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  • 251. Bakker, Marije F.
    et al.
    Peeters, Petra H. M.
    Klaasen, Veronique M.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Jansen, Eugene H. J. M.
    Ros, Martine M.
    Travier, Noemie
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Overvad, Kim
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Brennan, Paul
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Perquier, Florence
    Cadeau, Claire
    Boeing, Heiner
    Aleksandrova, Krasimira
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Kühn, Tilman
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Vineis, Paolo
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Panico, Salvatore
    Masala, Giovanna
    Tumino, Rosario
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Skeie, Guri
    Lund, Eiliv
    Ramon Quirós, J.
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Navarro, Carmen
    Amiano, Pilar
    Sánchez, María-José
    Buckland, Genevieve
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Johansson, Matthias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Key, Timothy J.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nick
    Riboli, Elio
    van Gils, Carla H.
    Plasma carotenoids, vitamin C, tocopherols, and retinol and the risk of breast cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort2016In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 103, no 2, p. 454-464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Carotenoids and vitamin C are thought to be associated with reduced cancer risk because of their antioxidative capacity.

    Objective: This study evaluated the associations of plasma carotenoid, retinol, tocopherol, and vitamin C concentrations and risk of breast cancer.

    Design: In a nested case-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort, 1502 female incident breast cancer cases were included, with an oversampling of premenopausal (n = 582) and estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) cases (n = 462). Controls (n = 1502) were individually matched to cases by using incidence density sampling. Prediagnostic samples were analyzed for alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lycopene, lutein, zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, retinol, alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol, and 454 vitamin C. Breast cancer risk was computed according to hormone receptor status and age at diagnosis (proxy for menopausal status) by using conditional logistic regression and was further stratified by smoking status, alcohol consumption, and body mass index (BMI). All statistical tests were 2-sided.

    Results: In quintile 5 compared with quintile 1, alpha-carotene (OR: 0.61; 95% CI: 0.39, 0.98) and beta-carotene (OR: 0.41; 95% CI: 0.26, 0.65) were inversely associated with risk of ER- breast tumors. The other analytes were not statistically associated with ER- breast cancer. For estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) tumors, no statistically significant associations were found. The test for heterogeneity between ER- and ER+ tumors was statistically significant only for beta-carotene (P-heterogeneity = 0.03). A higher risk of breast cancer was found for retinol in relation to ER-/progesterone receptor-negative tumors (OR: 2.37; 95% CI: 1.20, 4.67; P-heterogeneity with ER+/progesterone receptor positive = 0.06). We observed no statistically significant interaction between smoking, alcohol, or BMI and all investigated plasma analytes (based on tertile distribution).

    Conclusion: Our results indicate that higher concentrations of plasma beta-carotene and alpha-carotene are associated with lower breast cancer risk of ER tumors.

  • 252. Balassiano, Karen
    et al.
    Lima, Sheila
    Jenab, Mazda
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Canzian, Federico
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Boeing, Heiner
    Meidtner, Karina
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Laglou, Pagona
    Vineis, Paolo
    Panico, Salvatore
    Palli, Domenico
    Grioni, Sara
    Tumino, Rosario
    Lund, Eiliv
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Numans, Mattjis E.
    Peeters, Petra H. M.
    Ramon Quiros, J.
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    Navarro, Carmen
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Stenling, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Ehrnstrom, Roy
    Regner, Sara
    Allen, Naomi E.
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Offerhaus, G. Johan A.
    Sala, Nuria
    Riboli, Elio
    Hainaut, Pierre
    Scoazec, Jean-Yves
    Sylla, Bakary S.
    Gonzalez, Carlos A.
    Herceg, Zdenko
    Aberrant DNA methylation of cancer-associated genes in gastric cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-EURGAST)2011In: Cancer Letters, ISSN 0304-3835, E-ISSN 1872-7980, Vol. 311, no 1, p. 85-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epigenetic events have emerged as key mechanisms in the regulation of critical biological processes and in the development of a wide variety of human malignancies, including gastric cancer (GC), however precise gene targets of aberrant DNA methylation in GC remain largely unknown. Here, we have combined pyrosequencing-based quantitative analysis of DNA methylation in 98 GC cases and 64 controls nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort and in cancer tissue and non-tumorigenic adjacent tissue of an independent series of GC samples. A panel of 10 cancer-associated genes (CHRNA3, DOK1, MGMT, RASSF1A, p14ARF, CDH1, MLH1, ALDH2, GNMT and MTHFR) and LINE-1 repetitive elements were included in the analysis and their association with clinicopathological characteristics (sex, age at diagnosis, anatomical sub-site, histological sub-type) was examined. Three out of the 10 genes analyzed exhibited a marked hypermethylation, whereas two genes (ALDH2 and MTHFR) showed significant hypomethylation, in gastric tumors. Among differentially methylated genes, we identified new genes (CHRNA3 and DOK1) as targets of aberrant hypermethylation in GC, suggesting that epigenetic deregulation of these genes and their corresponding cellular pathways may promote the development and progression of GC. We also found that global demethylation of tumor cell genomes occurs in GC, consistent with the notion that abnormal hypermethylation of specific genes occurs concomitantly with genome-wide hypomethylation. Age and gender had no significant influence on methylation states, but an association was observed between LINE-1 and MLH1 methylation levels with histological subtype and anatomical sub-site. This study identifies aberrant methylation patters in specific genes in GC thus providing information that could be exploited as novel biomarkers in clinics and molecular epidemiology of GC.

