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  • 3501.
    Abbas, Zainab
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Al-Shishtawy, Ahmad
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Girdzijauskas, Sarunas
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Vlassov, Vladimir
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Short-Term Traffic Prediction Using Long Short-Term Memory Neural Networks2018In: Proceedings - 2018 IEEE International Congress on Big Data, BigData Congress 2018 - Part of the 2018 IEEE World Congress on Services, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2018, p. 57-65Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Short-term traffic prediction allows Intelligent Transport Systems to proactively respond to events before they happen. With the rapid increase in the amount, quality, and detail of traffic data, new techniques are required that can exploit the information in the data in order to provide better results while being able to scale and cope with increasing amounts of data and growing cities. We propose and compare three models for short-term road traffic density prediction based on Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) neural networks. We have trained the models using real traffic data collected by Motorway Control System in Stockholm that monitors highways and collects flow and speed data per lane every minute from radar sensors. In order to deal with the challenge of scale and to improve prediction accuracy, we propose to partition the road network into road stretches and junctions, and to model each of the partitions with one or more LSTM neural networks. Our evaluation results show that partitioning of roads improves the prediction accuracy by reducing the root mean square error by the factor of 5. We show that we can reduce the complexity of LSTM network by limiting the number of input sensors, on average to 35% of the original number, without compromising the prediction accuracy. .

  • 3502.
    Abbas, Zainab
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Sigurdsson, Thorsteinn
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Al-Shishtawy, Ahmad
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Vlassov, Vladimir
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Evaluation of the use of streaming graph processing algorithms for road congestion detection2018In: Proceedings - 16th IEEE International Symposium on Parallel and Distributed Processing with Applications, 17th IEEE International Conference on Ubiquitous Computing and Communications, 8th IEEE International Conference on Big Data and Cloud Computing, 11th IEEE International Conference on Social Computing and Networking and 8th IEEE International Conference on Sustainable Computing and Communications, ISPA/IUCC/BDCloud/SocialCom/SustainCom 2018, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2018, p. 1017-1025Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Real-time road congestion detection allows improving traffic safety and route planning. In this work, we propose to use streaming graph processing algorithms for road congestion detection and evaluate their accuracy and performance. We represent road infrastructure sensors in the form of a directed weighted graph and adapt the Connected Components algorithm and some existing graph processing algorithms, originally used for community detection in social network graphs, for the task of road congestion detection. In our approach, we detect Connected Components or communities of sensors with similarly weighted edges that reflect different states in the traffic, e.g., free flow or congested state, in regions covered by detected sensor groups. We have adapted and implemented the Connected Components and community detection algorithms for detecting groups in the weighted sensor graphs in batch and streaming manner. We evaluate our approach by building and processing the road infrastructure sensor graph for Stockholm's highways using real-world data from the Motorway Control System operated by the Swedish traffic authority. Our results indicate that the Connected Components and DenGraph community detection algorithms can detect congestion with accuracy up to ? 94% for Connected Components and up to ? 88% for DenGraph. The Louvain Modularity algorithm for community detection fails to detect congestion regions for sparsely connected graphs, representing roads that we have considered in this study. The Hierarchical Clustering algorithm using speed and density readings is able to detect congestion without details, such as shockwaves.

  • 3503.
    Abbatelli, Daniele
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Material flows in the waterjet industry: an environmental perspective2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abrasive Waterjet cutting (AWJ) presents many advantages over competing machining techniques, but several issues are related to the high volume of materials (and in particular of abrasive) used in the process.

    In this study, the environmental impact of the material flows in the abrasive waterjet industry has been analyzed adopting a life cycle perspective in order to individuate which phases place the largest burden on the environment. Moreover, three alternative abrasives (crushed rock, recycled glass and synthetic abrasive) and three disposal practices (in-site recycling, off-site recycling and recycling as construction material) have been also evaluated to estimate the benefits that can be achieved if these could be used in place of garnet abrasives and landfilling.

    The transportation of the abrasive resulted to be the phase that has the largest influence in every case and thus should be reduced as much as possible. For what concerns the alternative options, the usage of recycled glass and the in-site recycling of the abrasive were the two alternatives with the best environmental performances. However, crushed rock could be the best option for what concerns the global warming potential if carbon sequestration due to carbonation of silicate rocks is taken into account. Off-site recycling and recycling as construction material are good options only if the transportation to the recycling site can be reduced. Synthetic abrasive are instead found to have a much larger impact compared to every other alternative examined.

  • 3504. Abbatt, J. P. D.
    et al.
    Thomas, J. L.
    Abrahamsson, K.
    Boxe, C.
    Granfors, A.
    Jones, A. E.
    King, M. D.
    Saiz-Lopez, A.
    Shepson, P. B.
    Sodeau, J.
    Toohey, D. W.
    Toubin, C.
    von Glasow, R.
    Wren, S. N.
    Yang, X.
    Halogen activation via interactions with environmental ice and snow in the polar lower troposphere and other regions2012In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 12, no 14, p. 6237-6271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of ice in the formation of chemically active halogens in the environment requires a full understanding because of its role in atmospheric chemistry, including controlling the regional atmospheric oxidizing capacity in specific situations. In particular, ice and snow are important for facilitating multiphase oxidative chemistry and as media upon which marine algae live. This paper reviews the nature of environmental ice substrates that participate in halogen chemistry, describes the reactions that occur on such substrates, presents the field evidence for ice-mediated halogen activation, summarizes our best understanding of ice-halogen activation mechanisms, and describes the current state of modeling these processes at different scales. Given the rapid pace of developments in the field, this paper largely addresses advances made in the past five years, with emphasis given to the polar boundary layer. The integrative nature of this field is highlighted in the presentation of work from the molecular to the regional scale, with a focus on understanding fundamental processes. This is essential for developing realistic parameterizations and descriptions of these processes for inclusion in larger scale models that are used to determine their regional and global impacts.

  • 3505.
    Abbay, Kissery
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Gender Vis-à-vis Swedish Municipal Web sites2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 3506. Abbeloos, W.
    et al.
    Ataer-Cansizoglu, E.
    Caccamo, Sergio
    KTH.
    Taguchi, Y.
    Domae, Y.
    3D object discovery and modeling using single RGB-D images containing multiple object instances2018In: Proceedings - 2017 International Conference on 3D Vision, 3DV 2017, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2018, p. 431-439Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unsupervised object modeling is important in robotics, especially for handling a large set of objects. We present a method for unsupervised 3D object discovery, reconstruction, and localization that exploits multiple instances of an identical object contained in a single RGB-D image. The proposed method does not rely on segmentation, scene knowledge, or user input, and thus is easily scalable. Our method aims to find recurrent patterns in a single RGB-D image by utilizing appearance and geometry of the salient regions. We extract keypoints and match them in pairs based on their descriptors. We then generate triplets of the keypoints matching with each other using several geometric criteria to minimize false matches. The relative poses of the matched triplets are computed and clustered to discover sets of triplet pairs with similar relative poses. Triplets belonging to the same set are likely to belong to the same object and are used to construct an initial object model. Detection of remaining instances with the initial object model using RANSAC allows to further expand and refine the model. The automatically generated object models are both compact and descriptive. We show quantitative and qualitative results on RGB-D images with various objects including some from the Amazon Picking Challenge. We also demonstrate the use of our method in an object picking scenario with a robotic arm.

  • 3507. Abbeloos, W.
    et al.
    Caccamo, Sergio
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
    Ataer-Cansizoglu, E.
    Taguchi, Y.
    Feng, C.
    Lee, T. -Y
    Detecting and Grouping Identical Objects for Region Proposal and Classification2017In: 2017 IEEE Computer Society Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition Workshops, IEEE Computer Society, 2017, Vol. 2017, p. 501-502, article id 8014810Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Often multiple instances of an object occur in the same scene, for example in a warehouse. Unsupervised multi-instance object discovery algorithms are able to detect and identify such objects. We use such an algorithm to provide object proposals to a convolutional neural network (CNN) based classifier. This results in fewer regions to evaluate, compared to traditional region proposal algorithms. Additionally, it enables using the joint probability of multiple instances of an object, resulting in improved classification accuracy. The proposed technique can also split a single class into multiple sub-classes corresponding to the different object types, enabling hierarchical classification.

  • 3508.
    Abberud, Madelene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Time to first antibiotic administration in The Alfred Emergency and Trauma Centre for suspected febrile neutropenia: a retrospective chart review2012Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Febrile neutropenia (FN) is a frequent complication of chemotherapy use in cancer patients. There is evidence to suggest that the time to antibiotic administration is associated with increase survival and effective clinical outcome. The Australian consensus guidelines for the management of FN in adult cancer patients recommends treatment within 30 minutes to patients with features of systemic compromise. A study performed at The Alfred Hospital in 2010 revealed a median time of 145 minutes to first antibiotic administration. A new guideline was therefore developed and education was implemented. This study was conducted to evaluate the intervention. Aim: To determine time to first antibiotic prescribing and administration for patients with suspected FN presenting to the Alfred Emergency and Trauma centre. Materials and Methods: The electronic medical record of 112 episodes of suspected FN presenting between March and August 2012 were reviewed.  Data were retrospective collected according to a FN data spreadsheet. An observational study were also performed at  The Alfred Emergency and Trauma centre during October and November 2012 to determine time to first antimicrobial prescribing, because this data could not be collected from the electronic medical record. Results: The median time from presentation to antibiotic prescribing was 68 minutes. The median time from presentation to antibiotic administration was 121 minutes. Conclusions: The implementation of the new guidelines has reduced the time with 16.6%, but the target first antibiotic administration within 30 minutes has not been reached.

