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  • 301.
    Pahl-Ragnrsand, Cathrine
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Förändring av arbetssätt: -En studie av samverkan mellan konstruktörer och produktsamordnare och deras arbetsmiljöer på Scania2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractThe purpose was to study the way of working between designers and product coordinators, to evaluate them and give suggestions for how to improve the collaboration between the roles. The purpose was also to study some of the workplace environment as a product coordinator comes in contact with and make suggestions to Scania in how to improve them.A literature study was performed with the purpose to understand the area of subjects and thereby be able to suggest improvements. The author has also been studying literature and attending courses to get a better understanding about how Scania works. The work method between product coordinators and designers has been studied through a minor observational study and conversations with product coordinators. A benchmarking interview was performed at SAAB Aerostructures to get an insight into how a major change can turn out, what went well and what can be improved.The result demonstrates both the shortcomings of the studied workplace environments and how a product coordinator´s work day could look like, with problem areas where improvements can be made to create a better work flow. In the result are also Scania´s objective with 3D assemblies in the future and the outcome of the interview with SAAB.The results were analyzed and led to proposals on change measures for future work at Scania, which are reported in this thesis.Scania should devote resources to reviewing its employees’ workplace environment to promote innovation and creativity. With small, simple means a workplace could go from being ordinary to a place that will inspire to new resolutions and ideas. By making a assessment of a project’s needs can the integration be improved between the roles when the product coordinator is relocated to the designers when necessary and other times working with the colleagues in their own division to maintain the expertise.

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  • 302.
    Parida, Vinit
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Sturm, Dennis
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Grimheden, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Facilitating the Learning Environment: Initiatives within the PIEp Research School2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research schools have become common phenomena in the academic world. However, we find lack of studies investigating their influence and role in the academia. This study attempts to address this gap by describing how a specific research school has evolved into an effective learning environment for the enrolled PhD students. The Product Innovation Engineering program (PIEp) is currently the largest research initiative in Product Innovation in Sweden. The PIEp research school is a part of this program, with the aim to increase innovation capabilities in the Swedish industries. Through an action-based research approach the authors, who are research school participants themselves, present the processes and the chain of events to offer knowledge transfer and to give insight into this special research environment. In this pursuit, the findings are presented in three different themes,1) the role of common interest groups, 2) common interest group activities, and c) a tiger team workshop. This paper holds major implications for other research schools and funding organizations.

  • 303. Pasche, M.
    et al.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    A contingency-based approach to the use of product platforms and modules in NPD2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 304. Pasche, Maximilian
    et al.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Continuous innovation and improvement of product platforms2011In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 56, no 2-4, p. 256-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product platforms are applied in order to increase the stability of the product architecture and to reap benefits of scale and scope. However, many firms face a dynamic environment with quickly changing market demands. In such an environment, firms may have to continuously renew and improve their product platforms to achieve desired flexibility. The modifications comprise two types of innovations, component as well as architectural innovations. Combining these types to simultaneously achieve stability and strategic flexibility demands continuous innovation capability. This paper provides a viable approach to coordinate architectural and component innovations. The paper is based on a case study of an international truck manufacturer. Two major issues, decision-making and the management of knowledge, stand out as important for realising continuous innovation and improvement of product platforms. Moreover, product platform management needs to consider modularity and its related economies of substitution.

  • 305.
    PENSJÖ, ELLY
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    CABALLERO, SEBASTIAN
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Kvalitetsarbete i produktutvecklings-processen2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    I en alltmer globaliserad värld är det avgörande för företag att kunna skapa konkurrensfördelar för att differentiera sig från sina konkurrenter. Då positiva effekter har kopplats till kvalitetsarbetet har dess roll fått större inflytande hos organisationer. Ytterligare konkurrensfördelar kan erhållas genom att erbjuda kunder innovativa produkter. Dock råder det delade meningar om hur produktutveckling och kvalitet påverkar varandra. Under 1900-talet utvecklades en mängd olika kvalitetsfilosofier, där de mest framstående är ISO 9001, Six Sigma och Lean. Dessa tre kvalitetsfilosofier utgör en central del i denna rapport där deras påverkan på produktutvecklingsprocessen undersöks.

    Denna studie syftar till att ta reda på hur företag inom teknik- och industrisektorn arbetar med kvalitet samt vilka samband som finns mellan produktutveckling och kvalitet. Den ämnar också undersöka hur kvalitet garanteras genom hela produktutvecklingsprocessen.

    Resultatet i denna rapport bygger på en kvalitativ undersökning där fyra kvalitetsansvariga inom teknik- och industrisektorn har intervjuats. Undersökningen visar att företagens kvalitetsarbete kombinerar flera kvalitetsfilosofier, där ISO 9001, Six Sigma och Lean återfinns som de centrala.

    De tidigare nämnda filosofierna ISO 9001, Six Sigma och Lean återfinns hos de intervjuade företagen. Ett av företagen skiljer sig från de andra genom att bedriva kvalitetsarbetet med hjälp av det agila arbetssättet Scrum. Ytterligare påvisas det att produkt- och projektmätetal av olika slag utgör en stor del av kontrollen i kvalitetsarbetet.