  • 253.
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hadzidimitriou, A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mattsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Xochelli, Aliki
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sutton, L. A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Minga, E.
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Scarfo, L.
    Ist Sci San Raffaele, Div Expt Oncol, I-20132 Milan, Italy.;Ist Sci San Raffaele, Dept Oncohematol, I-20132 Milan, Italy.;Fdn Ctr San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy..
    Rossi, D.
    Amedeo Avogadro Univ Eastern Piedmont, Dept Translat Med, Div Hematol, Novara, Italy..
    Davis, Z.
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Haematol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England..
    Agathangelidis, A.
    Ist Sci San Raffaele, Div Expt Oncol, I-20132 Milan, Italy.;Ist Sci San Raffaele, Dept Oncohematol, I-20132 Milan, Italy.;Fdn Ctr San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy..
    Villamor, N.
    Hosp Clin Barcelona, Hemopathol Unit, Barcelona, Spain..
    Parker, H.
    Univ Southampton, Fac Med, Canc Sci, Southampton SO9 5NH, Hants, England..
    Kotaskova, J.
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic.;Univ Hosp Brno, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Stalika, E.
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, Hematol Dept, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Plevova, K.
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic.;Univ Hosp Brno, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Mansouri, Larry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Cortese, Diego
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Navarro Lopez, A.
    Hosp Clin Barcelona, Hemopathol Unit, Barcelona, Spain..
    Delgado, J.
    Hosp Clin Barcelona, Dept Hematol, Barcelona, Spain..
    Larrayoz, M.
    Univ Southampton, Fac Med, Canc Sci, Southampton SO9 5NH, Hants, England..
    Anagnostopoulos, A.
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Hematol Dept, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Belessi, C.
    Nikea Gen Hosp, Dept Hematol, Piraeus, Greece..
    Smedby, K. E.
    Dept Med, Solna, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Juliusson, G.
    Lund Univ, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Stem Cell Ctr, Hosp Dept Hematol, Lund, Sweden..
    Strefford, J. C.
    Univ Southampton, Fac Med, Canc Sci, Southampton SO9 5NH, Hants, England..
    Pospisilova, S.
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic.;Univ Hosp Brno, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Oscier, D.
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Haematol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England..
    Gaidano, G.
    Amedeo Avogadro Univ Eastern Piedmont, Dept Translat Med, Div Hematol, Novara, Italy..
    Campo, E.
    Hosp Clin Barcelona, Hemopathol Unit, Barcelona, Spain.;Univ Barcelona, Dept Pathol, Barcelona, Spain..
    Ghia, P.
    Ist Sci San Raffaele, Div Expt Oncol, I-20132 Milan, Italy.;Ist Sci San Raffaele, Dept Oncohematol, I-20132 Milan, Italy.;Fdn Ctr San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy..
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    REFINING PROGNOSIS OF CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA WITH SOMATICALLY HYPERMUTATED B-CELL RECEPTORS: A NOVEL PROGNOSTIC INDEX ON BEHALF OF THE EUROPEAN RESEARCH INITIATIVE ON CLL (ERIC)2015In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 100, p. 52-52Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 254.
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Hadzidimitriou, A
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sutton, Lesley Ann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rossi, D
    Minga, E
    Villamor, N
    Larrayoz, M
    Kminkova, J
    Agathangelidis, A
    Davis, Z
    Tausch, E
    Stalika, E
    Kantorova, B
    Mansouri, Larry
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Scarfò, L
    Cortese, Diego
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Navrkalova, V
    Rose-Zerilli, M J J
    Smedby, K E
    Juliusson, G
    Anagnostopoulos, A
    Makris, A M
    Navarro, A
    Delgado, J
    Oscier, D
    Belessi, C
    Stilgenbauer, S
    Ghia, P
    Pospisilova, S
    Gaidano, G
    Campo, E
    Strefford, J C
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Recurrent mutations refine prognosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia2015In: Leukemia, ISSN 0887-6924, E-ISSN 1476-5551, Vol. 29, p. 329-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through the European Research Initiative on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) (ERIC), we screened 3490 patients with CLL for mutations within the NOTCH1 (n=3334), SF3B1 (n=2322), TP53 (n=2309), MYD88 (n=1080) and BIRC3 (n=919) genes, mainly at diagnosis (75%) and before treatment (>90%). BIRC3 mutations (2.5%) were associated with unmutated IGHV genes (U-CLL), del(11q) and trisomy 12, whereas MYD88 mutations (2.2%) were exclusively found among M-CLL. NOTCH1, SF3B1 and TP53 exhibited variable frequencies and were mostly enriched within clinically aggressive cases. Interestingly, as the timespan between diagnosis and mutational screening increased, so too did the incidence of SF3B1 mutations; no such increase was observed for NOTCH1 mutations. Regarding the clinical impact, NOTCH1 mutations, SF3B1 mutations and TP53 aberrations (deletion/mutation, TP53ab) correlated with shorter time-to-first-treatment (P<0.0001) in 889 treatment-naive Binet stage A cases. In multivariate analysis (n=774), SF3B1 mutations and TP53ab along with del(11q) and U-CLL, but not NOTCH1 mutations, retained independent significance. Importantly, TP53ab and SF3B1 mutations had an adverse impact even in U-CLL. In conclusion, we support the clinical relevance of novel recurrent mutations in CLL, highlighting the adverse impact of SF3B1 and TP53 mutations, even independent of IGHV mutational status, thus underscoring the need for urgent standardization/harmonization of the detection methods.