  • 3509.
    Abbes, Yacine
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Educational studies in heat and power technology: how students learn with multimedia tools and problem-based learning2005Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher education is undergoing continuous changes and new learning tools and methods are implemented. Researchers in education do not always agree upon the effectiveness of some of the methods introduced into engineering education. The present thesis consists of two case studies on educational methods introduced at the Department of Energy Technology, at Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden. The qualitative research methodology has been used in case one and a combination of qualitative and quantitative methodology has been used in the second case. The sources of evidences consisted of: unstructured interviews, analysis of video recording, questionnaires, and analysis of a variety of documents. In the first case, an educational program in heat and power technology was analysed. The second case consists in an in-depth study of group dynamics in a Problem –Based Learning course. These studies showed that the learning approach adopted by students depends strongly on the way they view the particular learning tool or method. The first case study revealed the existence of two types of learners. Surfacelearners follow the structure suggested by the designers of the multimedia program. This category of learners focuses only on the material available in the program. Deep-learners go beyond the information and the structure suggested in the program and combine different learning tools in their learning. These students do not follow the structure of the tutorials’ of the multimedia program. This study showed that students who had a strong view how to learn with a multimedia program or a learning method benefited less from the learning tools available. Students with weak views on how to learn from educational program or leaning tool benefit less from the presentation and engage in more surface learning. Self-motivated learners use the multimedia presentation in novel ways and crosscheck the information given with other material. The second study showed that students have unclear and weak views on how to learn with student-directed Problem- Based Learning model. Four types of learners were identified in Problem-Based Learning project: Leaders, Key Actors, Common Students and Social Loafers. Leaders and Key Actors are self-motivated individuals and participate most in the projects. Students who viewed themselves or were viewed as leaders were held responsible to take most of the decisions and students expected them to work more than the average student. Students who viewed themselves as common team members expected a lower workload than leaders’. Key Actors are self-motivated students who do not view themselves as separate from other group members but who participate more than others. Leaders learned more group and social processes, that they did not fully take part in, while common students learned more from the project management aspects that they did not take part in. The study also found that Problem-Based Learning groups can become very cohesive, and can develop distorted views on how to learn with Problem-Based Learning, and un-common group dynamics phenomena such as groupthink can occur in Problem-Based Learning setting.

  • 3510.
    Abbes, Amina
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Berg, Maria
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Utvecklingssamtalet i förskolan: En studie om föräldrars erfarenheter och förväntningar2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    I förskolans utvecklingssamtal skall personal och föräldrar diskutera barnets utveckling och lärande, vad barnet gör, hur det trivs och hur barnet fungerar socialt (Skolverket 2005). Det finns inga mål barnet skall uppnå, som beskriver vad barnet skall kunna vid en viss tidpunkt. Det anses dock viktigt att följa barnets utveckling och lärande, men det är inte detsamma som att bedöma barnet utifrån fastställda kriterier och normer (Prop.2004/05:11). SYFTE: Vårt syfte med studien är att ta reda på vad föräldrar förväntar sig av utvecklingssamtal i förskolan, och vad de anser vara av betydelse i pedagogens roll under utvecklingssamtalet. METOD: Vi har valt att använda oss av self report som metod till vår studie. En self report är en skriven text av en person om ett fenomen som en forskare vill veta mer av. I vår studie är det föräldrar som skrivit ner berättelser utifrån frågeställningar om utvecklingssamtal i förskolan. RESULTAT: Resultatet visar att föräldrar vill veta hur barnet har det på förskolan. Föräldrarna vill framförallt veta hur barnet fungerar i gruppen, i det sociala samspelet. Något som framkommer är föräldrars funderingar på om barnet passar in i gruppen och har vänner att leka med. Ytterligare en förväntning på utvecklingssamtalet är hur barnet fungerar i de dagliga rutinerna. Föräldrarna vill ha information om barnet, de vill få ta del av sådant som fungerar bra och sådant som fungerar mindre bra

  • 3511.
    Abbestam, Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Sköld, Ida
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Konsten att paketera sig själv: - Kommunikationsstrategier för personligt varumärkesbyggande i sociala medier2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Målet med denna uppsats var att undersöka vilka kommunikativa strategier personer inom PR- och informationsbranschen arbetar efter för att bygga upp och stärka sina personliga varumärken i sociala medier. Studiens huvudfråga lyder ”Vilka kommunikativa strategier använder människor inom PR- och informationsbranschen för att stärka sitt personliga varumärkesbyggande i sociala medier?”. Syftet med studien var tudelat, dels ville vi bidra med djupare förståelse kring vad det finns för drivkrafter bakom personligt varumärkesbyggande i sociala medier och dels ville vi bidra med nya infallsvinklar och ett nytt empiriskt material till den samhällsvetenskapliga forskningsfronten.

    Studiens teoretiska ramverk utgår från varumärkesteori, Erving Goffmans teori om självpresentation samt Pierre Bourdieus teori om kapital och social positionering. Studien är genomförd med kvalitativa metoder, för det första har vi tagit del av aktuell forskning på områdena sociala medier och personligt varumärkesbyggande, vi har även gjort en innehållslig kartläggning av tio digitala personliga varumärken samt genomfört intervjuer med personerna bakom varumärkena. När vi i uppsatsen använder begreppet sociala medier syftar vi enbart på bloggar och microbloggverktyget Twitter.

    Resultatet för denna studie visar att respondenternas strategier för digitalt personligt varumärkesbyggande skiljer sig åt, strategierna skiljer sig även beroende på socialt medium. Somliga respondenter uppger att de genomgående arbetar strategiskt både på Twitter och med sin blogg medan andra menar att de inte har några strategier alls. Oavsett hur stort utrymme de strategiska baktankarna får går det att skönja likheter i samtliga respondenters varumärkesbyggande. Utifrån dessa likheter har vi identifierat fem idealnormer och strategier för personligt varumärkesbyggande för personer verksamma inom PR- och informations-branschen: att tydligt identifiera sin yrkesidentitet och sina personliga egenskaper, att utelämna privat och ofördelaktig information, att skriva om ett avgränsat ämnesområde, att visa på aktualitet och kunskap inom branschen samt att nätverka med personer inom branschen. Dessa har legat till grund när vi konstruerat följande tre idealtyper för respondenternas varumärkesbyggande: reporter, kommentator och kåseriskribent.

    Sammanfattningsvis har vi kunnat konstatera att personligt varumärkesbyggande i sociala medier tillskrivs allt större värde inom PR- och informationsbranschen. Värdet ligger i möjligheten att stärka sin position i förhållande till andra inom branschen, för att lyckas med detta krävs en utmejslad strategi och kunskap om hur man på bästa sätt paketerar sig själv. 

  • 3512.
    Abbevik, Elin
    University College of Arts, Crafts and Design, The Department of Design, Crafts and Art (DKK), Industrial design.
    365/4: en sneaker som följer användaren genom de 4 säsongerna2006Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 3513.
    abbevik, elin
    University College of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Design, Interior Architecture and Visual Communication (DIV), Industrial Design.
    Mind Wander: A design project in the field of social sustainability, aiming to create awareness about our imagination in today ́s society.2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 3514.
    Abbevik, Julia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Open Music2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 3515.
    Abbey, Susan E.
    et al.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    De Luca, Enza
    University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Mauthner, Oliver E.
    University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada.
    McKeever, Patricia
    Bloorview Research Institute, Bloorview Kids Rehab, Canada.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Queen's University, Belfast, Northern Ireland.
    Poole, Jennifer M.
    Ryerson University, Canada.
    Gewarges, Mena
    University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Ross, Heather J.
    University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Qualitative interviews versus standardised self-report questionnaires in assessing qualityb of life in heart transplant recipients2011In: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation, ISSN 1053-2498, E-ISSN 1557-3117, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 963-966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quality of life (QoL) studies in heart transplant recipients (HTRs) using validated, quantitative, self-report questionnaires have reported poor QoL in approximately 20% of patients. This consecutive mixed methods study compared self-report questionnaires, the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form Health Survey (MOS SF-36) and the Atkinson Life Satisfaction Scale, with phenomenologically informed audiovisual (AV) qualitative interview data in 27 medically stable HTRs (70% male; age 53 ± 13.77 years; time since transplant 4.06 ± 2.42 years). Self-report questionnaire data reported poor QoL and more distress compared with previous studies and normative population samples; in contrast, 52% of HTRs displayed pervasive distress according to visual methodology. Using qualitative methods to assess QoL yields information that would otherwise remain unobserved by the exclusive use of quantitative QOL questionnaires.

