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  • 301.
    Brändström, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Meyer, Anna C.
    Modig, Karin
    Sandström, Glenn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Stockholm University Demography Unit (SUDA), Stockholm University.
    Determinants of home care utilization among the Swedish old: nationwide register-based study2022In: European Journal of Ageing, ISSN 1613-9372, E-ISSN 1613-9380, Vol. 19, p. 651-662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the 1990s, Sweden has implemented aging-in-place policies increasing the share of older adults dependent on home care instead of residing in care homes. At the same time previous research has highlighted that individuals receive home care at a higher age than before. Consequently, services are provided for a shorter time before death, increasing reliance on family and kin as caregivers. Previous studies addressing how homecare is distributed rely primarily on small surveys and are often limited to specific regions. This study aims to ascertain how home care services are distributed regarding individual-level factors such as health status, living arrangements, availability of family, education, and socioeconomic position. To provide estimates that can be generalized to Sweden as a whole, we use register data for the entire Swedish population aged 65 + in 2016. The study's main findings are that home care recipients and the amount of care received are among the oldest old with severe co morbidities. Receiving home care is slightly more common among women, but only in the highest age groups. Childlessness and socioeconomic factors play a small role in who receives home care or not. Instead, the primary home care recipients are those older adults living alone who lack direct support from family members residing in the same household.

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  • 302.
    Brändström, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Norrhem, Svante
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Inledning2012In: Människan, arbetet och historien: en vänbok till professor Tom Ericsson / [ed] Anders Brändström & Svante Norrhem, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2012, p. 5-7Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 303.
    Brändström, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Norrhem, SvanteUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Människan, arbetet och historien: en vänbok till professor Tom Ericsson2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 304.
    Brändström, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Sandström, Glenn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Stockholm University.
    Retirement, home care and the importance of gender2021In: Historical Life Course Studies, E-ISSN 2352-6343, Vol. 10, p. 172-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent decades elderly care policies in Sweden have been characterized by a marked shift from institutional care to home care. Previous research has highlighted how this has resulted in the elderly receiving care at a higher age and increased reliance on family and kin for providing care. Using register data for the entire Swedish population aged 65+ in 2016, we analyze how home care services in contemporary Sweden distribute regarding individual-level factors such as gender, health status, living arrangements, and closeness to kin. By far, the most critical determinants of receiving home care are age, health status, and whether the elderly are living alone or not. Although our results do not discard that access to kin has become more important, our results show that childlessness and geographical proximity to adult children play a minor role for differentials in the reception of home care. The main conduit for informal care instead takes the form of spousal support. Gender plays a role in how living arrangements influence the probability of receiving home care, where cohabiting women are significantly more likely to receive care than cohabiting men. We interpret this as a result of women, on average, being younger than their male partners and more easily adopting caregivers' roles. This gendered pattern is potentially explained by the persistence of more traditional gender roles prevailing in older cohorts.

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  • 305.
    Brändström, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Tedebrand, Lars-Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Introduction1995In: Swedish Urban Demography during Industrialization / [ed] Anders Brändström and Lars-Göran Tedebrand, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 1995, p. 7-12Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 306.
    Brändström, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Tedebrand, Lars-Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Introduction2000In: Population Dynamics during Industrialization / [ed] Anders Brändström and Lars-Göran Tedebrand, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2000, p. 5-10Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 307.
    Brännlund, Isabelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Connections to place: taxation lands as objects of place-attachment in southern Sápmi 1740-1870Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 308.
    Brännlund, Isabelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Diverse Sami Livelihoods: A Comparative Study of Livelihoods in Mountain-Reindeer Husbandry Communities in Swedish Sápmi 1860-19202018In: Journal of Northern Studies, ISSN 1654-5915, E-ISSN 2004-4658, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 37-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish state policy regarding the Sam.i from the late nineteenth century onward and studies on Sam.i history have tended to treat reindeer husbandry as much more important than other liveli- hoods practiced by Sam.i communities and families.By comparing live- lihood diversity insouthern and northem mountain-reindeer husband- ry communities in Swedish Säpmi (the traditional land of the Sami people) during the period 1860-1920, this study challenges the notions of Sam.i as reindeer herders and mountain reindeer husbandry as a no- madic monoculture. The results shows that Sami communities and families exploited diverse natural resources, trades and means of sub- sistence. The study supports an understanding of historical Sam.i live- lihoods, were reindeer husbandry as recognized as one of various Sam.i trades and means of subsistence, rather than as the Sam.i livelihood.

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  • 309.
    Brännlund, Isabelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Diversity of reindeer husbandry livelihoods: a comparative study of mountain reindeer husbandry in Swedish Sápmi 1860-1920Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 310.
    Brännlund, Isabelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Familiar Places: A History of Place Attachment in a South Sami Community2019In: Genealogy, ISSN 2313-5778, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 1-18, article id 54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In contrast to situations in most other countries, Indigenous land rights in Sweden are tied to a specific livelihood—reindeer husbandry. Consequently, Sami culture is intimately connected to it. Currently, Sami who are not involved in reindeer husbandry use genealogy and attachment to place to signal Sami belonging and claim Sami identity. This paper explores the relationship between Sami genealogy and attachment to place before the reindeer grazing laws of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. I show that within local Sami communities the land representing home was part of family history and identity while using historical archive material, narratives, and storytelling. State projects in the late 19th century challenged the links between family and land by confining Sami land title to reindeer husbandry, thereby constructing a notion of Sami as reindeer herders. The idea has restricted families and individuals from developing their culture and livelihoods as Sami. The construct continues to cause conflicts between Sami and between Sami and other members of local communities. Nevertheless, Sami today continue to evoke their connections to kinship and place, regardless of livelihood.

