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  • 301. Darmark, Kim
    et al.
    Vogel, Pierre
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Kol- och skärvstensgropar i Enköpingstrakten: Ekonomiska förändringar under övergången till yngre bronsålder. Arkeologiska undersökningar längs nya väg E18 mellan Enköping och Sagån2008Report (Other academic)
  • 302.
    Davidsson, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Tingsplatser i Västanstång: En rättshistorisk jämförelse2007Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 303.
    Davidsson, Sebastian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Khopesh: Den rike mannens yxa?2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With its exotic appearance and depictions in ancient Egyptian art and literature, the curved sword referred to as ’khopesh’ has been the source of much speculation. While its actual use as a weapon of war is debated, as is its level of effectiveness, there can be no doubt that it was a highly prestigious symbol of power. This essay aims to shed light on not only the practical aspects of such a weapon but also to delve into the cultural and in particular royal ideological roles. This is achieved through studying textual sources, representations in art and preserved examples of the weapon. Comparisons will also be made with other contemporary bladed weapons in Egypt and its vicinity. Aspects of metallurgy which allows for the making of swords will also be touched upon.

  • 304.
    Deflorian, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Governing the "Enough" in a Warming World: The Discourse of Sufficiency from a Climate Governmentality Perspective2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis deals with the discourse of “sufficiency” as a response to the question of how government should be achieved in times of climate change. Sufficiency implies the critique of the imperative of economic growth and a return to a “sufficient” degree of consumption and partial subsistence in order to reach qualitative well-being. “Government” is understood in the Foucauldian sense as any attempt to shape the behavior of individuals, groups and the self, which can be examined through the lenses of “governmentality”, the rationalities and technologies  involved.  Drawing  from  Michel  Foucault's  endeavor  to  write  a  “history  of problematics” and Mitchell Dean's framework of an “analytics of government”, I develop a discourse analytical method to scrutinize how government is reconceived through the prac-tice of thought. Three books by leading advocates of the idea of sufficiency, which all hold potential programs of climate government, serve as case studies. By focussing on the fields of  visibility,  knowledge,  technical  means  and  identities  of  government,  I  reconstruct  the problematization of forms of government, the reconfiguration of governmentalities and the planned subjectification of individuals. My results indicate that human conduct in various domains is to be steered towards the total reduction of energy, resource use and emissions in order to achieve a stable climate in 2050. Through techniques of disciplinary and sovereign power individuals should develop two new “technologies of the self”: the re-balancing of needs  (through  the  reflection  on  personal  aspirations)  and  the  self-furnishing  of  demands (through practices like gardening, repairing and shared consumption). In that way, the gov-ernmentality of sufficiency remediates elements of liberalism and modern progress to guar-antee a “good life” for all in a warming world.

  • 305. Demakopoulou, Katie
    et al.
    Schallin, Ann-Louise
    Weiberg, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. Antikens kultur och samhällsliv.
    Excavations in Midea 2003: B. East Gate Area. Outside the East Gate: Trench 4 with extensions 4B, 4C and 4D and Cleanings 1-52004In: Opuscula Atheniensia: Annual of the Swedish Institute at Athens, ISSN 0078-5520, Vol. 29, p. 22-25Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 306.
    Dirlik, Nil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    The Tholos Tombs of Mycenaean Greece2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is contains descriptions and definitions of the 2nd millennium BC tholos tomb architecture in Mainland Greece. The study area is divided into eight regions: Peloponnessos, Central Greece, Epirus, Attica, Euboea, Thessaly, Macedonia and Thrace. The time period of earliest tomb dated between 2000-1675 BC and the latest between 1320-1160 BC. Attention has been put on issues of typological characteristics, construction technique and stone materials of the tholos tombs.

  • 307.
    Domeij Lundborg, Maria
    et al.
    tionen för arkeologi och antikens historia, Lunds universitet.
    Helmbrecht, Michaela
    tionen för arkeologi och antikens historia, Lunds universitet.
    Neiß (Neiss), Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    A final reply to Carrie Roy2012In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 107, no 2012:3, p. 217-219Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    At the 14th Saga Conference, Carrie Roy presented a paper on the meaning of the gripping- beast motif in Viking Period culture. Roy leveled serious criticism against her peers, including the co-authors of this note, declaring them victims of their own subjectivity. In Fornvännen 2012:1, we responded to criticism that Carrie Roy had directed towards us in print. The matter appeared especially urgent as her account contained errors of fact and misquotations that did injury to fellow researchers. Thus, the main focus of our reply was on academic craftsmanship. Reading Roy's reply in Fornvännen 2012:2, we noted with regret that she remains set in her ways, rather than admitting human error. Therefore, we felt compelled to compose a final reply.

