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  • 301.
    Elmsjö, Albert
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Rosqvist, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Engskog, Mikael K R
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Haglöf, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Kullberg, Joel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Iggman, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Arvidsson, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Pettersson, Curt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    NMR-based metabolic profiling in healthy individuals overfed different types of fat: links to changes in liver fat accumulation and lean tissue mass.2015In: Nutrition & Diabetes, ISSN 2044-4052, E-ISSN 2044-4052, Vol. 5, no 19, p. e182-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Overeating different dietary fatty acids influence the amount of liver fat stored during weight gain, however, the mechanisms responsible are unclear. We aimed to identify non-lipid metabolites that may differentiate between saturated (SFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) overfeeding using a non-targeted metabolomic approach. We also investigated the possible relationships between plasma metabolites and body fat accumulation.

    METHODS: In a randomized study (LIPOGAIN study), n=39 healthy individuals were overfed with muffins containing SFA or PUFA. Plasma samples were precipitated with cold acetonitrile and analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Pattern recognition techniques were used to overview the data, identify variables contributing to group classification and to correlate metabolites with fat accumulation.

    RESULTS: We previously reported that SFA causes a greater accumulation of liver fat, visceral fat and total body fat, whereas lean tissue levels increases less compared with PUFA, despite comparable weight gain. In this study, lactate and acetate were identified as important contributors to group classification between SFA and PUFA (P<0.05). Furthermore, the fat depots (total body fat, visceral adipose tissue and liver fat) and lean tissue correlated (P(corr)>0.5) all with two or more metabolites (for example, branched amino acids, alanine, acetate and lactate). The metabolite composition differed in a manner that may indicate higher insulin sensitivity after a diet with PUFA compared with SFA, but this needs to be confirmed in future studies.

    CONCLUSION: A non-lipid metabolic profiling approach only identified a few metabolites that differentiated between SFA and PUFA overfeeding. Whether these metabolite changes are involved in depot-specific fat storage and increased lean tissue mass during overeating needs further investigation.

  • 302.
    Elshorbagy, Amany K.
    et al.
    Univ Alexandria, Dept Physiol, Fac Med, Alexandria, Egypt.
    Samocha-Bonet, Dorit
    Garvan Inst Med Res, Diabet & Metab Div, Sydney, NSW, Australia;Univ New South Wales, Fac Med, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Jernerén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences. Univ Oxford, Dept Pharmacol, Oxford, England.
    Turner, Cheryl
    Univ Oxford, Dept Pharmacol, Oxford, England.
    Refsum, Helga
    Univ Oslo, Inst Basic Med Sci, Dept Nutr, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oxford, Dept Pharmacol, Oxford, England.
    Heilbronn, Leonie K.
    Univ Adelaide, Discipline Med, Adelaide, SA, Australia;Garvan Inst Med Res, Diabet & Metab Div, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Food Overconsumption in Healthy Adults Triggers Early and Sustained Increases in Serum Branched-Chain Amino Acids and Changes in Cysteine Linked to Fat Gain2018In: Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0022-3166, E-ISSN 1541-6100, Vol. 148, no 7, p. 1073-1080Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Plasma concentrations of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and the sulfur-containing amino acid cysteine are associated with obesity and insulin resistance. BCAAs predict future diabetes. Objective: We investigated amino acid changes during food overconsumption. Methods: Forty healthy men and women with a body mass index (mean +/- SEM) of 25.6 +/- 0.6 were overfed by 1250 kcal/d for 28 d, increasing consumption of all macronutrients. Insulin sensitivity and body composition were assessed at baseline (day 0) and day 28. Fasting serum amino acids were measured at days 0, 3, and 28. Linear mixed-effects models evaluated the effect of time in the total group and separately in those with low and high body fat gain (below compared with at or above median fat gain, 1.95 kg). At days 0 and 28, insulin-induced suppression of serum amino acids during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp test and, in a subset (n = 20), adipose tissue mRNA expression of selected amino acid metabolizing enzymes were assessed. Results: Weight increased by 2.8 kg. High fat gainers gained 2.6 kg fat mass compared with 1.1 kg in low fat gainers. Valine and isoleucine increased at day 3 (+17% and +22%, respectively; P <= 0.002) and remained elevated at day 28, despite a decline in valine (P = 0.019) from day 3 values. Methionine, cystathionine, and taurine were unaffected. Serum total cysteine (tCys) transiently increased at day 3 (+11%; P = 0.022) only in high fat gainers (P-interaction = 0.043), in whom the cysteine catabolic enzyme cysteine dioxygenase (CDO1) was induced (+26%; P = 0.025) in adipose tissue (P-interaction = 0.045). Overconsumption did not alter adipose tissue mRNA expression of the BCAA-metabolizing enzymes branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase E1 alpha polypeptide (BCKDHA) or branched-chain amino transferase 1 (BCAT1). In the total population at day 0, insulin infusion decreased all serum amino acids (-11% to -47%; P < 0.01), except for homocysteine and tCys, which were unchanged, and glutathione, which was increased by 54%. At day 28, insulin increased tCys (+8%), and the insulin-induced suppression of taurine and phenylalanine observed at day 0, but not that of BCAAs, was significantly impaired. Conclusions: These findings highlight the role of nutrient oversupply in increasing fasting BCAA concentrations in healthy adults. The link between cysteine availability, CDO1 expression, and fat gain deserves investigation.

  • 303. Emaus, Marleen J.
    et al.
    Peeters, Petra H. M.
    Bakker, Marije F.
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Olsen, Anja
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Dossus, Laure
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine
    Baglietto, Laura
    Fortner, Renee T.
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Boeing, Heiner
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Masala, Giovanna
    Pala, Valeria
    Panico, Salvatore
    Tumino, Rosario
    Polidoro, Silvia
    Skeie, Guri
    Lund, Eiliv
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Ramon Quiros, J.
    Travier, Noemie
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Winkvist, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wennberg, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Key, Timothy J.
    Aune, Dagfinn
    Gunter, Marc
    Riboli, Elio
    van Gils, Carla H.
    Vegetable and fruit consumption and the risk of hormone receptor-defined breast cancer in the EPIC cohort2016In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 103, no 1, p. 168-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The recent literature indicates that a high vegetable intake and not a high fruit intake could be associated with decreased steroid hormone receptor–negative breast cancer risk.

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the association between vegetable and fruit intake and steroid hormone receptor–defined breast cancer risk.

    Design: A total of 335,054 female participants in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort were included in this study (mean ± SD age: 50.8 ± 9.8 y). Vegetable and fruit intake was measured by country-specific questionnaires filled out at recruitment between 1992 and 2000 with the use of standardized procedures. Cox proportional hazards models were stratified by age at recruitment and study center and were adjusted for breast cancer risk factors.

    Results: After a median follow-up of 11.5 y (IQR: 10.1–12.3 y), 10,197 incident invasive breast cancers were diagnosed [3479 estrogen and progesterone receptor positive (ER+PR+); 1021 ER and PR negative (ER−PR−)]. Compared with the lowest quintile, the highest quintile of vegetable intake was associated with a lower risk of overall breast cancer (HRquintile 5–quintile 1: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.80, 0.94). Although the inverse association was most apparent for ER−PR− breast cancer (ER−PR−: HRquintile 5–quintile 1: 0.74; 95% CI: 0.57, 0.96; P-trend = 0.03; ER+PR+: HRquintile 5–quintile 1: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.79, 1.05; P-trend = 0.14), the test for heterogeneity by hormone receptor status was not significant (P-heterogeneity = 0.09). Fruit intake was not significantly associated with total and hormone receptor–defined breast cancer risk.

    Conclusion: This study supports evidence that a high vegetable intake is associated with lower (mainly hormone receptor–negative) breast cancer risk.

  • 304. Eneroth, Hanna
    et al.
    Wallin, Stina
    Leander, Karin
    Nilsson Sommar, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Åkesson, Agneta
    Risks and Benefits of Increased Nut Consumption: Cardiovascular Health Benefits Outweigh the Burden of Carcinogenic Effects Attributed to Aflatoxin B1 Exposure2017In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 9, no 12, article id 1355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nuts are rich in nutrients and mounting evidence shows that consumption reduces cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence. Nuts may also be a major source of aflatoxin B₁, a potent liver carcinogen and the risk/benefit balance is unknown. Based on national statistics and data from the PREDIMED intervention trial, we estimated the potential CVD-reduction if Swedes aged 55-79 consumed 30 g nuts/day, instead of the current national average of five grams per day. We also assessed the reduction in disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) due to myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke. We estimated the aflatoxin B₁ exposure from nuts and calculated the margin of exposure. The approximation that one nanogram aflatoxin B₁/kg body weight/day results in one additional liver cancer case/10 million person-years was used to estimate the number of liver cancer cases. The increased nut consumption scenario prevented more than 7000 CVDs in 2013 (306/100,000 person-years) and contributed to about 55,000 saved DALYs for stroke and 22,000 for MI. The concomitant increase in aflatoxin B₁ exposure caused an estimated zero to three additional cases of liver cancer, corresponding to 159 DALYs spent, emphasizing the associated risks. Increased nut consumption, as part of a varied healthy diet, is warranted even when aflatoxin B₁ exposure is taken into account. However, efforts to reduce aflatoxin exposure from food are essential.

  • 305.
    Engelheart, Stina
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Brummer, Robert Jan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Assessment of nutritional status in the elderly: a proposed function-driven model2018In: Food & Nutrition Research, ISSN 1654-6628, E-ISSN 1654-661X, Vol. 62, article id 1366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is no accepted or standardized definition of 'malnutrition'. Hence, there is also no definition of what constitutes an adequate nutritional status. In elderly people, assessment of nutritional status is complex and is complicated by multi-morbidity and disabilities combined with nutrition-related problems, such as dysphagia, decreased appetite, fatigue, and muscle weakness.

    Objective: We propose a nutritional status model that presents nutritional status from a comprehensive functional perspective. This model visualizes the complexity of the nutritional status in elderly people.

    Design and results: The presented model could be interpreted as the nutritional status is conditional to a person's optimal function or situation. Another way of looking at it might be that a person's nutritional status affects his or her optimal situation. The proposed model includes four domains: (1) physical function and capacity; (2) health and somatic disorders; (3) food and nutrition; and (4) cognitive, affective, and sensory function. Each domain has a major impact on nutritional status, which in turn has a major impact on the outcome of each domain.

    Conclusions: Nutritional status is a multifaceted concept and there exist several knowledge gaps in the diagnosis, prevention, and optimization of treatment of inadequate nutritional status in elderly people. The nutritional status model may be useful in nutritional assessment research, as well as in the clinical setting.

