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  • 351.
    Udo, Camilla
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Forsman, Henrietta
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Jensfelt, Marcus
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Flink, Maria
    Karolinska University Hospital; Karolinska Institutet.
    Research use and evidence-based practice among Swedish medical social workers: a qualitative study2019In: Clinical social work journal, ISSN 0091-1674, E-ISSN 1573-3343, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 258-265Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 352.
    Udo, Camilla
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke högskola.
    Axelsson, Bertil
    Björk, Olle
    Lövgren, Malin
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke högskola.
    Physicians working in oncology identified challenges and factors that facilitated communication with families when children could not be cured2019In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: We explored physicians’ experiences of communicating with families when their child had cancer and a cure was no longer an option, by focusing on barriers and facilitating factors.

    Methods: Physicians from the six cancer centres in Sweden took part in focus group discussions from December 2017 and May 2018 and the data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Focus groups enabled us to gather individual and shared perspectives.

    Results: The 35 physicians (20 male) had a mean age of 47 (range 31-74) and a mean of 11 years’ experience in oncology, ranging from under one year to 43 years. They reported communication challenges when a cure was not possible, namely: emotional and mental drain, lack of mutual understanding and uncertainty about communication skills. They also reported facilitating factors: flexibility in complex conversations, the child’s position in the conversations, continuity and trusting relationships, support from colleagues and having discussed the potentially life-threatening nature of cancer from the very start of treatment.

    Conclusion: Physicians working in paediatric oncology perceived challenges and facilitating factors in their communication with families when a cure was not an option. Training to overcome communication issues could support the early integration of palliative care and curative treatment.

  • 353.
    Udo, Camilla
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. CKF, Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna, County Council of Dalarna, Falun.
    Lövgren, M
    Lundquist, G
    Axelsson, B
    Palliative care physicians' experiences of end-of-life communication: A focus group study2018In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 27, no 1, article id e12728Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore palliative home care physicians' experiences regarding end-of-life breakpoint communication (BPC). This is a qualitative study where focus group interviews were conducted and analysed using qualitative content analysis. The results show that the participants saw themselves as being responsible for accomplishing BPC, and they were convinced that it should be regarded as a process of communication initiated at an early stage, i.e. proactively. However, BPC was often conducted as a reaction to the patient's sudden deterioration or sometimes not at all. The barriers to achieving proactive BPC included physicians' uncertainty regarding the timing of BPC, primarily due to difficulties in prognostication in terms of time of death, and uncertainty as to what BPC should include and how it should best be approached. Furthermore, there was insufficient documentation regarding previous BPC, which impeded proactive BPC. Although our study shows that physicians are ambitious when it comes to the communication of information to patients and families, there is a need for further training in how to conduct BPC and when to initiate the BPC process. Furthermore, there should be documentation that different professionals can access as this would appear to facilitate a proactive BPC process.

  • 354.
    Udo, Camilla
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Lövgren, Malin
    P033 Physicians’ Perceptions of End-of-Life Breakpoint Communication: A Focus Group Study2016In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, ISSN 0885-3924, E-ISSN 1873-6513, Vol. 52, no 6, p. e73-e74Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 355.
    Udo, Camilla
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. CKF (Centre of Clinical Research) County Council of Dalarna, Falun, Sweden.
    Lövgren, Malin
    The Department of Health Care Sciences, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden. .
    Lundquist, Gunilla
    CKF (Centre of Clinical Research) County Council of Dalarna, Falun, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Bertil
    Research unit Östersund hospital, Department of Radiation Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Physicians’ perceptions of end-of-life breakpoint communication: A focus group study2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 356.
    Udo, Camilla
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. CKF; Ersta Sköndal University College.
    Lövgren, Malin
    Ersta Sköndal University College; Karolinska.
    Sveen, Josefin
    Ersta Sköndal University College; Uppsala universitet.
    Bylund Grenklo, Tove
    Karolinska institutet.
    Alvariza, Anette
    Ersta Sköndal University College.
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Ersta Sköndal University College.
    A nationwide study of young adults’ perspectives on participation in bereavement research2019In: Journal of Palliative Medicine, ISSN 1096-6218, E-ISSN 1557-7740Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Young adults represent a minority in research; they are often considered too young or too old for participation. There is sparse information, especially in bereavement research, regarding how this age group perceives research participation and what they consider beneficial or harmful.