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  • 311.
    Brännlund, Isabelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Histories of reindeer husbandry resilience: land use and social networks of reindeer husbandry in Swedish Sápmi 1740-19202015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Against a background of ongoing and predicted climatic and environmental change facing humans on a global level, this thesis combines historical perspectives with theories of social resilience in a study of reindeer husbandry in Swedish Sápmi, from the late 18th century to the early 20th century. The thesis includes four individual studies that examine the topic from different angles, connected together by reoccurring elements of social resilience. The first paper analyses the adaptive capacity of reindeer husbandry communities in the northernmost part of Swedish Sápmi during the 19th to early 20th century, using materials from the Sami bailiffs’ archives, governors’ reports and documentation from official committees. The second paper is based on similar materials and explores livelihood diversity of reindeer husbandry in southern and northern regions of Swedish Sápmi from 1860 to 1920. The third paper examines the social networks of reindeer husbandry and includes an analysis on how these are represented in demographic sources at the turn of the 20th century. The fourth and final paper examines taxation lands as objects of place-attachment in a south Sami reindeer husbandry context from 1740 to 1870.

    The thesis demonstrates that communities and families practiced highly flexible herding in terms of what pasture area they used, when and how they used it and with whom. In order to maintain this flexibility, communities needed authority to manage their own livelihoods and a diverse and interconnected landscape. The results further show that reindeer husbandry was a dynamic and diverse livelihood, well into the 20th century. Fishing, hunting, trapping or farming was part of many reindeer herding families’ livelihoods. By tethering aspects of diversity to norms and ideals within the communities included in the study, I argue that farming can be understood as both an enforced adaptation and as an adaptive capacity depending on the ideals within the community in question.

    The thesis supports the notions that reindeer husbandry since long has faced many challenges, including: border closings; competing land uses; disturbance from settlers; enforced regulations and laws concerning reindeer husbandry; and restrictions of livelihood diversity. Furthermore, these challenges were not only sources of disturbances in their own right, but they also restricted the adaptive capacity of reindeer herding communities.

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  • 312.
    Brännlund, Isabelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Markanvändning i Vilhelmina norra sameby: Girijaure lappskatteland 1740–19192014In: Sydsamer - Landskap och historia: Ett dokumentationsprojekt på sydsamiskt område under åren 2012-2014 / [ed] Erik Norberg och Ulf Stefan Winka, Östersund: Gaaltje , 2014, p. 116-144Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 313.
    Brännlund, Isabelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Påtvingade omställningar och det minskade utrymmet för anpassning: om rennäring, anpassning och kolonialism2012In: Bårjås, ISSN 1502-0002, p. 16-24Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 314.
    Brännlund, Isabelle
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Reindeer management during the colonization of Sami lands: A long-term perspective of vulnerability and adaptation strategies2011In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 1095-1105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reindeer husbandry’s strong connection to the land, together with the ongoing climate-change debate, has generated growing interest in its socio-ecological resilience and vulnerability. The ability of indigenous societies and their activities to respond to change is widely recognized to be dependent on several factors, such as socioeconomic forces and aspects of governance, all of which have long historical backgrounds. However, although historians constantly address questions about human societies, there have been very few historical studies on their resilience, vulnerability and adaptation strategies. Here, using historical so­urces, we analyze the vulnerability of reindeer husbandry (and the Sami societies that depended on it) in Sweden during the 19th century. We demonstrate that although reindeer management was a much more diverse enterprise at that time than it is now, the major adaptation strategy and constraining forces were similar to those of today. The foremost adaptation strategy was, and still is, the flexible use of pasture area, and the clearest constraints during the 19th century were the loss of authority over the land and the imposed regulation of reindeer management – both of which were strongly connected to the process of colonization.    