  • 255.
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala Univ, Sci Life Lab, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Sutton, Lesley-Ann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Minga, Eva
    CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Agathangelidis, Andreas
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, I-20132 Milan, Italy.;Ist Sci San Raffaele, IRCCS, Div Mol Oncol, I-20132 Milan, Italy.;Ist Sci San Raffaele, IRCCS, Dept Oncohematol, I-20132 Milan, Italy..
    Nichelatti, Michele
    Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Niguarda Canc Ctr, Mol Pathol Unit, Milan, Italy.;Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Niguarda Canc Ctr, Dept Haematol, Milan, Italy..
    Tsanousa, Athina
    Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Dept Informat, GR-54006 Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Scarfo, Lydia
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, I-20132 Milan, Italy.;Ist Sci San Raffaele, IRCCS, Div Mol Oncol, I-20132 Milan, Italy.;Ist Sci San Raffaele, IRCCS, Dept Oncohematol, I-20132 Milan, Italy..
    Davis, Zadie
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Haematol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England..
    Yan, Xiao-Jie
    North Shore Long Isl Jewish Hlth Syst, Feinstein Inst Med Res, Manhasset, NY USA..
    Shanafelt, Tait
    Mayo Clin, Div Hematol, Dept Med, Rochester, MN USA..
    Plevova, Karla
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic.;Univ Hosp Brno, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Sandberg, Yorick
    Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr, Dept Immunol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Vojdeman, Fie Juhl
    Rigshosp, Dept Hematol, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Boudjogra, Myriam
    Hop La Pitie Salpetriere, Serv Hematol Biol, Paris, France..
    Tzenou, Tatiana
    Univ Athens, Dept Propaedeut Med, Athens, Greece..
    Chatzouli, Maria
    Nikea Gen Hosp, Dept Hematol, Piraeus, Greece..
    Chu, Charles C.
    North Shore Long Isl Jewish Hlth Syst, Feinstein Inst Med Res, Manhasset, NY USA..
    Veronese, Silvio
    Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Niguarda Canc Ctr, Mol Pathol Unit, Milan, Italy.;Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Niguarda Canc Ctr, Dept Haematol, Milan, Italy..
    Gardiner, Anne
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Haematol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England..
    Mansouri, Larry
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala Univ, Sci Life Lab, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Smedby, Karin E.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Pedersen, Lone Bredo
    Rigshosp, Dept Hematol, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    van Lom, Kirsten
    Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr, Dept Hematol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Giudicelli, Veronique
    Univ Montpellier, IMGT Int ImMunoGeneT Informat Syst, LIGM, Inst Genet Humaine, F-34059 Montpellier, France..
    Francova, Hana Skuhrova
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic.;Univ Hosp Brno, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Nguyen-Khac, Florence
    Hop La Pitie Salpetriere, Serv Hematol Biol, Paris, France..
    Panagiotidis, Panagiotis
    Univ Athens, Dept Propaedeut Med, Athens, Greece..
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    Lund Univ & Hosp, Dept Hematol, Lund Stem Cell Ctr, Lund, Sweden..
    Angelis, Lefteris
    Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Dept Informat, GR-54006 Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Anagnostopoulos, Achilles
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Lefranc, Marie-Paule
    Univ Montpellier, IMGT Int ImMunoGeneT Informat Syst, LIGM, Inst Genet Humaine, F-34059 Montpellier, France..
    Facco, Monica
    Univ Padua, Sch Med, Dept Med, Hematol & Clin Immunol Branch, I-35100 Padua, Italy.;Venetian Inst Mol Med, Padua, Italy..
    Trentin, Livio
    Univ Padua, Sch Med, Dept Med, Hematol & Clin Immunol Branch, I-35100 Padua, Italy.;Venetian Inst Mol Med, Padua, Italy..
    Catherwood, Mark
    Belfast City Hosp, Dept Haematooncol, Belfast BT9 7AD, Antrim, North Ireland..
    Montillo, Marco
    Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Niguarda Canc Ctr, Mol Pathol Unit, Milan, Italy.;Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Niguarda Canc Ctr, Dept Haematol, Milan, Italy..
    Geisler, Christian H.
    Rigshosp, Dept Hematol, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Langerak, Anton W.
    Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr, Dept Immunol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Pospisilova, Sarka
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic.;Univ Hosp Brno, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Chiorazzi, Nicholas
    North Shore Long Isl Jewish Hlth Syst, Feinstein Inst Med Res, Manhasset, NY USA..
    Oscier, David
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Haematol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England..
    Jelinek, Diane F.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Immunol, Dept Med, Rochester, MN USA..
    Darzentas, Nikos
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Belessi, Chrysoula
    Nikea Gen Hosp, Dept Hematol, Piraeus, Greece..
    Davi, Frederic
    Hop La Pitie Salpetriere, Serv Hematol Biol, Paris, France..
    Rosenquist Barndell, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ghia, Paolo
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, I-20132 Milan, Italy.;Ist Sci San Raffaele, IRCCS, Div Mol Oncol, I-20132 Milan, Italy.;Ist Sci San Raffaele, IRCCS, Dept Oncohematol, I-20132 Milan, Italy..
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece.;CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Clinical effect of stereotyped B-cell receptor immunoglobulins in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: a retrospective multicentre study2014In: LANCET HAEMATOLOGY, ISSN 2352-3026, Vol. 1, no 2, p. E74-E84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background About 30% of cases of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) carry quasi-identical B-cell receptor immunoglobulins and can be assigned to distinct stereotyped subsets. Although preliminary evidence suggests that B-cell receptor immunoglobulin stereotypy is relevant from a clinical viewpoint, this aspect has never been explored in a systematic manner or in a cohort of adequate size that would enable clinical conclusions to be drawn. Methods For this retrospective, multicentre study, we analysed 8593 patients with CLL for whom immunogenetic data were available. These patients were followed up in 15 academic institutions throughout Europe (in Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Greece, Italy, Netherlands, Sweden, and the UK) and the USA, and data were collected between June 1, 2012, and June 7, 2013. We retrospectively assessed the clinical implications of CLL B-cell receptor immunoglobulin stereotypy, with a particular focus on 14 major stereotyped subsets comprising cases expressing unmutated (U-CLL) or mutated (M-CLL) immunoglobulin heavy chain variable genes. The primary outcome of our analysis was time to first treatment, defined as the time between diagnosis and date of first treatment. Findings 2878 patients were assigned to a stereotyped subset, of which 1122 patients belonged to one of 14 major subsets. Stereotyped subsets showed significant differences in terms of age, sex, disease burden at diagnosis, CD38 expression, and cytogenetic aberrations of prognostic significance. Patients within a specific subset generally followed the same clinical course, whereas patients in different stereotyped subsets-despite having the same immunoglobulin heavy variable gene and displaying similar immunoglobulin mutational status-showed substantially different times to first treatment. By integrating B-cell receptor immunoglobulin stereotypy (for subsets 1, 2, and 4) into the well established Dohner cytogenetic prognostic model, we showed these, which collectively account for around 7% of all cases of CLL and represent both U-CLL and M-CLL, constituted separate clinical entities, ranging from very indolent (subset 4) to aggressive disease (subsets 1 and 2). Interpretation The molecular classification of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia based on B-cell receptor immunoglobulin stereotypy improves the Dohner hierarchical model and refines prognostication beyond immunoglobulin mutational status, with potential implications for clinical decision making, especially within prospective clinical trials.