    AIM:

    To explore how parentally bereaved and nonbereaved young adults perceive research participation.

    DESIGN:

    Qualitative analysis of free-text comments collected in a Swedish nation-wide survey.

    SETTING/PARTICIPANTS:

    Parentally cancer-bereaved and nonbereaved young adults between 18 and 25 years old living in Sweden.

    RESULTS:

    Five categories were identified from the free-text comments, three among the cancer-bereaved: (1) therapeutic to remember the deceased, (2) valuable to help others and improve care, and (3) short-term distressful-long-term beneficial, and two among the nonbereaved: (1) increased reflection and awareness about life, and (2) an opportunity to help others.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    It is important to invite young adults to participate in bereavement research. The results suggest that potential harm is minimal and that participating in bereavement research can have a beneficial effect on young adults.

  • 357.
    Udo, Camilla
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Melin Johansson, Christina
    Danielson, Ella
    Health care staff’s discussions of existential issues in cancer care2010In: Changing Health. 6th International Conference on Social Work in Health and Mental Health. 28th June - 2nd July 2010, Dublin, Ireland, Dublin, Ireland, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: A qualitative study was made to explore healthcare staff’s discussions about existential issues when caring for patients with cancer on a surgical ward, as described in supervision sessions. Methods: Secondary content analysis of twelve tape-recorded supervision sessions was used. The sessions lasted for two hours every third week during one year. The supervision sessions were conducted at a surgical clinic in a county hospital in the middle of Sweden. Twenty-one participants, 25 to 55 years of age (MD=38) who had worked on a surgical clinic for 1 to 30 years (MD=10) participated. Findings: The analysis showed that reflections about existential issues do exist among healthcare staff in surgical wards. There are barriers, in staff themselves as well as in the organisation hindering them to encounter patients’ existential needs which is illustrated by the domain: “Health care staff’s discussions of their existential dilemmas” and the themes “feelings of powerlessness”, “identifying with patients”, and “getting close or keeping a distance”. Staff observed that patients have existential needs which are illustrated by the domain: “Health care staff’s discussions of patients’ existential distress” and the themes “being in despair” and “feelings of isolation”. Conclusions: This study shows that healthcare staff in surgical wards is conscious of patients’ existential distress. Yet staff lack strategies to encounter patients’ existential issues. There is a need for knowledge about the meaning of existential issues and education for staff working in a surgical ward and how to encounter patients’ existential needs.

  • 358.
    Udo, Camilla
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Danielson, Ella
    Existential issues among health care staff in surgical cancer care: Discussions in supervision sessions2011In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 447-453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The aim was, through analysis of dialogues in supervision sessions, to explore if health care staff in surgical care discussed existential issues when caring for cancer patients. Method A secondary analysis of the content of twelve tape-recorded supervision sessions (18 h) was conducted. The study analysed the dialogue content in supervision sessions involving a group of eight participants who worked at a surgical clinic at a county hospital in central Sweden. The sessions were held every third week during the course of one year. Results The analysis showed that surgical health care staff contemplates existential issues. The staff discussed their existential dilemmas, which hindered them from meeting and dealing with patients’ existential questions. This is illustrated in the themes: “feelings of powerlessness”, “identifying with patients”, and “getting close or keeping one’s distance”. The staff also discussed the fact that patients expressed existential distress, which is illustrated in the themes: “feelings of despair” and “feelings of isolation”. Conclusions This study shows that there are existential issues at a surgical clinic which health care staff need to acknowledge. The staff find themselves exposed to existential dilemmas when caring for cancer patients. They are conscious of patients’ existential issues, but lack strategies for dealing with this. This study highlights a need to provide support to staff for developing an existential approach, which will boost their confidence in their encounters with patients.