  • 315.
    Brännlund, Isabelle
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Social organization of reindeer husbandry: representations of household and siida structures in demographic material at the turn of the 20th centuryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 316.
    Brännström, Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Axelmakterna i läromedel ur ett historiekulturellt perspektiv2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 317.
    Brännström Olsson, Frida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Bibeln i en galax långt, långt borta.: Star Wars som transmutation av Jesu frestelse.2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 318.
    Brömster, Jacob
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Att behålla eller frige sin träl: En studie om frigivning av trälar i medeltida diplom mellan åren 1250-13352015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 319.
    Brömster, Jacob
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Räfstens vår: Skillnader och likheter i rannsakning och bestraffning ur ett genusperspektiv under ärkebiskop Angermannus visitationsresa våren 15962014Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    The aim of this study was to investigate and analyze similarities and differences in trials and punishment from a gender perspective, during the inquisition in the episcopate of Linköping. A inquisition initiated by duke Karl but performed by archbishop Abraham Angermannus in the year 1596.During the working process a quantitive method was used in the purpose of getting statistic data considering number of men and women that were trialed and punished. A hermeneutic qualitive method was also used in the purpose of closer investigating certain cases that men and women were involved in. The theoretical concepts that have been of importance and used in this study are the individual and the female subject that is based on gender in judicial procedures.The results showed that 49 % of the men were trialed for quarrel. Not as many men were trialed for contempt towards the church and witchery.The most frequently used corporal punishment in this cases were flogging that were executed for totally 38 % of the men.The investigation also proved that men were punished with these forms of corporal punishments for showing their contempt towards the church. Although flogging were the most sentenced punishment for quarrelsome husbands, some were set free from this, even if they had behaved very badly towards their wife.Not many noblemen was affected by Angermannus inquisition and only six out of seven in total calculations, were trialed for contempt against the church. None of them were punished. In the case of women whom lived in the episcopate, witchery were the most trialed crime.As for the men, the most usual form of corporal punishment for women, were flogging that was executed for 51 %. However, flogging in comparison with number of men punished a greater number of women. But not as many noblewomen were trialed or punished, in comparison with the number of nobleman. Only two were trialed for contempt towards the church.Considering fornication and adultery, a much larger number of men were trialed for adultery. When it comes to certain forms of punishment, more men than women were sentenced to pay various forms of fines to the church. At the same time, a smaller amount of men were sentenced to flogging followed by a number of buckets with water, that were poured over the condemned. Considering the nobles and the cases of sexual crimes more men than women were trialed.Between the sexes, more men than women were sentenced with conditional sentences. In some cases the conditional sentences were identical between the sexes, meanwhile another case proved that a conditional sentence were sentenced for the household.How did the inquisition affect women with different social status? In this case considering farm girls and widows? 112 farm girls and widows were trialed in the episcopate. The quantitative study showed that 94 farm girls in contrast with 18 widows was trialed. Not many widows had to suffer the corporal punishment in comparison with farm girls, whom not only got more punishment, but also were sentenced to flogging, a punishment that never was attested to widows.

    Keywords: Archbishop Angermannus, gender, 16th century, inquisition, protocol, trial, corporal punishment

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  • 320. Buckland, Paul
    et al.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Prosser, Tim
    Edlington Wood: using Lidar to put ancient fields and old excavations into their contemporary landscape2020In: Transactions of the Hunter Archaeological Society, ISSN 0966-2251, Vol. 29, p. 84-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Roman sites in Edlington Wood, three miles west-south-west of Doncaster, South Yorkshire, first came to wider notice as a result of finds by the woodman in the 1930s and the material was of sufficient interest for Philip Corder to use it as the basis for a paper in a festschrift to O. G. S. Crawford. Most of these finds and later material were deposited in Doncaster Museum, although others went to the owners and local metal detectorists. In 1970 a threat of quarrying led to a detailed survey of the site by the Royal Commission on Historical Monuments and limited excavation on one site. Two large areas within the Wood were cleared but remain as improved grassland. The recent availability of Lidar imagery allows the occupation sites and fragments of field system located by ground survey to be placed in a broader context of small rectangular fields and some attempt at a landscape chronology to be made. The cultivation of the fields in a system of cord rig is discussed.

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  • 321. Buckland, Paul C.
    et al.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    The Alder Leaf Beetle Agelastica alni (L.) (Col.: Chrysomelidae) in the Dearne Valley. Climate change or poor quarantine.2014In: Sorby Record, ISSN 0260-2245, no 50, p. 2-6Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 322. Buckland, Paul C.
    et al.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    G. Russell, Coope
    Sadler, Jon P.
    School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham.
    A bibliography of quaternary entomology: (qbib)2019Data set
    Abstract [en]

    Originally published in 1991 (Buckland & Coope, 1991), this is the most comprehensive bibliography of articles and books on Quaternary fossil insects and their use in palaeoclimatology, palaeoecology and environmental archaeology available on the planet. Updates are periodically posted here, at www.bugscep.com, and on other open resources.

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  • 323. Buckland, Paul C.
    et al.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Panagiotakopulu, Eva
    Department of Geography, School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh.
    Caught in a trap: landscape and climate implications of the insect fauna from a Roman well in Sherwood Forest2018In: Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences, ISSN 1866-9557, E-ISSN 1866-9565, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 125-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sherwood Forest in Nottinghamshire is often considered a well preserved ancient landscape, subsequently having survived by way of centuries of management as a hunting preserve. Archaeological evidence suggests otherwise, with an enclosed landscape beginning in the pre-Roman Iron Age and continuing through the Romanperiod. Due to the nature of the region's soils, however, there is little empirical, palaeoecological evidence on its environmental history prior to the medieval period. This paper presents an insect fauna from a Roman well in a small enclosure in north Nottinghamshire, on the edge of Sherwood Forest, and its interpretation in terms of contemporary land use. Wells and small pools act as large pitfall traps and mayeffectively sample aspects of the local and regional insect fauna. The Wild Goose Cottage fauna and its environmental implications are also compared with a number of archaeologically and geographically similar contexts.