  • 308. Dorais, Michael
    et al.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Shriner, Christina
    Evidence for a Single Clay/Temper Source for the Manufacture of Middle and Late Helladic Aeginetan Pottery from Asine, Greece2004In: Geoarchaeology, ISSN 0883-6353, E-ISSN 1520-6548, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 657-684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an effort to further characterize the Middle and Late Helladic pottery industry on Aegina, we have analyzed amphibole in 23 sherds imported to the coastal settlement of Asine. The sherds derive from vessels of different classes and shapes and range in age from MH I-II to LH IIIB-IIIC Early. All sherds come from vessels that carry manufacturing marks, and their amphiboles have compositions that are incompatible with those of Methana, Poros, and Melos. Twenty of the sherds have amphiboles that are identical in composition and overlap a narrow range of amphibole compositions found in specific lava flows on the northern portion of Aegina. Given that the dacites across Aegina contain amphiboles with a wide range in compositions, we suggest that the narrow range of amphibole compositions in the sherds indicates that they were derived from either a specific clay source on the island, located in a stream system southeast of the prehistoric settlement at Kolonna, or that the potters used a specific temper source along the same stream system. Multiple clay or temper sources would have produced sherds with a broader range of amphibole compositions reflecting the diversity of amphibole compositions found on Aegina. One sherd has amphibole compositions indicative of an additional Aeginetan component that is not found in the other sherds. Two sherds have amphiboles with compositions that do not match any known reference amphiboles for Aegina, Methana, Poros, or Melos. These may have been derived from still unsampled dacites on Aegina or have been manufactured from materials located outside the Saronic Gulf.