    Ett effektivare arbete och ekonomisk lönsamhet är två positiva effekter av kvalitetsarbetet som företagen har kunnat se i produktutvecklingsprocessen. Något som till en början kan ses som en negativ effekt är den förlängda utvecklingsprocessen, men resultatet pekar på att den extra spenderade tiden gynnar företagen i slutändan.

    Från studien har flera slutsatser dragits. En av dessa är att ISO 9001 är ett bra första initiativ för att förbättra kvaliteten i en organisation. Den är dock inte tillräcklig för att garantera högkvalitativa produkter och bör därmed kompletteras med en eller flera kvalitetsfilosofier. En annan slutsats är att kvalitetsarbetet bör till stor del utgöras av att kontrollera produktavvikelser och kundnöjdhet. Till sist dras slutsatsen att organisationer gynnas av att integrera kvalitetsarbetet i produktutvecklingsprocessen.

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  • 306.
    PEYRON, FILIPPA
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Kriterier av lyckadproduktutveckling som uppfylls vid införandet av aktivitetsbaserad arbetsplatsmiljö2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

     Flera av de stora svenska företagen väljer att anpassa sina arbetsmiljöer till den aktivitetsbaserade modellen. Bland annat har TetraPak och SAAB i Göteborg valt att anpassa sina lokaler efter den nya kontorsutformningen. Trots det populära valet att omforma sina lokaler så ställer sig många frågande till ifall denna typ av utformning är den ideala. Bland annat pekar en undersökning på att flera tror att nyckeln till trivsel, hälsa och produktivitet på jobbet är genom ett eget kontor.

    Denna undersökning ämnar att ta reda på vilka kriterier som forskningen anser vara viktiga för lyckad produktutveckling, som uppfylls med införandet av aktivitetsbaserad arbetsmiljö. Undersökningen genomförs genom intervjuer med fyra respondenter från olika företag som infört ABW. Dessa respondenter intervjuas angående deras upplevelser kring kriterier som är viktiga för både produktutvecklingsarbetet och deras upplevelse av ABW. Det genomförs också en intervju med en arkitekt som varit verksam under 20 år med att hjälpa företag införa ABW i sina lokaler.

    Vad studien kommer fram till är att samtliga företag uppfyller alla kriterier som krävs av en aktivitetsbaserad miljö och att respondenterna ser på konceptet med ABW precis på samma sätt som forskningen gör. De genomför både fysiska och sociala förändringar, genomgår digitalisering, har en positiv inställning från medarbetarna, arbetar med kontinuerliga förbättringar samt har rak, öppen, flexibel och effektiv kommunikation.

    Det finns flera kriterier för god produktutveckling som uppfylls eller förbättras med införandet av ABW. Dessa är involverade från ledningsgrupp, kreativ kultur, tvärfunktionella samarbeten och förenklad kommunikation. De aspekter som undersökningen inte lyckas undersöka är arbetet med PU-processer, -strategier och -metoder. Trots att arkitekten fastslog att det går att låta medarbetare som arbetar med sammansättning av produkter och prototypframställning också sitta i aktivitetsbaserade miljöer så har de på de undersökta företagen valt att frångå detta och låta dem behålla sina fasta platser. Därför kunde inte detta heller undersökas.

    Slutligen drogs slutsatsen att inverkan på företagens produktutveckling är positiv i stor utsträckning när de inför ABW. Vissa aspekter går inte att undersöka eftersom att respondenterna inte har insyn i dem och andra aspekter går inte att undersöka eftersom att företagen inte genomfört de förändringar som är nödvändiga för att kunna undersöka dem. All inverkan som gick att undersöka hade dock en positiv tendens.

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  • 307.
    Qadoumi, Hamza
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    How to Influence the Adoption of Innovations by Communicating Value2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation adoption has established itself in literature as the individual process which consists of series of stages one undergoes from first hearing about a product to finally adopting it (Rogers, 2003). The common theory in innovation adoption literature addresses the diffusion of innovation over time, and the adoption process it undergoes by various adopter groups. Research highlights the uncertainties novel innovations might possess and the challenges of adopting such innovations, disregarding the opportunity to conceptualize the usage of the innovation, and reduction of uncertainty through communication of information embodied in the innovation itself. This report will address this gap in knowledge by assessing the influence of innovation adoption through the communication of values.

    This thesis report is based on literature studies, qualitative and quantitative research and generative sessions, which serve as a complementary perspective and add knowledge and understanding about why, what and how people adopt innovations, and its implications for both the company and its customers.

    The study has revealed the identification of several customer segments. This report also shows the possibilities of reducing perceived uncertainties while enhancing the adoption of novel innovations by communicating values through the composition of signals containing verbal and visual triggers.

    Moreover, this study introduces a different way of influencing the adoption of novel innovations with regards to technological applications and the possibilities of doing so on a much larger scale, digitally.