  • 324. Buckland, Paul C.
    et al.
    Magilton, John R.
    Dolby, Malcolm J.
    Wild, John Peter (Contributor)
    Buckland, Philip I. (Contributor)
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Excavations on Roman pottery kiln sites in Cantley Parish, South Yorkshire, 1956–19752022In: Journal of Roman Pottery Studies Volume 19 / [ed] Steven Willis, Oxbow Books, 2022, Vol. 19, p. 44-146Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The South Yorkshire Roman pottery industry is concentrated largely in the parish of Cantley, immediately south-east ofDoncaster, the site of the fort and associated settlement of Danvm. Over seventy kilns, lying either side of the Lincolnto York via Castleford road, have been located, of which 55 have been excavated. This report deals with the remainingunpublished material, that from Cantley Kilns 30–32, 35–36 and 40–44. The earliest excavated kilns belong to themid-second century and production continued at least until the mid-fourth century. Material from Doncaster and othersites, however, suggests that earlier local late first and early second century production centres remain to be identified.Kiln types range from surface-built with removable furniture, to more substantial deeply excavated types with survivinginternal structures, including radial firebars over single and double pedestals, to more massive permanent floors overup to four pedestals. The products include mortaria, beakers, cooking pots/jars and bowls. White slip is employed onmortaria and red and white paint occurs on a few other vessels. Most of the material is in a hard gritty fabric producedin both light grey and red oxidised forms with varying degrees of burnishing. The mortaria have Mancetter/Hartshillaffinities which appear evident even after the demise of stamping by SARRIVS and others, and the cooking pots andbowls, reflect the general trend of Black-burnished ware production, although the latest forms do not occur. Threetypes, lid-seated jars, wide-mouthed/shouldered bowls and large bowls/pancheons of truncated conical form, belongto different, perhaps Continental traditions. Whilst most of the material appears to have been marketed locally, a fewvessels travelled further, particularly in the mid-second century, when Rossington Bridge, on the southern edge of theindustry, was involved in supply to the Antonine Wall.

  • 325. Buckland, Paul C.
    et al.
    Panagiotakopulu, Eva
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Fossil insects and the Neolithic: methods and potencial2004In: ANTAEUS 27: Annals of the Archaeological Instititute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 2004, p. 235-252Conference paper (Refereed)
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  • 326.
    Buckland, Philip
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Lessons from extinctions2017In: Wood Wise, p. 22-27Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Many beetles are very good at colonising new areas when changes in the landscape open up new possibilities. Equally, they are highly susceptible to local extinction in the face of landscape scale changes in their environment.

  • 327.
    Buckland, Philip
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    The development and implementation of software for palaeoenvironmental and palaeoclimatological research: the Bugs Coleopteran Ecology Package (BugsCEP)2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis documents the development and application of a unique database orientated software package, BugsCEP, for environmental and climatic reconstruction from fossil beetle (Coleoptera) assemblages. The software tools are described, and the incorporated statistical methods discussed and evaluated with respect to both published modern and fossil data, as well as the author’s own investigations.

    BugsCEP consists of a reference database of ecology and distribution data for over 5 800 taxa, and includes temperature tolerance data for 436 species. It also contains abundance and summary data for almost 700 sites - the majority of the known Quaternary fossil coleopteran record of Europe. Sample based dating evidence is stored for a large number of these sites, and the data are supported by a bibliography of over 3 300 sources. Through the use of built in statistical methods, employing a specially developed habitat classification system (Bugs EcoCodes), semi-quantitative environmental reconstructions can be undertaken, and output graphically, to aid in the interpretation of sites. A number of built in searching and reporting functions also increase the efficiency with which analyses can be undertaken, including the facility to list the fossil record of species found by searching the ecology and distribution data. The existing Mutual Climatic Range (MCR) climate reconstruction method is implemented and improved upon in BugsCEP, as BugsMCR, which includes predictive modelling and the output of graphs and climate space maps.

    The evaluation of the software demonstrates good performance when compared to existing interpretations. The standardization method employed in habitat reconstructions, designed to enable the inter-comparison of samples and sites without the interference of differing numbers of species and individuals, also appears to be robust and effective. Quantitative climate reconstructions can be easily undertaken from within the software, as well as an amount of predictive modelling. The use of jackknifing variants as an aid to the interpretation of climate reconstructions is discussed, and suggested as a potential indicator of reliability. The combination of the BugStats statistical system with an enhanced MCR facility could be extremely useful in increasing our understanding of not only past environmental and climate change, but also the biogeography and ecology of insect populations in general.

    BugsCEP is the only available software package integrating modern and fossil coleopteran data, and the included reconstruction and analysis tools provide a powerful resource for research and teaching in palaeo-environmental science. The use of modern reference data also makes the package potentially useful in the study of present day insect faunas, and the effects of climate and environmental change on their distributions. The reconstruction methods could thus be inverted, and used as predictive tools in the study of biodiversity and the implications of sustainable development policies on present day habitats.

    BugsCEP can be downloaded from http://www.bugscep.com

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  • 328.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Environmental archaeology, climate change and e-science2010In: Thule: Kungliga Skytteanska Samfundets årsbok. 2010 / [ed] Roger Jacobsson, Umeå: Kungliga Skytteanska Samfundet , 2010, p. 55-69Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 329.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Freeing information to the people: Using the past to aid the future2011In: International Innovation - Disseminating Science Research and Technology, ISSN 2041-4552, no 4, p. 51-53Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Dr Philip Buckland discusses his recent project SEAD: the web-accessible scientific database that crosses archaeological and environmental disciplines. 