  • 256.
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Jeronim, Sabine
    MLL Munich Leukemia Lab, Munich, Germany.
    Iskas, Michalis
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece; G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Exochi, Greece.
    Puiggros, Anna
    Fdn IMIM Hosp del Mar, Barcelona, Spain.
    Plevova, Karla
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol CEITEC, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Xochelli, Aliki
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Delgado, Julio
    Univ Barcelona, Seccio Hematopatol, Hosp Clin, Inst Invest Biomed Augusti Pi & Sunyer IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain.
    Kotaskova, Jana
    Masaryk Univ, CEITEC, Brno, Czech Republic; Univ Hosp Brno, Dept Internal Med Hematol & Oncol, Brno, Czech Republic; Med Fac MU, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Stalika, Evangelia
    CERTH, Thermi, Greece.
    Costa, Pablo Abrisqueta
    Vall dHebron Inst Oncol, Barcelona, Spain.
    Durechova, Kristina
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol CEITEC, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Papaioannou, Giorgos
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece; G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Exochi, Greece.
    Collado, Rosa
    Consorcio Hosp Gen Univ, Serv Hematol, Valencia, Spain.
    Doubek, Michael
    Univ Hosp Brno, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Jose Calasanz, M.
    Univ Navarra, Dept Genet, Serv Citogenet, Pamplona, Spain.
    Ruiz-Xiville, Neus
    Univ Autonoma Barcelona, Inst Recerca Leucemia Josep Carreras IJC, Hosp Germans Trias & Pujol, Serv Lab Hematol,ICO, Badalona, Spain.
    Moreno, Carol
    Hosp Santa Creu & Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain.
    Anagnostopoulos, Achilles
    George Papanicolaou Hosp, Haematol Dept, BMT Unit, Gene & Cell Therapy Ctr, Exochi, Greece.
    Stavroyianni, Niki
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece; G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Exochi, Greece.
    Kater, Arnon
    Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Espinet, Blanca
    Fdn IMIM Hosp del Mar, Barcelona, Spain.
    Pospisilova, Sarka
    Masaryk Univ, CEITEC, Brno, Czech Republic; Univ Hosp Brno, Dept Internal Med Hematol & Oncol, Brno, Czech Republic; Med Fac MU, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Athanasiadou, Anastasia
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece; G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Exochi, Greece.
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Thermi, Greece.
    Haferlach, Claudia
    MLL Munich Leukemia Lab, Munich, Germany.
    Cytogenetic complexity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: definitions, associations with other bio-markers and clinical impact2017In: Leukemia and Lymphoma, ISSN 1042-8194, E-ISSN 1029-2403, Vol. 58, no Supplement: 1, p. 65-66Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 257.
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Mattsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia
    Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Minga, Eva
    Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Agathangelidis, Andreas
    Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece.;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.;IRCCS San Raffaele Sci Inst, Div Expt Oncol, Strateg Res Program CLL, Milan, Italy..
    Sutton, Lesley Ann
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Scarfo, Lydia
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.;IRCCS San Raffaele Sci Inst, Div Expt Oncol, Strateg Res Program CLL, Milan, Italy..
    Davis, Zadie
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Haematol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England..
    Yan, Xiao-Jie
    Northwell Hlth, Feinstein Inst Med Res, New York, NY USA..
    Plevova, Karla
    CEITEC Cent European Inst Technol, Masarykbrno, Czech Republic.;Univ Hosp Brno, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Sandberg, Yorick
    Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Dept Immunol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Vojdeman, Fie J.
    Rigshosp, Dept Hematol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Tzenou, Tatiana
    Univ Athens, Dept Propaedeut Med 1, Athens, Greece..
    Chu, Charles C.
    Northwell Hlth, Feinstein Inst Med Res, New York, NY USA..
    Veronese, Silvio
    Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Mol Pathol Unit, Niguarda Canc Ctr, Milan, Italy.;Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Dept Haematol, Niguarda Canc Ctr, Milan, Italy..
    Mansouri, Larry
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Smedby, Karin E.
    Karolinska Inst, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Dept Med Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Hematol Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Giudicelli, Veronique
    Univ Montpellier, Lab ImmunoGenet Mol LIGM, IMGT, IGH,UPR CNRS 1142, Montpellier, France..
    Nguyen-Khac, Florence
    Hematol Dept, Paris, France.;Univ Paris 06, Hop Pitie Salpetriere, Paris, France..
    Panagiotidis, Panagiotis
    Univ Athens, Dept Propaedeut Med 1, Athens, Greece..
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    Lund Univ & Hosp, Dept Hematol, Lund Stem Cell Ctr, Lund, Sweden..
    Anagnostopoulos, Achilles
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Hematol Dept, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Lefranc, Marie-Paule
    Univ Montpellier, Lab ImmunoGenet Mol LIGM, IMGT, IGH,UPR CNRS 1142, Montpellier, France..
    Trentin, Livio
    Padova Univ, Hematol & Clin Immunol Branch, Dept Med, Sch Med, Padua, Italy.;Venetian Inst Mol Med, Padua, Italy..
    Catherwood, Mark
    Belfast City Hosp, Dept Hematooncol, Belfast, Antrim, North Ireland..
    Montillo, Marco
    Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Mol Pathol Unit, Niguarda Canc Ctr, Milan, Italy.;Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Dept Haematol, Niguarda Canc Ctr, Milan, Italy..
    Niemann, Carsten U.
    Rigshosp, Dept Hematol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Langerak, Anton W.
    Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Dept Immunol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Pospisilova, Sarka
    CEITEC Cent European Inst Technol, Masarykbrno, Czech Republic.;Univ Hosp Brno, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Stavroyianni, Niki
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Hematol Dept, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Chiorazzi, Nicholas
    Northwell Hlth, Feinstein Inst Med Res, New York, NY USA..
    Oscier, David
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Haematol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England..
    Jelinek, Diane F.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Immunol, Rochester, MN USA..
    Shanafelt, Tait
    Mayo Clin, Dept Med, Div Hematol, Rochester, MN USA..
    Darzentas, Nikos
    CEITEC Cent European Inst Technol, Masarykbrno, Czech Republic..
    Belessi, Chrysoula
    Nikea Gen Hosp, Dept Hematol, Piraeus, Greece..
    Davi, Frederic
    Hematol Dept, Paris, France..
    Ghia, Paolo
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.;IRCCS San Raffaele Sci Inst, Div Expt Oncol, Strateg Res Program CLL, Milan, Italy..
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, Hematol Dept, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    No improvement in long-term survival over time for chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients in stereotyped subsets #1 and #2 treated with chemo(immuno)therapy2018In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 103, no 4, p. E158-E161Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 258.
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Mattsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Rosenquist Brandell, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Prognostic indices in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: where do we stand how do we proceed?2016In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 279, no 4, p. 347-357Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The remarkable clinical heterogeneity in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) has highlighted the need for prognostic and predictive algorithms that can be employed in clinical practice to assist patient management and therapy decisions. Over the last 20 years, this research field has been rewarding and many novel prognostic factors have been identified, especially at the molecular genetic level. Whilst detection of recurrent cytogenetic aberrations and determination of the immunoglobulin heavy variable gene somatic hypermutation status have an established role in outcome prediction, next-generation sequencing has recently revealed novel mutated genes with clinical relevance (e.g. NOTCH1, SF3B1 and BIRC3). Efforts have been made to combine variables into prognostic indices; however, none has been universally adopted. Although a unifying model for all groups of patients and in all situations is appealing, this may prove difficult to attain. Alternatively, focused efforts on patient subgroups in the same clinical context and at certain clinically relevant 'decision points', that is at diagnosis and at initiation of first-line or subsequent treatments, may provide a more accurate approach. In this review, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages as well as the clinical applicability of three recently proposed prognostic models, the MD Anderson nomogram, the integrated cytogenetic and mutational model and the CLL-international prognostic index. We also consider future directions taking into account novel aspects of the disease, such as the tumour microenvironment and the dynamics of (sub)clonal evolution. These aspects are particularly relevant in view of the increasing number of new targeted therapies that have recently emerged.