  • 306. Engeset, D.
    et al.
    Skeie, G.
    Olsen, A.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Dietary patterns and whole grain in Scandinavia. The HELGA project2013In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 63, no Supplement 1, p. 341-341Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objectives: In the recent years a trendwithin nutrition epidemiology has been to assess overall dietaryquality, often by identifying dietary patterns. The HELGAstudy population is based on samples of existing cohorts fromthe three Scandinavian countries. All three cohorts are part ofthe EPIC study. The aim of this study is to find a typical wholegrain pattern in Scandinavia and see if the pattern is similar inthe three countries.Methods: The associations among the variables were investigatedby factor analysis.Results: Both Norway and Sweden had two breakfast patternsand one dinner pattern. Both the countries had a healthybreakfast pattern including food items commonly consideredhealthy, such as fruit, yoghurt and breakfast cereals. However,coarse bread was the main item in a more traditional pattern for Norway, while it was a part of the healthy pattern inSweden. The second breakfast pattern in Sweden included unhealthyitems like white bread, cakes, sweets, soft drinks andalcohol. The dinner pattern was almost equal in Sweden andNorway. Denmark differed from the other Scandinavian countriesconcerning dietary patterns. Only one breakfast patternwas found. This pattern had some similarities with the traditionalNorwegian pattern, but scored high on all whole grainitems while in Norway only wheat had a high score. Two dinnerpatterns are seen for Denmark, the healthier one includesfruit and vegetables, fish and poultry, the second includes meatand meat products, ice cream and alcohol.Conclusions: When comparing dietary patterns from thethree Scandinavian countries, we find both differences andsimilarities. The main whole grain item used in Norway andSweden seems to be wheat, while rye is more dominant in Denmark.

  • 307. Engeset, Dagrun
    et al.
    Braaten, Tonje
    Teucher, Birgit
    Kühn, Tilman
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B
    Leenders, Max
    Agudo, Antonio
    Bergmann, Manuela M
    Valanou, Elisavet
    Naska, Androniki
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Key, Timothy J
    Crowe, Francesca L
    Overvad, Kim
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Peeters, Petra H
    Wennberg, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Jansson, Jan Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Dossus, Laure
    Dartois, Laureen
    Li, Kuanrong
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Ward, Heather
    Riboli, Elio
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Huerta, José María
    Sánchez, María-José
    Tumino, Rosario
    Altzibar, Jone M
    Vineis, Paolo
    Masala, Giovanna
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Muller, David C
    Johansson, Mattias
    Luisa Redondo, M
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Olsen, Anja
    Olsen, Karina Standahl
    Brustad, Magritt
    Skeie, Guri
    Lund, Eiliv
    Fish consumption and mortality in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort2015In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 57-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fish is a source of important nutrients and may play a role in preventing heart diseases and other health outcomes. However, studies of overall mortality and cause-specific mortality related to fish consumption are inconclusive. We examined the rate of overall mortality, as well as mortality from ischaemic heart disease and cancer in relation to the intake of total fish, lean fish, and fatty fish in a large prospective cohort including ten European countries. More than 500,000 men and women completed a dietary questionnaire in 1992-1999 and were followed up for mortality until the end of 2010. 32,587 persons were reported dead since enrolment. Hazard ratios and their 99 % confidence interval were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression models. Fish consumption was examined using quintiles based on reported consumption, using moderate fish consumption (third quintile) as reference, and as continuous variables, using increments of 10 g/day. All analyses were adjusted for possible confounders. No association was seen for fish consumption and overall or cause-specific mortality for both the categorical and the continuous analyses, but there seemed to be a U-shaped trend (p < 0.000) with fatty fish consumption and total mortality and with total fish consumption and cancer mortality (p = 0.046).

  • 308. Engeset, Dagrun
    et al.
    Hofoss, Dag
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Skeie, Guri
    Dietary patterns and whole grain cereals in the Scandinavian countries: differences and similarities. The HELGA project2015In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 905-915Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To identify dietary patterns with whole grains as a main focus to see if there is a similar whole grain pattern in the three Scandinavian countries; Denmark, Sweden and Norway. Another objective is to see if items suggested for a Nordic Food Index will form a typical Nordic pattern when using factor analysis. Setting: The HELGA study population is based on samples of existing cohorts: the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study, the Swedish Vasterbotten cohort and the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health study. The HELGA study aims to generate knowledge about the health effects of whole grain foods. Subjects: The study included a total of 119 913 participants. Design: The associations among food variables from FFQ were investigated by principal component analysis. Only food groups common for all three cohorts were included. High factor loading of a food item shows high correlation of the item to the specific diet pattern. Results: The main whole grain for Denmark and Sweden was rye, while Norway had highest consumption of wheat. Three similar patterns were found: a cereal pattern, a meat pattern and a bread pattern. However, even if the patterns look similar, the food items belonging to the patterns differ between countries. Conclusions: High loadings on breakfast cereals and whole grain oat were common in the cereal patterns for all three countries. Thus, the cereal pattern may be considered a common Scandinavian whole grain pattern. Food items belonging to a Nordic Food Index were distributed between different patterns.

  • 309.
    Englund, Davis A.
    et al.
    Tufts Univ, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutr Res Ctr Aging, Nutr Exercise Physiol & Sarcopenia Lab, Boston, USA.
    Kirn, Dylan R.
    Tufts Univ, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutr Res Ctr Aging, Nutr Exercise Physiol & Sarcopenia Lab, Boston, USA.
    Koochek, Afsaneh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Zhu, Hao
    Hebrew SeniorLife, Inst Aging Res, Boston, USA.
    Travison, Thomas G.
    Hebrew SeniorLife, Inst Aging Res, Boston, USA; Harvard Med Sch, Boston, USA.
    Reid, Kieran F.
    Tufts Univ, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutr Res Ctr Aging, Nutr Exercise Physiol & Sarcopenia Lab, Boston, USA.
    von Berens, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Melin, Michael
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Gustafsson, Thomas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fielding, Roger A.
    Tufts Univ, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutr Res Ctr Aging, Nutr Exercise Physiol & Sarcopenia Lab, Boston, USA.
    Nutritional Supplementation With Physical Activity Improves Muscle Composition in Mobility-Limited Older Adults, The VIVE2 Study: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial2018In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, ISSN 1079-5006, E-ISSN 1758-535X, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 95-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nutritional supplementation and physical activity have been shown to positively influence muscle mass and strength in older adults. The efficacy of long-term nutritional supplementation in combination with physical activity in older adults remains unclear.

    Methods: Mobility-limited (short physical performance battery [SPPB] ≤9) and vitamin D insufficient (serum 25(OH) D 9–24 ng/mL) older adults were recruited for this study. All subjects participated in a physical activity program. Subjects were randomized to consume a daily nutritional supplement (150 kcal, 20 g whey protein, 800 IU vitamin D, 119 mL beverage) or placebo (30 kcal, nonnutritive, 119 mL). In a prespecified secondary analysis, we examined total-body composition (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), thigh composition (computed tomography), and muscle strength, power, and quality before and after the 6-month intervention.

    Results: One hundred and forty-nine subjects were randomized into the study [mean (standard deviation, SD) age 78.5 (5.4) years; 46.3% female; mean (SD) short physical performance battery 7.9 (1.2); mean (SD) vitamin D 18.7 (6.4) ng/mL]. After the intervention period both groups demonstrated improvements in muscle strength, body composition, and thigh composition. Nutritional supplementation lead to further losses of intermuscular fat (p = .049) and increased normal muscle density (p = .018).

    Conclusions: Six months of physical activity resulted in improvements in body composition, subcutaneous fat, intermuscular fat, and strength measures. The addition of nutritional supplementation resulted in further declines in intermuscular fat and improved muscle density compared to placebo. These results suggest nutritional supplementation provides additional benefits to mobility-limited older adults undergoing exercise training.

  • 310.
    Englund, Davis
    et al.
    Tufts Univ, Nutr Exercise Physiol & Sarcopenia Lab, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutr Res Ctr Aging, Boston, MA 02111 USA..
    Kirn, Dylan
    Tufts Univ, Nutr Exercise Physiol & Sarcopenia Lab, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutr Res Ctr Aging, Boston, MA 02111 USA..
    Koochek, Afsaneh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Travison, Thomas
    Hebrew SeniorLife, Inst Aging Res, Boston, MA USA..
    Reid, Kieran
    Tufts Univ, Nutr Exercise Physiol & Sarcopenia Lab, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutr Res Ctr Aging, Boston, MA 02111 USA..
    von Berens, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Zhu, Hao
    Hebrew SeniorLife, Inst Aging Res, Boston, MA USA..
    Lilja, Mats
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gustafsson, Thomas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Fielding, Roger
    Tufts Univ, Nutr Exercise Physiol & Sarcopenia Lab, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutr Res Ctr Aging, Boston, MA 02111 USA..
    Nutritional supplementation with physical activity improves muscle composition in mobility-limited older adults, the VIVE2 study: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial2017In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 31, no S1, article id 460.3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 311.
    Ericsson, Madelene
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Sjödin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Burén, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Försämrad hjärtfunktion efter fyra veckors intag av lågkolhydrat/högfettkost hos möss: Kan vi lära av translationell forskning?2017In: Svensk kardiologi, ISSN 1400-5816, no 1, p. 33-35Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 312.
    Eriksson, Britt
    Linköping university, Linköping, Sweden.
    Metabolic, methodological and developmental aspects of body composition: Studies in women and children with special reference to early life mechanisms behind childhood obesity2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent decades the number of children with overweight has increased worldwide. To understand the mechanisms behind this development, knowledge regarding metabolism and physiology in relation to the nutritional situation in early life is of importance. In particular, information about body composition development during early childhood is relevant. This thesis presents three studies in this area. In the pregnancy study serum samples, collected from 23 women before, during and after pregnancy, were analysed for serum levels of leptin, adiponectin and resistin and used to assess insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in relation to the total body fat (TBF) content of the women. TBF (%) and leptin were significantly correlated with HOMA-IR before and during pregnancy. When HOMA-IR was regressed on TBF (%) the slope of the regression line was 0.111 in gestational week 32 and significantly (p<0.05) higher than the value before pregnancy, 0.046, indicating that healthy pregnancy enhances the relationship between body fatness and insulin resistance. In the HF-study hydration of fat-free mass (hydration factor, HF) was assessed in 12 newborns using the doubly labelled water (DLW) method and air displacement plethysmography (PeaPod). HF was 80.9% with a low biological variability (0.81% of average HF). In the longitudinal study the body density of 108 healthy fullterm infants (53 girls, 55 boys) was measured at one and 12 weeks of age using PeaPod. Body composition was calculated using two models (Fomon’s and Butte’s). BMI values for the mothers of the infants were assessed before pregnancy. Body composition and total energy expenditure using the DLW-method were assessed in 20 of these children at the age of 1.5 years, when their sleeping metabolic rate was measured using indirect calorimetry and their resting energy metabolism was calculated using prediction equations. Butte´s model gave significantly (p<0.05) lower values for TBF than Fomon´s model, and invalid results for five newborns. Using Fomon´s model, at one week of age girls contained 13.4 ± 3.7 % and boys contained 12.5 ± 4.0 % TBF. The corresponding figures at 12 weeks were 26.3 ± 4.2 % and 26.4 ± 5.1 %. The mothers’ BMI values before pregnancy were correlated with the body weight but not with the TBF (g,%) or fat-free mass (g) of their infants at one week of age. At 1.5 years of age girls (n=9) contained 28.0±2.8 % and boys (n=11) 28.3±3.7 % TBF. Between one and 12 weeks of age all infants increased their TBF content, while 13 children increased and seven children decreased their TBF content between the ages of 12 weeks and 1.5 years. The results demonstrated that predicting rather than measuring resting energy metabolism involves a risk for spurious correlations between TBF and physical activity level. The level of physical activity (x), was negatively correlated with [TBF (%) at 1.5 years minus TBF (%) at 12 weeks] (y), r=-0.52, p=0.02. In conclusion, the results suggest that the body fat content of a woman has a stimulating effect on the growth, rather than on the fat retention, of her foetus. They also show that the Fomon model is the best available model when calculating the body composition of infants from body density. Finally, the results indicate that physical activity at the age of 1.5 years is important regarding the rate at which the high level of body fat, typical of infancy, decreases in early childhood.