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  • 308.
    Qian, Chen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product Innovation Technology.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Collective firm-internal online idea development: Exploring the impact of feedback timeliness and knowledge overlapIn: European Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1460-1060, E-ISSN 1758-7115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – New opportunities to nurture good ideas for innovation arise as firms use web-based ideation platforms for collective idea generation and development. What influences creative performance in firm-internal collective idea development is however not as well researched as idea generation and thus an important area of research is the feedback and commenting on ideas. More specifically, the aim of this paper is to explore the role of feedback timeliness and knowledge overlap between feedback providers and ideas in collective firm-internal online idea development.Design/methodology/approach – An empirical study has been performed, drawing on data collected from a Swedish multi-national company using a web-based system for collective firm-internal ideation. The investigation explicitly captures the effects on ideation performance played by idea development contributions, in terms of: 1) feedback timeliness and 2) knowledge overlap between feedback providers and ideas.Findings – The empirical results show that idea development is significantly influenced by feedback timeliness as well as by the knowledge overlap between feedback providers and ideas. Specifically, it is found that longer time interval for feedback and an increased knowledge overlap result in an increased likelihood of idea acceptance. However, beyond a certain point, the positive effect of a longer feedback time interval decreases, resulting in a curvilinear relationship. Research limitations/implications – The results do not only shed new light on theory about collective idea development, but also provides management implications for collective firm-internal ideation. As the data used in the study has been collected in one single firm, care should be taken in generalizing the results to other domains.Practical implications – The results inform managers that it is not always better to involve more individuals in these emergent and distributed ideation systems, but that it might be beneficial to take measures to exercise some control in terms of when distributed and diverse employees can freely join in and out, especially considering the diversity of ideas, comments and creators. Originality/value – The results from the empirical study reveal the effects of of feedback timeliness and knowledge overlap on idea development. This provides us with new insights on the complex dynamics at place in collective firm-internal idea development, and offers implications for how we can fruitfully manage this process.

  • 309.
    Qian, Chen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Collective firm-internal online idea development Exploring the impact of feedback timeliness and knowledge overlap2019In: European Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1460-1060, E-ISSN 1758-7115, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 13-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose New opportunities to nurture good ideas for innovation arise as firms use web-based ideation platforms for collective idea generation and development. What influences creative performance in firm-internal collective idea development is however not as well researched as idea generation and thus an important area of research is the feedback and commenting on ideas. More specifically, the purpose of this paper is to explore the role of feedback timeliness and knowledge overlap between feedback providers and ideas in collective firm-internal online idea development. Design/methodology/approach An empirical study has been performed, drawing on data collected from a Swedish multi-national company using a web-based system for collective firm-internal ideation. The investigation explicitly captures the effects on ideation performance played by idea development contributions, in terms of feedback timeliness and knowledge overlap between feedback providers and ideas. Findings The empirical results show that idea development is significantly influenced by feedback timeliness as well as by the knowledge overlap between feedback providers and ideas. Specifically, it is found that longer time to feedback and an increased knowledge overlap result in an increased likelihood of idea acceptance. However, beyond a certain point, the positive effects of a longer time to feedback and increased knowledge overlap decrease, resulting in curvilinear relationships with idea acceptance. Originality/value The results from the empirical study reveal the effects of feedback timeliness and knowledge overlap on idea development. This provides us with new insights on the complex dynamics at place in collective firm-internal idea development and offers implications for how we can fruitfully manage this process.

  • 310.
    Qian, Chen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. Chongqing University, China.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product Innovation Technology.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    What drives the emergence of innovation contribution behaviors in online ideation?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to explore what different contribution behaviors there are in online ideation. Based on a data collected from a Swedish multi-national company using an idea management system, two main factors for ideation, namely: 1) motivational proactivity and 2) cognitive specificity, were used for clustering contribution behaviors through Latent Class Analysis. The results revealed four main behavioral categories and individuals belonging to different behavioral categories contributed differently to idea generation and idea development. A logistic regression model was used to test the different behavioral categories’ impacts on ideation performance. The results showed that contribution behaviors displayed in idea development impact ideation performance more than the ones in idea generation. These results contribute to existing theory through shedding new light on innovation behaviors in different ideation processes and how these behaviors impact ideation performance. Moreover, it provides management implications for online ideation at both the individual- and the firm level.

  • 311.
    Qureshi, Tahir Naseer
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Rahatulain, Afifa
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Challenges and Opportunities in Introducing Systems Engineering Process and Tools in Traditionally Hydraulic Industry2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 312.
    Rahatulain, Afifa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Qureshi, Tahir Naseer
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The impact of non-holistic decision making on product development projects - A case study2019In: 2019 IEEE International Symposium on Systems Engineering, IEEE conference proceedings, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 313. Regnell, B.
    et al.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Höst, M.
    Larsson, T.
    Nilsson, F.
    Sundin, E.
    Mätning av innovationsförmåga i team2008In: Innovationsförmåga / [ed] Olsson, A, Malmö: Holmbergs , 2008, p. 78-105Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 314. Richtner, Anders
    et al.
    Brattstrom, Anna
    Frishammar, Johan
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Creating Better Innovation Measurement Practices2017In: MIT Sloan Management Review, ISSN 1532-9194, E-ISSN 1532-8937, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 45-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 315.
    Ringenson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Arnfalk, Peter
    Kramers, Anna H.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies. Integrated Transport Research Lab (ITRL).
    Sopjani, Liridona
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Indicators for Promising Accessibility and Mobility Services2018In: Sustainability: Science, Practice, & Policy, ISSN 1548-7733, E-ISSN 1548-7733, Vol. 10, no 8, article id 2836Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cities are increasingly facing major transportation challenges, and new sustainable solutions are needed. New ICT-enabled services can be part of solving the problems, including both improving and finding new transportation services and providing digital access to different services. It is important to identify which services have the best potential for environmental benefits (e.g., travel reduction leading to lesser emissions), economic viability and spread. Such identification can be carried out with the help of indicators. This article uses four types of new accessibility services to test out a previously formulated set of indicators and suggest changes to make them more useful. Using common indicators for transportation and digital accessibility services seem to support collecting and condensing information about the services and simplifies understanding their benefits and challenges. However, a challenge for this approach is finding indicators that are both specific and broad enough to be useful. Full article