  • 259.
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Moreno, Carol
    Hosp Santa Creu & Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain.
    Cuellar, Carolina
    St Pau Hosp, Barcelona, Spain.
    Scarfo, Lydia
    Osped San Raffaele, Segrate, Italy.
    Ghia, Paolo
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy; IRCCS Ist Sci San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.
    Brandell, Richard Rosenquist
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Vicente, Eva Puy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Is FCR the treatment of choice for IGHV mutated CLL without poor FISH cytogenetics?2017In: Leukemia and Lymphoma, ISSN 1042-8194, E-ISSN 1029-2403, Vol. 58, no Supplement: 1, p. 170-171Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 260.
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Puiggros, A.
    Hosp del Mar, Lab Citogenet Mol, Serv Patol, Barcelona, Spain.;Spanish Cooperat Grp Hematol Cytogenet, Barcelona, Spain..
    Xochelli, Aliki
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sutton, L. -A
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nguyen-Khac, F.
    Univ Paris 06, Hop Pitie Salpetriere, Hematol Dept, Paris, France.;Univ Paris 06, Hop Pitie Salpetriere, Paris, France..
    Gardiner, A.
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Haematol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England..
    Plevova, K.
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic.;Univ Hosp Brno, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Ortega, M.
    Spanish Cooperat Grp Hematol Cytogenet, Barcelona, Spain.;Hosp Univ Vall dHebron, Barcelona, Spain..
    Collado, R.
    Spanish Cooperat Grp Hematol Cytogenet, Barcelona, Spain.;Consorcio Hosp Gen Univ Valencia, Valencia, Spain..
    Gonzalez, T.
    Spanish Cooperat Grp Hematol Cytogenet, Barcelona, Spain.;Fdn Publ Galega Med Xen, Santiago De Compostela, Spain..
    Granada, I.
    Spanish Cooperat Grp Hematol Cytogenet, Barcelona, Spain.;Hosp Badalona Germans Trias & Pujol, Badalona, Spain..
    Luno, E.
    Spanish Cooperat Grp Hematol Cytogenet, Barcelona, Spain.;Hosp Univ Cent Asturias, Oviedo, Spain..
    Kotaskova, J.
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic.;Univ Hosp Brno, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Davis, Z.
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Haematol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England..
    Anagnostopoulos, A.
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Hematol Dept, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Strefford, J.
    Univ Southampton, Fac Med, Canc Sci, Southampton SO9 5NH, Hants, England..
    Pospisilova, S.
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic.;Univ Hosp Brno, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Davi, F.
    Univ Paris 06, Hop Pitie Salpetriere, Hematol Dept, Paris, France.;Univ Paris 06, Hop Pitie Salpetriere, Paris, France..
    Athanasiadou, A.
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Hematol Dept, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Rosenquist, Richard Brandell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Oscier, D.
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Haematol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England..
    Sola, B. Espinet
    Hosp del Mar, Lab Citogenet Mol, Serv Patol, Barcelona, Spain.;Spanish Cooperat Grp Hematol Cytogenet, Barcelona, Spain..
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    ADDITIONAL TRISOMIES AMONGST PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA CARRYING TRISOMY 12: THE PARTNER CHROMOSOME MAKES A DIFFERENCE2015In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 100, p. 224-224Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 261.
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Strefford, Jonathan C.
    Bikos, Vasilis
    Parry, Marina
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Oscier, David
    Splenic marginal-zone lymphoma: ontogeny and genetics2015In: Leukemia and Lymphoma, ISSN 1042-8194, E-ISSN 1029-2403, Vol. 56, no 2, p. 301-310Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Splenic marginal-zone lymphoma (SMZL) is a rare tumor that has recently emerged as a prototype for how the interplay between genetics and environment shapes the natural history of lymphomas. Indeed, the recent identification of molecular immunogenetic subgroups within SMZL may prove to be relevant not only for the sub-classification of the disease but also for improved understanding of the underlying biology. In contrast to other B-cell lymphomas, SMZL lacks a characteristic genetic lesion, although the majority of cases harbor genomic aberrations, as recently revealed by high-throughput studies that identified recurrent genetic aberrations, several in pathways related to marginal-zone differentiation and B-cell signaling. Here we provide an overview of recent research into the molecular and cellular biology of SMZL and related disorders, with special emphasis on immunogenetics and genomic aberrations, and discuss the value of molecular and cellular markers for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of these entities.