  • 359.
    Udo, Camilla
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Center for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun.
    Neljesjö, Maria
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Strömkvist, Ingegerd
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Elf, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Karolinska Institutet; Chalmers University of Technology.
    A qualitative study of assistant nurses’ experiences of palliative care in residential care2018In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 527-535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Aim

    To explore assistant nurses' experiences and perceptions of both positive and negative aspects of providing palliative care for older people in residential care facilities.

    Design

    A qualitative explorative study.

    Methods

    Critical incidents were collected through semi‐structured face‐to‐face interviews and analysed by performing a qualitative content analysis.

    Results

    A total of 40 critical incidents from daily work was described by assistant nurses. The results showed that close cooperation between unlicensed and licensed professionals was crucial to provide good care but was sometimes negatively affected by the organizational structure. The availability of professionals was identified as a critical factor in providing good care at the end of life in a consultative organization. The most prominent findings were those that indicated that, especially in a consultative organization, there seems to be a need for clear roles, comprehensive and clear care plans and a solid support structure to ensure continuity of care.

  • 360.
    Udo, Camilla
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Neljesjö, Maria
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Strömkvist, Ingegerd
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Elf, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Assistant nurses’ experiences and perceptions of palliative care situations in residential care2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 361.
    Udo, Camilla
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Neljesjö, Maria
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Strömkvist, Ingegerd
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Elf, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    P177 Assistant Nurses’ Experiences and Perceptions of Palliative Care Situations in Residential Care2016In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, ISSN 0885-3924, E-ISSN 1873-6513, Vol. 52, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 362.
    Udo, Camilla
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Svenningsson, Irene
    Björkelund, Cecilia
    Hange, Dominique
    Jerlock, Margareta
    Petersson, Eva-Lisa
    An interview study of the care manager function: Opening the door to continuity of care for patients with depression in primary care2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 974-982Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore experiences among patients with depression of contact with a care manager at a primary care centre.

    Design: A qualitative explorative study.

    Methods: During spring and summer 2016, 20 individual face-to-face interviews were conducted with patients with experience of care manager contact. The material was analysed using systematic text condensation.

    Results: The participants described that having contact with a care manager was a support in their recovery process. Care became more available, and the structured continuous contact and the care manager's availability contributed to a trusting relationship. Having someone to share their burden with was a relief. However, it was described as negative when the care manager was perceived as inflexible and not open to issues that the participants felt a need to discuss. For the care manager contact to be successful, there is a need for flexibility and individually tailored contact.

  • 363. van den Heuvel, Eleanor
    et al.
    Gilhooly, Mary
    Sutherland, Ian
    Jowitt, Felicity
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Parker, Stuart
    Gaydecki, Patrick
    Ratcliffe, Norman
    Bichard, Jo-Anne
    Long, Adele
    Cotterill, Nikki
    Orme, Susie
    Tackling ageing continence through theory, tools and technology (TACT3)2013Report (Other academic)
  • 364.
    Vethanayagam, Natalie
    et al.
    Barnsley Hospital, Barnsley, United Kingdom.
    Orrell, Alison
    Bangor University, School of Social Sciences, Bangor, United Kingdom.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Orme, Susan
    Barnsley Hospital, Barnsley, United Kingdom.
    Parker, Stuart G
    Newcastle University, Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle, United Kingdom.
    Gilhooly, Mary
    Brunel University London, Department of Clinical Sciences, London, United Kingdom.
    Understanding help-seeking in older people with urinary incontinence: An interview study2017In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 1061-1069Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) increases with age and can negatively affect quality of life.  However, relatively few older people with UI seek treatment.  The aim of this study was to explore the views of older people with UI on the process of seeking help.

    Older people with UI were recruited to the study from three continence services in the north of England: a geriatrician-led hospital outpatient clinic (n=18), a community based nurse-led service (n=22) and a consultant gynaecologist-led service specialising in surgical treatment (n=10). Participants took part in semi-structured interviews, which were transcribed and underwent thematic content analysis.