  • 316.
    Ringqvist, Emma
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nyckeln till framgång i Systematiskt Arbetsmiljöarbete2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Companies engaged in Systematic Work Environment Management (SWEM) have been shown to have healthier and more satisfied workers, better reputation, and greater monetary success than companies that do not. There is however a knowledge-gap about what approaches or attitudes companies with successful SWEM utilize, that lead to this success. Up to date, the focus of case studies have been how SAM as a whole is conducted in companies, or what flaws there are, regardless of the companies’ level of success. In short, there is a lack of relevant research. This work is a study of an eldercare unit (eldercare being a profession with over-all poor working environment) that conducts SWEM efficiently, the goal being to understand the reasons to their success. Employees of all levels were interviewed in order to gain insight into what type of work they do and how that relates to SWEM, after which an analysis of the interview-transcriptions was made to identify what practices and behaviours promote efficient SWEM. From these, a number of main components emerged – keys to success. The keys were (1) a focus on patient well-being, (2) keen leadership, and (3) open communication. Although work environment management may differ between different industries and companies, the keys are general enough to give employers a clue about what they need to work on in order to promote SWEM.

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  • 317.
    Ringård, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Segerlund, Carl
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Leading innovators: barriers and enablers to innovation2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 318.
    Risberg, Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Large companies taking climate action by using science-based methods: A case study performed at a global leader in appliance manufacturing with a leading position in sustainability2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Many companies acknowledge the threat from global carbon emissions and how it affects climate change. Despite the continuous warnings, many organizations lack the necessary and recommended action plans that can hamper their negative impact on the environment. One of the managerial tools that companies use globally in order to work proactively and strategically on issues related to the environment, is to set up carbon reduction targets. With time companies have in-house strategies on how to reach the carbon reduction targets by creating a roadmap of cutting measures. Unfortunately, the majority of companies do not have carbon reduction targets that are in line with what science think is needed to avoid contributing to global warming. Nonetheless, forward-thinking early adopters have been using “science-based” methods to challenge the status quo by developing ambitious carbon targets that are in line with today’s best carbon science.

    This qualitative research investigates the challenging steps from setting a long-term carbon target, using the guidelines and methods presented by the Science-based target initiative. With an exploratory research approach, a case study was conducted at a global leader in appliance manufacturing and industry leader within sustainability. The data was gathered by using semistructured interviews combined with observational findings with a focus to examine how carbon targets emerge in a situated organizational setting. The interviewee's representatives come from two categories, internal company representatives and, external companies that have used the guidelines to set science-based carbon targets. For manufacturing firms, the findings from investigating three steps of the process: calculating the base-year, target integration and predicting future technology development. Calculating the base-year was identified as the most challenging step.

    The empirical findings helped build an understanding of the different dimensions that facilitate corporate sustainability management. This research has helped to contribute to the lack of empirical findings within the carbon management and carbon target area. Specifically, the sciencebased carbon target topic.

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  • 319.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Design and Product Realization: a student oriented course approach for high motivation and deep learning2004In: Proceeding of International Engineering and Product Design Education Conference, September 2.3, 2004, Delft, The Netherlands, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 320.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    PIEp: Product Innovation Engineering program2008In: Innovationsförmåga / [ed] Olsson, A, Malmö: Holmbergs , 2008Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 321.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Product Innovation Engineering program: en nationell och långsiktig satsning för ökad innovationsförmåga2008In: Management of Technology, no 10, p. 14-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 322.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Aagaard, Annabeth
    Aarhus University, Dept. Business Development & Technology.
    Arekrans, Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Laurenti, Rafael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Analyzing co-creation in business models as going circular2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The business potentials of businesses and business models going circular are vast as identified by Nasr (2011). Despite the increase of publications on the topic of circular economy (CE) and circular business models (CBM), there is still a lack of research on the effect on sustainability orientation of the organization (Parida & Vincent, 2019). Also, many firms reveal a lack of integration of sustainability issues in their business strategy and business models, typically hampering a transition to CE (Ritzén and Ölundh Sandström, 2017).

    According to Urbinati, Chiaroni and Chiesa (2017) CBMs can be explored based on the degree of adoption of circularity along two major dimensions:

    1. the customer value proposition & interface, i.e. the implementation of the circularity concept in proposing value to customers;
    2. the value network, i.e. the ways through which interacting with suppliers and reorganizing the own internal activities.