  • 309.
    Duczko, Wladyslaw
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Byzantine Presence in Viking Age Sweden - Archaeological Finds and their Interpretation1997In: Rom und Byzanz im Norden, Internationale Fachkonferenz, Kiel 18-25 September 1994, 1997, p. 291-311Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 310.
    Duczko, Wladyslaw
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Contacts btween Estonia and Scandinavia in the light of the 12th century hoard from Valbo1995In: Archaeology East and West of the Baltic. Papers from the Second Estonia-Swedish Archaeological Symposium Sigtuna May 1991, 1995, p. 99-102Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 311.
    Duczko, Wladyslaw
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Fullerö1996In: Reallexikon der Germanischen Altertumskunde (J. Hoops), Vol. 10, no L 3/4, p. 242-243Other (Other scientific)
  • 312.
    Duczko, Wladyslaw
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Gamla Uppsala1997In: Reallexikon der Germanischen Altertumskunde (J. Hoops), Vol. 10, no L.5/6, p. 409-418Other (Other scientific)
  • 313.
    Duczko, Wladyslaw
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Gamla Uppsala - svearnas maktcentrum i äldre och nyare forskning (Gamla Uppsala - the centre of power in older and new research)1997In: "...gick Grendel att söka det höga huset.." Arkeologiska källor till aristokratiska miljöer i Skandinavien under yngre järnålder (Archaeological sources to the aristocratic milieu in Scandinavia during the Early and later Iron Age). Rapport från ett semin, 1997, p. 71-81Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 314.
    Duczko, Wladyslaw
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Inledning (Introduction), De litterera och arkeologiska kungarna (The litteratur and archaeological kings), Kungsgården (King`s estate), Uppsalahögarna som symboler och arkeologiska källor (Uppsala mounds as symbols and archaeological sources), About East1996In: Arkeologi och miljögeologi i Gamla Uppsala. Studier och rapporter ( Archaeology and environmental geology in Gamla Uppsala. Studies and reports), Bo Gräslund, Uppsala , 1996, Vol. II, p. 5-6; 9Chapter in book (Other scientific)
  • 315.
    Duczko, Wladyslaw
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Kungar, thegnar, Tegnebyar, juveler och silverskatter.Om danskt inflytande i Sverige under senvikingatid(Kings, thegns, Tegnebys, jewellery and hoards. On Danish influence in Sweden during the late Viking Age)1995In: Tor - Journal of Archaeology, Uppsala, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 625-662Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 316.
    Duczko, Wladyslaw
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Med volvo till vikingatid (With Volvo to Viking Age)1995In: Fjölnir, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 65-71Article, book review (Other scientific)
  • 317.
    Duczko, Wladyslaw
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Nytt om Gamla Uppsala (New about Gamla Uppsala)1998In: Gamla Uppsala - centralplats och omland. Arkeologisk Förundersökning på Ostkustbanan 1996-97. RAÄ UV Uppsala Rapport, Vol. 1997:26, p. 13-23Report (Other scientific)
  • 318.
    Duczko, Wladyslaw
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Oksana Minaeva. From Paganism to Christianity: Formation of Medieval Bulgarian Art (681-972), 19961997In: Bysantinska Sällskapet Bulletin, Vol. 15, p. 45-46Article, book review (Other scientific)
  • 319.
    Duczko, Wladyslaw
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Real and imaginary contributions of Poland and Rus to the conversion of Sweden1997In: Early Christianity in Central Europe, Paper of Conferance at Lublin 1996, Przemyslaw Urbanczyk, Warsaw , 1997, p. 129-135Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 320.
    Duczko, Wladyslaw
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Round Brooches of Tunby/Jägarbacken-Type. An example of Danish Viking Age jewellery and its place in European goldsmith`s art.1998In: Studien zur Archäologie des Ostseeraumes. Festschrift fur Michael Muller-Wille., , p. 529 - 536Other (Other scientific)
  • 321.
    Duczko, Wladyslaw
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Ruriks tryzub och torshammare med svärdet. Vad ett vikingatida hänge har oss att säga (Rurik`s "tryzub" and the hammar of Thor with sword . What a Viking -age pendant may say us)1995In: Fjölnir, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 9-16Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 322.
    Duczko, Wladyslaw
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Scandinavians in the Southern Baltic between the 5th and the 10th centuries AD1997In: Origins of Central Europe, Papers of Conference at Jadwisin, 1996, Przemyslaw Urbanczyk, Warsaw , 1997, p. 191-211Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 323.
    Duczko, Wladyslaw
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Stara Uppsala: centrum wladzy wczesnosredniowiecznej Szwecji (Old Uppsala: centre of power in the Early Medieval Sweden)1998In: Studia z dziejów cywilizacji, Festschrift for Jerzy Gassowski, , p. 75-79Other (Other scientific)
  • 324.
    Duczko, Wladyslaw
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Viking Sweden and Byzantium. An Archaeologist`s version1996In: Byzantium - Identity, Image, Influence, XIX International Congress of Byzantine Studies, University of Copenhagen 18-24 August 1996, 1996, Vol. I, p. 193-200Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 325.
    Duczko, Wladyslaw
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Viking Sweden and Islam - An Archaeological view1998In: Byzantium and Islam in Scandinavia. Papers of the Symposium held at Uppsala 15-16 June 1996, 1998, p. 107-115Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 326.
    Duczko, Wladyslaw
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Vikingatida silversmycken i Mora-skatten. Den icke-monetära delen av en nyupptäckt silverskatt från Dalarna1978In: Tor: meddelanden från Uppsala universitets museum för nordiska fornsaker, ISSN 0495-8772, Vol. 18, p. 311-358Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 327.
    Duna, Amar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Hades Hus: Topografi och arkitektur i den antika grekiska och romerska underjorden2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper looks to examine the topographical and architectural elements of the Greco-Roman underworld Hades during antiquity. Previous research has investigated either the Greek or Roman authors in order to investigate the topography and architecture of the underworld. The well preserved orphic gold tablets have shed some light to the topographical and architectural elements of the underworld but modern research have concluded that these describe the entrance to the underworld. The Greco-Roman mentality on maps and physical places have been an essential aspect in the study of the topography and architecture of the underworld due to the fact that ancient authors have possibly been inspired by this mentality. In this thesis the ancient authors, both Greek and Roman, have been put into a chronological context to establish the topography over the Greco-Roman Underworld and describe the changes that occur over time between the different authors during antiquity. The results are then used to make a connection between the author’s interpretations and the mentality of maps and physical places.    

  • 328.
    Duphorn, Walter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Gränser i tid och rum: En analys av de händelser och gränser som kan ses i osteologiskt material från Buttle Änge2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to see what new information can be added to the growing knowledge of the site Buttle Änge by analysing the osteological materials that have been found in proximity to picture stones (trench 4) and the inlying cairn (trench 12) in 2013. This area has been used in varying ways for a very long time, on the site graves from the late Vendel Period and early Viking Age have been dated in addition to this large amounts of ceramic shards and slag indicate that at some point melting and pottery had been performed on the site. The focus of this analysis has mainly been on identifying the activities that can be seen in the osteological materials and to arrange them in a chronological order. The methods implemented have been used to see MNI, what species are represented, age at time of death, degree of fragmentation, how hard the cremated bones are burned and in the case of non-cremated bones from cow, sheep, goat and pig what part of the body is represented. The results of this analysis showed that on the north-eastern side of trench 4 was a concentration of bone that indicate animal slaughter. On the south-western end of the trench a cremated human could be identified, this individual was lying next to a previously identified grave with an identical level of cremation. The graves and the slaughter site were clearly separated. In trench 12 the analysis of the cremated bones indicated the presence of two more individuals than what was previously recorded, this was based on the difference in age and level of cremation on the fragments used in the ageing of the dead. In the cairn non-cremated bones were found, in one of the bigger deposits the remains of a human foetus were found. This foetus had likely died soon before or after birth, why it was placed in the cairn is unknown but it is not the only case. The results show that this place has been used in varying ways and that the previous use of the site as a burial ground was likely taken into consideration as long as the memory of it lasted in the local community.