  • 313.
    Eriksson, Britt
    et al.
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Hanna
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Löf, Marie
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hannestad, Ulf
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Forsum, Elisabet
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Body-composition development during early childhood and energy expenditure in response to physical activity in 1.5-y-old children2012In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 96, no 3, p. 567-573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity has increased recently, but the mechanisms involved are incompletely known. Previous research has shown a correlation between the percentage of total body fat (TBF) and physical activity level (PAL). However, the PAL values used may involve a risk of spurious correlations because they are often based on predicted rather than measured estimates of resting energy metabolism. l

    Objectives: We studied the development of body composition during early childhood and the relation between the percentage of TBF and PAL on the basis of the measured resting energy metabolism.

    Design: Body composition was previously measured in 108 children when they were 1 and 12 wk old. When 44 of these children (21 girls and 23 boys) were 1.5 y old, their total energy expenditure and TBF were assessed by using the doubly labeled water method. Resting energy metabolism, which was assessed by using indirect calorimetry, was used to calculate PAL.

    Results: Significant correlations were shown for TBF (r = 0.32, P = 0.035) and fat-free mass (r = 0.34, P = 0.025) between values (kg) assessed at 12 wk and 1.5 y of age. For TBF (kg) a significant interaction (P = 0.035) indicated a possible sex difference. PAL at 1.5 y was negatively correlated with the percentage of TBF (r = -0.40, P = 0.0076) and the increase in the percentage of TBF between 12 wk and 1.5 y (r = 0.38, P = 0.0105).

    Conclusions: The results indicate that body fatness and physical activity interact during early childhood and thereby influence obesity risk. Our results are based on a small sample, but nevertheless, they motivate additional studies in boys compared with girls regarding the development of body composition during early life.

  • 314.
    Eriksson, Britt
    et al.
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Löf, Marie
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Department of Computer and Information Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hannestad, Ulf
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Forsum, Elisabet
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Fat-free mass hydration in newborns: assessment and implications for body composition studies2011In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 100, no 5, p. 680-686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Equipment (Pea Pod) for assessing infant body density accurately and conveniently has recently become available. This density can be converted to body composition using the “Fomon” or the “Butte” model. These models differ regarding the water content in fat-free mass (hydration factor, HF). We assessed HF and its biological variability in newborns and compared results calculated using the two models at one and 12 weeks. Body volume and body weight were measured in 12 infants less than 10 days old using Pea Pod. Their total body water was assessed using isotope dilution. Their HF was found to be 80.9% with low biological variability (0.81% of average HF). Further, Pea Pod was used to assess body density of 108 infants at one and 12 weeks of age. Values for body fat (%) calculated using the “Butte” model were significantly lower than when using the “Fomon” model at one week (p<0.05) and 12 weeks (p<0.01). The difference between the two models was particularly large at one week, probably due to their different HF-values. Our HF-value is in agreement with that in the “Fomon” model and our results support the conclusion that this model is preferable when calculating body composition in infants.

  • 315.
    Eriksson, Britt
    et al.
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Löf, Marie
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Olausson, Hanna
    Department of Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Forsum, Elisabet
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Body fat, insulin resistance, energy expenditure and serum concentrations of leptin, adiponectin and resistin before, during and after pregnancy in healthy Swedish women2010In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 103, no 1, p. 50-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthy human pregnancy is associated with changes in food intake, body fatness, energy expenditure and insulin resistance. However, available knowledge is limited regarding the physiological basis of these changes. Published evidence suggests that so-called adipokines (i.e. leptin, adiponectin and resistin) have significant roles when such changes are established. We explored, throughout a complete pregnancy, relationships between total body fat (TBF), energy expenditure, insulin resistance (homeostasic model of insulin resistance, HOMA-IR) and serum concentrations of leptin, adiponectin and resistin. Such concentrations were assessed before pregnancy in gestational weeks 8, 14, 20, 32 and 35, and 2 weeks postpartum in twenty-three healthy women. TBF, BMR (n 23) and HOMA-IR (n 17) were assessed before pregnancy in gestational weeks 14 and 32 and 2 weeks postpartum. TBF (%) was correlated with HOMA-IR (r 0.68-0.79, P < 0.01) and with serum leptin (r 0.85-0.88, P < 0.001) before and during pregnancy. Serum leptin was correlated with HOMA-IR (r 0.53-0.70, P < 0.05) before and during pregnancy. Serum adiponectin was inversely correlated with HOMA-IR in gestational week 32 (r - 0.52, P < 0.05). When HOMA-IR was regressed on TBF (%), the slope of the regression line was 0.046 before pregnancy, which was significantly (P < 0.05) different from the corresponding value, 0.111, in gestational week 32. The results indicate that pregnancy has an enhancing effect on the relationship between body fatness and insulin resistance. This effect, possibly mediated by leptin, may represent a mechanism by which offspring size is regulated in response to the nutritional situation of the mother.

  • 316.
    Eriksson, Britt
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Olsson, Hanna
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Löf, Marie
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hannestad, Ulf
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Forsum, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Body composition and energy expenditure in response to physical activity in 1.5-year-old children studied by means of the doubly labeled water methodManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During recent decades the prevalence of overweight and obesity in childhood has increased and studies of the mechanisms involved are motivated. Previous research has shown a correlation between total body fat (TBF) (%) and physical activity level (PAL) but the assessment of PAL has often involved a risk for spurious correlations. Thus we compared PAL calculated using basal metabolic rate (BMR) predicted from equations, based on body weight (PALBMR) and associated with a risk for spurious correlations, with PAL calculated using sleeping metabolic rate (SMR) assessed using indirect calorimetry (PALSMR) in 20 healthy children aged 1.5 years. Total energy expenditure and body fatness were assessed using the doubly labelled water method. Body fatness of these children was also assessed at one week and three months of age. PALBMR was significantly (r=-0.48, p=0.03) correlated with TBF (%) while PALSMR was not. Furthermore, the increase in body fatness between three months and 1.5 years was significantly (r=-0.52, p=0.02) correlated with PALSMR at the age of 1.5 years. Our results indicate complex relationships between body fatness and physical activity in early life. When conducting studies in this area, resting energy metabolism should be measured rather than predicted using equations based on body weight.

  • 317.
    Eriksson, Nathalie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences.
    Damfotbollsspelares kostintag under 24 timmar retroperspektiv intervjustudie: En tvärsnittundersökning2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to examine the dietary intake of female amateur football players in the division 2, 3 and 5 in the middle part of Sweden. The study is a descriptive, cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach. Data collection consisted of 24 hour recall interviews and a questionnaire with background information about the participant. The participants consisted of 40 female football players from divisions 2, 3 and 5. The participants' average calorie intake was estimated using the program Dietist Net Pro 1979 kilocalories (kcal)/day, compared with the average recommended daily allowance (RDA), which was estimated at 2137 kcal. The low energy consumption contributed to the participants' inability to meet the RDA for iron, folate, vitamin D, calcium, magnesium and carbohydrates. There were 19 participants who ate more than the average amount of energy and 21 participants who ate below the average amount of calories. No statistically significant differences in energy or nutrient intake could be established between the participants in different divisions or age groups. Female football players in this study were found to eat too little energy (food) on the basis of their energy needs, which may potentially contribute to nutritional deficiencies, specifically in iron, folate, vitamin D, calcium, magnesium and carbohydrates. Deficiencies in these nutrients may lead to impaired performance in training and matches, impaired general health and recovery, and to a break-down of body tissues for energy.

  • 318. Erlich, Rita
    et al.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
    Wahlqvist, Mark L
    Cooking as a healthy behaviour2012In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 1139-1140Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 319. Erlich, Rita
    et al.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wahlqvist, Mark L
    Cooking as a healthy behaviour2012In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 1139-1140Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 320. Eussen, Simone JPM
    et al.
    Nilsen, Roy M
    Midttun, Oivind
    Hustad, Steinar
    IJssennagger, Noortje
    Meyer, Klaus
    Fredriksen, Ase
    Ulvik, Arve
    Ueland, Per M
    Brennan, Paul
    Johansson, Mattias
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Vineis, Paolo
    Chuang, Shu-Chun
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine
    Dossus, Laure
    Perquier, Florence
    Overvad, Kim
    Teucher, Birgit
    Grote, Verena A
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Adarakis, George
    Plada, Maria
    Sieri, Sabina
    Tumino, Rosario
    Santucci de Magistris, Maria
    Ros, Martine M
    Peeters, Petra HM
    Luisa Redondo, Maria
    Zamora-Ros, Raul
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Schneede, Jörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Pharmacology.
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wark, Petra A
    Gallo, Valentina
    Norat, Teresa
    Riboli, Elio
    Vollset, Stein Emil
    North-south gradients in plasma concentrations of B-vitamins and other components of one-carbon metabolism in Western Europe: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Study2013In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 110, no 2, p. 363-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Different lifestyle patterns across Europe may influence plasma concentrations of B-vitamins and one-carbon metabolites and their relation to chronic disease. Comparison of published data on one-carbon metabolites in Western European regions is difficult due to differences in sampling procedures and analytical methods between studies. The present study aimed, to compare plasma concentrations of one-carbon metabolites in Western European regions with one laboratory performing all biochemical analyses. We performed the present study in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort among 5446 presumptively healthy individuals. Quantile regression was used to compare sex-specific median concentrations between Northern (Denmark and Sweden), Central (France, Germany, The Netherlands and United Kingdom) and Southern (Greece, Spain and Italy) European regions. The lowest folate concentrations were observed in Northern Europe (men, 10.4 nmol/l; women, 10.7 nmol/l) and highest concentrations in Central Europe. Cobalamin concentrations were slightly higher in Northern Europe (men, 330 pmol/l; women, 352 pmol/l) compared with Central and Southern Europe, but did not show a clear north-south gradient. Vitamin B-2 concentrations were highest in Northern Europe (men, 22.2 nmol/l; women, 26.0 nmol/l) and decreased towards Southern Europe (P-trend < 0.001). Vitamin B-6 concentrations were highest in Central Europe in men (77.3 nmol/l) and highest in the North among women (70.4 nmol/l), with decreasing concentrations towards Southern Europe in women (P-trend < 0.001). In men, concentrations of serine, glycine and sarcosine increased from the north to south. In women, sarcosine increased from Northern to Southern Europe. These findings may provide relevant information for the study of regional differences of chronic disease incidence in association with lifestyle.