    The analysis of this study is focused on describing the new business models that these organizations have defined for going circular and specifically scrutinizing the actions (or non-actions) of co-creation that occurs in their value network. T

    he selected case organizations are four large mature OEMs, B2C and B2B, and one small C2C service provider. The paper contributes empirically and theoretically with exploration and empirical illustrations of organizations fully in action of innovating their CBMs and identifies the key challenges in integrating CE and business, when innovation is a matter for the companies’ value networks and not only for the individual company.

  • 323.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Beskow, C
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Continous Improvement of the Product Development Process1999In: Proceedings of ICED 99, Munich, Germany, 1999, 1999Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 324.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Gutiérrez, Ernesto
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Probe: managing the project portfolio for competitive advantage2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 325.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    CONSIDERATIONS FOR AN INNOVATION MEASUREMENT SYSTEM SUPPORTING  CHANGES TOWARDS INCREASED INNOVATION CAPABILITY IN PRACTICE2011In: 12th Continuous Innovation Network Conference (CINET), 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 326.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Designing and implementing a method to build innovation capability in product development teams2013In: Proceedings of iced13 volume 6: design information and knowledge, The Design Society, 2013, Vol. 6 DS75-06, p. 199-208Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a framework and process (MINT) to support product development teams that have an ambition to improve their capability to manage both radical and incremental innovation. The driving force for the method was a clearly expressed need from teams to be able to measure and direct and change their own innovation work practice. The paper encompasses a longitudinal collaboration between academia and industry and aims to contribute to the development of a deeper understanding of how to successfully implement design research results in practice as called for by the design research community. The MINT method which is outlined in the paper has been developed and successfully adopted to the need of different teams in several companies. The learning outcome from the research project is analysed and three categories of critical factors which relates to the design, content and implementation process of the method are discussed and compared to relevant innovation and change management literature.

  • 327.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Identification of new opportunities2009In: Organising for innovation and growth: Experiences and efforts in ten companies / [ed] Marianne Döös, Lena Wilhelmson, Stockholm: Vinnova , 2009Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 328.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Innovative teams in St. Jude Medical AB: new opportunities identification2009In: High Road Strategy for Innovation, VINNOVA , 2009Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 329.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Introducing management controls in an entrepreneurial company and its influence on achieving ambidexterity2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a study of how combinations of management controls are introduced and influencing a small entrepreneurial company over time. Particularly, it studies why these controls are introduced and how they are influencing the company´s ability to achieve ambidexterity i.e. to be flexible and innovative and yet enable the efficiency required. Using a combination of interviews and document analysis in an entrepreneurial clean-tech firm rich data on the emergence of management controls is collected. The preliminary analysis shows that drivers for introducing management controls goes from external to internal factors over time and that personnel controls slowly are replaced by more formal processes until the firm experience a fast growth in size. In this phase, the organisation is seen to intensively introduce both more formal processes and structures in parallel to a strong focus on a consciously strengthen its entrepreneurial cultural to achieve ambidexterity. The study is able to put some light on challenges related to how small entrepreneurial companies are managing an ambition to remain innovative while increasing its level of management control as a response to its growing in size. The result from the study indicates that the types of management controls in use over time builds on each other and that the introduction of management controls to manage innovation is particularly challenging.

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  • 330.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Managing the Tensions to Achieve Ambidexterity in a Small Growing Frim2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we report on what tensions arise, as a small growing clean tech company attempt to keep their innovative culture, while striving to improve their efficiency. The company provides a particularly interesting case as it is in a midst of a strong growth phase in combination with that its management has both an awareness of and a willingness to take bold actions to achieve an ambidextrous organization. Both managers and employees are interviewed complementing the rather single sided focus on managers in existing literature. The two groups are found to have different views on what tensions are most crucial to manage; managers tend to focus on handling the tension between innovation understood as idea generation and efficiency while employees found the tension arising from managers inability to make decisions on what innovation projects to select more crucial. In addition, employees found the internal effort to increase sales and administrative process efficiency enabling also for innovation and do not perceive a tension between innovation and efficiency. Based in the study the use of a shared leadership model with a clear division between sensing and developing opportunities and managing procedures for efficiency is identified as a novel and interesting approach for achieving ambidexterity

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  • 331.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Change Mechanisms for Increasing Innovation Capability2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 332.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus P.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Innovation in teams: inducing action by defining challenges and indicators2012In: Proceedings of the 19th International Product Development, Management Conference, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 333.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Research Based Experimentation for Increasing Innovation Capaiblity2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 334.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    LCA and EPS: Experiences from Use in Industry1995In: International Conference on Engineering Design ICED 1995, Praha., 1995Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 335.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Sandström Ö., Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Barriers to the Circular Economy - Integration of Perspectives and Domains2017In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier B.V. , 2017, p. 7-12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable development requires disruptive changes and radical innovations, and the capability to deliver this in relation to adapt to a sustainable development is needed in mature large industrial companies. Integration between sustainability and business development is needed, which the Circular Economy model offers. Circular Economy is little implemented in practice, and in the present paper barriers to a transition to Circular Economy is identified. Barriers are financial, structural, operational, attitudinal and technological. They are also, as analyzed in relation to innovation management, characterized by a need to increase integration between a number of different perspectives and domains in industry.