  • 329.
    Edberg, Rune
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Tesch, Sten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Nyfunna skeppsbilder från 1100-talet i Sigtuna1996In: Tor: meddelanden från Uppsala universitets museum för nordiska fornsaker, ISSN 0495-8772, Vol. 28, p. 305-312Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 330.
    Edenmo, Roger
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Prestigeekonomi under yngre stenåldern: Gåvoutbyten och regionala identiteter i den svenska båtyxekulturen2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis identifies and discusses some fundamental changes that took place during the middle neolithic period in Sweden, with the introduction of the Boat Axe Culture. The possibility of intrepreting the Corded Ware Cultures by way of networks, identified through the regional designes of battle axes, are proposed. With the aid of a reconsideration of the typology of the Swedish boat axes, ethnographic examples of gift-exchanges, and a theoretical reappraisal of the implications of archaeological praxis for prehistorc life-worlds, new possibillities for interpreting the changing role of such prestige items as the boat-axes are presented. A new chronological scheme is also presented for the Swedish boat axes, with a tripartite division of the latter middle neolithic into MN BI-III. The value of the boat axe is further considered to be explicable only in terms of a prestige item, dependent on a system of exchange for its continual valuation. Central to this discussion is the relationship between value and exchange. Several regions within the Swedish Boat Axe Culture are identified, and the boat axes in two of these regions in the southern part of the Mälar valley are thoroughly examined. It is shown that during the cours of the Boat Axe period, the emphasis gradually changed from a regional to an intra-regional focus concerning the development of types and special designes of the boat axes. Identified similarities and dissimilarities of contemporary boat axes within and between regions are explained as a result of a parallel change in gift exchanges, from a regional focus to an intra-regional focus. An hierarchical ordering of the latter middle neolithic soceity is also identified, where only a portion of the boat-axes were selected as burial gifts. This development is chartered onto the broader neolithic development in Sweden, with special focus on the role of prestige items such as battle axes. A fundamental change is identified as taking place during the Boat Axe period, when the full implications of a prestige economy were implemented and the major strategies for power settled on the inter-regional level.

  • 331. Edgren, Bengt
    et al.
    Herschend, Frands
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Eketorp: den levande borgen på Ölands Stora Alvar2003Book (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 332.
    Einerstam, Alexandra
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Varför spann Ariadne? Med Asine som exempel1997Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
  • 333.
    Ekberg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Svenska fynd med äldre runor och deras arkeologiska datering1995Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
  • 334.
    Ekblad, Susanne
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Den kristna missionen i Uppland speglad i runstensmaterialet1997Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year))Student thesis
  • 335.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    A cattle Country2015In: Seminar, Vol. september, no 673Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 336.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Archaeology, Historical Sciences, and Environmental Conservation2015In: The Oxford Handbook of Historical Ecology and Applied Archaeology / [ed] Christian Isendahl and Daryl Stump, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental conservation has long been orientated towards reconstructing or conserving ‘naturalness’. The historical sciences in combination with new ecological thinking have taught us that landscapes are constantly in flux. We now know that many landscapes that previously were regarded as natural in fact have been shaped and reshaped by people over millennia, and that human disturbance of different kinds may enhance landscape heterogeneity and biodiversity. This chapter presents cases from different parts of Africa that demonstrate how archaeology, palaeoecology, and historical analysis have contributed to reform the traditional outlook of environmental conservation and revise misconstrued landscape histories. It shows that historical studies can offer insights that contribute a better understanding of species conservation, ecosystem function, prediction of ecosystem behaviour, and sound management of cultural landscapes. The long-term historical continuities in the landscape raise awareness of the importance of traditional practices and their benefits for environmental conservation.