  • 321. Eyre, Sintra
    et al.
    Rothenberg, Elisabet
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Behandling med proteinreducerad kost vid njursvikt: Majoritet av svenska njurmedicinska enheter tillämpar metoden, visar enkät. [Treatment with protein-restricted diet in renal failure. The majority of Swedish renal units practice the method according to a questionnaire]2008In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 105, no 30-31, p. 2089-2093Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the use of low protein diet (LPD) in Sweden using a questionnaire distributed to renal dietitians and nephrologists in 1997 and dietitians in 2006. Close to 80% of the dietitians answered the questionnaires, representing approximately 68% of the nephrology clinics in Sweden. A majority of these clinics use LPD, though there are several clinics who find this to be an inappropriate treatment for the pre-dialysis patient. The protein levels have become more individualized during the past decade, in accordance with the guidelines of the Swedish Association of Nephrologist. Very low protein diets (0.3 g protein/kg/day) are not in use any more.

  • 322.
    Fallahi Khoshknab, M.
    et al.
    Nursing, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran .
    Mazaheri, Monir
    Karolinska Institute.
    Tamizi, Z.
    Clinical Research Center, Razi Educational Center, Tehran, Iran .
    Khankh, H. R.
    Nursing, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran .
    Babaei, R.m.
    Social Science, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran .
    Ghazanfari, N.
    Nursing, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran .
    Khoshknab, P. F
    Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran .
    The effect of weight monitoring and recording on control of obesity and overweight2011In: Eating and Weight Disorders, ISSN 1124-4909, E-ISSN 1590-1262, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 137-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is one of the dilemmas of the recent century and imposes huge costs related to its complications and diseases on people and societies. This study aims to investigate whether recording and monitoring weight and its changes can modify eating habits and therefore weight control.

    METHODS: This is a quasi-experimental interventional study. Seventy nine of the staff of the University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation (USWR) were randomly placed in two intervention (N=40) and control (39) groups. A standard weight scale and height meter was used to measure weight, height and body mass index (BMI). For the intervention group, weight was measured, recorded and announced to the participants twice a week for 3 months. For the control group, weight measurement and recording was done once in the beginning of the study and once at the end of the study. Data were analyzed using SPSS ver.11.5 and compared between groups.

    RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the average age between the groups. Mean pre-intervention weight was 87.08±10.9 Kg and 85.83±16.44 Kg in the intervention and control groups, respectively and was not significantly different. Mean post-intervention weight was 83.5 Kg in the intervention group, which was significantly different from pre-intervention weight. Mean post-intervention weight was 86.31 Kg in the control group that was not significantly different from pre-intervention weight.

    CONCLUSION: Recording and monitoring weight and its changes in overweight people can affect weight control since knowledge and insight about weight may motivate people to modify their eating habits. We therefore recommend this strategy as an adjuvant to weight control programs.

  • 323.
    Fallahi Khoshknab, M.
    et al.
    University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Tamizi, Z.
    Razi Educational Center, Tehran, Iran.
    Khankh, H.R.
    University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Babaei, R.m.
    University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Ghazanfari, N.
    University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Khoshknab, P.F
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    The effect of weight monitoring and recording on control of obesity and overweight2011In: Eating and Weight Disorders, ISSN 1124-4909, E-ISSN 1590-1262, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 137-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is one of the dilemmas of the recent century and imposes huge costs related to its complications and diseases on people and societies. This study aims to investigate whether recording and monitoring weight and its changes can modify eating habits and therefore weight control. METHODS: This is a quasi-experimental interventional study. Seventy nine of the staff of the University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation (USWR) were randomly placed in two intervention (N=40) and control (39) groups. A standard weight scale and height meter was used to measure weight, height and body mass index (BMI). For the intervention group, weight was measured, recorded and announced to the participants twice a week for 3 months. For the control group, weight measurement and recording was done once in the beginning of the study and once at the end of the study. Data were analyzed using SPSS ver.11.5 and compared between groups. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the average age between the groups. Mean pre-intervention weight was 87.08±10.9 Kg and 85.83±16.44 Kg in the intervention and control groups, respectively and was not significantly different. Mean post-intervention weight was 83.5 Kg in the intervention group, which was significantly different from pre-intervention weight. Mean post-intervention weight was 86.31 Kg in the control group that was not significantly different from pre-intervention weight. CONCLUSION: Recording and monitoring weight and its changes in overweight people can affect weight control since knowledge and insight about weight may motivate people to modify their eating habits. We therefore recommend this strategy as an adjuvant to weight control programs.

  • 324.
    Fallaize, R.
    et al.
    Univ Reading, Hugh Sinclair Unit Human Nutr, Reading RG6 6AP, Berks, England.;Univ Reading, Inst Cardiovasc & Metab Res, Reading RG6 6AP, Berks, England..
    Carvalho-Wells, A. L.
    Univ Reading, Hugh Sinclair Unit Human Nutr, Reading RG6 6AP, Berks, England.;Univ Reading, Inst Cardiovasc & Metab Res, Reading RG6 6AP, Berks, England..
    Ayres, K.
    Univ Reading, Dept Math & Stat, Reading RG6 6AP, Berks, England..
    Dembinska-Kiec, A.
    Univ Med Coll, Dept Clin Biochem, Krakow, Poland..
    Drevon, C. A.
    Oslo Univ Hosp Oslo, Dept Clin Endocrinol, Oslo, Norway..
    DeFoort, C.
    INSERM, Human Nutr & Lipids 476, F-13258 Marseille, France..
    Lopez-Miranda, J.
    IMIBIC Reina Sofia Univ Hosp Univ Cordoba, Lipid & Atherosclerosis Unit, Cordoba, Spain..
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Blaak, E.
    Maastricht Univ, Med Ctr, NUTRIM Sch Nutr & Translat Res Metab, NL-6200 MD Maastricht, Netherlands..
    Roche, H. M.
    UCD Conway Inst, Nutrigen Res Grp, Dublin, Ireland..
    Lovegrove, J. A.
    Univ Reading, Hugh Sinclair Unit Human Nutr, Reading RG6 6AP, Berks, England.;Univ Reading, Inst Cardiovasc & Metab Res, Reading RG6 6AP, Berks, England..
    Interactions between APOE genotype and plasma fatty acids on cardiometabolic risk markers in individuals with the Metabolic Syndrome2015In: Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, ISSN 0029-6651, E-ISSN 1475-2719, Vol. 74, no OCE5, p. E286-E286Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 325.
    Fallaize, Rosalind
    et al.
    Univ Reading, Hugh Sinclair Unit Human Nutr, Reading RG6 6AP, Berks, England.;Univ Reading, Inst Cardiovasc & Metab Res, Reading RG6 6AP, Berks, England.;Univ Hertfordshire, Sch Life & Med Sci, Coll Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB, Herts, England..
    Carvalho-Wells, Andrew L.
    Univ Reading, Hugh Sinclair Unit Human Nutr, Reading RG6 6AP, Berks, England.;Univ Reading, Inst Cardiovasc & Metab Res, Reading RG6 6AP, Berks, England..
    Tierney, Audrey C.
    Univ Coll Dublin, Conway Inst, Nutrigen Res Grp, Dublin, Ireland..
    Marin, Carmen
    Univ Cordoba, IMIBIC, Reina Sofia Univ Hosp, Lipids & Atherosclerosis Unit, Cordoba, Spain..
    Kiec-Wilk, Beata
    Univ Med Coll, Dept Metab Dis, Krakow, Poland..
    Dembinska-Kiec, Aldona
    Jagiellonian Univ, Dept Clin Biochem, Coll Med, Krakow, Poland..
    Drevon, Christian A.
    Univ Oslo, Dept Nutr, Inst Basic Med Sci, Fac Med, Oslo, Norway..
    DeFoort, Catherine
    INSERM, Human Nutr & Lipids 476, Marseille, France..
    Lopez-Miranda, Jose
    Univ Cordoba, IMIBIC, Reina Sofia Univ Hosp, Lipids & Atherosclerosis Unit, Cordoba, Spain..
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Saris, Wim H.
    MUMC, Dept Human Biol, NUTRIM Sch Nutr & Translat Res Metab, Maastricht, Netherlands..
    Blaak, Ellen E.
    MUMC, Dept Human Biol, NUTRIM Sch Nutr & Translat Res Metab, Maastricht, Netherlands..
    Roche, Helen M.
    Univ Coll Dublin, Conway Inst, Nutrigen Res Grp, Dublin, Ireland..
    Lovegrove, Julie A.
    Univ Reading, Hugh Sinclair Unit Human Nutr, Reading RG6 6AP, Berks, England.;Univ Reading, Inst Cardiovasc & Metab Res, Reading RG6 6AP, Berks, England..
    APOE genotype influences insulin resistance, apolipoprotein CII and CIII according to plasma fatty acid profile in the Metabolic Syndrome2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 6274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metabolic markers associated with the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) may be affected by interactions between the APOE genotype and plasma fatty acids (FA). In this study, we explored FA-gene interactions between the missense APOE polymorphisms and FA status on metabolic markers in MetS. Plasma FA, blood pressure, insulin sensitivity and lipid concentrations were determined at baseline and following a 12-week randomized, controlled, parallel, dietary FA intervention in 442 adults with MetS (LIPGENE study). FA-APOE gene interactions at baseline and following change in plasma FA were assessed using adjusted general linear models. At baseline E4 carriers had higher plasma concentrations of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and apolipoprotein B (apo B) compared with E2 carriers; and higher TC, LDL-C and apo B compared with E3/E3. Whilst elevated plasma n-3 polyunsaturated FA (PUFA) was associated with a beneficially lower concentration of apo CIII in E2 carriers, a high proportion of plasma C16:0 was associated with insulin resistance in E4 carriers. Following FA intervention, a reduction in plasma long-chain n-3 PUFA was associated with a reduction in apo CII concentration in E2 carriers. Our novel data suggest that individuals with MetS may benefit from personalized dietary interventions based on APOE genotype.