  • 336.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Udén, Maria
    Innovationspiloterna, PIEp.
    PIEp Innovationspiloter – ökad innovationsförmåga genom analys och kreativitet2012In: Management of Innovation and Technology, IMIT, ISSN 2001-208X, no 4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 337.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Zika-Viktorsson, A.
    Forslin, R.
    Mats, Engwall
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Learning to change: a network approach to engineering management development2005In: International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED 05, Melbourne, August 15-18, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 338.
    Rosén, Josefin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Evaluating Innovation Readiness - A Case Study2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    To remain competitive and create a sustainable business, Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) need to develop both incremental and radical innovation. What many companies struggle with is to evaluate the potential of innovation initiatives. The development of products and innovations has over the years changed from a traditional technocentric view into a more human-centered view with the user’s desirability in focus. Also, the increased global competition and interest in business model innovation are forcing companies to verify the viability of the offering to their customers. While Technology Readiness Level (TRL) is an established tool for evaluating the technology, there are no holistic methods which also evaluates the readiness of the users and business. 

    The purpose of this thesis was to review available theory and methods used for evaluating the potential and readiness of innovation initiatives and to develop a holistic methodology to link the business, user, and technology related innovation activities. The innovation readiness is a combination of business, user, and technology readiness. The study started with a literature study where existing methods were presented from the three aspects; business, user, and technology. Since many critical decisions are made in the front-end of the innovation, the focus in the study has been to identify methods in the early stages of the process. This thesis was performed in collaboration with Company X, a global equipment manufacturer which also was the main object in this study. The findings from a case study performed at Company X were verified by comparing the identified methods and processes used at five external companies. Data was gathered by conducting semi-structured interviews both at Company X and the external companies and finding were compared in a cross-case analysis. In general, the methods used at the OEMs are quite similar, and all manage to balance the three aspects; business, user, and technology. 

    Based on the findings from the study of the companies and the literature review, a methodology framework is suggested which presents existing evaluating methods from the three aspects business, user, and technology. 

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  • 339. Sakao, T.
    et al.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Matsen, D.
    Framing research for service orientation of manufacturers through PSS approaches2009In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 754-778Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In order to respond to the industrial trend towards service design and delivery, research must address a vast area partially related to value creation, marketing and network theories. However, compared to the space to be explored, there is little insight available. Thus, the purpose of this paper, as a first step, is to propose a way to frame such research. Design/methodology/ approach: An extensive literature review is performed of over 100 articles on product/service system (PSS) in general, service design, innovation, and business models in a broad view. Then, the analysis from the authors' viewpoint is carried out to give a frame. Findings: The paper presents three crucial dimensions for service-orientation research, i.e. an offer dimension representing products and services, a provider dimension, and a customer/user dimension. In addition, three research targets are proposed: PSS-offer modelling, PSS development and PSS potential. Furthermore, several promising future research directions are identified. These include evaluating economic consequences or environmental benefits, establishing terminology, organizational issues, and developing methods and tools to support designers. Originality/value: The paper presents a way of viewing research for service orientation, which contributes especially to further research in this area.

  • 340. Sakao, Tomohiko
    et al.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, Anna
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Uncovering benefits and risks of integrated product service offerings - Using a case of technology encapsulation2013In: Journal of Systems Science and Systems Engineering, ISSN 1004-3756, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 421-439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this article is to uncover benefits and risks of Integrated Product Service Offering (IPSO) in a systematic manner. To do so, it adopts an explorative longitudinal in-depth case study (development of an IPSO based on a new technology) and adds insights to the existing literature. The article first proposes a theoretical and generic framework termed the PCP (Provider - Customer - Product) triangle with associated information flow and uncertainty. Second, various types of benefits and risks are presented based on the framework. Among others, the benefit of keeping IPR (Intellectual Property Rights) with the provider and the risk of regulation change are new findings from the case study. In addition, the case study reveals that IPSO is regarded as a positive contributor to innovation. Applying the framework and classification of benefits and risks as norms to other cases has yet to be done for verification. However, the framework contributes scientifically to a better understanding of the benefits and risks of IPSO. In addition, this framework is advantageous with its easiness to understand, which contributes practically to the dissemination of IPSO insight to industry.

  • 341. Sandström, C.
    et al.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Value, Actors and Networks: a revised perspective on Disruptive Innovation2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 342. Sandström, Christian
    et al.
    Berglund, Henrik
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Symmetric Assumptions in the Theory of Disruptive Innovation: Theoretical and Managerial Implications2014In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 472-483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on disruptive innovation has convincingly explained why many established firms encounter problems under conditions of discontinuous change. Incumbents fail to invest in new technologies that are not demanded by their existing customers. This argument is grounded in resource dependency theory and the associated assumption that existing customers control a firm's internal resource allocation processes. While the problem of disruptive innovation has been convincingly explained, there is still a need for managerial solutions. We argue that a key reason why such solutions are lacking can be found in the asymmetric assumptions made in the original theory of disruptive innovation. Specifically, we identify two related forms of asymmetry. First, the focal (incumbent) firm is treated as a collection of heterogeneous actors with different preferences, incentives and competencies, whereas firms in the surrounding environment are treated as if they contained no such heterogeneity. Second, the theory of disruptive innovation describes incumbents as controlled by their environment, but has failed to recognize that the environment can also be influenced. In this paper we argue that a more symmetric theory of disruptive innovation-i.e. one that treats all similar entities in the same way-opens up for a range of interesting managerial solutions.