  • 3516.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Araya-Ajoy, Yimen G.
    Norwegian Univ Sci and Technol, Norway.
    Mouchet, Alexia
    Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Moiron, Maria
    Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Stuber, Erica F.
    Univ Nebraska Lincoln, NE USA.
    Kempenaers, Bart
    Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Dingemanse, Niels J.
    Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany; Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Germany.
    Does perceived predation risk affect patterns of extra-pair paternity? A field experiment in a passerine bird2018In: Functional Ecology, ISSN 0269-8463, E-ISSN 1365-2435, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 1001-1010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-consumptive predator effects have been shown to influence a wide range of behavioural, life history and morphological traits. Extra-pair reproduction is widespread among socially monogamous birds and may incur predation costs. Consequently, altered rates of extra-pair reproduction are expected in circumstances characterized by increased adult perceived predation risk. In addition, extra-pair reproduction is expected to be most affected for birds with phenotypes that generally increase predation risk (such as more active individuals). In two consecutive years, perceived predation risk was manipulated for great tits Parus major breeding in 12 nest-box plots by broadcasting sounds of their main predator (European sparrowhawk Accipiter nisus; six plots). As a control treatment, sounds of a sympatric, avian non-predator species were broadcast (Eurasian blackbird Turdus merula; six plots). Levels of extra-pair paternity did not differ between plots with different predation risk treatments. Males that moved more in a novel environment (more active or faster exploring) tended to have offspring with fewer partners, but this effect did not vary with predation risk treatment. From an adaptive viewpoint, predation costs associated with extra-pair reproduction may be small and may not outweigh the benefits of extra-pair behaviour. Research on a broader range of taxa with different mating strategies is now needed to confirm the generality of our findings.

  • 3517.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin N.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uhrig, Emily J.
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zidar, Josefina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Favati, Anna
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlblom, Josefin
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala Biomedical Centre BMC, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Winberg, Svante
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala Biomedical Centre BMC, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Løvlie, Hanne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The influence of rearing on behavior, brain monoamines and gene expression in three-spined sticklebacks2018Data set
    Abstract [en]
    1. The causes of individual variation in behavior are often not well understood, and potential underlying mechanisms include both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as early environmental, physiological, and genetic differences.
    2. In an exploratory laboratory study, we raised three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) under 4 different environmental conditions (simulated predator environment, complex environment, variable social environment, and control). We investigated how these manipulations related to behavior, brain physiology and gene expression later in life, with focus on brain dopamine and serotonin levels, turnover rates, and gene expression.
    3. The different rearing environments influenced behavior and gene expression, but did not alter monoamine levels or metabolites. Specifically, compared to control fish, fish exposed to a simulated predator environment tended to be less aggressive, more exploratory, and more neophobic; and fish raised in both complex and variable social environments tended to be less neophobic. Exposure to a simulated predator environment tended to lower expression of dopamine receptor DRD4A, a complex environment increased expression of dopamine receptor DRD1B, while a variable social environment tended to increase serotonin receptor 5-HTR2B and increased serotonin transporter SLC6A4A expression. Despite both behavior and gene expression varying with early environment, there was no evidence that gene expression mediated the relationship between early environment and behavior.
    4. Our results confirm that environmental conditions early in life can affect phenotypic variation. However, the mechanistic pathway of the monoaminergic systems translating early environmental variation into observed behavioral responses was not detected.
  • 3518.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin N.
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, IFM Biol, Dept Phys Chem & Biol, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Uhrig, Emily J.
    Linkoping Univ, IFM Biol, Dept Phys Chem & Biol, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Zidar, Josefina
    Linkoping Univ, IFM Biol, Dept Phys Chem & Biol, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Favati, Anna
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almberg, Johan
    Linkoping Univ, IFM Biol, Dept Phys Chem & Biol, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Dahlbom, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Winberg, Svante
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Lövlie, Hanne
    Linkoping Univ, IFM Biol, Dept Phys Chem & Biol, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    The Influence of Rearing on Behavior, Brain Monoamines, and Gene Expression in Three-Spined Sticklebacks2018In: Brain, behavior, and evolution, ISSN 0006-8977, E-ISSN 1421-9743, Vol. 91, no 4, p. 201-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The causes of individual variation in behavior are often not well understood, and potential underlying mechanisms include both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as early environmental, physiological, and genetic differences. In an exploratory laboratory study, we raised three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) under 4 different environmental conditions (simulated predator environment, complex environment, variable social environment, and control). We investigated how these manipulations related to behavior, brain physiology, and gene expression later in life, with focus on brain dopamine and serotonin levels, turnover rates, and gene expression. The different rearing environments influenced behavior and gene expression, but did not alter monoamine levels or metabolites. Specifically, compared to control fish, fish exposed to a simulated predator environment tended to be less aggressive, more exploratory, and more neophobic; and fish raised in both complex and variable social environments tended to be less neophobic. Exposure to a simulated predator environment tended to lower expression of dopamine receptor DRD4A, a complex environment increased expression of dopamine receptor DRD1B, while a variable social environment tended to increase serotonin receptor 5-HTR2B and serotonin transporter SLC6A4A expression. Despite both behavior and gene expression varying with early environment, there was no evidence that gene expression mediated the relationship between early environment and behavior. Our results confirm that environmental conditions early in life can affect phenotypic variation. However, the mechanistic pathway of the monoaminergic systems translating early environmental variation into observed behavioral responses was not detected.

  • 3519. Abbey-Lee, Robin N.
    et al.
    Uhrig, Emily J.
    Zidar, Josefina
    Favati, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Almberg, Johan
    Dahlbom, Josefin
    Winberg, Svante
    Løvlie, Hanne
    The Influence of Rearing on Behavior, Brain Monoamines, and Gene Expression in Three-Spined Sticklebacks2018In: Brain, behavior, and evolution, ISSN 0006-8977, E-ISSN 1421-9743, Vol. 91, no 4, p. 201-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The causes of individual variation in behavior are often not well understood, and potential underlying mechanisms include both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as early environmental, physiological, and genetic differences. In an exploratory laboratory study, we raised three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) under 4 different environmental conditions (simulated predator environment, complex environment, variable social environment, and control). We investigated how these manipulations related to behavior, brain physiology, and gene expression later in life, with focus on brain dopamine and serotonin levels, turnover rates, and gene expression. The different rearing environments influenced behavior and gene expression, but did not alter monoamine levels or metabolites. Specifically, compared to control fish, fish exposed to a simulated predator environment tended to be less aggressive, more exploratory, and more neophobic; and fish raised in both complex and variable social environments tended to be less neophobic. Exposure to a simulated predator environment tended to lower expression of dopamine receptor DRD4A, a complex environment increased expression of dopamine receptor DRD1B, while a variable social environment tended to increase serotonin receptor 5-HTR2B and serotonin transporter SLC6A4A expression. Despite both behavior and gene expression varying with early environment, there was no evidence that gene expression mediated the relationship between early environment and behavior. Our results confirm that environmental conditions early in life can affect phenotypic variation. However, the mechanistic pathway of the monoaminergic systems translating early environmental variation into observed behavioral responses was not detected.

  • 3520.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin N.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uhrig, Emily
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zidar, Josefina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Favati, A.
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almberg, J.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlbom, J.
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala Biomedical Centre BMC, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Winberg, S.
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala Biomedical Centre BMC, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Løvlie, Hanne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The Influence of Rearing on Behavior, Brain Monoamines, and Gene Expression in Three-Spined Sticklebacks2018In: Brain, behavior, and evolution, ISSN 0006-8977, E-ISSN 1421-9743, Vol. 91, no 4, p. 201-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The causes of individual variation in behavior are often not well understood, and potential underlying mechanisms include both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as early environmental, physiological, and genetic differences. In an exploratory laboratory study, we raised three-spined sticklebacks <i>(Gasterosteus aculeatus)</i> under 4 different environmental conditions (simulated predator environment, complex environment, variable social environment, and control). We investigated how these manipulations related to behavior, brain physiology, and gene expression later in life, with focus on brain dopamine and serotonin levels, turnover rates, and gene expression. The different rearing environments influenced behavior and gene expression, but did not alter monoamine levels or metabolites. Specifically, compared to control fish, fish exposed to a simulated predator environment tended to be less aggressive, more exploratory, and more neophobic; and fish raised in both complex and variable social environments tended to be less neophobic. Exposure to a simulated predator environment tended to lower expression of dopamine receptor DRD4A, a complex environment increased expression of dopamine receptor DRD1B, while a variable social environment tended to increase serotonin receptor 5-HTR2B and serotonin transporter SLC6A4A expression. Despite both behavior and gene expression varying with early environment, there was no evidence that gene expression mediated the relationship between early environment and behavior. Our results confirm that environmental conditions early in life can affect phenotypic variation. However, the mechanistic pathway of the monoaminergic systems translating early environmental variation into observed behavioral responses was not detected.