    Disciplines as diverse as anthropology and palaeoecology take an interest in our environment and how we have treated it. The Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database aims to create a multi-proxy, GIS-ready database for environmental and archaeological data to aid multidisciplinary research

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  • 330.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Redaktion: Stenålderns landskap väntar i havet2017In: Populär Arkeologi, ISSN 0281-014X, no 3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 331.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    SEAD - The Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database Inter-linking Multiproxy Environmental Data with Archaeological Investigations and Ecology2013In: Archaeology in the Digital Era: Papers from the 40th Annual Conference of Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Southampton, 26-29 March 2012 / [ed] Graeme Earl, Tim Sly, Angeliki Chrysanthi, Patricia Murrieta-Flores, Constantinos Papadopoulos, Iza Romanowska & David Wheatley, Amsterdam University Press, 2013, Vol. 1, p. 320-331Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The volume of data on past environmental and climate changes, as well as human interactions with these, has long since passed the level where it is manageable outside of large scale database systems. The Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database project aims to not only store and disseminate such data, but also provide tools for querying and analysing them, whilst maintaining a close connection with the archaeological and ecological data that are essential for their comprehensive interpretation. Large scale, geographically and chronologically unrestricted databases provide us with essentially unlimited scope for putting individual sites into a broader context and applying locally collated data to the investigation of earth system level changes. By providing integrated access to data from a variety of proxies, including plant macrofossils, pollen, insects and geochemistry, along with dating evidence, more complex questions can be answered where any single proxy would not be able to provide comprehensive answers.

  • 332.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Subfossil species2008In: Checklist of Beetles of the British Isles: 2008 edition / [ed] A.G. Duff, A.G. Duff, Wells , 2008, p. 125-127Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since publication of the Coleoptera volume of the second edition of Kloet & Hincks' checklist of British insects (Pope, 1977), a large number of additions and deletions to the list have been published, as well as numerous nomenclatural changes. In addition, recent advances in our understanding of the phylogeny of Coleoptera have led to major modifications of higher classification in checklists and catalogues that have been published more recently in Europe and North America. In the absence of any widely accepted, modern checklist of the British fauna, British workers have been using binomial names taken from a variety of often conflicting sources.

    It is intended that this checklist should have a wider currency and be suitable for use in future conservation reviews, survey reports and taxonomic dictionaries for biological recording. It is, therefore, vital that the nomenclature used should be widely accepted by coleopterists working on the British fauna. It is also important that the checklist should be as useful as possible to those working at larger scales ranging from European through Palaearctic to the world fauna. It is envisaged that the checklist will be updated annually to keep abreast of published changes and suggested amendments from correspondents. To this end, comments on the checklist are welcome and should be addressed to the Editor by e-mail to andrew.duff@virgin.net.

  • 333.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    The Bugs Coleopteran Ecology Package (BugsCEP): the development and implementation of software for palaeoenvironmental and palaeoclimatological research2009Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book describes the development and practical application of a unique database orientated software package, BugsCEP, for environmental, climatic and biodiversity reconstruction from beetle assemblages. BugsCEP consists of a database of ecology and distribution data for over 9400 insect taxa, and includes temperature tolerance data for 436 species. It contains abundance and summary data for over 770 sites, most of the known European Quaternary fossil coleopteran record, supported by a bibliography of over 3700 sources. Built in statistics, including a specially developed habitat classification system, provide semi-quantitative environmental reconstructions to aid in the interpretation of sites. BugsCEP's querying and reporting functions also increase the efficiency with which analyses can be undertaken, including the facility to explore the fossil record of species by searching ecology and distribution data. The Mutual Climatic Range (MCR) reconstruction method is implemented and improved upon, including predictive modelling and the graphical output of reconstructions and climate space maps. BugsCEP is available from www.bugscep.com.

  • 334.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    The Bugs Coleopteran Ecology Package (BugsCEP) database: 1000 sites and half a million fossils later2014In: Quaternary International, ISSN 1040-6182, E-ISSN 1873-4553, Vol. 341, p. 272-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Bugs database project started in the late 1980s as what would now be considered a relatively simple system, albeit advanced for its time, linking fossil beetle species lists to modern habitat and distribution information. Since then, Bugs has grown into a complex database of fossils records, habitat and distribution data, dating and climate reference data wrapped into an advanced software analysis package. At the time of writing, the database contains raw data and metadata for 1124 sites, and Russell Coope directly contributed to the analysis of over 154 (14%) of them, some 98790 identifications published in 231 publications. Such quantifications are infeasible without databases, and the analytical power of combining a database of modern and fossil insects with analysis tools is potentially immense for numerous areas of science ranging from conservation to Quaternary geology.

    BugsCEP, The Bugs Coleopteran Ecology Package, is the latest incarnation of the Bugs database project. Released in 2007, the database is continually added too and is available for free download from http://www.bugscep.com. The software tools include quantitative habitat reconstruction and visualisation, correlation matrices, MCR climate reconstruction, searching by habitat and retrieving, among other things, a list of taxa known from the selected habitat types. It also provides a system for entering, storing and managing palaeoentomological data as well as a number of expert system like reporting facilities.

    Work is underway to create an online version of BugsCEP, implemented through the Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database (SEAD) project (http://www.sead.se). The aim is to provide more direct access to the latest data, a community orientated updating system, and integration with other proxy data. Eventually, the tools available in the offline BugsCEP will be duplicated and Bugs will be entirely in the web.