  • 262.
    Baltzer, Nicholas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational Biology and Bioinformatics. Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Stockholm County, Sweden.
    Sundström, Karin
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Stockholm, Stockholm Count, Sweden..
    Nygård, Jan F.
    Canc Registry Norway, Dept Registry Informat, Oslo, Oslo County, Norway..
    Dillner, Joakim
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Stockholm, Stockholm Count, Sweden..
    Komorowski, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational Biology and Bioinformatics. Polish Acad Sci, Inst Comp Sci, Warsaw, Warsaw County, Poland..
    Risk stratification in cervical cancer screening by complete screening history: Applying bioinformatics to a general screening population2017In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 141, no 1, p. 200-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women screened for cervical cancer in Sweden are currently treated under a one-size-fits-all programme, which has been successful in reducing the incidence of cervical cancer but does not use all of the participants' available medical information. This study aimed to use women's complete cervical screening histories to identify diagnostic patterns that may indicate an increased risk of developing cervical cancer. A nationwide case-control study was performed where cervical cancer screening data from 125,476 women with a maximum follow-up of 10 years were evaluated for patterns of SNOMED diagnoses. The cancer development risk was estimated for a number of different screening history patterns and expressed as Odds Ratios (OR), with a history of 4 benign cervical tests as reference, using logistic regression. The overall performance of the model was moderate (64% accuracy, 71% area under curve) with 61-62% of the study population showing no specific patterns associated with risk. However, predictions for high-risk groups as defined by screening history patterns were highly discriminatory with ORs ranging from 8 to 36. The model for computing risk performed consistently across different screening history lengths, and several patterns predicted cancer outcomes. The results show the presence of risk-increasing and risk-decreasing factors in the screening history. Thus it is feasible to identify subgroups based on their complete screening histories. Several high-risk subgroups identified might benefit from an increased screening density. Some low-risk subgroups identified could likely have a moderately reduced screening density without additional risk.

  • 263. Bamia, C.
    et al.
    Lagiou, P.
    Jenab, M.
    Aleksandrova, K.
    Fedirko, V.
    Trichopoulos, D.
    Overvad, K.
    Tjonneland, A.
    Olsen, A.
    Clavel-Chapelon, F.
    Boutron-Ruault, M-C
    Kvaskoff, M.
    Katzke, V. A.
    Kuehn, T.
    Boeing, H.
    Noethlings, U.
    Palli, D.
    Sieri, S.
    Panico, S.
    Tumino, R.
    Naccarati, A.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B(As)
    Peeters, P. H. M.
    Weiderpass, E.
    Skeie, G.
    Quiros, J. R.
    Agudo, A.
    Chirlaque, M-D
    Sanchez, M-J
    Ardanaz, E.
    Dorronsoro, M.
    Ericson, U.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Wennberg, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Khaw, K-T
    Wareham, N.
    Key, T. J.
    Travis, R. C.
    Ferrari, P.
    Stepien, M.
    Duarte-Salles, T.
    Norat, T.
    Murphy, N.
    Riboli, E.
    Trichopoulou, A.
    Fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to hepatocellular carcinoma in a multi-centre, European cohort study2015In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 112, no 7, p. 1273-1282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Vegetable and/or fruit intakes in association with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk have been investigated in case-control studies conducted in specific European countries and cohort studies conducted in Asia, with inconclusive results. No multi-centre European cohort has investigated the indicated associations. Methods: In 486 799 men/women from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition, we identified 201 HCC cases after 11 years median follow-up. We calculated adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for HCC incidence for sex-specific quintiles and per 100 g d(-1) increments of vegetable/fruit intakes. Results: Higher vegetable intake was associated with a statistically significant, monotonic reduction of HCC risk: HR (100 g d(-1) increment): 0.83; 95% CI: 0.71-0.98. This association was consistent in sensitivity analyses with no apparent heterogeneity across strata of HCC risk factors. Fruit intake was not associated with HCC incidence: HR (100 g d(-1) increment): 1.01; 95% CI: 0.92-1.11. Conclusions: Vegetable, but not fruit, intake is associated with lower HCC risk with no evidence for heterogeneity of this association in strata of important HCC risk factors. Mechanistic studies should clarify pathways underlying this association. Given that HCC prognosis is poor and that vegetables are practically universally accessible, our results may be important, especially for those at high risk for the disease.

  • 264.
    Banaem, Hossein Y.
    et al.
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Ahmadian, Alireza
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Saberi, Hooshangh
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Daneshmehr, Alireza
    Univiversity of Tehran, Iran.
    Khodadad, Davood
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Brain tumor modeling: glioma growth and interaction with chemotherapy2011In: Proc. SPIE 8285, International Conference on Graphic and Image Processing (ICGIP 2011), SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2011, article id 82851MConference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In last decade increasingly mathematical models of tumor growths have been studied, particularly on solid tumors which growth mainly caused by cellular proliferation. In this paper we propose a modified model to simulate the growth of gliomas in different stages. Glioma growth is modeled by a reaction-advection-diffusion. We begin with a model of untreated gliomas and continue with models of polyclonal glioma following chemotherapy. From relatively simple assumptions involving homogeneous brain tissue bounded by a few gross anatomical landmarks (ventricles and skull) the models have been expanded to include heterogeneous brain tissue with different motilities of glioma cells in grey and white matter. Tumor growth is characterized by a dangerous change in the control mechanisms, which normally maintain a balance between the rate of proliferation and the rate of apoptosis (controlled cell death). Result shows that this model closes to clinical finding and can simulate brain tumor behavior properly.