    Three main themes emerged: Being brushed aside, in which participants expressed the feeling that general practitioners did not prioritise or recognise their concerns; Putting up with it, in which participants delayed seeking help for their UI due to various reasons including embarrassment, the development of coping mechanisms, perceiving UI as a normal part of the ageing process, or being unaware that help was available; and Something has to be done, in which help-seeking was prompted by the recognition that their UI was a serious problem, whether as a result of experiencing UI in public, the remark of a relative, the belief that they had a serious illness, or the detection of UI during comprehensive geriatric assessment.

    Greater awareness that UI is a treatable condition and not a normal part of ageing is needed in the population and amongst health professionals. Comprehensive geriatric assessment appeared an important trigger for referral and treatment in our participants.  Screening questions by health care professionals could be a means to identify, assess and treat older people with UI.

  • 365.
    Vikström, Emelie
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Magnusson, Ann
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    BEMÖTA BARNENS BEHOV: En kvalitativ studie av personalens upplevelser av yrkesroll och arbetsuppgifter på hem för vård eller boende för ensamkommande barn2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The present study explores how members of staff at HVB for unaccompanied minors experience their work tasks, their roles as care givers, and what they mean it takes to meet the needs of the children. The data consists of six semi-structured interviews conducted at three different HVB. The interviews were analysed using reports made by the National Board of Health and Welfare (Socialstyrelsen) and the health and Social Care Inspectorate (IVO), and theories about resilience from mental illness. Furthermore, the current paper draws on previous research on the needs of unaccompanied minors and on international professionals’ roles and work tasks. The results show that the staff’s main task is to meet some of the needs of the children as their need of security, support, stability and sense of belonging. Time, knowledge, personal suitability and formal training were emphasized as important characteristics in order for them to adequately respond to the children’s needs.

  • 366.
    Walizadah, Hermia
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Jansson, Kalle
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Skolans arbete med hedersrelaterat våld och förtryck: En kvalitativ studie om hur skolpersonalen arbetar med elever som är utsatta för hedersrelaterat våld och förtryck2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The school must work to detect, prevent and provide protection in case of emergency situations to students who are exposed to honor-related violence and oppression. The research about how schools should work with honor-related violence and oppression is lacking. The aim of the study was to investigate how school staff work with students who are subjected to honor-related violence and oppression. The study is based on six qualitive interviews with school staff: principals, school counselors and teachers. The result showed that the schools are working to create relations with students and their parents, the schools have an action plan, offering counselling from the school counselor and the school staff is organizing boy groups where they discuss masculine standards, girl groups where the school staff strengthens the girls by talking about women’s rights and parent groups where the school staff supports the parents in their parenting roles. We can see differences in the work based on the school staff's own interest and knowledge.

  • 367.
    Wallström, Caroline
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Ensamkommande ungdomars behov: En kvalitativ intervjustudie som kartlägger ensamkommande ungdomarnas fysiska och psykiska mående utifrån boendepersonalens uppfattningar2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study has been to identify how the work is conducted in five municipal homes for care and accommodation for unaccompanied refugee youths. Five qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with six respondents who work as staff in the youth accommodation for unaccompanied refugee youths. The results were analyzed based on Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. The results showed a spread among the youths where some had difficulties with the most basic needs such as eating and sleeping, while other young people had worked their way up in the hierarchy and were on the top of the stairs working for self-actualization.

  • 368.
    Wärman Rainer, Frida
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    För barn eller akademiker?: En studie om socialtjänstens webbaserade information för barn och unga.2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to reach an understanding about how the social services in Dalarna are informing children and youths about their functions and services through the Internet. A combination of qualitative and quantitative methods has been used and data has been collected through content analysis of all web sites of Dalarnas counties. The data that has been collected has been analyzed from a child perspective and through theories of strategic communication. The results have disclosed that there from a child perspective are many faults in the web based information provided by the counties and it seems like they do not have any strategies for how communication with children and youths should be handled. The result also reveals that current law and the UN conventions on the rights of the child are not taken into consideration.