  • 3521.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uhrig, Emily
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Southern Oregon Univ, OR 97520 USA.
    Garnham, Laura
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundgren, Kristoffer
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Child, Sarah
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Manchester, England.
    Lovlie, Hanne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Experimental manipulation of monoamine levels alters personality in crickets2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 16211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Animal personality has been described in a range of species with ecological and evolutionary consequences. Factors shaping and maintaining variation in personality are not fully understood, but monoaminergic systems are consistently linked to personality variation. We experimentally explored how personality was influenced by alterations in two key monoamine systems: dopamine and serotonin. This was done using ropinirole and fluoxetine, two common human pharmaceuticals. Using the Mediterranean field cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus), we focused on the personality traits activity, exploration, and aggression, with confirmed repeatability in our study. Dopamine manipulations explained little variation in the personality traits investigated, while serotonin manipulation reduced both activity and aggression. Due to limited previous research, we created a dose-response curve for ropinirole, ranging from concentrations measured in surface waters to human therapeutic doses. No ropinirole dose level strongly influenced cricket personality, suggesting our results did not come from a dose mismatch. Our results indicate that the serotonergic system explains more variation in personality than manipulations of the dopaminergic system. Additionally, they suggest that monoamine systems differ across taxa, and confirm the importance of the mode of action of pharmaceuticals in determining their effects on behaviour.

  • 3522.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Dingemanse, Niels J.
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Germany.
    Adaptive individual variation in phenological responses to perceived predation levels2019In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, article id 1601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adaptive evolution of timing of breeding (a component of phenology) in response to environmental change requires individual variation in phenotypic plasticity for selection to act upon. A major question is what processes generate this variation. Here we apply multi-year manipulations of perceived predation levels (PPL) in an avian predator-prey system, identifying phenotypic plasticity in phenology as a key component of alternative behavioral strategies with equal fitness payoffs. We show that under low-PPL, faster (versus slower) exploring birds breed late (versus early); the pattern is reversed under high-PPL, with breeding synchrony decreasing in conjunction. Timing of breeding affects reproductive success, yet behavioral types have equal fitness. The existence of alternative behavioral strategies thus explains variation in phenology and plasticity in reproductive behavior, which has implications for evolution in response to anthropogenic change.

  • 3523.
    Abbink, Jan
    et al.
    African Studies Centre, Leiden University.
    Adetula, VictorThe Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. University of Jos, Nigeria.Mehler, AndreasArnold Bergstraesser Institute.Melber, HenningThe Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. The Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Africa Yearbook Volume 14: Politics, Economy and Society South of the Sahara 20172018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 3524.
    Abbink, Jon
    et al.
    African Studies Centre, Leiden University.
    Adetula, Victor
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. University of Jos, Nigeria.
    Mehler, Andreas
    Arnold Bergstraesser Institute.
    Melber, Henning
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. The Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sub-Saharan Africa2018In: Africa Yearbook Volume 14: Politics, Economy and Society South of the Sahara in 2017 / [ed] Jon Abbink, Victor Adetula, Andreas Mehler and Henning Melber, Leiden: Brill , 2018, p. 3-19Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter summarises major developments in sub-Sahara Africa focusing on the themes of elections, conflicts and the status and performance of sub-Sahara Africa in the world economy.  

  • 3525.
    Abbireddy, Sharath
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Computer Science and Engineering.
    A Model for Capacity Planning in Cassandra: Case Study on Ericsson’s Voucher System2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Cassandra is a NoSQL(Not only Structured Query Language) database which serves large amount of data with high availability .Cassandra data storage dimensioning also known as Cassandra capacity planning refers to predicting the amount of disk storage required when a particular product is deployed using Cassandra. This is an important phase in any product development lifecycle involving Cassandra data storage system. The capacity planning is based on many factors which are classified as Cassandra specific and Product specific.This study is to identify the different Cassandra specific and product specific factors affecting the disk space in Cassandra data storage system. Based on these factors a model is to be built which would predict the disk storage for Ericsson’s voucher system.A case-study is conducted on Ericsson’s voucher system and its Cassandra cluster. Interviews were conducted on different Cassandra users within Ericsson R&D to know their opinion on capacity planning approaches and factors affecting disk space for Cassandra. Responses from the interviews were transcribed and analyzed using grounded theory.A total of 9 Cassandra specific factors and 3 product specific factors are identified and documented. Using these 12 factors a model was built. This model was used in predicting the disk space required for voucher system’s Cassandra.The factors affecting disk space for deploying Cassandra are now exhaustively identified. This makes the capacity planning process more efficient. Using these factors the Voucher system’s disk space for deployment is predicted successfully.

  • 3526. Abbo, Catherine
    et al.
    Ekblad, Solvig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Waako, Paul
    Okello, Elialilia
    Muhwezi, Wilson
    Musisi, Seggane
    Psychological distress and associated factors among the attendees of traditional healing practices in Jinja and Iganga districts, Eastern Uganda: a cross-sectional study.2008In: Int J Ment Health Syst, ISSN 1752-4458, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 16-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychological distress and associated factors among the attendees of traditional healing practices in Jinja and Iganga districts, Eastern Uganda: a cross-sectional study.

    Abbo C, Ekblad S, Waako P, Okello E, Muhwezi W, Musisi S.

    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Stockholm, Sweden. cathya180@gmail.com.

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Mental health problems are a major public health concern worldwide. Evidence shows that African communities, including Uganda, use both modern and traditional healing systems. There is limited literature about the magnitude of psychological distress and associated factors among attendees of traditional healing practices. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and associated factors of psychological distress among attendees of traditional healing practices in two districts in Uganda. METHODS: Face-to-face interviews with the Lusoga version of the Self Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20) were carried out with 400 patients over the age of 18 years attending traditional healing in Iganga and Jinja districts in Eastern Uganda. Patients were recruited consecutively in all the traditional healers' shrines that could be visited in the area. Persons with 6 or more positive responses to the SRQ were identified as having psychological distress. Prevalence was estimated and odds ratios of having psychological distress were obtained with multiple logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: 387 questionnaire responses were analyzed. The prevalence of psychological distress in connection with attendance at the traditional healers' shrines was 65.1%. Having a co-wife and having more than four children were significantly associated with psyclogical distress. Among the socioeconomic indicators, lack of food and having debts were significantly associated with psychological distress. The distressed group was more likely to need explanations for ill health. Those who visited both the healer and a health unit were less likely to be distressed. CONCLUSION: This study provides evidence that a substantial proportion of attendees of traditional healing practices suffer from psychological distress. Associated factors include poverty, number of children, polygamy, reason for visiting the healer and use of both traditional healing and biomedical health units. These findings may be useful for policy makers and biomedical health workers for the engagement with traditional healers.

  • 3527.
    Abbo, Maryam
    Södertörn University, Teacher Education.
    Digitala medier: Användning av surfplattor för att skriva berättelser i svensk språkundervisning2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to examine the use of tablet computers in a Swedish language, classroom. This study aims to investigate student and teacher attitudes when using tablet computers for story writing. One fifth grade classroom was observed on three occasions and a total of six students and three teachers were subsequently interviewed. This study addresses the following questions:

    • How are tablet computers used for writing stories in a Swedish classroom?

     

    • What opportunities and obstacles do teachers experience when using the tablet computers when it comes to writing stories?
    • Which method was preferred by the students? Writing stories on tablet computers or writing by hand?

    This qualitative study was based on observations and interviews. Analysis of observations and interviews show that the tablet computers appear to help the students with language, organisation and structure in the writing of stories. However, teachers still need to incorporate both writing by hand and using the tablet computers to ensure competence for real-life situations which still use a mixture of both skills. The results also showed that tablet computers are a useful tool for communication when students help each other in their writing. Classroom observations suggest that tablet computers can act as a mediator tool in the Swedish elementary school classroom primarily as it makes the writing process easier for the students. Analysis of teacher interviews suggest that teachers prefer to have students use tablets as it makes the student’s texts clearer, facilitating assessment.