  • 343. Schmidt, D. M.
    et al.
    Schenkl, S. A.
    Munkhart, E.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Mortl, M.
    Interview study: Decisions and decision criteria for development in industry2014In: IEEE International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management, 2014, p. 297-301Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decision-making in early stages of product development affects product success essentially. For this reason, the professional handling and management of decisions in early development stages is necessary. To investigate current decision-making in industry, we conducted an interview study to quantify decision criteria, which decision makers from industry base their decisions on. Dependent on a list of decision criteria from literature, several employees from RandD departments were interviewed and the interviews were analyzed regarding decision criteria. Most important decision criteria are the financial aspect, customer requirements and product-technical feasibility. However, interviewees did not mention a few other criteria, which were mentioned in literature.

  • 344.
    Simonsson, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Collaboration Challenges in Digital Service Innovation Projects2018In: International Journal of Automation Technology, ISSN 1881-7629, E-ISSN 1883-8022, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 499-506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalization is frequently seen as an important source of service innovation, enabling new solutions where products and services are bundled into offerings. As the realization of such offerings frequently requires the inclusion of new technological components and implies changes to activities across the value chain, they often require collaboration with other companies. This article explores what challenges arise when different organizations collaborate in service innovation enabled by digitalization. This study investigates a joint project between three companies aiming to innovate, build, and verify a proof-of-concept for an automated return process at a European rental company in the construction industry. An explorative case study approach was selected, and data were collected through semi-structured interviews with key managers in the collaborating companies as well as through meetings and workshops during the innovation project. The empirical observations revealed four main challenges: (1) the formulation of shared and complementary innovation objectives, (2) the joint design of a new business model addressing both value creation and value appropriation, (3) the management of the collaborative project across organizational boundaries, and (4) the fruitful combining of multiple agile organizing approaches.

  • 345.
    Simonsson, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Digital Business Model Innovation: Implications for Offering, Platform and Organization: Driving Transformation and Innovation2018In: Digital Business Models: Driving Transformation and Innovation / [ed] Annabeth Aagaard, Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 147-168Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simonsson and Magnusson address a range of issues facing original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) using digital technologies as a means for increasing the service part of their offerings. Digitalization enables manufacturing companies to pursue new strategies where various services are bundled with products to support customers in a larger part of their businesses and operations, often referred to as servitization. Such a transition is of interest for OEMs as it allows them to target a bigger area of the customer business and builds closer customer contact. This chapter identifies and explores a number of fundamental challenges related to this type of digital business model innovation, more specifically customer interaction, offer delivery, platform strategies and organization, based on a case study from the Swedish company Husqvarna.

  • 346.
    Sopjani, Liridona
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Integrated Transport Research Lab, ITRL. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Arekrans, Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Laurenti, Rafael
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Unlocking the Linear Lock-In: Mapping Research on Barriers to Transition2020In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 3, article id 1034Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The linear paradigm of take-make-dispose in production and consumption patterns impedes the achievement of global sustainability goals. Strategies for maintaining the added value of resources and circulating them have been discussed as promising for the future. There are, however, many barriers to be addressed to overcome the linear lock-in. The large body of literature on these barriers is notably diverse in terms of theory, methods, sectors, products, and settings. This demonstrates the complexity of delineating implications to the practice and research needs. Without a common framework to analyse barriers, knowledge does not accumulate, hindering the development and implementation of solutions and policies that could effectively address the barriers. In this article, we developed a systematic map of studies on barriers related to the circular transition. The purpose was twofold: (1) to classify published research on barriers; (2) to provide a searchable database for future more rigorous systematic literature reviews. We reviewed the abstract of 527 publications and classified the study according to a developed scheme. This classification scheme includes the research paradigms (circular economy, sharing economy, collaborative consumption and product-service systems), circular strategy (recycling, remanufacturing, component/product reuse, and access-based consumption), country, sector/industry/product, and research approach and method. The resulting research map is open source, serving also as an adaptive digital database for researchers alike to perform systematic reviews and contribute further to its collaborative development

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  • 347.
    Sopjani, Liridona
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Integrated Transport Research Lab, ITRL. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. humanexperience.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Janhager Stier, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    Aligning private and public domains for sustainable disruptive innovation2016In: Proceedings og 17th International CINet Conference / [ed] Dr. Paolo Neirotti, Turin, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the constellation of various actors from private and public

    sectors represented by three companies, a municipality, a non-profit

    organization, a research lab and users to collaborate on bringing forward a

    sustainability driven disruptive innovation. The purpose of the paper is to

    investigate how the various actors’ interests and contributions influence the

    management of the collaboration setup and what barriers and enablers boost or

    impede the outcome of the setup, i.e. deploying an innovation with sustainability

    promise. We argue that the alignment of diverse actors’ interests and aims for

    the innovation in collaborative settings is crucial for the collaboration to lead to

    desirable outcomes. However, only alignment at an abstract level cannot ensure

    success even when actors bring competencies that balance the innovation

    requirements. Rather, creating cohesion and commitment of all actors

    simultaneously at a concrete level is necessary. The integration of new

    approaches to collaboration such as design methods may strengthen

    commitment despite actors coming from different organizational cultures and

    traditions.