  • 326.
    Fang, X.
    et al.
    Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Han, H.
    Department of Health Statistics, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.
    Li, M.
    Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.
    Liang, C.
    Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.
    Fan, Z.
    Department of Cardiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Aaseth, J.
    Kongsvinger Hospital Division, Innlandet Hospital Trust, Kongsvinger, Norway; Kongsvinger Hospital Division, Innlandet Hospital Trust, Kongsvinger, Norway.
    He, J.
    Department of Health Statistics, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.
    Montgomery, Scott
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dose-Response Relationship between Dietary Magnesium Intake and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Regression Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies2016In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 8, no 11, article id 739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The epidemiological evidence for a dose-response relationship between magnesium intake and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is sparse. The aim of the study was to summarize the evidence for the association of dietary magnesium intake with risk of T2D and evaluate the dose-response relationship. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies that reported dietary magnesium intake and risk of incident T2D. We identified relevant studies by searching major scientific literature databases and grey literature resources from their inception to February 2016. We included cohort studies that provided risk ratios, i.e., relative risks (RRs), odds ratios (ORs) or hazard ratios (HRs), for T2D. Linear dose-response relationships were assessed using random-effects meta-regression. Potential nonlinear associations were evaluated using restricted cubic splines. A total of 25 studies met the eligibility criteria. These studies comprised 637,922 individuals including 26,828 with a T2D diagnosis. Compared with the lowest magnesium consumption group in the population, the risk of T2D was reduced by 17% across all the studies; 19% in women and 16% in men. A statistically significant linear dose-response relationship was found between incremental magnesium intake and T2D risk. After adjusting for age and body mass index, the risk of T2D incidence was reduced by 8%-13% for per 100 mg/day increment in dietary magnesium intake. There was no evidence to support a nonlinear dose-response relationship between dietary magnesium intake and T2D risk. The combined data supports a role for magnesium in reducing risk of T2D, with a statistically significant linear dose-response pattern within the reference dose range of dietary intake among Asian and US populations. The evidence from Europe and black people is limited and more prospective studies are needed for the two subgroups.

  • 327.
    Farooqi, Nighat
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine. Umea Univ Hosp, Dept Resp Med & Allergy, SE-90185 Umea, Sweden.
    Slinde, F.
    Håglin, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Assessment of energy intake in women with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A doubly labeled water method study2015In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 518-524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To maintain energy balance, reliable methods for assessing energy intake and expenditure should be used in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The purpose of this study was to validate the diet history and 7-day food diary methods of assessing energy intake (EI) using total energy expenditure (TEE) with the doubly labeled water (DLW) method (TEEDLW) as the criterion method in outpatient women with COPD. EI was assessed by diet history (EIDH) and a 7-day food diary (EIFD) in 19 women with COPD, using TEEDLW as the criterion method. The three methods were compared using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) and Bland-Altman analyses. The participants were classified according to their reporting status (EI/TEE) as valid-reporters 0.79-1.21, under-reporters < 0.79 or over-reporters > 1.21. Diet history underestimated reported EI by 28%, and 7-day food diary underestimated EI by approximately 20% compared with TEEDLW. The ICC analysis showed weak agreement between TEEDLW and EIDH (ICC=-0.01; 95%CI-0.10 to 0.17) and between TEEDLW and EIFD (ICC=0.11; 95%CI -0.16 to 0.44). The Bland-Altman plots revealed a slight systematic bias for both methods. For diet history, six women (32%) were identified as valid-reporters, and for the 7-day food diary, twelve women (63%) were identified as valid-reporters. The accuracy of reported EI was only related to BMI. The diet history and 7-day food diary methods underestimated energy intake in women with COPD compared with the DLW method. Individuals with higher BMIs are prone to underreporting. Seven-day food diaries should be used with caution in assessing EI in women with COPD.

  • 328.
    Farvid, Maryam S.
    et al.
    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, USA ; Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran ; Massachusetts General Hospital, USA.
    Malekshah, Akbar F.
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Pourshams, Akram
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Poustchi, Hossein
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Sepanlou, Sadaf G.
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Sharafkhah, Maryam
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Khoshnia, Masoud
    Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Farvid, Mojtaba
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Abnet, Christian C.
    National Cancer Institute, USA.
    Kamangar, Farin
    Morgan State University, USA.
    Dawsey, Sanford M.
    National Cancer Institute, USA.
    Brennan, Paul
    International Agency for Research on Cancer, France.
    Pharoah, Paul D.
    University of Cambridge, UK.
    Boffetta, Paolo
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, USA.
    Willett, Walter C.
    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, USA ; Brigham and Women's Hospital, USA ; Harvard University, USA.
    Malekzadeh, Reza
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Dietary Protein Sources and All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality: The Golestan Cohort Study in Iran2017In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, ISSN 0749-3797, E-ISSN 1873-2607, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 237-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Dietary protein comes from foods with greatly different compositions that may not relate equally with mortality risk. Few cohort studies from non-Western countries have examined the association between various dietary protein sources and cause-specific mortality. Therefore, the associations between dietary protein sources and all-cause, cardiovascular disease, and cancer mortality were evaluated in the Golestan Cohort Study in Iran. Methods: Among 42,403 men and women who completed a dietary questionnaire at baseline, 3,291 deaths were documented during 11 years of follow up (2004-2015). Cox proportional hazards models estimated age-adjusted and multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs for all cause and disease-specific mortality in relation to dietary protein sources. Data were analyzed from 2015 to 2016. Results: Comparing the highest versus the lowest quartile, egg consumption was associated with lower all-cause mortality risk (HR=0.88, 95% CI=0.79, 0.97, ptrend=0.03). In multivariate analysis, the highest versus the lowest quartile of fish consumption was associated with reduced risk of total cancer (HR=0.79, 95% CI=0.64, 0.98, ptrend=0.03) and gastrointestinal cancer (HR=0.75, 95% CI=0.56, 1.00, ptrend=0.02) mortality. The highest versus the lowest quintile of legume consumption was associated with reduced total cancer (HR=0.72, 95% CI=0.58, 0.89, ptrend=0.004), gastrointestinal cancer (HR=0.76, 95% CI=0.58, 1.01, ptrend=0.05), and other cancer (HR=0.66, 95% CI=0.47, 0.93, ptrend=0.04) mortality. Significant associations between total red meat and poultry intake and allcause, cardiovascular disease, or cancer mortality rate were not observed among all participants. Conclusions: These findings support an association of higher fish and legume consumption with lower cancer mortality, and higher egg consumption with lower all-cause mortality. (C) 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 329.
    Faxén Irving, Gerd
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Karlström, Brita
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Rothenberg, Elisabet
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Mat- och måltidsvetenskap.
    Geriatrisk nutrition2016 (ed. 2)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Geriatrisk nutrition utkom första gången 2010. Denna bok är en reviderad upplaga, som har förändrats på flera sätt både avseendeinnehåll, struktur och lay-out. Boken riktar sig både till studenter inom olika vårdutbildningar och till yrkesverksamma inomvård och omsorg av äldre. Den har ambitionen att ge en förståelse för hur åldrandet påverkar kroppens funktioner och hälsan.Fokus i boken ligger på mat, näring och nutrition och de specifika nutritionsproblem som följer med åldrandet. Boken vill ävenge en medicinsk bakgrund till olika sjukdomar som är vanliga hos äldre, vilket är förutsättningen för att förstå sjukdomsspecifiknutritionsbehandling. Boken tar också upp regelverk, organisation och kvalitet samt etiska och kulturella aspekter på nutritionsomhändertagandeav äldre. Helt nytt är ett kapitel om centrala begrepp och termer samt ett separat kapitel om kulturella aspekteroch ett utökat avsnitt som behandlar D vitamin. Boken är faktagranskad av personer med specifika kompetenser inom olikaområden som boken tar upp.