  • 337.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Changing Landscapes: An Environmental History of Chibuene, Southern Mozambique2004Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis analyses the dynamics of environmental change and its embeddedness in the long term interactions of social history and rainfall variability through the building of an environmental history of the Chibuene locality, the coastal plain of southern Mozambique, 5 km south of the town Vilanculos, from 400 AD to present day. Land-use practices over time are discussed on the basis of vegetation and land-use history based pollen analysis, charcoal influx and diatom analysis. It is shown that the savanna vegetation is a long term feature of the Chibuene landscapes and that there have been several expansions of savannas and subsequent retractions of forests through time, linked primarily with rainfall variation. Written sources and archaeological material are drawn upon for a discussion on changing practices of environmental management and it is argued that as the Chibuene landscape is marked by a high degree of environmental insecurity, it is the competent management of resources that has enabled the continuous occupation of Chibuene from c. the 7th century AD, through management of natural resources, flexible farming practices and wide reaching social networks. The last two decades have seen a marked change in land-use patterns, reflected in a decrease in forests of the Chibuene area, the reasons for which are complex and needs to be further studied. Interviews with individual elders in the village community provide alternative ways of understanding environmental degradation as merely the loss of disappearance of forests, or the failure of crops due to droughts, but also as the erosion of local power, wars and social unrest. In a similar way, through a long-term perspective this study stresses that socio-political life, climatic variability and environmental dynamics are interlinked, highlighting the importance of the complimentarity of different forms of knowledge and ways of knowing the Chibuene landscape.

  • 338.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, Centre for Environment and Development Studies.
    Chibuene2017In: The Swahili World / [ed] In: Wynne-Jones, S., LaViolette, A. The Swahili World. Routledge., Abingdon: Routledge , 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 339.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Forest-savanna dynamics in the coastal lowland of southern Mozambique since 400 AD2008In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 18, p. 1247-1257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the coastal lowlands of Mozambique, an expansion of savannas at the cost of forests has been attributed to anthropogenic influence. There are few investigations that have studied vegetation dynamics over the long term. Pollen analysis from two sedimentary cores in the Chibuene area, 7 km south of Vilanculos presented in this paper show that the coastal area 1600 years ago consisted of a mosaic of forests, Miombo woodlands and grasslands. The data also show that the area supported extensive forests in the past until AD 1400–1600 when the forests declined dramatically. Changing settlement patterns, as suggested from archaeological excavations, cannot be correlated with the forest decline and the charcoal abundance, in the sedimentary cores does not suggest an intensification of farming. Instead the decline of forests appears to be temporally correlated with a prolonged period of repeated dry spells associated with the ‘Little Ice Age’, which caused a shift in vegetation whereby typical forest species as Trema, Celtis and Moraceae were outcompeted on account of the droughts. This study challenges rooted assumptions about the cause of decline of forests in the coastal region. It also suggests that the forest fragments present on the Mozambique coast today are naturally subject to threat from climatic stress and as such are highly sensitive areas to future climate change.

  • 340.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Livelihood Security, Vulnerability and Resilience: A Historical Analysis of Chibuene, Southern Mozambique2012In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 479-489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A sustainable livelihood framework is used to analyse livelihood security, vulnerability and resilience in the village of Chibuene, Vilanculos, southern Mozambique from a historical and contemporary perspective. Interviews, assessments, archaeology, palaeoecology and written sources are used to address tangible and intangible aspects of livelihood security. The analysis shows that livelihood strategies for building resilience, diversification of resource use, social networks and trade, have long historical continuities. Vulnerability is contingent on historical processes as long-term socio-environmental insecurity and resultant biodiversity loss. These contingencies affect the social capacity to cope with vulnerability in the present. The study concludes that contingency and the extent and strength of social networks should be added as a factor in livelihood assessments. Furthermore, policies for mitigating vulnerability must build on the reality of environmental insecurity, and strengthen local structures that diversify and spread risk.

  • 341.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, För teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten gemensamma enheter, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development.
    Miljöhistoria och dess frestelser2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental history is a wide field that encompasses many of our traditional disciplines. This paper gives a short introduction and historical overview over the different directions that environmental history as a field entails. It also gives a brief introduction to the Philosophy of History. The historical overview is based on the categories: Natural History, History of ideas, Traditional Environmental History, Historical Ecology and what I refer to here as ‘Postcolonial Environmental History’  – a direction that is yet to develop. In the second part of the paper, specific problems or ‘temptations’ related to environmental history are raised. The aim of this paper is to advocate an inclusive and broad environmental history that does not shy away from the complexities of interactions within society, within nature and in the interactions between them.