    This paper summarises aspects of the current scope, capabilities and applications of the BugsCEP database and software, with special reference to and quantifications of the contributions of Russell Coope to the field of palaeoentomology as represented in the database. The paper also serves to illustrate the potential for the use of BugsCEP in biographical studies, and discusses some of the issues relating to the use of large scale sources of quantitative data.

    All datasets used in this article are available through the current version of BugsCEP available at http://www.bugscep.com.

  • 335.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    The Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database (SEAD): An International Research Cyber-Infrastructure for Studying Past Changes in Climate, Environment and Human Activities2010In: Journal of Northern Studies, ISSN 1654-5915, no 1, p. 120-126Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 336.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Bateman, Mark D.
    Department of Geography, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK.
    Bennike, Ole
    GEUS Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, ØsterVoldgade 10, Copenhagen 1350, Denmark.
    Buckland, Paul C.
    Chase, Brian M.
    Institut des Sciences de l’Evolution-Montpellier (ISEM), Universite´ de Montpellier, CNRS, EPHE, IRD, Bat 22, CC061, Place Euge`ne Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier cedex 5, France.
    Frederick, Charles
    6Department of Geography and the Environment, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA.
    Greenwood, Malcolm
    Department of Geography, Loughborough University, Leics LE11 3TU, UK.
    Murton, Julian
    Department of Geography, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9RH, UK.
    Murton, Della
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK.
    Panagiotakopulu, Eva
    Institute of Geography, University of Edinburgh, Drummond Street, Edinburgh EH8 9XP, UK.
    Mid-Devensian climate and landscape in England: new data from Finningley, South Yorkshire2019In: Royal Society Open Science, E-ISSN 2054-5703, Vol. 6, no 7, article id 190577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While there is extensive evidence for the Late Devensian, less is known about Early and Middle Devensian (approx. 110-30 ka) climates and environments in the UK. The Greenland ice-core record suggests the UK should have endured multiple changes, but the terrestrial palaeo-record lacks sufficient detail for confirmation from sites in the British Isles. Data from deposits at Finningley, South Yorkshire, can help redress this. A channel with organic silts, dated 40 314-39 552 cal a BP, contained plant macrofossil and insect remains showing tundra with dwarf-shrub heath and bare ground. Soil moisture conditions varied from free draining to riparian, with ponds and wetter vegetated areas. The climate was probably low arctic with snow cover during the winter. Mutual climatic range (MCR), based on Coleoptera, shows the mean monthly winter temperatures of -22 to -2 degrees C and summer ones of 8-14 degrees C. Periglacial structures within the basal gravel deposits and beyond the glacial limits indicate cold-climate conditions, including permafrost. A compilation of MCR reconstructions for other Middle Devensian English sites shows that marine isotope stage 3-between 59 and 28 ka-experienced substantial variation in climate consistent with the Greenland ice-core record. The exact correlation is hampered by temporal resolution, but the Finningley site stadial at approximately 40 ka may correlate with the one of the Greenland stadials 7-11.

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  • 337.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Buckland, Paul C.
    BugsCEP, an entomological database twenty-five years on2014In: Antenna (Journal of the Royal Entomological Society), ISSN 0140-1890, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 21-28Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 338.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Buckland, Paul C.
    Den Bank Close, Sheffield, United Kingdom.
    Pitfall trapping at Gården Under Sandet (GUS) 1995, Western Greenland2023In: Norwegian Journal of Entomology, ISSN 1501-8415, E-ISSN 1894-0692, Vol. 70, no 2, p. 158-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During archaeological excavations on the site of the Norse farm at Gården under Sandet (GUS), in Ameralik Fjord, south-west Greenland, the opportunity was taken to sample the modern ground-living insect fauna by pitfall trapping from a range of natural habitats for comparison with fossil assemblages from the medieval farm and its midden. Two species, the predatory bug Nabis flavomarginatus Scholtz, 1847 and small ladybird Nephus redtenbacheri Mulsant, 1846 are recorded for the first time in this part of Greenland, although there are earlier records from the sediments associated with medieval farms in the region and both have been regarded as Norse introductions. The minute staphylinid Mycetoporus nigrans Mäklin, 1853, added to the Greenland list from this material by Peter Hammond (in Buckland et al. 1998), was found to be common in most natural habitats around GUS. Grids of eight traps, four at ground level and four on posts, were set out in six localities defined by their vegetational characteristics and emptied three times over the month-long sampling period. The cicadellid Psammotettix lividellus (Zetterstedt, 1840) appeared in all ground traps being particularly abundant on the dwarf birch and sedge dominated floodplain, to which the polyphagous mirid bug Chlamydatus pullus (Reuter, 1870) appears confined.

  • 339.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Buckland, Paul C.
    Species found as fossils in Quaternary sediments2012In: Checklist of Beetles of the British Isles / [ed] A.G. Duff, United Kingdom: Pemberley Books , 2012, 2nd, p. 127-130Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This new checklist is the most up-to-date and comprehensive checklist of the beetle fauna of the British Isles, representing many man-years of effort by leading British coleopterists. The main checklist is fully annotated with detailed endnotes.