  • 330.
    Faxén Irving, Gerd
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Rothenberg, Elisabet
    Kristianstad University, Research Environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Mat- och måltidsvetenskap.
    Lukt, smak och aptit2016In: Geratrisk nutrition / [ed] Faxén Irving, G., Karlström, B., & Rothenberg, E., Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2016, 2, p. 67-78Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 331. Faxén-Irivning, G
    et al.
    Rothenberg, Elisabet
    Kristianstad University, Forskningsmiljön Mat, måltid, hälsa i 24-timmarsperspektivet. Kristianstad University, Resrarch environment Food and Meals in Everyday Life (MEAL). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Humanvetenskap.
    Nutrition2012In: Stroke - Patienters, närståendes och vårdares perspektiv, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2012, p. 23-38Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 332. Feitosa, Mary F.
    et al.
    Kraja, Aldi T.
    Chasman, Daniel I.
    Sung, Yun J.
    Winkler, Thomas W.
    Ntalla, Ioanna
    Guo, Xiuqing
    Franceschini, Nora
    Cheng, Ching-Yu
    Sim, Xueling
    Vojinovic, Dina
    Marten, Jonathan
    Musani, Solomon K.
    Li, Changwei
    Bentley, Amy R.
    Brown, Michael R.
    Schwander, Karen
    Richard, Melissa A.
    Noordam, Raymond
    Aschard, Hugues
    Bartz, Traci M.
    Bielak, Lawrence F.
    Dorajoo, Rajkumar
    Fisher, Virginia
    Hartwig, Fernando P.
    Horimoto, Andrea R. V. R.
    Lohman, Kurt K.
    Manning, Alisa K.
    Rankinen, Tuomo
    Smith, Albert V.
    Tajuddin, Salman M.
    Wojczynski, Mary K.
    Alver, Maris
    Boissel, Mathilde
    Cai, Qiuyin
    Campbell, Archie
    Chai, Jin Fang
    Chen, Xu
    Divers, Jasmin
    Gao, Chuan
    Goel, Anuj
    Hagemeijer, Yanick
    Harris, Sarah E.
    He, Meian
    Hsu, Fang-Chi
    Jackson, Anne U.
    Kahonen, Mika
    Kasturiratne, Anuradhani
    Komulainen, Pirjo
    Kuhnel, Brigitte
    Laguzzi, Federica
    Luan, Jian'an
    Matoba, Nana
    Nolte, Ilja M.
    Padmanabhan, Sandosh
    Riaz, Muhammad
    Rueedi, Rico
    Robino, Antonietta
    Said, M. Abdullah
    Scott, Robert A.
    Sofer, Tamar
    Stancakova, Alena
    Takeuchi, Fumihiko
    Tayo, Bamidele O.
    van der Most, Peter J.
    Varga, Tibor V.
    Vitart, Veronique
    Wang, Yajuan
    Ware, Erin B.
    Warren, Helen R.
    Weiss, Stefan
    Wen, Wanqing
    Yanek, Lisa R.
    Zhang, Weihua
    Zhao, Jing Hua
    Afaq, Saima
    Amin, Najaf
    Amini, Marzyeh
    Arking, Dan E.
    Aung, Tin
    Boerwinkle, Eric
    Borecki, Ingrid
    Broeckel, Ulrich
    Brown, Morris
    Brumat, Marco
    Burke, Gregory L.
    Canouil, Mickael
    Chakravarti, Aravinda
    Charumathi, Sabanayagam
    Chen, Yii-Der Ida
    Connell, John M.
    Correa, Adolfo
    Fuentes, Lisa de las
    de Mutsert, Renee
    de Silva, H. Janaka
    Deng, Xuan
    Ding, Jingzhong
    Duan, Qing
    Eaton, Charles B.
    Ehret, Georg
    Eppinga, Ruben N.
    Evangelou, Evangelos
    Fau, Jessica D.
    Felix, Stephan B.
    Forouhi, Nita G.
    Forrester, Terrence
    Franco, Oscar H.
    Friedlander, Yechiel
    Gandin, Ilaria
    Gao, He
    Ghanbari, Mohsen
    Gigante, Bruna
    Gu, C. Charles
    Gu, Dongfeng
    Hagenaars, Saskia P.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Harris, Tamara B.
    He, Jiang
    Heikkinen, Sami
    Heng, Chew-Kiat
    Hirata, Makoto
    Howard, Barbara V.
    Ikram, M. Arfan
    John, Ulrich
    Katsuya, Tomohiro
    Khor, Chiea Chuen
    Kilpelainen, Tuomas O.
    Koh, Woon-Puay
    Krieger, Jose E.
    Kritchevsky, Stephen B.
    Kubo, Michiaki
    Kuusisto, Johanna
    Lakka, Timo A.
    Langefeld, Carl D.
    Langenberg, Claudia
    Launer, Lenore J.
    Lehne, Benjamin
    Lewis, Cora E.
    Li, Yize
    Lin, Shiow
    Liu, Jianjun
    Liu, Jingmin
    Loh, Marie
    Louie, Tin
    Magi, Reedik
    McKenzie, Colin A.
    Meitinger, Thomas
    Metspalu, Andres
    Milaneschi, Yuri
    Milani, Lili
    Mohlke, Karen L.
    Momozawa, Yukihide
    Nalls, Mike A.
    Nelson, Christopher P.
    Sotoodehnia, NelsonNona
    Norris, Jill M.
    O'Connell, Jeff R.
    Palmer, Nicholette D.
    Perls, Thomas
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Peters, Annette
    Peyser, Patricia A.
    Poulter, Neil
    Raffel, Leslie J.
    Raitakari, Olli T.
    Roll, Kathryn
    Rose, Lynda M.
    Rosendaal, Frits R.
    Rotter, Jerome I.
    Schmidt, Carsten O.
    Schreiner, Pamela J.
    Schupf, Nicole
    Scott, William R.
    Sever, Peter S.
    Shi, Yuan
    Sidney, Stephen
    Sims, Mario
    Sitlani, Colleen M.
    Smith, Jennifer A.
    Snieder, Harold
    Starr, John M.
    Strauch, Konstantin
    Stringham, Heather M.
    Tan, Nicholas Y. Q.
    Tang, Hua
    Taylor, Kent D.
    Teo, Yik Ying
    Tham, Yih Chung
    Turner, Stephen T.
    Uitterlinden, Andre G.
    Vollenweider, Peter
    Waldenberger, Melanie
    Wang, Lihua
    Wang, Ya Xing
    Bin Wei, Wen
    Williams, Christine
    Yao, Jie
    Yu, Caizheng
    Yuan, Jian-Min
    Zhao, Wei
    Zonderman, Alan B.
    Becker, Diane M.
    Boehnke, Michael
    Bowden, Donald W.
    Chambers, John C.
    Deary, Ian J.
    Esko, Tonu
    Farrall, Martin
    Franks, Paul W.
    Freedman, Barry I.
    Froguel, Philippe
    Gasparini, Paolo
    Gieger, Christian
    Jonas, Jost Bruno
    Kamatani, Yoichiro
    Kato, Norihiro
    Kooner, Jaspal S.
    Kutalik, Zoltan
    Laakso, Markku
    Laurie, Cathy C.
    Leander, Karin
    Lehtimaki, Terho
    Study, Lifelines Cohort
    Magnusson, Patrik K. E.
    Oldehinkel, Albertine J.
    Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.
    Poiasek, Ozren
    Porteous, David J.
    Rauramaa, Rainer
    Samani, Nilesh J.
    Scott, James
    Shu, Xiao-Ou
    van der Harst, Pim
    Wagenknecht, Lynne E.
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Watkins, Hugh
    Weir, David R.
    Wickremasinghe, Ananda R.
    Wu, Tangchun
    Zheng, Wei
    Bouchard, Claude
    Christensen, Kaare
    Evans, Michele K.
    Gudnason, Vilmundur
    Horta, Bernardo L.
    Kardia, Sharon L. R.
    Liu, Yongmei
    Pereira, Alexandre C.
    Psaty, Bruce M.
    Ridker, Paul M.
    van Dam, Rob M.
    Gauderman, W. James
    Zhu, Xiaofeng
    Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.
    Fornage, Myriam
    Rotimi, Charles N.
    Cupples, L. Adrienne
    Kelly, Tanika N.
    Fox, Ervin R.
    Hayward, Caroline
    van Duijn, Cornelia M.
    Tai, E. Shyong
    Wong, Tien Yin
    Kooperberg, Charles
    Palmas, Walter
    Rice, Kenneth
    Morrison, Alanna C.
    Elliott, Paul
    Caulfield, Mark J.
    Munroe, Patricia B.
    Rao, Dabeeru C.
    Province, Michael A.
    Levy, Daniel
    Novel genetic associations for blood pressure identified via gene-alcohol interaction in up to 570K individuals across multiple ancestries2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 6, article id e0198166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heavy alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for hypertension; the mechanism by which alcohol consumption impact blood pressure (BP) regulation remains unknown. We hypothesized that a genome-wide association study accounting for gene-alcohol consumption interaction for BP might identify additional BP loci and contribute to the understanding of alcohol-related BP regulation. We conducted a large two-stage investigation incorporating joint testing of main genetic effects and single nucleotide variant (SNV)-alcohol consumption interactions. In Stage 1, genome-wide discovery meta-analyses in approximate to 131 K individuals across several ancestry groups yielded 3,514 SNVs (245 loci) with suggestive evidence of association (P <1.0 x 10(-5)). In Stage 2, these SNVs were tested for independent external replication in individuals across multiple ancestries. We identified and replicated (at Bonferroni correction threshold) five novel BP loci (380 SNVs in 21 genes) and 49 previously reported BP loci (2,159 SNVs in 109 genes) in European ancestry, and in multi-ancestry meta-analyses (P < 5.0 x 10(-8)). For African ancestry samples, we detected 18 potentially novel BP loci (P< 5.0 x 10(-8)) in Stage 1 that warrant further replication. Additionally, correlated meta-analysis identified eight novel BP loci (11 genes). Several genes in these loci (e.g., PINX1, GATA4, BLK, FTO and GABBR2 have been previously reported to be associated with alcohol consumption. These findings provide insights into the role of alcohol consumption in the genetic architecture of hypertension.

  • 333.
    Ferdous, Tamanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Malnutrition among Bangladeshi elderly: Determinants and consequences2009Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 334.
    Fernström, Maria
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Clinical Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bakkman, Linda
    Department of Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Loogna, Peter
    Bariatric Center, Sophiahemmet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rooyackers, Olav
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Karolinska Institutet Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svensson, Madeleine
    Department of Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet Solna, Stockholm, Sweden; School of Health and Social Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Towe
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Karolinska Institutet Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brandt, Lena
    Department of Clinical Medicine, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lagerros, Ylva Trolle
    Department of Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet Solna, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Improved Muscle Mitochondrial Capacity Following Gastric Bypass Surgery in Obese Subjects2016In: Obesity Surgery, ISSN 0960-8923, E-ISSN 1708-0428, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 1391-1397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Weight loss resulting from low-calorie diets is often less than expected. We hypothesized that energy restriction would influence proton leakage and improve mitochondrial efficiency, leading to reduced energy expenditure, partly explaining the difficulties in weight loss maintenance.

    Methods: Eleven women with a median BMI of 38.5 kg/m(2) (q-range 37-40), and referred to gastric bypass surgery participated. Before surgery, and at 6 months of follow-up, muscle biopsies were collected from the vastus lateralis muscle. Mitochondria were isolated and analyzed for coupled (state 3) and uncoupled (state 4) respiration and mitochondrial capacity (P/O ratio).

    Results: At follow-up, the participants had a median BMI of 29.6 kg/m(2) (28.3-32.0). State 3 increased from 20.6 (17.9-28.9) to 34.9 nmol O2/min/U citrate synthase (CS) (27.0-49.0), p = 0.01, while state 4 increased from 2.8 (1.8-4.2) to 4.2 nmol O2/min/U CS (3.1-6.1), although not statistically significant. The P/O ratio increased from 2.7 (2.5-2.8) to 3.2 (3.0-3.4), p = 0.02, indicating improved mitochondrial efficiency.

    Conclusions: Six months after gastric bypass surgery, the mitochondrial capacity for coupled, i.e., ATP-generating, respiration increased, and the P/O ratio improved. Uncoupled respiration was not enhanced to the same extent. This could partly explain the decreased basal metabolism and the reduced inclination for weight loss during energy restriction.

  • 335. Ferrari, P
    et al.
    McKay, JD
    Jenab, M
    Brennan, P
    Canzian, F
    Vogel, U
    Tjonneland, A
    Overvad, K
    Tolstrup, JS
    Boutron-Ruault, M-C
    Clavel-Chapelon, F
    Morois, S
    Kaaks, R
    Boeing, H
    Bergmann, M
    Trichopoulou, A
    Katsoulis, M
    Trichopoulos, D
    Krogh, V
    Panico, S
    Sacerdote, C
    Palli, D
    Tumino, R
    Peeters, PH
    van Gils, CH
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, B
    Vrieling, A
    Lund, E
    Hjartaker, A
    Agudo, A
    Suarez, LR
    Arriola, L
    Chirlaque, M-D
    Ardanaz, E
    Sanchez, M-J
    Manjer, J
    Lindkvist, B
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Allen, N
    Key, T
    Khaw, K-T
    Slimani, N
    Rinaldi, S
    Romieu, I
    Boffetta, P
    Romaguera, D
    Norat, T
    Riboli, E
    Alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase gene polymorphisms, alcohol intake and the risk of colorectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study2012In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 66, no 12, p. 1303-1308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Heavy alcohol drinking is a risk factor of colorectal cancer (CRC), but little is known on the effect of polymorphisms in the alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) on the alcohol-related risk of CRC in Caucasian populations.