  • 342.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Samhälle, beslutsfattande och miljö2012In: Miljöhistorier: Personliga, lokala, globala berättelser om dåtid, nutid och framtid. / [ed] Anneli Ekblom, Michel Notelid, CSD Uppsala och Institutionen för arkeologi och antik historia , 2012, p. 53-62Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under de senaste åren har det varit en renässansför synteser över Global miljöhistoria, speciellt synteser i syfte att kommenteradagens hållbarhets-problem. Som en arkeolog delar jag detta intresse förhistoria. Men problemet är att miljöhistoria i mitt tycke sällan tar upp just de frågor som är relevanta idag. Berättelserna om ekologiska självmord,miljöförstöring och kollaps av samhällen på grund av klimatförändringar är visserligenbra historier. De ger oss, som Cronon (1992) skulle säga, moraliska pekpinnarochde kan övertyga oss om att vi behöver förändra vårt samhälle. Men de kommerinte att hjälpa oss att förstå hur förändringen ska gå till. Om vi är överensom att samhälleligaomställningar är nödvändiga för att möta de utmaningar somen mer hållbar framtid innebär, ja då måste vi ha verktyg för att forma dessa omställningar. Vi behöver veta vilka omställningar som är mer hållbara än andra och  vi måste vara tydliga med vad vi vill att dessa omställningar ska leda till.. Historien kan hjälpa oss här, eftersom en rad olika lösningar redan har testats och utvärderats i det förflutna. Men för att förstå och utvärdera dessa lösningar måste vi intressera oss för detspecifika och det komplexa samhälleliga samspelet mellan individer, normer, och politiska och sociala system (se texterna i denna bok; Balée 2006; Crumley2007; Costanza et al. 2007; Chakrabarty 2009). Vi måste bättre förstå vilka de faktorerär som tenderar att driva omställningar i samhället: är det starka individer, kollektiva krav, statlig kontroll, innovation, resiliens, långsamma gradvisa övergångareller revolutionära förändringar, tryck från miljö eller klimat ellerekonomiska, sociala krafter eller en kombination? – listan skulle kunna varal ängre. Här kommer jag att hävda vikten av att ta dess frågor på allvar genom att lyfta fram några utvalda exempel från det förflutna och nutid och jag kommer strukturera texten på basis av ett antal påståenden om relationen mellan samhälle och miljö

  • 343.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Eichhorn, Barbara
    Institut für Archäologische Wissenschaften, Archäologie und Archäobotanik Afrikas, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität.
    Sinclair, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Badenhorst, Shaw
    Department of Archaeozoology, Transvaal Museum, Department of anthropology and Archaeology, University of South Africa.
    Berger, Amelie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Land use history and resource utilisation from A.D. 400to the present, at Chibuene, southern Mozambique2014In: Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, ISSN 0939-6314, E-ISSN 1617-6278, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 15-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses changing patterns of resource utilisation over time in the locality of Chibuene, Vilankulos, situated on the coastal plain of southern Mozambique. The macroscopic charcoal, bone and shellassemblages from archaeological excavations are presented and discussed against the off-site palaeoecological records from pollen, fungal spores and microscopic charcoal. The Chibuene landscape has experienced four phases of land use and resource utilisation that have interacted with changes in the environment. Phase 1 (A.D. 400–900), forest savanna mosaic, low intensity cattle herding and cultivation, trade of resources for domestic use. Phase 2 (A.D. 900–1400), forest savanna mosaic, high intensity/extensive cultivation and cattle herding. Phase 3 (A.D. 1400–1800), savanna woodland and progressive decrease in forests owing to droughts. Decline of agricultural activities and higher reliance on marine resources. Possible trade of resources with the interior. Phase 4 (A.D. 1800–1900), open savanna with few forest patches. Warfare and social unrest. Collapse of trade with the interior. Decline in marine resources and wildlife. Loss of cattle herds. Expansion of agriculture locally and introduction of New World crops and clearing of Brachystegia trees. The study shows the importance of combining different environmental resources for elucidating how land use and natural variability have changed over time.