  • 3528. Abbondanno, U
    et al.
    Aerts, G
    Alvarez, F
    Alvarez, H
    Andriamonje, S
    Andrzejewski, J
    Badurek, G
    Baumann, P
    Becvar, F
    Benlliure, J
    Berthomieux, E
    Betev, B
    Calvino, F
    Cano-Ott, D
    Capote, R
    Cennini, P
    Chepel, V
    Chiaveri, E
    Colonna, N
    Cortes, G
    Cortina, D
    Couture, A
    Cox, J
    Dababneh, S
    David, S
    Dolfini, R
    Domingo-Pardo, C
    Duran, I
    Embid-Segura, M
    Ferrant, L
    Ferrari, A
    Ferreira-Marques, R
    Frais-Koelbl, H
    Furman, W
    Goncalves, I
    Gonzalez-Romero, E
    Goverdovski, A
    Gramegna, F
    Griesmayer, E
    Gunsing, F
    Haas, B
    Haight, R
    Heil, M
    Herrera-Martinez, A
    Isaev, S
    Jericha, E
    Kadi, Y
    Kappeler, F
    Kerveno, M
    Ketlerov, V
    Koehler, P E
    Konovalov, V
    Krticka, M
    Leeb, H
    Lindote, A
    Lopes, M I
    Lozano, M
    Lukic, S
    Marganiec, J
    Marrone, S
    Martinez-Val, J
    Mastinu, P
    Mengoni, A
    Milazzo, P M
    Molina-Coballes, A
    Moreau, C
    Mosconi, M
    Neves, F
    Oberhummer, H
    O'Brien, S
    Pancin, J
    Papaevangelou, T
    Paradela, C
    Pavlik, A
    Pavlopoulos, P
    Perlado, J M
    Perrot, L
    Peskov, Vladmir
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Plag, R
    Plompen, A
    Plukis, A
    Poch, A
    Policarpo, A
    Pretel, C
    Quesada, J M
    Rapp, W
    Rauscher, T
    Reifarth, R
    Rosetti, M
    Rubbia, C
    Rudolf, G
    Rullhusen, P
    Salgado, J
    Schafer, E
    Soares, J C
    Stephan, C
    Tagliente, G
    Tain, J L
    Tassan-Got, L
    Tavora, L M N
    Terlizzi, R
    Vannini, G
    Vaz, P
    Ventura, A
    Villamarin-Fernandez, D
    Vincente-Vincente, M
    Vlachoudis, V
    Voss, F
    Wendler, H
    Wiescher, M
    Wisshak, K
    The data acquisition system of the neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN2005In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, ISSN 0168-9002, E-ISSN 1872-9576, Vol. 538, no 1-3, p. 692-702Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The n_TOF facility at CERN has been designed for the measurement of neutron capture, fission and (n, xn) cross-sections with high accuracy. This requires a flexible and-due to the high instantaneous neutron flux-almost dead time free data acquisition system. A scalable and versatile data solution has been designed based on 8-bit flash-ADCs with sampling rates up to 2 GHz and 8 Mbyte memory buffer. The software is written in C and C++ and is running on PCs equipped with RedHat Linux.

  • 3529. Abbondanno, U
    et al.
    Carlson, Per
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Physics.
    Peskov, Vladimir
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Physics.
    Zanini, L
    et al.,
    New experimental validation of the pulse height weighting technique for capture cross-section measurements2004In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, ISSN 0168-9002, E-ISSN 1872-9576, Vol. 521, no 2-3, p. 454-467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The accuracy of the pulse height weighting technique for the determination of neutron capture cross-sections is investigated. The technique is applied to measurements performed with C6D6 liquid scintillation detectors of two different types using capture samples of various dimensions. The data for well-known (n, gamma) resonances are analyzed using weighting functions obtained from Monte Carlo simulations of the experimental set-up. Several causes of systematic deviation are identified and their effect is quantified. In all the cases measured the reaction yield agrees with the standard value within 2%.

  • 3530. Abbott, A. L.
    et al.
    Adelman, M. A.
    Alexandrov, A. V.
    Barnett, H. J. M.
    Beard, J.
    Bell, P.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Blacker, D.
    Buckley, C. J.
    Cambria, R. P.
    Comerota, A. J.
    Connolly, E. S., Jr.
    Davies, A. H.
    Eckstein, H. H.
    Faruqi, R.
    Fraedrich, G.
    Gloviczki, P.
    Hankey, G. J.
    Harbaugh, R. E.
    Heldenberg, E.
    Kittner, S. J.
    Kleinig, T. J.
    Mikhailidis, D. P.
    Moore, W. S.
    Naylor, R.
    Nicolaides, A.
    Paraskevas, K. I.
    Pelz, D. M.
    Prichard, J. W.
    Purdie, G.
    Ricco, J. B.
    Riles, T.
    Rothwell, P.
    Sandercock, P.
    Sillesen, H.
    Spence, J. D.
    Spinelli, F.
    Tan, A.
    Thapar, A.
    Veith, F. J.
    Zhou, W.
    Why the United States Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Should not Extend Reimbursement Indications for Carotid Artery Angioplasty/Stenting2012In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, ISSN 1078-5884, E-ISSN 1532-2165, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 247-251Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3531. Abbott, A. L.
    et al.
    Adelman, M. A.
    Alexandrov, A. V.
    Barnett, H. J. M.
    Beard, J.
    Bell, P.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Blacker, D.
    Buckley, C. J.
    Cambria, R. P.
    Comerota, A. J.
    Connolly, E. Sander
    Davies, A. H.
    Eckstein, H. -H
    Faruqi, R.
    Fraedrich, G.
    Gloviczki, P.
    Hankey, G. J.
    Harbaugh, R. E.
    Heldenberg, E.
    Kittner, S. J.
    Kleinig, T. J.
    Mikhailidis, D. P.
    Moore, W. S.
    Naylor, R.
    Nicolaides, A.
    Paraskevas, K. I.
    Pelz, D. M.
    Prichard, J. W.
    Purdie, G.
    Ricco, J. -B
    Riles, T.
    Rothwell, P.
    Sandercock, P.
    Sillesen, H.
    Spence, J. D.
    Spinelli, F.
    Tan, A.
    Thapar, A.
    Veith, F. J.
    Zhou, Wei
    Why the United States Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) should not extend reimbursement indications for carotid artery angioplasty/stenting2012In: International Journal of Angiology, ISSN 0392-9590, E-ISSN 1827-1839, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 85-89Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3532.
    Abbott, Allan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
    Evidence base and future research directions in the management of low back pain2016In: World Journal of Orthopedics, ISSN 2218-5836, E-ISSN 2218-5836, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 156-161Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Low back pain (LBP) is a prevalent and costly condition. Awareness of valid and reliable patient history taking, physical examination and clinical testing is important for diagnostic accuracy. Stratified care which targets treatment to patient subgroups based on key characteristics is reliant upon accurate diagnostics. Models of stratified care that can potentially improve treatment effects include prognostic risk profiling for persistent LBP, likely response to specific treatment based on clinical prediction models or suspected underlying causal mechanisms. The focus of this editorial is to highlight current research status and future directions for LBP diagnostics and stratified care.

  • 3533.
    Abbott, Allan
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Physiotherapeutic rehabilitation and lumbar fusion surgery2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last two decades, the economic costs and rates of lumbar fusion surgery for chronic low back pain has risen dramatically in western industrialized countries. Data from the Swedish National Spine Register suggest that 25% of patients experience unimproved pain and up to 40% are not satisfied with the outcome of lumbar fusion surgery. Thus, there is a definite need to optimize the selection and management of patients to improve lumbar fusion outcomes. Aim: To investigate the role of biopsychosocial factors in explaining disability and health related quality of life in chronic low back pain patients before and after lumbar fusion surgery and to evaluate the effectiveness of post-operative rehabilitation regimes. Methods: At total of 107 patients were recruited, aged 18 to 65 years, selected for lumbar fusion due to 12 months of symptomatic back and/or leg pain due to spinal stenosis, degenerative/isthmic spondylolisthesis or degenerative disc disease. Measures of disability, health related quality of life, pain, mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, pain coping styles, work status, health care use, analgesic use and sickness leave were collected with self-rated questionnaires at baseline (Studies I-IV), 3, 6, 12 months (Study II) and 2-3 years after surgery (Studies II-III). In Studies II-IV, patients were randomised to psychomotor therapy (N=53) or exercise therapy (N=54) implemented during the first 3 post-operative months. Semi-structured interviews were conducted 3-6 months after surgery on 20 patients including 10 from each rehabilitation group to investigate experiences of back problems before and after surgery, post-operative recovery and expectations of rehabilitation analysed in terms of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (Study IV). Results: Approximately 50% of the variability in baseline disability and 40% of the variability in baseline health related quality of life could be explained by psychological variables. In particular, catastrophizing, control over pain, self-efficacy and outcome expectancy had significant mediation roles (Study I). For the short and long term outcome of lumbar fusion surgery, post-operative psychomotor therapy is significantly more effective than exercise therapy with approximately 10-20% better outcome in measures of disability, fear of movement/(re)injury, pain catastrophizing, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy sickness leave, health care utilization and return to work (Study II). A model with good outcome predictive performance which significantly predicts disability, back pain and health related quality of life outcomes 2-3 year after lumbar fusion surgery, was shown to involve pre-operative screening of disability, leg pain intensity, mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, outcome expectations, catastrophizing, control over pain and the implementation of post-operative psychomotor therapy (Study III). Lumbar fusion patient s experiences of back problems before and after the operation as well as experiences of recovery and outcome expectations correspond well with the content of outcomes measures used in the study suggesting good content validity (Study IV). Conclusion: Psychological factors strongly influence levels of disability and health related quality of life in lumbar fusion candidates as well as predicts post-operative outcomes. Early post-operative rehabilitation focusing on cognition, behaviour and motor control is recommended for improved lumbar fusion outcomes.