    SUBJECTS/METHODS: A nested case-control study (1269 cases matched to 2107controls by sex, age, study centre and date of blood collection) was conducted within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) to evaluate the impact of rs1229984 (ADH1B), rs1573496 (ADH7) and rs441 (ALDH2) polymorphisms on CRC risk. Using the wild-type variant of each polymorphism as reference category, CRC risk estimates were calculated using conditional logistic regression, with adjustment for matching factors.

    RESULTS: Individuals carrying one copy of the rs1229984(A) (ADH1B) allele (fast metabolizers) showed an average daily alcohol intake of 4.3 g per day lower than subjects with two copies of the rs1229984(G) allele (slow metabolizers) (P-diff<0.01). None of the polymorphisms was associated with risk of CRC or cancers of the colon or rectum. Heavy alcohol intake was more strongly associated with CRC risk among carriers of the rs1573496(C) allele, with odds ratio equal to 2.13 (95% confidence interval: 1.26-3.59) compared with wild-type subjects with low alcohol consumption P-((interaction)=0.07).

    CONCLUSIONS: The rs1229984(A) (ADH1B) allele was associated with a reduction in alcohol consumption. The rs1229984 (ADH1B), rs1573496 (ADH7) and rs441 (ALDH2) polymorphisms were not associated with CRC risk overall in Western-European populations. However, the relationship between alcohol and CRC risk might be modulated by the rs1573496 (ADH7) polymorphism. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2012) 66, 1303-1308; doi: 10.1038/ejcn.2012.173; published online 14 November 2012

  • 336. Ferrari, Pietro
    et al.
    Freisling, Heinz
    Duell, Eric J
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Lujan-Barroso, Leila
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Nailler, Laura
    Polidoro, Silvia
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Palli, Domenico
    Tumino, Rosario
    Grioni, Sara
    Knüppel, Sven
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Olsen, Anja
    Overvad, Kim
    Orfanos, Philippos
    Katsoulis, Michail
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Quirós, Jose Ramón
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Huerta, José María
    Etxezarreta, Pilar Amiano
    Sánchez, María José
    Crowe, Francesca
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas J
    Ocke, Marga
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Peeters, Petra H M
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Wirfält, Elisabet
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Engeset, Dagrun
    Nicolas, Geneviève
    Gallo, Valentina
    Norat, Teresa
    Riboli, Elio
    Slimani, Nadia
    Challenges in estimating the validity of dietary acrylamide measurements2013In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 52, no 5, p. 1503-1512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Acrylamide is a chemical compound present in tobacco smoke and food, classified as a probable human carcinogen and a known human neurotoxin. Acrylamide is formed in foods, typically carbohydrate-rich and protein-poor plant foods, during high-temperature cooking or other thermal processing. The objectives of this study were to compare dietary estimates of acrylamide from questionnaires (DQ) and 24-h recalls (R) with levels of acrylamide adduct (AA) in haemoglobin.

    METHODS: In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, acrylamide exposure was assessed in 510 participants from 9 European countries, randomly selected and stratified by age, sex, with equal numbers of never and current smokers. After adjusting for country, alcohol intake, smoking status, number of cigarettes and energy intake, correlation coefficients between various acrylamide measurements were computed, both at the individual and at the aggregate (centre) level.

    RESULTS: Individual level correlation coefficient between DQ and R measurements (r DQ,R) was 0.17, while r DQ,AA and r R,AA were 0.08 and 0.06, respectively. In never smokers, r DQ,R, r DQ,AA and r R,AA were 0.19, 0.09 and 0.02, respectively. The correlation coefficients between means of DQ, R and AA measurements at the centre level were larger (r > 0.4).

    CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that estimates of total acrylamide intake based on self-reported diet correlate weakly with biomarker AA Hb levels. Possible explanations are the lack of AA levels to capture dietary acrylamide due to individual differences in the absorption and metabolism of acrylamide, and/or measurement errors in acrylamide from self-reported dietary assessments, thus limiting the possibility to validate acrylamide DQ measurements.

  • 337. Fewtrell, Maly
    et al.
    Bronsky, Jiri
    Campoy, Cristina
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Embleton, Nicholas
    Mis, Natasa Fidler
    Hojsak, Iva
    Hulst, Jessie M.
    Indrio, Flavia
    Lapillonne, Alexandre
    Molgaard, Christian
    Complementary Feeding: A Position Paper by the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) Committee on Nutrition2017In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 119-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This position paper considers different aspects of complementary feeding (CF), focussing on healthy term infants in Europe. After reviewing current knowledge and practices, we have formulated these recommendations: Timing: Exclusive or full breast-feeding should be promoted for at least 4 months (17 weeks, beginning of the 5th month of life) and exclusive or predominant breast-feeding for approximately 6 months (26 weeks, beginning of the 7th month) is a desirable goal. Complementary foods (solids and liquids other than breast milk or infant formula) should not be introduced before 4 months but should not be delayed beyond 6 months. Content: Infants should be offered foods with a variety of flavours and textures including bitter tasting green vegetables. Continued breast-feeding is recommended alongside CF. Whole cows' milk should not be used as the main drink before 12 months of age. Allergenic foods may be introduced when CF is commenced any time after 4 months. Infants at high risk of peanut allergy (those with severe eczema, egg allergy, or both) should have peanut introduced between 4 and 11 months, following evaluation by an appropriately trained specialist. Gluten may be introduced between 4 and 12 months, but consumption of large quantities should be avoided during the first weeks after gluten introduction and later during infancy. All infants should receive iron-rich CF including meat products and/or iron-fortified foods. No sugar or salt should be added to CF and fruit juices or sugar sweetened beverages should be avoided. Vegan diets should only be used under appropriate medical or dietetic supervision and parents should understand the serious consequences of failing to follow advice regarding supplementation of the diet. Method: Parents should be encouraged to respond to their infant's hunger and satiety queues and to avoid feeding to comfort or as a reward.

  • 338. Fidler Mis, Nataša
    et al.
    Braegger, Christian
    Bronsky, Zjiri
    Campoy, Cristina
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Embleton, Nicholas D.
    Hojsak, Iva
    Hulst, Jessie
    Indrio, Flavia
    Lapillonne, Alexandre
    Mihatsch, Walter
    Molgaard, Christian
    Vora, Rakesh
    Fewtrell, Mary
    Response to Letter: How Much Free Sugars Intake Should Be Recommended for Children Younger Than 2 Years Old?2018In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 66, no 3, p. E87-E88Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 339.
    Fischer, Claudia
    et al.
    The EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research and the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081 BT, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Brug, Johannes
    Department of Health Sciences, VU University, De Boelelaan 1081, 1081 HV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Tak, Nannah I.
    oelelaan 1081, 1081 HV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Novum, SE-141 83, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Velde, Saskia J. Te
    The EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research and the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081 BT, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Differences in fruit and vegetable intake and their determinants among 11-year-old schoolchildren between 2003 and 20092011In: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, ISSN 1479-5868, E-ISSN 1479-5868, Vol. 8, p. 141-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Fruit and vegetable (FV) intake in children in the Netherlands is much lower than recommended. Recurrent appraisal of intake levels is important for detecting changes in intake over time and to inform future interventions and policies. The aim of the present study was to investigate differences in fruit and vegetable intake, and whether these could be explained by differences in potential determinants of FV intake in 11-year-old Dutch schoolchildren, by comparing two school samples assessed in 2003 and 2009. Methods: For 1105 children of the Pro Children study in 2003 and 577 children of the Pro Greens study in 2009 complete data on intake and behavioural determinants were available. The self-administered questionnaire included questions on children's ethnicity, usual fruit and vegetable intake, mother's educational level, and important potential determinants of fruit and vegetable intake. Multiple regression analysis was applied to test for differences in intake and determinants between study samples. Mediation analyses were used to investigate whether the potential mediators explained the differences in intake between the two samples. Results: In 2009, more children complied with the World Health Organization recommendation of 400 g fruit and vegetables per day (17.0%) than in 2003 (11.8%, p = 0.004). Fruit consumption was significantly higher in the sample of 2009 than in the sample of 2003 (difference = 23.8 (95% CI: 8.1; 39.5) grams/day). This difference was mainly explained by a difference in the parental demand regarding their child's intake (23.6%), followed by the child's knowledge of the fruit recommendation (14.2%) and parental facilitation of consumption (18.5%). Vegetable intake was lower in the 2009 sample than in the 2003 sample (12.3 (95% CI -21.0; -3.6). This difference could not be explained by the assessed mediators. Conclusions: The findings indicate that fruit intake among 11-year-olds improved somewhat between 2003 and 2009. Vegetable intake, however, appears to have declined somewhat between 2003 and 2009. Since a better knowledge of the recommendation, parental demand and facilitation explained most of the observed fruit consumption difference, future interventions may specifically address these potential mediators. Further, the provision of vegetables in the school setting should be considered in order to increase children's vegetable intake.

  • 340.
    Fischer, Claudia
    et al.
    The EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research and the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Brug, Johannes
    Department of Health Sciences, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Tak, Nannah I.
    Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Velde, Saskia J. Te
    The EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research and the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Differences in fruit and vegetable intake and their determinants among 11-year-old schoolchildren between 2003 and 20092011In: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, ISSN 1479-5868, E-ISSN 1479-5868, Vol. 8, p. 141-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Fruit and vegetable (FV) intake in children in the Netherlands is much lower than recommended. Recurrent appraisal of intake levels is important for detecting changes in intake over time and to inform future interventions and policies. The aim of the present study was to investigate differences in fruit and vegetable intake, and whether these could be explained by differences in potential determinants of FV intake in 11-year-old Dutch schoolchildren, by comparing two school samples assessed in 2003 and 2009. Methods: For 1105 children of the Pro Children study in 2003 and 577 children of the Pro Greens study in 2009 complete data on intake and behavioural determinants were available. The self-administered questionnaire included questions on children's ethnicity, usual fruit and vegetable intake, mother's educational level, and important potential determinants of fruit and vegetable intake. Multiple regression analysis was applied to test for differences in intake and determinants between study samples. Mediation analyses were used to investigate whether the potential mediators explained the differences in intake between the two samples. Results: In 2009, more children complied with the World Health Organization recommendation of 400 g fruit and vegetables per day (17.0%) than in 2003 (11.8%, p = 0.004). Fruit consumption was significantly higher in the sample of 2009 than in the sample of 2003 (difference = 23.8 (95% CI: 8.1; 39.5) grams/day). This difference was mainly explained by a difference in the parental demand regarding their child's intake (23.6%), followed by the child's knowledge of the fruit recommendation (14.2%) and parental facilitation of consumption (18.5%). Vegetable intake was lower in the 2009 sample than in the 2003 sample (12.3 (95% CI -21.0; -3.6). This difference could not be explained by the assessed mediators. Conclusions: The findings indicate that fruit intake among 11-year-olds improved somewhat between 2003 and 2009. Vegetable intake, however, appears to have declined somewhat between 2003 and 2009. Since a better knowledge of the recommendation, parental demand and facilitation explained most of the observed fruit consumption difference, future interventions may specifically address these potential mediators. Further, the provision of vegetables in the school setting should be considered in order to increase children's vegetable intake.