  • 344.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Gillson, Lindsey
    University of Cape Town, South Africa.
    Dung fungi as indicators of past herbivore abundance, Kruger and Limpopo National Park2010In: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, ISSN 0031-0182, E-ISSN 1872-616X, Vol. 296, no 1-2, p. 14-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Effective wildlife management needs historical data on herbivore abundance and its interactions with vegetation, climate and disturbance over longer time periods than is available through observational and archive data. Spores specific to herbivore dung provide a potential source of information on past herbivore abundances. This paper sets out to evaluate the potential of fungal spores as environmental indicators and in particular the use of coprophilous fungi in understanding past herbivore densities and their impact on the savanna landscape of Kruger and Limpopo National Parks (South Africa and Mozambique). Spore assemblages from six sedimentary cores are analysed and compared with the pollen data. Spores of coprophilous fungi, Coniochaeta cf ligniaria, and Sordariaceae in particular provide a valuable source of information about past herbivore densities.  The spore assemblages of investigated localities show historical fluctuations in herbivore abundance. Peaks in wild/domestic herbivore densities can be seen, on a local scale from 800– 900 AD and another at 1400 AD, however, these cannot be linked with any significant changes in vegetation. The last 200-300 years have seen an increased abundance of herbivores in the Limpopo floodplain sites, particularly domestic cattle. There is no clear correspondence between changes in herbivore abundance and local vegetation in this period or the 20th century. However, domestic cattle, together with wild herbivores, probably contributed to creating a mosaic type of landscape with heterogeneous tree cover.

  • 345.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Gillson, Lindsey
    University of Cape Town, South Africa.
    Fire history and fire ecology of Northern Kruger (KNP) and Limpopo National Park (PNL), southern Africa2010In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 20, no 7, p. 1063-1077Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the general correlations between fire and grass/tree relationships, as represented by fossil charcoal and pollen, from different vegetation types in the savanna ecosystems of the neighbouring Kruger (KNP) and Limpopo (PNL) national parks. Our analysis suggests that the basic presumption that fire is a main driver of vegetation dynamics in the savanna ecosystem by suppressing tree seedlings and encouraging grasses needs to be re-examined. An improved approach is to understand how fire may act both as a negative and positive feedback in different vegetational phases and both as a driver and responder in transitions between phases. The correlation between arboreal pollen (AP) percentages and charcoal influx suggests that in the grassland phase (< 5% AP), fire acts as a driver of woody recruitment and as a positive feedback, i.e. potentially driving the system to shift into a savanna phase. In the savanna phase (5–10% AP) fire limits woody recruitment and acts as a negative feedback in maintaining the savanna. Thus, in the savanna phase other factors than fire alone drive the transition from savanna to woodland-forest. In the riparian phase, where evidence of farming is present particularly from ad 1600 onwards, fire appears to facilitate tree recruitment where AP ranges between c. 10 and 20% AP. Though a decline in AP abundance can be seen contemporaneously with charcoal peaks, our analysis suggests that overall, human-induced fires do not seem to have a negative impact on woody cover. Our results have implications for fire management as riparian-dominated phases and savannas with a sufficient woody cover are less sensitive to changes in fire policies than open grasslands that may, with a change in fire frequency, change into another state.

  • 346.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Gillson, Lindsey
    University of Cape Town.
    Hierarchy and scale: testing the long term role of water, grazing and nitrogen in the savanna landscape of Limpopo National Park (Mozambique)2010In: Landscape Ecology, ISSN 0921-2973, E-ISSN 1572-9761, Vol. 25, no 10, p. 1529-1546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper compares vegetation dynamics at two sites in the savanna landscape of Limpopo National Park (PNL), Mozambique. In order to test the relationship between vegetation cover and hydrology, nutrient availability and disturbance from grazing and fire over the last 1,200 years at local (100 m2) scales, we use palaeoecological data (i.e. pollen assemblages, charcoal abundance, C/N ratio, stable isotopes and herbivore-associated spore abundance). Two pans governed by similar rainfall regimes (on average 600 mm/year) but different hydrologies are compared. Chixuludzi Pan is responsive to the Limpopo River and is more water rich than Radio Pan, which is situated in a dry landscape with little surface water. The analysis suggests that in savannas where water is scarce, the recruitment of woody taxa is constrained mainly by the availability of underground water. In the Radio Pan sequence, the present grassland savanna has been stable throughout the time studied. In contrast, the Chixuludzi Pan savanna landscape where local hydrology, due to the proximity of Limpopo River, allows for a higher water availability the relationship between grass-arboreal pollen suggests a greater variability in vegetation cover, and other factors such as grazing, herbivory and nitrogen availability are important as controlling mechanisms for woody cover. The historical depth of the analysis enables a sub-hierarchy of local scale process to be identified, in this case local hydrology. Local water availability is shown to override the effect of regional rainfall and, in turn, to control the influence of other local scale factors such as nutrients and grazing.