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  • 348.
    Sopjani, Liridona
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Integrated Transport Research Lab, ITRL. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. humanexperience.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    Janhager Stier, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Co-creation with diverse actors for sustainability innovation2017In: Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Engineering Design (ICED17), Vol. 8: Human Behaviour in Design, Vancouver, Canada, 21.-25.08.2017 / [ed] Anja Maier, Stanko Škec, Harrison Kim, Michael Kokkolaras, Josef Oehmen, Georges Fadel, Filippo Salustri, Mike Van der Loos, Vancouver, 2017, Vol. 8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability driven innovations differ from current established technologies imposing new

    requirements on users and often interdependent with other actors’ changes. Strategic Niche Management

    (SNM) stresses interactions between actors through niches i.e. protected spaces for experimentation to

    support innovation. However, it is unclear what activities are necessary when different actors are

    involved in developing and diffusing sustainability innovation. This paper aims at identifying activities

    crucial for sustainability innovation in an implemented mobility project. The results show that cocreation

    through iterations and reflections by combinations of diverse actors and users can be considered

    a core process for sustainability innovation. Six activities are identified as critical: matching the

    interdependencies by combining the actors’ diverse competences and resources; facilitating to steer the

    group of actors into actions; engaging users at early stages of innovation; trying to drive change by

    offering the users an opportunity; co-creating through a multitude of actors with the development and

    usage simultaneously; steering and facilitating to enable co-creation.

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  • 349.
    Sopjani, Liridona
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Integrated Transport Research Lab, ITRL. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager Stier, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    User involvement in disruptive innovation – A study on users of a light electric vehicle sharing system2016In: Proceedings of 23rd Innovation and Product Development Management Conference / [ed] Nuran ACUR, Glasgow, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the extent to which user involvement in disruptive innovation

    influences the users in terms of their experiences when exposed to such innovation for

    a period of time. The study is conducted in an on-going research project undertaken in

    collaboration with academia and private stakeholders, which is developing and

    implementing a product-service system for light electric vehicles. This solution is

    environmentally driven and new in two ways: it integrates a different type of vehicle

    and introduces a new service concept i.e. the caretaker concept. The users are studied

    while they interact with the innovation in their own environments, where emphasis

    has been placed on the experiences of these users when disruptive innovations as such

    are introduced into their everyday life. Data from the first seven users (caretakers)

    were collected through a survey and semi-structured interviews over two periods of

    time, from which early user characteristics are presented and user experiences when

    deploying disruptive innovations, as well as enablers and barriers for integrating these

    into daily life. As disruptive innovations tend to redefine or restructure market

    trajectories to some extent, understanding these user segments and their experienced

    enablers and barriers may facilitate the creation of better strategies on how to make

    these innovations more desirable for society at large. Findings suggest that user

    involvement positively influences users experiences toward adapting to new ideas

    with regards to mobility.

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  • 350.
    Sopjani, Liridona
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Integrated Transport Research Lab, ITRL. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager Stier, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    Hesselgren, Mia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Georén, Peter
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Involving users and user roles in the transition to sustainable mobility systems: The case of light electric vehicle sharing in Sweden2019In: Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, ISSN 1369-8478, E-ISSN 1873-5517, Vol. 71, p. 207-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low-carbon mobility alternatives, such as shared services integrating light electric vehicles, support transitions to sustainable transport systems. However, new products and services are not enough, as changes must also incorporate the practices of travelling, infrastructure, and mobility cultures in which users of mobility solutions are core stakeholders. This paper argues that userinvolvement is necessary in sustainable innovation processes but that the expected diversity of user roles and their involvement can also lead to contrasting outcomes for sustainable innovation transitions. Guided by theory in user involvement, this study investigated users and nonusers of light electric vehicles in a sharing mobility service system set up as living lab in two large workplaces in Sweden. Fifty-one interviews with employees at the workplaces were conducted during the implementation process and analysed combined with a questionnaire and data from system tracking through sensor technology. The paper finds that both users and non-users are co-creators in building momentum for sustainable mobility alternatives and provides a spectrum of user roles with defined characteristics. Four roles are distinguished within this spectrum: vigilant users, passive collaborators, active decision makers and ambassadors. We suggest that a convergent activation strategy is deployed for involving a full spectrum of users in order to capture their insights in ways that positively affect transition. Such a strategy addresses users and non-users as part of decision-making concerning alternatives and cultivates a culture of user collaboration, while also enabling a plurality of contributions in order to challenge existing regimes and established practices among individuals

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