  • 3534.
    Abbott, Allan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    The Coping Strategy Questionnaire2010In: Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 1836-9553, E-ISSN 1836-9561, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 63-63Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3535.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Neuro R1:07, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden; Institute of Health and Sport, Bond University, Queensland, Australia.
    Ghasemi-Kafash, Elaheh
    Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Dedering, Åsa
    Department of Physical Therapy, Neuro R1:07, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    The validity of using an electrocutaneous device for pain assessment in patients with cervical radiculopathy2014In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 500-506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and preference for assessing pain magnitude with electrocutaneous testing (ECT) compared to the visual analogue scale (VAS) and Borg CR10 scale in men and women with cervical radiculopathy of varying sensory phenotypes. An additional purpose was to investigate ECT sensory and pain thresholds in men and women with cervical radiculopathy of varying sensory phenotypes. This is a cross-sectional study of 34 patients with cervical radiculopathy. Scatterplots and linear regression were used to investigate bivariate relationships between ECT, VAS and Borg CR10 methods of pain magnitude measurement as well as ECT sensory and pain thresholds. The use of the ECT pain magnitude matching paradigm for patients with cervical radiculopathy with normal sensory phenotype shows good linear association with arm pain VAS (R(2) = 0.39), neck pain VAS (R(2) = 0.38), arm pain Borg CR10 scale (R(2) = 0.50) and neck pain Borg CR10 scale (R(2) = 0.49) suggesting acceptable validity of the procedure. For patients with hypoesthesia and hyperesthesia sensory phenotypes, the ECT pain magnitude matching paradigm does not show adequate linear association with rating scale methods rendering the validity of the procedure as doubtful. ECT for sensory and pain threshold investigation, however, provides a method to objectively assess global sensory function in conjunction with sensory receptor specific bedside examination measures.

  • 3536.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Physiotherapist, Department for Physiotherapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Halvorsen, Marie
    Physiotherapist, Department for Physiotherapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dedering, Åsa
    Physiotherapist, Department for Physiotherapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Is there a need for cervical collar usage post anterior cervical decompression and fusion?: A randomized control pilot trial2013In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 290-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a common surgical intervention for radiculopathy resulting from degenerative cervical spine conditions. Post-surgical cervical collar use is believed to reduce post-operative pain, provide the patient with a sense of security during activities of daily living and even reduce rates of non-fusion. This prospective randomized controlled pilot trial investigates trial design feasibility in relation to prospective physical, functional, and quality of life-related outcomes of patients undergoing ACDF with interbody cage, with (n = 17) and without (n = 16) post-operative cervical collar usage. Results show that the sample provides sufficient statistical power to show that the use of a rigid cervical collar during 6 post-operative weeks is associated with significantly lower levels of neck disability index after 6 weeks and significantly lower levels of prospective neck pain. To investigate causal quality of life or fusion rate outcomes, sample size needs to be increased at least fourfold and optimally sixfold when accounting for data loss in prospective follow-up. The study suggests that post-surgical cervical collar usage may help certain patients cope with initial post-operative pain and disability.

  • 3537.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Orthopaedics, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm , Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Department of Orthopaedics, Institute for Clinical Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tyni-Lenné, Raija
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Patient’s experience post-lumbar fusion regarding back problems, recovery and expectations in terms of the international classification of functioning, disability and health.2011In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 33, no 15-16, p. 1399-1408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To describe within the context of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), patient's experiences post-lumber fusion regarding back problems, recovery and expectations of rehabilitation and to contrast with the content of outcome measures and the ICF low back pain (LBP) core sets.

    METHODS:

    The study has a cross-sectional and retrospective design and involves 20 lumbar fusion patients. Using the ICF, qualitative content analysis of semi-structured interviews 3-6 months post-surgery was performed. This was compared with the ICF related content of the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Medical Outcome Study Short Form 36 (SF-36), European Quality of Life Questionnaire (EQ5D) and the ICF LBP core sets.

    RESULTS:

    Patient's experiences were most frequently linked to psychological, sensory, neuromusculoskeletal and movement related body function chapters of the ICF. The most frequently linked categories of activity and participation were mobility, domestic activities, family relationships, work, recreation and leisure. Environmental factors frequently linked were the use of analgesics, walking aids, family support, social security systems, health care systems and labour market employment services.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    This study highlights important ICF related aspects of patient's experiences post-lumber fusion. The use of the comprehensive ICF core sets is recommended in conjunction with ODI, SF-36 and the EQ5D for a broader analysis of patient outcomes post-lumbar fusion.

  • 3538.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Bond University, Australia.
    Kjellman, Görel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Multidimensional assessment of pain related disability after surgery for cervical disc disease2013In: APA Conference 2013: New moves, Australian Physiotherapy Association , 2013, p. 2-2Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Questions: Given only 25% of patients, 10 year post-surgery for cervical disc disease report clinically meaningful improvements in functional disability, what are the biopsychosocial factors associated with continued long-term disability? What are the implications for physiotherapy practice?

    Design: Cross-sectional observational study.

    Participants: Ninety patients who had undergone anterior discectomy and fusion (ACDF) surgery 10-13 years prior.

    Outcome Measures: The Neck Disability Index (NDI), ACDF surgery type, surgical fusion status, patient age and Part 1 of the West Haven-Yale multidimensional pain inventory Swedish version (MPI-S) were entered into a statistical model. Part 1 of the MPI-S contains 5 subscales: pain severity, interference, life control, affective distress and support.

    Results: Seventy-three patients answered the questionnaires. Non-linear categorical regression modeling (CATREG) of the selected predictive variables explained 76.1% of the variance in NDI outcomes 10-13 years post ACDF. Of these predictors, MPI-S affective distress subscale (β = 0.635, p = <0.001) and pain severity subscale (β = 0.354, p = <0.001) were significant individual predictors of NDI ratings.

    Conclusion: This is the first study to investigate potential factors associated with prolonged functional disability greater than 10 years post-surgery for cervical disc disease. The results suggest the importance of not only pain severity but also screening affective distress as a potential barrier to physical functioning in patients previously operated for cervical disc disease. Future research on the utility of affect-focused body awareness therapy and pain coping strategies for post-surgical patients with continuing pain and physical disability is indicated.

    Key Practice Points:

    •  The screening of pain severity and affective distress is of importance for patients presenting with continuing physical disability after previous surgery for cervical disc disorders

    •  Affect-focused body awareness therapies and pain coping strategies may be a potential treatment alternative for patients with continuing pain and physical disability.

  • 3539.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Bond University, Gold Coast, Australia.
    Möller, Hans
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gerdhem, Paul
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    CONTRAIS: CONservative TReatment for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: a randomised controlled trial protocol2013In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 14, article id 261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Idiopathic scoliosis is a three-dimensional structural deformity of the spine that occurs in children and adolescents. Recent reviews on bracing and exercise treatment have provided some evidence for effect of these interventions. The purpose of this study is to improve the evidence base regarding the effectiveness of conservative treatments for preventing curve progression in idiopathic scoliosis.

    Methods/design:

    Patients: Previously untreated girls and boys with idiopathic scoliosis, 9 to 17 years of age with at least one year of remaining growth and a curve Cobb angle of 25–40 degrees will be included. A total of 135 participants will be randomly allocated in groups of 45 patients each to receive one of the three interventions.Interventions: All three groups will receive a physical activity prescription according to the World Health Organisation recommendations. One group will additionally wear a hyper-corrective night-time brace. One group will additionally perform postural scoliosis-specific exercises.Outcome: Participation in the study will last until the curve has progressed, or until cessation of skeletal growth. Outcome variables will be measured every 6 months. The primary outcome variable, failure of treatment, is defined as progression of the Cobb angle more than 6 degrees, compared to the primary x-ray, seen on two consecutive spinal standing x-rays taken with 6 months interval. Secondary outcome measures include the SRS-22r and EQ5D-Y quality of life questionnaires, the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) short form, and Cobb angle atend of the study.

    Discussion:This trial will evaluate which of the tested conservative treatment approaches that is the most effective for patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Trial registration: NCT01761305

  • 3540.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital; Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Orthopaedics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tyni-Lenné, Raija
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Department for Orthopaedics, Institute for Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Early rehabilitation targeting cognition, behaviour and motor function after lumbar fusion: A randomized controlled trial2010In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 35, no 8, p. 848-857Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Design - Open label randomized controlled trial with 3-, 6-, 12-month, and 2- to 3-year follow-up.

    Objective - To investigate the effectiveness of a psychomotor therapy focusing on cognition, behavior, and motor relearning compared with exercise therapy applied during the first 3 months after lumbar fusion.

    Summary of Background Data - Postoperative management after lumbar fusion commonly focuses on analgesic pain control and activities of daily living. After 3 months, exercise therapy is often implemented. No randomized controlled trial has investigated early rehabilitation techniques conducted during the first 3 months after surgery.

    Methods - The study recruited 107 patients, aged 18 to 65 years, selected for lumbar fusion because of 12 months of symptomatic spinal stenosis, spondylosis, degenerative/isthmic spondylolisthesis, or degenerative disc disease. The exercise therapy group received a home program focusing on pain contingent training of back, abdominal, and leg muscle functional strength and endurance, stretching, and cardiovascular fitness. The psychomotor therapy group received a home program and 3 outpatient sessions focusing on modifying maladaptive pain cognitions, behaviors, and motor control. Rated questionnaires investigating functional disability, pain, health-related quality of life, functional self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, fear of movement/(re)injury, and coping were assessed at 3, 6, 12 months, and 2 to 3 years after surgery.