  • 340.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Buckland, Paul C.
    Species found as fossils in Quaternary sediments2018In: Checklist of beetles of the British Isles: with a chapter on fossil beetles / [ed] Andrew G. Duff, Iver: Pemberley Books , 2018, 3, p. 171-174Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 341.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Buckland, Paul C.
    When a Waterhole is Full of Dung: An Illustration of the Importance of Environmental Evidence for Refining Archaeological Interpretation of Excavated Features2019In: Archaeometry, ISSN 0003-813X, E-ISSN 1475-4754, Vol. 61, no 4, p. 977-990Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prehistoric field systems sometimes encompass excavated, pit-like features which are difficult to classify due to the complex stratigraphies resulting from reuse, infilling and collapse. They are frequently classified as wells and watering holes, but other potential uses for excavated depressions are rarely cited. We argue the need for environmental archaeology in the interpretation of features of this nature, and present a case study from a Bronze Age site at Pode Hole, near Peterborough (UK), where fossil insect material clearly contradicts the archaeological interpretation. We present empirical evidence for a sealed context filled with dung which cannot be interpreted as a water source. This evidence strongly contrasts with other superficially similar features at the site.

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  • 342.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Buckland, Paul C.
    Olsson, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Paleoentomology: Insects and other Arthropods in Environmental Archaeology2014In: The Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology / [ed] Claire Smith, Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2014, p. 5740-5755Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Insects are the most diverse group of animals on the planet, and as suchare present in a wider variety of habitats than most other organism groups.This diversity, in addition to a long evolutionary history (Grimaldi &Engel 2005), and together with a propensity to be preserved in both desiccatingand anaerobic environments, has provided an excellent tool for thereconstruction of both Quaternary and more immediate archaeologicalenvironments. Insect remains often provide proxy environmental information onthe immediate context from which the fossils are derived, and as such may beeither complementary to the more regional picture provided by palynology orindicate site conditions, such as levels of hygiene and evidence of tradingconnections, which are rarely available from any other palaeoecological source.They therefore provide information on a broad range of habitats and conditions,on- and off-site, and in addition, in appropriate contexts, also climate.Processing of samples is essentially simple, requiring readily availablematerials, yet is time consuming, and identification of the usuallydisarticulated fragments (sclerites) requires diligence and patience and accessto well curated reference collections. Fortunately, abundant literature,computer software and database tools now exist to aid in their interpretation.

  • 343.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Buckland, Paul C.
    Olsson, Fredrik
    Paleoentomology: insects and other arthropods in environmental archaeology2018In: Encyclopedia of global archaeology / [ed] Claire Smith, Cham: Springer, 2018, 2Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Insects are the most diverse group of animals on the planet and as such are present in a wider variety of habitats than most other complex organisms. This diversity, in addition to a long evolutionary history (Grimaldi and Engel 2005), and together with a propensity to be preserved in both desiccating and anaerobic environments, has provided an excellent tool for the reconstruction of both Quaternary and more immediate archaeological environments. Insect remains often provide proxy environmental information on the immediate context from which the fossils are derived, and as such may be either complementary to the more regional picture provided by palynology or indicate site conditions, such as levels of hygiene and evidence of trading connections, which are rarely available from any other palaeoecological source. They therefore provide information on a broad range of habitats and conditions, on- and off-site, and in addition, in appropriate contexts, also climate. Processing of samples is essentially simple, requiring readily available materials, yet is time consuming, and identification of the usually disarticulated fragments (sclerites) requires diligence and patience and access to well-curated reference collections. Fortunately, abundant literature, computer software, and database tools now exist to aid in their interpretation.

  • 344.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Dell'Unto, Nicolo
    Lund University.
    Pálsson, Gísli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    To tree, or not to tree? On the Empirical Basis for Having Past Landscapes to Experience2018In: Digital Humanities Quarterly, E-ISSN 1938-4122, Vol. 12, no 3Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides an overview of some of the complex issues involved in reconstructing and visualizing past landscapes. It discusses the importance of empirical data and introduces some of the terminology necessary for understanding methods which are often considered more in the domain of the natural sciences than humanities. Current methods and practices are put in the context of environmental archaeology, archaeological theory and heritage management as well as related, briefly, to the broader context of archaeological theory, practice and research data infrastructure. Finally, some examples and pointers for the future are given in the hope that the article may provide a point of reference for those looking to gain an entry point into the study of past landscapes, and understand their relevance in archaeological visualisation.

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  • 345.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Eriksson, Erik J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database (SEAD)2014In: The Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology / [ed] Claire Smith, Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2014, p. 7076-7085Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental archaeology encompasses a wide range of scientific methods for analyzing the results of past human activities, environments, climates and perhaps most importantly, the relationships between these. Many of these methods are referred to as proxy analyses, denoting the illumination of the past as interpreted through the evidence of fossil organisms or properties. These lines of evidence, or proxy data sources, are assumed to reflect past conditions by way of their dependence on them. For example, crops will only grow within a specific climate range; organic waste will lead to increased soil phosphate levels and burning increases magnetic susceptibility. Whilst it is easier to store, manage and analyze the data produced by these methods individually, there is much to be gained from multi-proxy integration at the raw data level. Despite this methodological diversity, the common factors of space, time and context allow us to compare and integrate the results of analyses. This is, however, easier said than done, and without efficient data handling systems the data rapidly become unmanageable. SEAD represents one solution to this problem, and forms a node in an international web of open access paleoenvironmental and archaeological databases which are driving archaeological science into new realms of more complex, multi-site, multi-proxy analyses and meta-analyses. This article sets out to describe the system, the scientific implications of which are covered in Buckland et al. 2010.