  • 341.
    Flodin, Lena
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Geriatr Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol CLINTEC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Saaf, Maria
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Diabet Endocrinol & Metab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Samnegard, Eva
    Danderyd Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci, Div Orthoped, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ekstrom, Wilhelmina
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Sect Orthoped & Sports Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Al-Ani, Amer N.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Orthopaed, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol CLINTEC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hedstrom, Margareta
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Orthopaed, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol CLINTEC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Effects of protein-rich nutritional supplementation and bisphosphonates on body composition, handgrip strength and health-related quality of life after hip fracture: a 12-month randomized controlled study2015In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 15, article id 149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The catabolic state that follows hip fracture contributes to loss of muscle mass and strength, that is sarcopenia, which impacts functional ability and health-related quality of life. Measures to prevent such long-term postoperative consequences are of important concern. The aim of this study was to evaluate the combined effects of protein-rich nutritional supplementation and bisphosphonate on body composition, handgrip strength and health-related quality of life following hip fracture. Methods: The study included 79 men and women with hip fracture, mean age 79 years (SD 9), without severe cognitive impairment, who were ambulatory and living independently before fracture. Patients were randomized postoperatively to receive liquid supplementation that provided 40 g of protein and 600 kcal daily for six months after the fracture, in addition to bisphosphonates once weekly for 12 months (group N, n = 26), or bisphosphonates alone once weekly for 12 months (group B, n = 28). All patients, including the controls (group C, n = 25) received calcium 1 g and vitamin D3 800 IU daily. Body composition as measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), handgrip strength (HGS) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) were registered at baseline, six and 12 months postoperatively. Results: There were no differences among the groups regarding change in fat-free mass index (FFMI), HGS, or HRQoL during the study year. Intra-group analyses showed improvement of HGS between baseline and six months in the N group (P = 0.04). HRQoL decreased during the first year in the C and B groups (P = 0.03 and P = 0.01, respectively) but not in the nutritional supplementation N group (P = 0.22). Conclusions: Protein-rich nutritional supplementation was unable to preserve FFMI more effectively than vitamin D and calcium alone, or combined with bisphosphonate, in this relatively healthy group of hip fracture patients. However, trends toward positive effects on both HGS and HRQoL were observed following nutritional supplementation.

  • 342.
    Fogelkvist, Maria
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Fac Med & Hlth, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Univ Orebro, Orebro 16, Sweden.
    Parling, Thomas
    Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kjellin, Lars
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Aila-Gustafsson, Sanna
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    A qualitative analysis of participants' reflections on body image during participation in a randomized controlled trial of acceptance and commitment therapy2016In: Journal of Eating Disorders, E-ISSN 2050-2974, Vol. 4, article id 29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Negative body image is a risk factor for development and relapse in eating disorders (ED). Many patients continue to be dissatisfied with their body shape or weight after treatment. This study presents a qualitative analysis of written reflections on body image from patients with an ED and a negative body image before and after an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy group treatment at a specialized ED-unit.

    Method: Before and after the treatment participants (n = 47) answered a questionnaire with open ended questions on their thoughts on body image. Data were analyzed through conventional content analysis.

    Results: Body image meant different things for different participants. For some it had to do with how you evaluate your body, whereas others focused on whether their body image was realistic or not. Some emphasized their relationship with their body, while some described body image as strongly related to global self-esteem. These different views on the concept of body image affected the participants' descriptions of their own body image, and how they wanted it to change. Body image was considered a state that fluctuated from day to day. After treatment the participants described changes in their body image, for instance perceiving oneself as less judgmental towards one's body, and a shift in focus to the important things in life.

    Conclusions: The participants had different views on body image and how they wished it to change. Thus treatment interventions targeting negative body image needs to address various aspects of this complex construct.

  • 343. Fondell, Elinor
    et al.
    Christensen, Sara E.
    Bälter, Olle
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Bälter, Katarina
    Adherence to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations as a measure of a healthy diet and upper respiratory tract infection2011In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 860-869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The Nordic countries have published joint dietary recommendations, the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR), since 1980. We evaluated adherence to the NNR as a measure of a healthy diet and its potential association with self-reported upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). Design: A prospective, population-based study with a follow-up period of 4 months. Dietary intake was assessed using a semi-quantitative FFQ with ninety-six items, along with other lifestyle factors, at baseline. URTI was assessed every three weeks. A Poisson regression model was used to control for age, sex and other confounding factors. Setting: A middle-sized county in northern Sweden. Subjects: Swedish men and women (n 1509) aged 20-60 years. Results: The NNR include recommendations on macronutrient proportions, physical activity and intake of micronutrients, sodium, fibre and alcohol. We found that overall adherence to the NNR was moderately good. In addition, we found that high adherence to the NNR (>5.5 adherence points) was not associated with a lower risk of URTI (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 0.89, 95% CI 0.73, 1.08) compared with low adherence (<4.5 adherence points). When investigating individual components of the NNR, only high physical activity was associated with lower URTI risk (IRR=0.82, 95% CI 0.69, 0.97) whereas none of the dietary components were associated with risk of URTI. Conclusions: Overall adherence to the NNR was moderately good. Overall adherence to the NNR was not associated with URTI risk in our study. However, when investigating individual components of the NNR, we found that high physical activity was associated with lower URTI risk.

  • 344.
    Forsum, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Nutrition. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Energy requirements during pregnancy: old questions and new findings2004In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 79, no 6, p. 933-934p. 933-934Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 345.
    Forsum, Elisabet
    et al.
    Division of Nutrition, Dept. of Biomedicine and Surgery, Linköpings Universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Boström, Karin
    Lust och Hälsa, Linköping, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Britt
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Olin-Skoglund, Sabina
    Kvinnans vikt före och under graviditet har betydelse för barnet: Riktlinjer från USA skulle gagna svensk folkhälsa [A woman's weight before and during pregnancy is of importance to her infant. USA guidelines would benefit public health in Sweden]2003In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 100, no 48, p. 3954-3956Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    This paper describes weight gain during pregnancy in Sweden in relation to guidelines from the United States. These guidelines take into consideration the fact that optimal weight gain during pregnancy is related to the woman's prepregnant weight in relation to her height. Almost 50 per cent of women delivering babies in Sweden during the year 2000 were obese or overweight. In the three populations studied, less than 50 per cent gained weight in accordance with the US guidelines, while more than 20 per cent gained less weight than recommended. The results indicate that, in Sweden, more attention should be paid to the body weight of women who bear children.

  • 346.
    Forsum, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Britt
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Löf, Marie
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Olausson, Hanna
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olhager, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Maternal body composition in relation to infant growth and fatness2008In: International Journal of Body Composition Research, ISSN 1479-456X, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 131-140Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 347.
    Forsum, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Nutrition. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Nutrition. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Löf, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Nutrition. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olausson, Hanna
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olhager, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Maternal body composition in relation to infant growth and fatness2008In: International Journal of Body Composition Research, ISSN 1479-456X, Vol. 6, p. 131-140Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 348.
    Forsum, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janerot Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Löf, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    MET-values of standardised activities in relation to body fat: studies in pregnant and non-pregnant women2018In: Nutrition & Metabolism, ISSN 1743-7075, E-ISSN 1743-7075, Vol. 15, article id 45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Physical activity is associated with health in women. Published MET-values (MET: metabolic equivalent of task) may assess physical activity and energy expenditure but tend to be too low for subjects with a high total body fat (TBF) content and therefore inappropriate for many contemporary women. The MET-value for an activity is the energy expenditure of a subject performing this activity divided by his/her resting energy expenditure, often assumed to be 4.2 kJ/kg/h. Relationships between TBF and MET have been little studied although overweight and obesity is common in women. Available data indicate that MET-values decrease during pregnancy but more studies in pregnant contemporary women are needed. Subjects and methods: Using indirect calorimetry we measured energy expenditure and assessed MET-values in women, 22 non-pregnant (BMI: 18-34) and 22 in gestational week 32 (non-pregnant BMI: 18-32) when resting, sitting, cycling (30 and 60 watts), walking (3.2 and 5.6 km/h) and running (8 km/h). Relationships between TBF and MET-values were investigated and used to predict modified MET-values. The potential of such values to improve calculations of total energy expenditure of women was investigated. Results: The resting energy expenditure was below 4.2 kJ/kg/h in both groups of women. Women in gestational week 32 had a higher resting energy metabolism (p amp;lt; 0.001) and 7-15% lower MET-values (p amp;lt; 0.05) than non-pregnant women. MET-values of all activities were correlated with TBF (p amp;lt; 0.05) in non-pregnant women and modified MET-values improved estimates of total energy expenditure in such women. In pregnant women, correlations (p amp;lt;= 0.03) between TBF and MET were found for running (8 km/h) and for walking at 5.6 km/h. Conclusions: Our results are relevant when attempts are made to modify the MET-system in contemporary pregnant and non-pregnant women. MET-values were decreased in gestational week 32, mainly due to an increased resting energy metabolism and studies describing how body composition affects the one MET-value (i.e. the resting energy metabolism in kJ/kg/h) during pregnancy are warranted. Studies of how pregnancy and TBF affect MET-values of high intensity activities are also needed. Corrections based on TBF may have a potential to improve the MET-system in non-pregnant women.

  • 349.
    Frankelius, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Innovationen som tog skruv2015In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 112, no 20–21, p. 985-987Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Läkaren och professorn emeritus Per-Ingvar Brånemark avled 20 december 2014. Han etablerade området osseointegration, strukturell förbindelse mellan levande ben och ytan av ett artificiellt material, som i dag utnyttjas för allt från höftleder och fästelement för silikonproteser till hörapparater. 2011 fick Brånemark priset European Inventor Award i kategorin Lifetime achievement av det europeiska patentverket. Men processen från uppfinning till berömmelse var tidvis turbulent – både i medicinskt och ekonomiskt perspektiv.

  • 350.
    Franks, Paul W.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Lund University, Sweden and Harvard University, USA.
    Body Weight and Risk of Early Death2013In: Obesity, ISSN 1930-7381, E-ISSN 1930-739X, Vol. 21, no 9, p. 1743-1743Article in journal (Other academic)
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