    Results - Follow-up rates were 93% at 12 months and 81% at 2 to 3 years after surgery. Psychomotor therapy improved functional disability, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and fear of movement/(re)injury significantly more than exercise therapy at respective follow-up occasions. Similar results occurred for pain coping but group differences were nonsignificant at 2 to 3 years follow-up. Potentially clinical relevant higher reoperation rates occurred after psychomotor therapy but rates were within normal ranges.

    Conclusion - The study shows that postoperative rehabilitation can be safely implemented during the first 3 months after lumbar fusion and should include measures to modify psychological as well as motor functions.

  • 3541.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Orthopaedics, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tyni-Lenné, Raija
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Department for Orthopaedics, Institute for Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Leg pain and psychological variables predict outcome 2-3 years after lumber fusion surgery2011In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 1626-1634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prediction studies testing a thorough range of psychological variables in addition to demographic, work-related and clinical variables are lacking in lumbar fusion surgery research. This prospective cohort study aimed at examining predictions of functional disability, back pain and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) 2-3 years after lumbar fusion by regressing nonlinear relations in a multivariate predictive model of pre-surgical variables. Before and 2-3 years after lumbar fusion surgery, patients completed measures investigating demographics, work-related variables, clinical variables, functional self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, fear of movement/(re)injury, mental health and pain coping. Categorical regression with optimal scaling transformation, elastic net regularization and bootstrapping were used to investigate predictor variables and address predictive model validity. The most parsimonious and stable subset of pre-surgical predictor variables explained 41.6, 36.0 and 25.6% of the variance in functional disability, back pain intensity and HRQOL 2-3 years after lumbar fusion. Pre-surgical control over pain significantly predicted functional disability and HRQOL. Pre-surgical catastrophizing and leg pain intensity significantly predicted functional disability and back pain while the pre-surgical straight leg raise significantly predicted back pain. Post-operative psychomotor therapy also significantly predicted functional disability while pre-surgical outcome expectations significantly predicted HRQOL. For the median dichotomised classification of functional disability, back pain intensity and HRQOL levels 2-3 years post-surgery, the discriminative ability of the prediction models was of good quality. The results demonstrate the importance of pre-surgical psychological factors, leg pain intensity, straight leg raise and post-operative psychomotor therapy in the predictions of functional disability, back pain and HRQOL-related outcomes.

  • 3542.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Orthopaedics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tyni-Lenné, Raija
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Institute for Clinical Sciences, Department for Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The influence of psychological factors on pre-operative levels of pain intensity, disability and HRQOL in lumbar spinal fusion surgery patients2010In: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 96, no 3, p. 213-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    To assess the extent to which perceived pain and psychological factors explain levels of disability and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients scheduled for lumbar fusion surgery, and to test the hypothesis that relationships between pain intensity, mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, disability and HRQOL are mediated by cognitive beliefs and appraisals.

    DESIGN:

    Cross-sectional, correlation study.

    SETTING:

    Orthopaedic outpatient setting in a tertiary hospital.

    PARTICIPANTS:

    One hundred and seven chronic back pain patients scheduled for lumbar fusion surgery.

    MEASURES:

    Visual analogue scale for pain intensity, Short Form 36 mental health subscale, Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, Back Beliefs Questionnaire, Self-efficacy Scale, Coping Strategy Questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Index and European Quality of Life Questionnaire.

    RESULTS:

    The group effect of multiple mediators significantly influenced the relationships between pain intensity and mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, functional disability and HRQOL. Pain catastrophising significantly mediated the relationship between pain intensity and mental health, control over pain significantly mediated the relationship between mental health and functional disability, self-efficacy and pain outcome expectancy significantly mediated the relationship between mental health and HRQOL, and self-efficacy also significantly mediated the relationship between pain intensity, fear of movement/(re)jury and functional disability. The model explained 28, 30, 52 and 42% of the variation in mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, functional disability and HRQOL, respectively.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    This study highlights the strong influence and mediation roles of psychological factors on pain, mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, disability and HRQOL in patients scheduled for lumber fusion. Future research should focus on screening as well as pre- and post-operative interventions based on these psychological factors for the potential improvement of lumber fusion surgery outcomes.

    Copyright 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 3543.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tynni-Lenne, Raija
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Early physiotherapeutic rehabilitation following lumbar spinal fusion surgery2009In: Oral Presentations: Cervical Spine: The Surgical Treatment of Painful Disorders, Springer, 2009, Vol. 18, Supplement 4, p. S409-S410Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Physiotherapy after lumbar spinal fusion surgery is traditionally focused on physical exercise. Too few studies have investigatedthe efficacy of modern lumbar stabilization exercise regimes. Benefits have been shown for combining traditional physical exercise with a psychosocial intervention. No randomised controlled study has evaluated thecombined biopsychosocial effect of modern lumbar stabilization exercisesand cognitive behavioural intervention compared to traditional physical exercise starting immediately after lumbar spinal fusion.

    Purpose: To investigate the effectiveness of modern physiotherapy(MPT) compared to a traditional physiotherapy (TPT) starting immediately after lumber spinal fusion.

    Study design/setting: Randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Patient sample, inclusion period and follow-up: Patients between 18 and 65 years, selected for lumbar spinal fusion due to at least 12 months of CLBP symptoms caused by spinal stenosis, spondylosis, spondylolisthesis or degenerative disc disease were included in the study between 2005 and 2007. A total of 107 patients were randomly allocated to the MPT group (n = 53) and TPT group (n = 54). The TPT group was prescribed daily home based pain contingent training of traditional physical exercises for back, abdominal and leg muscles. The MPT group was prescribed daily home based training of lumbar stabilization exercises combined with 90 min of cognitive behavioural intervention at 3, 6 and 9 weeks after the operation. The patients outcomes were followed up at 3, 6, 12 months and 2–3 years

    Outcome measures: Oswestry disability index (ODI), pain intensity, HRQOL, kinesiophobia, anxiety/depression, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, use of coping strategies, work status, sickness leave and health care use.

    Methods: Analysis of mean differences between groups.

    Results: 2–3 year follow-up showed that the MPT group had significantly lower percentage scores in ODI = 18.2 (P = 0.008), kinesiophobia= 30.0 (P = 0.001), catastrophizing = 21.8 (P = 0.006) and higher self-efficacy = 64.6 (P = 0.019) compared to TPT group’s ODI = 28.1, kinesiophobia = 41.9, catastrophizing = 31.3 and self-efficacy = 55.5. The MPT group had significantly more employment, less health care use (P = 0.035) and less long-term sickness leave (P = 0.040).

    Conclusions: This study provides evidence for the benefits of combining lumbar stabilization exercise and cognitive behavioural intervention starting immediately after lumbar fusion.

  • 3544.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tynni-Lenné, R
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, R
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The effectiveness of physiotherapeutic rehabilitation and issues of outcome prediction after lumber fusion surgery.2011In: Proceedings of the WCPT Congress, Amsterdam Netherlands. / [ed] Physiotherapy, World Confederation of Physical Therapy , 2011, Vol. 97 (Suppl 1), p. 20-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The primary purpose was to analyse the short and long term effectiveness of physiotherapeutic rehabilitation programs performed during the first 3 month after lumbar fusion surgery. A secondary purpose was to analyse factors predicting long-term disability, back pain and health related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes after lumbar fusion.

    Relevance: The study provides evidence for the effectiveness of early physiotherapy after lumbar fusion. Furthermore improved knowledge of predictive factors can help physiotherapist in the screening of lumbar fusion candidates and the individualised implementation of pre-surgical and post-surgical interventions.

    Participants: A total of 107 patients were recruited from the Karolinska University Hospital's Orthopaedic Clinic, Stockholm, Sweden. The inclusion criteria were: men and women aged between 18 and 65 years with a >12 month history of back pain and/or sciatica; a primary diagnosis of spinal stenosis, degenerative or isthmic spondylolisthesis or degenerative disc disease; selected for lumbar fusion with or without decompression; competence in the Swedish language. The criteria for exclusion were: previous lumbar fusion, rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

    Methods: An open book randomised controlled trial with pre-surgical and post-surgical measures at 3, 6, 12 and 24-36 months was performed to investigate the effectiveness of a psychomotor therapy focusing on cognition, behaviour and motor relearning compared to exercise therapy focusing on strength and conditioning, applied during the first 3 months after lumbar fusion. Randomisation allocated 53 patients to psychomotor therapy and 54 patients to exercise therapy. The Oswestry disability index (ODI) was the primary outcome measure. Secondary measures included the Visual analogue scale for back pain (VAS), European quality of life questionnaire (EQ5D), as well as other clinical, psychological and work related variables.