  • 347.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Gillson, Lindsey
    Plant Conservation Unit, Botany Department, University of Cape Town, South Africa.
    Notelid, Michel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    A Historical Ecology of the Limpopo and Kruger National Parks and Lower Limpopo Valley2011In: Journal of Archaeology and Ancient History, ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 1-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper uses new palaeo-ecological data and a selective review of archaeological and written sources to show how social and natural history over the last 1200 years have interacted to form the present day landscape of Limpopo National Park and Northern Kruger National Park. The long-term mosaic of different communities in this landscape, hunter and gatherers, pastoralists, farmers and traders has, over time, contributed to shape and reshape a heterogeneous landscape. While some features in this landscape, such as water scarcity, have remained stable over time, there have also been major transformations in both the physical landscape and social life. The natural mosaics have been utilised and enhanced over time and the combination of natural and cultural mosaics are reflected in the landscape through archaeological sites, the pollen record and in the present day landscape.

  • 348.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala.
    Gillson, Lindsey
    Univ Cape Town, Rondebosch, South Africa.
    Notelid, Michel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Water flow, ecological dynamics, and management in the lower Limpopo Valley: a long‐term vie2017In: WIREs Water, ISSN 0935-879X, E-ISSN 2049-1948, Vol. 4, no 5, article id e1228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this contribution, we review long-term (millennial-decadal scale) river-flow changes, climate interactions, and interlinkage with vegetation dynamics, as well as society and policy, focusing on the lower Limpopo Valley (from the South African border through Mozambique). Drawing on paleoecological data, we address the valley's potential for defining critical ecological thresholds and managing an adaptive ecological landscape, by focusing on the dynamic relationship between different drivers (fire, hydrology, and grass/tree relationships). We briefly review the long-term interactions between water flow, climate variability, and society using archeological records and written sources. Lastly, we analyze the social and political context of water management, focusing on the last 100 years and transboundary water management. We also discuss planning and mitigation in relation to climate change and rainfall extremes that are projected to increase. It is stressed that forward-thinking policies must heed long-term climate variability, hydrology and biological and social impact and to plan and mitigate for environmental events. The discussion also brings to the fore the importance of an adaptable and equitable strategy in cross-border water sharing.

  • 349.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Gillson, Lindsey
    Plant Conservation Unit, Botany department, University of Cape Town.
    Risberg, Jan
    Bert Bolin Centre for Climate research, Stockholm University.
    Holmgren, Karin
    Bert Bolin Centre for Climate research, Stockholm University.
    Chidoub, Zara
    Rainfall variability and vegetation dynamics of the lower Limpopo Valley, Southern Africa, 500 AD to present2012In: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, ISSN 0031-0182, E-ISSN 1872-616X, Vol. 363, p. 69-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The long‐term responses of vegetation to climate variability are of relevance for predicting present and future vegetation change, and have implications for the management of savanna and riparian ecosystems. This paper explores the links between regional rainfall, hydrology and vegetation dynamics in the savannas and riverine forests of the lower Limpopo Valley, southern Africa, from 800 AD to the present, reviewing palaeoecological data (fossil pollen, spores, diatoms and lithology) from several hydrological systems in Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa and Limpopo National Park (PNL), Mozambique. The PNL–KNP records show that riverine arboreal taxa expanded during wetter periods, including 800–1400 AD and after 1800 AD. Between 1400 and 1800 AD, grasses, savanna taxa and generalist taxa were favored over riparian taxa, a change that is linked with the onset of dry spells in the region (corresponding to the so-called Little Ice Age). The most extreme drought events around 1700 AD resulted in a marked decline of riparian forest taxa near Lake Mapimbi, KNP. In contrast, many water-scarce sequences away from the riverine environment, such as Radio Pan, Mafayeni Pan, Malahlapanga Pan and Lake Makwadzi show stable grassland vegetation throughout the last 1200 years. The results demonstrate the resilience of the grassland–savanna ecosystems to projected climate change with warmer and overall drier climate. The riverine forests are predicted to be more vulnerable especially as more extreme weather events are projected.

  • 350.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Isendahl, Christian
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Lindholm, Karl-Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    The Resilience of Heritage: Cultivating a Future of the Past. Essays in Honour of Professor2018Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Throughout his career, Paul Sinclair has encouraged students to pursue a concerned archaeology that goes beyond establishing cultural chronologies to formulating critical inquiries fundamental to our world and for our future. This book honours his achievements by exploring urbanism, resilience and livelihoods, contacts and trade, and heritage and landscape. In the tradition of Paul Sinclair’s eclectic multi-, inter- and transdisciplinary approach to archaeology and historical ecology, this book expands the scope of archaeology by combining the examination of the material record with climatology, paleoecology, ethnography, sociology and archival sources to address both past and present interactions between people and environment. In doing so, the contributions to this volume highlight the value of knowledge about the past in contemporary society.

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