  • 346.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Eriksson, Erik J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Palm, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    SEAD - The Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database: Progress Report Spring 20142014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report provides an overview of the progress and results of the VR:KFI infrastructure projects 2007-7494 and (825-)2010-5976. It should be considered as a status report in an on-going long-term research infrastructure development project.

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    SEAD - Progress Report Spring 2014
  • 347.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Eriksson, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Linderholm, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Engelmark, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Palm, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Svensson, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Buckland, Paul
    Panagiotakopulu, Eva
    Institute of Geography, School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Olofsson, Johan
    Uppsala Municipal Council, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Integrating human dimensions of Arctic palaeoenvironmental science: SEAD – the strategic environmental archaeology database2011In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 345-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental change has a human dimension, and has had so for at least the last 10 000 years. The prehistoric impact of people on the Arctic landscape has occasionally left visible traces, such as house and field structures. More often than not, however, the only evidence available is at the microscopic or geochemical level, such as fossil insect and seed assemblages or changes in the physical and chemical properties of soils and sediments. These records are the subject of SEAD, a multidisciplinary database and software project currently underway at Umeå University, Sweden, which aims to create an online database and set of tools for investigating these traces, as part of an international research infrastructure for palaeoecology and environmental archaeology.

  • 348.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Hammarlund, Dan
    Lund University.
    Hjärthner-Holdar, Eva
    Swedish National Historical Museums.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University.
    Lindahl, Anders
    Lund University.
    Palm, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Possnert, Göran
    Uppsala University.
    The Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database: a resource for international, multiproxy and transdisciplinary studies of environmental and climatic change2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate and environmental change are global challenges which require global data and infrastructure to investigate. These challenges also require a multi-proxy approach, integrating evidence from Quaternary science and archaeology with information from studies on modern ecology and physical processes among other disciplines. The Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database (SEAD http://www.sead.se) is a Swedish based international research e-infrastructure for storing, managing, analysing and disseminating palaeoenvironmental data from an almost unlimited number of analysis methods. The system currently makes available raw data from over 1500 sites (>5300 datasets) and the analysis of Quaternary fossil insects, plant macrofossils, pollen, geochemistry and sediment physical properties, dendrochronology and wood anatomy, ceramic geochemistry and bones, along with numerous dating methods. This capacity will be expanded in the near future to include isotopes, multi-spectral and archaeo-metalurgical data. SEAD also includes expandable climate and environment calibration datasets, a complete bibliography and extensive metadata and services for linking these data to other resources. All data is available as Open Access through http://qsead.sead.se and downloadable software.

     

    SEAD is maintained and managed at the Environmental Archaeology Lab and HUMlab at Umea University, Sweden. Development and data ingestion is progressing in cooperation with The Laboratory for Ceramic Research and the National Laboratory for Wood Anatomy and Dendrochronology at Lund University, Sweden, the Archaeological Research Laboratory, Stockholm University, the Geoarchaeological Laboratory, Swedish National Historical Museums Agency and several international partners and research projects. Current plans include expanding its capacity to serve as a data source for any system and integration with the Swedish National Heritage Board's information systems.

     

    SEAD is partnered with the Neotoma palaeoecology database (http://www.neotomadb.org) and a new initiative for building cyberinfrastructure for transdisciplinary research and visualization of the long-term human ecodynamics of the North Atlantic funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

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    Poster
  • 349.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Lemdahl, Geoffrey
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Explaining Late Quaternary beetle extinctions in the UK using palaeoenvironmental databases for quantitative environmental reconstruction2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The comparison of palaeoenvironmental and archaeological records of fossil insects with modern red data books can provide a picture of local extinctions. Buckland & Buckland (2012) performed such a study on the Coleoptera of the British Isles, using the BugsCEP database for the fossil data, and looking at broad chronological divisions. The ecology of these regionally extinct beetles, all of which are extant in other parts of the World, may be used to investigate the environmental and climatic changes which may have lead to their extirpation. This process can be semi-automated and habitats quantified through the use of ecological classification and a database infrastructure which links fossil and modern ecological and climate data (Buckland & Buckland 2006; http://www.bugscep.com). Preliminary results indicate that the majority of extirpated species with mid-Holocene records were dependent on woodland environments (Buckland 2014). These investigations can be refined by using narrower time-slices, interpolating dating evidence and including more comprehensive archaeological dating evidence. The expansion of the analysis to include the full assemblages found in the samples containing the extirpated species also allows for a more comprehensive picture of the long-term relationships between biodiversity, environmental and climatic change and human activity.

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    Presentation
  • 350.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Linderholm, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Östman, Sofi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Samuel, Ericson
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Wallin, Jan-Erik
    Pollenlaboratoriet i Umeå AB.
    Engelmark, Roger
    Environmental archaeological analysis from the archaeological excavations at Ørland kampflybase, Vik 70/1, Ørland, Sør-Trøndelag, Norway. 2015-20162017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A total of 322 bulk samples, 267 bulk subsamples and 1632 survey samples from the excavation of Iron Age settlements at Ørland, Vik, Sør-Trondelag, were analysed at the Environmental Archaeology Laboratory (MAL) at Umeå University. The overall aim of these analyses was to look for evidence which could help identify possible prehistoric activity areas, understand building functions and divisions, and shed light on land management around the farmsteads.

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