invandrare och äldre är tre grupper vars behov sällan uppmärksammas i utvecklingen av dessa tjänster. Detta ökar klyftorna i samhället.

    Studien undersöker hur metoden personas kan användas för att kommunicera vilka behov som ett urval av dessa grupper har i sin användning av offentliga e-tjänster. Personas är en användarcentrerad form av målgruppsanalys där användare representeras genom personliga berättelser. Dessa beskriver fiktiva användares mål, vanor och behov.

    Femton personer ur grupperna dyslektiker, synskadade och äldre intervjuades och observerades i sin användning av fyra offentliga e-tjänster. Intervjuerna resulterade i fyra exempel på personas som presenterades för fem myndighetsrepresentanter i en fokusgrupp. Där utvärderades den förväntade nyttan med att använda personas som en metod att beskriva användargrupper med särskilda behov.

    Resultaten från fokusgruppen visar att studiens tillämpning av personas kompletterar och levandegör riktlinjer för tillgänglighet. Tillämpningen är dessutom lätt att ta till sig på kort tid. Personas ersätter inte möten och utvärderingar med faktiska användare, men kan ge stöd och spara resurser vid planering, utveckling och utvärdering av offentliga e-tjänster. Den generella formen av personas som presenteras i studien behöver anpassas till specifika produkter för att kunna vara praktiskt tillämpbara i faktiska utvecklingsprojekt.

    Studien är utförd på uppdrag av Statskontoret som fram till den 31 december 2005 arbetade med att främja utvecklingen av en elektronisk offentlig förvaltning.

  • 400.
    Burford, Sally
    et al.
    University of Canberra, Australia.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Cross-channel Information Architecture for a World Exposition2017In: International Journal of Information Management, ISSN 0268-4012, E-ISSN 1873-4707, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 547-552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports an investigation and assessment of the digital information, provided via multiple channels, for the 2015 World Exposition (Expo) in Milan. Using emerging theoretical constructs in cross-channel information architecture as a lens, the researchers examined aspects of the digital information ecology that supported the Exposition event. This study focused, firstly, on how well information and its structure maintain a coherence that is useful and meaningful to its target audience across various technologies and platforms. Secondly, it attended to the means and mechanisms for moving from one information artefact to another and it comments on the ease with which global audiences traversed the multiple channels that formed the information environment of Expo 2015.

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