  • 265.
    Banaem, Hossein Yousefi
    et al.
    Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran.
    Ahmadian, Alireza
    Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran.
    Saberi, Hooshangh
    Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran.
    Daneshmehr, Alireza
    University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran.
    Khodadad, Davood
    Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran.
    Brain tumor modeling: glioma growth and interaction with chemotherapy2011In: International Conference on Graphic and Image Processing (ICGIP) / [ed] Yi Xie & Yanjun Zheng, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2011, Vol. 8285, article id 82851MConference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In last decade increasingly mathematical models of tumor growths have been studied, particularly on solid tumors which growth mainly caused by cellular proliferation. In this paper we propose a modified model to simulate the growth of gliomas in different stages. Glioma growth is modeled by a reaction-advection-diffusion. We begin with a model of untreated gliomas and continue with models of polyclonal glioma following chemotherapy. From relatively simple assumptions involving homogeneous brain tissue bounded by a few gross anatomical landmarks (ventricles and skull) the models have been expanded to include heterogeneous brain tissue with different motilities of glioma cells in grey and white matter. Tumor growth is characterized by a dangerous change in the control mechanisms, which normally maintain a balance between the rate of proliferation and the rate of apoptosis (controlled cell death). Result shows that this model closes to clinical finding and can simulate brain tumor behavior properly.

  • 266.
    Bandopadhayay, Pratiti
    et al.
    Departments of Cancer Biology and Pediatric Neuro-Oncology, Department of Pediatric Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children's Hospital; The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts.
    Bergthold, Guillaume
    Departments of Cancer Biology, Department of Pediatric Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children's Hospital; The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts.
    Nguyen, Brian
    Schubert, Simone
    Gholamin, Sharareh
    Tang, Yujie
    Bolin, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schumacher, Steven E.
    Zeid, Rhamy
    Masoud, Sabran
    Yu, Furong
    Vue, Nujsaubnusi
    Gibson, William J.
    Paolella, Brenton R.
    Mitra, Siddhartha S.
    Cheshier, Samuel H.
    Qi, Jun
    Liu, Kun-Wei
    Wechsler-Reya, Robert
    Weiss, William A.
    Department of Neurology, Pediatrics, and Neurosurgery, University of California, San Francisco, California.
    Swartling, Fredrik J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kieran, Mark W.
    Bradner, James E.
    Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School; The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts.
    Beroukhim, Rameen
    Departments of Cancer Biology and Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School; Center for Cancer Genome Characterization, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston; The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts;.
    Cho, Yoon-Jae
    Departments of Neurology and Neurological Sciences and Neurosurgery, Stanford University School of Medicine; Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford.
    BET Bromodomain Inhibition of MYC-Amplified Medulloblastoma2014In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 912-925Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:

    MYC-amplified medulloblastomas are highly lethal tumors. Bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) bromodomain inhibition has recently been shown to suppress MYC-associated transcriptional activity in other cancers. The compound JQ1 inhibits BET bromodomain-containing proteins, including BRD4. Here, we investigate BET bromodomain targeting for the treatment of MYC-amplified medulloblastoma.

    Experimental Design:

    We evaluated the effects of genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of BET bromodomains on proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis in established and newly generated patient- and genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM)-derived medulloblastoma cell lines and xenografts that harbored amplifications of MYC or MYCN. We also assessed the effect of JQ1 on MYC expression and global MYC-associated transcriptional activity. We assessed the in vivo efficacy of JQ1 in orthotopic xenografts established in immunocompromised mice.

    Results:

    Treatment of MYC-amplified medulloblastoma cells with JQ1 decreased cell viability associated with arrest at G1 and apoptosis. We observed downregulation of MYC expression and confirmed the inhibition of MYC-associated transcriptional targets. The exogenous expression of MYC from a retroviral promoter reduced the effect of JQ1 on cell viability, suggesting that attenuated levels of MYC contribute to the functional effects of JQ1. JQ1 significantly prolonged the survival of orthotopic xenograft models of MYC-amplified medulloblastoma (P < 0.001). Xenografts harvested from mice after five doses of JQ1 had reduced the expression of MYC mRNA and a reduced proliferative index.

    Conclusion:

    JQ1 suppresses MYC expression and MYC-associated transcriptional activity in medulloblastomas, resulting in an overall decrease in medulloblastoma cell viability. These preclinical findings highlight the promise of BET bromodomain inhibitors as novel agents for MYC-amplified medulloblastoma.

  • 267. Bandopadhayay, Pratiti
    et al.
    Bergthold, Guillaume
    Nguyen, Brian
    Schubert, Simone
    Gholamin, Sharareh
    Tang, Yujie
    Bolin, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Schumacher, Steven
    Zeid, Rhamy
    Masoud, Sabran
    Yu, Furong
    Vue, Nujsaubnusi
    Gibson, William
    Paolella, Brenton
    Mitra, Siddhartha
    Cheshier, Samuel
    Qi, Jun
    Liu, Kun-Wei
    Wechsler-Reya, Robert
    Weiss, William
    Swartling, Fredrik Johansson
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Kieran, Mark W.
    Bradner, James E.
    Beroukhim, Rameen
    Cho, Yoon-Jae
    Medulloblastoma models which harbor amplifications of myc family members are sensitive to BET-Bromodomain inhibition2014In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 16, p. 90-90Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 268. Bandyopadhyay, Sulalit
    et al.
    McDonagh, Birgitte H.
    Singh, Gurvinder
    Raghunathan, Karthik
    Sandvig, Axel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience. 3 Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), N-7491 Trondheim, Norway.
    Sandvig, Ioanna
    Andreassen, Jens-Petter
    Glomm, Wilhelm R.
    Growing gold nanostructures for shape-selective cellular uptake2018In: Nanoscale Research Letters, ISSN 1931-7573, E-ISSN 1556-276X, Vol. 13, article id 254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With development in the synthesis of shape- and size-dependent gold (Au) nanostructures (NSs) and their applications in nanomedicine, one of the biggest challenges is to understand the interaction of these shapes with cancer cells. Herein, we study the interaction of Au NSs of five different shapes with glioblastoma-astrocytoma cells. Three different shapes (nanorods, tetrahexahedra, and bipyramids), possessing tunable optical properties, have been synthesized by a single-step seed-mediated growth approach employing binary surfactant mixtures of CTAB and a secondary surfactant By the use of two-step seed-mediated approach, we obtained new NSs, named nanomakura (Makura is a Japanese word used for pillow) which is reported for the first time here. Spherical Au nanoparticles were prepared by the Turkevich method. To study NS-cell interactions, we functionalized the NSs using thiolated PEG followed by 11-Mercaptoundecanoic acid. The influence of shape and concentration of NSs on the cytotoxicity were assessed with a LIVE/DEAD assay in glioblastoma-astrocytoma cells. Furthermore, the time-dependent uptake of nanomakura was studied with TEM. Our results indicate that unlike the other shapes studied here, the nanomakura were taken up both via receptor-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis. Thus, from our library of different NSs with similar surface functionality, the shape is found to be an important parameter for cellular uptake.