  • 369.
    Zimmermann, Angélique
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Vad innebär hunden för våra brukare?: Personalens erfarenheter av djurassisterade insatser medhundar inom kommunal LSS-dagverksamhet i Dalarnas län.2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to investigate how users are influenced by

    animal-assisted interventions with dogs in municipal day-care centres (developing

    centres or working places for persons with autism and/or intellectual disabilities)

    in Dalarna County. This is a qualitative study, initiated through a quantitative

    mapping concerning the presence of dogs or other animals in all municipal LSS

    day-care centres in Dalarna. Its limited to the staff perspective on the impact of

    dog-assisted interventions on the target group, and results are based on semistructured

    interviews with staff from all municipal day-care centres in Dalarna,

    where users are offered dog-assisted interventions. The results where analysed

    through previous research, KASAM and social responsiveness. They show that the

    dog-assisted interventions promote mental/physical wellbeing and motivate the

    users of the day-care centres to develop physical, mental and social skills. I found

    evidence that users benefit from animal-assisted interventions with dogs – in many

    ways.

  • 370.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala universitet.
    Cedervall, Y
    Giedraitis, V
    Berglund, L
    Lennhed, B
    Rosendahl, E
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Kilander, L
    Can Timed Up-and-GO (TUG) Dual Task Performance Aid Diagnosis of Dementia?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 371.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Cedervall, Y
    Lundberg, C
    Giedraitis, V
    Berglund, L
    Kilander, L
    Ingelsson, M
    Rosendahl, E
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Timed Up-and-Go dual-task performance in people with cognitive impairment2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 372. Åhman, Hanna Bozkurt
    et al.
    Giedraitis, Vilmantas
    Cedervall, Ylva
    Lennhed, Björn
    Berglund, Lars
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Kilander, Lena
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Ingelsson, Martin
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala University.
    Dual-task performance and neurodegeneration: Correlations between timed up-and-go dual-task test outcomes and Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers2019In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 71, no Suppl 1, p. S75-S83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Tools to identify individuals at preclinical stages of dementia disorders are needed to enable early interventions. Alterations in dual-task performance have been detected early in progressive neurodegenerative disorders. Hence, dual-task testing may have the potential to screen for cognitive impairment caused by neurodegeneration. Exploring correlations between dual-task performance and biomarkers of neurodegeneration is therefore of interest.

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate correlations between Timed Up-and-Go dual-task (TUGdt) outcomes and Alzheimer's disease (AD) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers amyloid-β 42 (Aβ42), total tau (t-tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-tau).

    METHODS: This cross-sectional cohort study included 90 participants (age range 49-84 years) undergoing memory assessment, who were subsequently diagnosed with AD, other dementia disorders, mild cognitive impairment, or subjective cognitive impairment. TUG combined with "Naming Animals" (TUGdt NA) and "Months Backwards" (TUGdt MB), respectively, were used to assess dual-task performance. The number of correct words and time taken to complete the tests were measured. The CSF biomarkers were analysed by ELISA. Spearman's rank correlation was used for analyses between TUGdt outcomes (TUGdt NA and TUGdt MB), and CSF biomarkers, adjusted for age, gender, and educational level.

    RESULTS: The number of correct words, as well as the number of correct words/10 s during TUGdt NA correlated negatively to CSF t-tau and p-tau. No correlations were found between any time scores and CSF biomarkers.

    CONCLUSION: The correlations between TUGdt NA and t-tau and p-tau may indicate that neurodegeneration affects dual-task performance. Longitudinal studies are needed to further explore dual-task testing in screening for cognitive impairment due to neurodegeneration.

  • 373.
    Åkerström, Karolina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    "Stress finns alltid med i bilden": Skolrelaterad stress hos barn – en fråga för skolkuratorn?2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to investigate how school counsellors describe school-related stress in children and how they work in their profession with questions related to school-related stress in children. The method in the study was qualitative and semi-structured interviews were conducted with school counsellors working in elementary school. The theoretical frame of the study was a sense of context (KASAM) and social support in order to gain a broader understanding of children's school-related stress and the role of the school-counsellor in the psychosocial work on children's school-related stress. The results of the study showed that school counsellors saw a high incidence of school-related stress in children, mainly related to social interaction, achievements and expectations in school work and the organizational structure of the school. The study found that school counsellors felt that school-related stress issues are important to work with at individual group and organizational levels.

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