    Analysis: A total of 78 patients were needed assuming a power = 80%. Patient compliance was analysed and an intention to treat principle applied to data analysis. For statistical comparison between the 2 independent groups, analysis of covariance was used. Categorical regression with optimal scaling transformation, elastic net regularization and bootstrapping were used to investigate pre-surgical predictor variables and address predictive model validity.

    Results: Follow-up rates were 93% at 12 months and 81% at 24-36 months after surgery. Psychomotor therapy improved functional disability, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy and fear of movement/(re)injury significantly more than exercise therapy at respective follow-up occasions. Pre-surgical control over pain significantly predicted functional disability and HRQOL. Pre-surgical catastrophizing and leg pain intensity significantly predicted functional disability and back pain while the pre-surgical lasegue test significantly predicted back pain. The implementation of post-operative psychomotor therapy also significantly predicted functional disability while pre-surgical outcome expectations significantly predicted HRQOL.

    Conclusions: The study shows that post-operative rehabilitation can be safely implemented during the first 3 months after lumbar fusion and should include measures to modify psychological as well as motor functions. The study also demonstrates the importance of pre-surgical psychological factors, leg pain intensity, the lasegue test and post-operative psychomotor therapy in the predictions of functional disability, back pain and HRQOL related outcomes.

    Implications: Physiotherapist should screen patients pain, psychological factors and neuromusculoskeletal system pre-surgically and rehabilitate patients with early psychomotor therapy after lumbar fusion.

  • 3545.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tynni-Lenné, Raija
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Early rehabilitation targeting cognition, behaviour and motor function after lumbar fusion: A randomised controlled trial2010In: Abstracts: Oral Presentations, 2010, p. 186-186Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Design: Open label randomised controlled trial with 3, 6, 12 month and 2-3 year follow-up.

    Objective. To investigate the effectiveness of a psychomotor therapy focusing on cognition, behaviour and motor relearning compared to exercise therapy applied during the first 3 months after lumbar fusion.

    Methods: The study recruited 107 patients, aged 18 to 65 years, selected for lumbar fusion due to 12 months of symptomatic spinal stenosis, degenerative/isthmic spondylolisthesis or degenerative disc disease. The exercise therapy group received a home program focusing on pain contingent training of back, abdominal and leg muscle functional strength and endurance, stretching and cardiovascular fitness. The psychomotor therapy group received a home program and 3 outpatient sessions focusing on modifying maladaptive pain cognitions, behaviours and motor control. Patient-rated questionnaires investigating functional disability, pain, health related quality of life, functional self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, fear of movement/(re)injury and copingwere assessed at baseline, 3, 6, 12 months and 2-3 years after surgery.

    Results: Follow-up rates were 93% at 12 months and 81% at 2-3 years after surgery. Psychomotor therapy improved functional disability, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy and fear of movement/(re)injury significantly more than exercise therapy at respective follow-up occasions. Similar results occurred for pain coping but group differences were non-significant at 2-3 year follow-up.

    Conclusions: The study shows that post-operative rehabilitation can be effectively implemented during the first 3 months after lumbar fusion and should include measures to modify psychological aswell as motor functions.

  • 3546. Abbott, Andrew
    et al.
    Addicoat, Matthew
    Aldous, Leigh
    Bhuin, Radha Gobinda
    Borisenko, Natalia
    Lopes, Jose Nuno Canongia
    Clark, Ryan
    Coles, Samuel
    Gomes, Margarida Costa
    Cross, Benjamin
    Everts, Jeffrey
    Firestone, Millicent
    Gardas, Ramesh
    Gras, Matthieu
    Halstead, Simon
    Hardacre, Christopher
    Holbrey, John
    Itoh, Toshiyuki
    Ivanistsev, Vladislav
    Jacquemin, Johan
    Jessop, Philip
    Jones, Robert
    Kirchner, Barbara
    Li, Sichao
    KTH.
    Lynden-Bell, Ruth
    MacFarlane, Doug
    Maier, Florian
    Mezger, Markus
    Padua, Agilio
    Pavel, Octavian D.
    Perkin, Susan
    Purcell, Simon
    Rutland, Mark
    Slattery, John M.
    Suzer, Sefik
    Tamura, Kazuhisa
    Thomas, Morgan L.
    Tiwari, Shraeddha
    Tsuzuki, Seiji
    Uralcan, Betul
    Wallace, William
    Watanabe, Masayoshi
    KTH.
    Wishart, James
    Ionic liquids at interfaces: general discussion2018In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 206, p. 549-586Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3547. Abbott, Anne L.
    et al.
    Adelman, Mark A.
    Alexandrov, Andrei V.
    Barber, P. Alan
    Barnett, Henry J. M.
    Beard, Jonathan
    Bell, Peter
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Blacker, David
    Bonati, Leo H.
    Brown, Martin M.
    Buckley, Clifford J.
    Cambria, Richard P.
    Castaldo, John E.
    Comerota, Anthony J.
    Connolly, E. Sander, Jr.
    Dalman, Ronald L.
    Davies, Alun H.
    Eckstein, Hans-Henning
    Faruqi, Rishad
    Feasby, Thomas E.
    Fraedrich, Gustav
    Gloviczki, Peter
    Hankey, Graeme J.
    Harbaugh, Robert E.
    Heldenberg, Eitan
    Hennerici, Michael G.
    Hill, Michael D.
    Kleinig, Timothy J.
    Mikhailidis, Dimitri P.
    Moore, Wesley S.
    Naylor, Ross
    Nicolaides, Andrew
    Paraskevas, Kosmas I.
    Pelz, David M.
    Prichard, James W.
    Purdie, Grant
    Ricco, Jean-Baptiste
    Ringleb, Peter A.
    Riles, Thomas
    Rothwell, Peter M.
    Sandercock, Peter
    Sillesen, Henrik
    Spence, J. David
    Spinelli, Francesco
    Sturm, Jonathon
    Tan, Aaron
    Thapar, Ankur
    Veith, Frank J.
    Wijeratne, Tissa
    Zhou, Wei
    Why Calls for More Routine Carotid Stenting Are Currently Inappropriate An International, Multispecialty, Expert Review and Position Statement2013In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 1186-1190Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3548. Abbott, Anne L
    et al.
    Adelman, Mark A
    Alexandrov, Andrei V
    Barnett C C, Henry J M
    Beard, Jonathan
    Bell, Peter
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Blacker, David
    Buckley, Clifford J
    Cambria, Richard P
    Comerota, Anthony J
    Connolly, E Sander
    Davies, Alun H
    Eckstein, Hans-Henning
    Faruqi, Rishad
    Fraedrich, Gustav
    Gloviczki, Peter
    Hankey, Graeme J
    Harbaugh, Robert E
    Heldenberg, Eitan
    Kittner, Steven J
    Kleinig, Timothy J
    Mikhailidis, Dimitri P
    Moore, Wesley S
    Naylor, Ross
    Nicolaides, Andrew
    Paraskevas, Kosmas I
    Pelz, David M
    Prichard, James W
    Purdie, Grant
    Ricco, Jean-Baptiste
    Riles, Thomas
    Rothwell, Peter
    Sandercock, Peter
    Sillesen, Henrik
    Spence, J David
    Spinelli, Francesco
    Tan, Aaron
    Thapar, Ankur
    Veith, Frank J
    Zhou, Wei
    Why the US Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Should Not Extend Reimbursement Indications for Carotid Artery Angioplasty/Stenting2012In: Angiology, ISSN 0003-3197, E-ISSN 1940-1574, Vol. 63, no 8, p. 639-644Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3549. Abbott, Anne L.
    et al.
    Adelman, Mark A.
    Alexandrov, Andrei V.
    Barnett, Henry J. M.
    Beard, Jonathan
    Bell, Peter
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Blacker, David
    Buckley, Clifford J.
    Cambria, Richard P.
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    Nicolaides, Andrew
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    Pelz, David M.
    Prichard, James W.
    Purdie, Grant
    Ricco, Jean-Baptiste
    Riles, Thomas
    Rothwell, Peter
    Sandercock, Peter
    Sillesen, Henrik
    Spence, J. David
    Spinelli, Francesco
    Tan, Aaron
    Thapar, Ankur
    Veith, Frank J.
    Zhou, Wei
    Why the United States Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services should not extend reimbursement indications for carotid artery angioplasty/stenting2012In: VASCULAR, ISSN 1708-5381, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3550. Abbott, B
    et al.
    Morley, Anthony
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Zwalinski, L.
    Production and integration of the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer2018In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 13, no 5, article id T05008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the shutdown of the CERN Large Hadron Collider in 2013-2014, an additional pixel layer was installed between the existing Pixel detector of the ATLAS experiment and a new, smaller radius beam pipe. The motivation for this new pixel layer, the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), was to maintain or improve the robustness and performance of the ATLAS tracking system, given the higher instantaneous and integrated luminosities realised following the shutdown. Because of the extreme radiation and collision rate environment, several new radiation-tolerant sensor and electronic technologies were utilised for this layer. This paper reports on the IBL construction and integration prior to its operation in the ATLAS detector.

68697071727374 3501 - 3550 of 1167375
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