  • 269. Banefelt, J.
    et al.
    Liede, A.
    Mesterton, J.
    Stålhammar, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Hernandez, R. K.
    Sobocki, P.
    Persson, Bo-Eric
    Uppsala University.
    Survival and clinical metastases among prostate cancer patients treated with androgen deprivation therapy in Sweden2014In: Cancer Epidemiology, ISSN 1877-7821, E-ISSN 1877-783X, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 442-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To examine the incidence of metastases and clinical course of prostate cancer patients who are without confirmed metastasis when initiating androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods: Retrospective cohort study conducted using electronic medical records from Swedish outpatient urology clinics linked to national mandatory registries to capture medical and demographic data. Prostate cancer patients initiating ADT between 2000 and 2010 were followed from initiation of ADT to metastasis, death, and/or end of follow-up. Results: The 5-year cumulative incidence (CI) of metastasis was 18%. Survival was 60% after 5 years; results were similar for bone metastasis-free survival. The 5-year CI of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) was 50% and the median survival from CRPC development was 2.7 years. Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and PSA doubling time were strong predictors of bone metastasis, any metastasis, and death. Conclusion: This study provides understanding of the clinical course of prostate cancer patients without confirmed metastasis treated with ADT in Sweden. Greater PSA values and shorter PSA doubling time (particularly <= 6 months) were associated with increased risk of bone metastasis, any metastasis, and death.

  • 270. Bao, Cuiping
    et al.
    Yang, Rongrong
    Pedersen, Nancy
    Xu, Weige
    Xu, Hui
    Song, Ruixue
    Qi, Xiuying
    Xu, Weili
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Tianjin Medical University, China.
    Overweight in midlife and risk of cancer in late life: A nationwide Swedish twin study2019In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 144, no 9, p. 2128-2134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our study examined whether midlife overweight (body mass index [BMI] >= 25) is associated with late-life cancer risk and explored the role of genetic and early-life environmental factors in this association. The study included 14,766 individuals from the Swedish Twin Registry, whose midlife (30-50 years) height and weight were recorded. Information on cancer diagnoses in late life (>65 years) was derived from the National Patient Registry and Cancer Registry. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) models were used to analyze unmatched case-control data (controlled for the clustering of twins within a pair). A co-twin matched case-control analysis used conditional logistic regression to compare cancer-discordant twins. Of all participants, 3968 (26.9%) were overweight and 4253 (28.8%) had cancer. In multi-adjusted GEE models using normal-weight (BMI 18.5-24.9) participants as the reference group, overweight was related to higher risk of colon cancer (OR 1.36, 95% CI: 1.00-1.84, p = 0.049), liver cancer (OR 2.00, 95% CI: 1.11-3.62), cervix uteri cancer (OR 2.86, 95% CI: 1.19-6.91) and corpus uteri cancer (OR 1.78, 95% CI: 1.14-2.78) but lower risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer (OR 0.77, 95% CI: 0.66-0.90). In conditional logistic regression analysis, these associations were attenuated becoming nonsignificance. The difference in ORs from the unmatched and matched analyses was not significant. In conclusion, midlife overweight is associated with increased risk of late-life colon, liver and uterine cancer but reduced risk of late-life nonmelanoma skin cancer. Further investigations are warranted to explore the role of genetic and early-life environmental factors in these associations.

  • 271. Baranov, Vladimir
    et al.
    Yeung, Moorix Mo-Wai
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Hammarström, Sten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Expression of carcinoembryonic antigen and nonspecific cross-reacting 50-kDa antigen in human normal and cancerous colon mucosa: comparative ultrastructural study with monoclonal antibodies1994In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 54, no 12, p. 3305-3314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The precise localization of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and non-specific cross-reacting 50-kDa antigen (NCA 50) in normal colon mucosa and colon adenocarcinoma was investigated by using an indirect immunoperoxidase electron microscopic technique with specific monoclonal antibodies. In normal adult colon both antigens were localized to microvesicles and filaments of the "fuzzy coat" on the apical surface of the epithelial cells. In addition, NCA 50 was found in the narrow spaces between adjoining microvilli. Mature columnar cells at the free luminal surface contained most of the antigen positive material. CEA and NCA 50 were also detected as intracellular components of goblet cells. In multilayered tumor glands, the cell surface expression of the antigens was dependent on the position of the tumor cell in the gland. The neoplastic cells showed either a predominant apical labeling or a positive staining of almost the entire cell surface. Some of the neoplastic cells contained CEA in so-called "intracellular lumina." In contrast to normal colon epithelial cells most tumor cells synthesized NCA 50 actively. In normal colonic mucosa, unlike in cancerous tissue, CEA and NCA 50 appear to be released via vesicles formed from the microvillous membrane of mature columnar cells. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that CEA and NCA play a role in the nonspecific defense against microorganisms in the large intestine.

  • 272.
    Barash, Uri
    et al.
    Technion, Rappaport Fac Med, Canc & Vasc Biol Res Ctr, POB 9649, IL-31096 Haifa, Israel.
    Lapidot, Moshe
    Rambam Hlth Care Campus, Dept Gen Thorac Surg, Haifa, Israel.
    Zohar, Yaniv
    Rambam Hlth Care Campus, Dept Pathol, Haifa, Israel.
    Loomis, Cynthia
    NYU, Sch Med, Dept Cardiothorac Surg, Langone Med Ctr, New York, NY USA.
    Moreira, Andre
    NYU, Sch Med, Dept Cardiothorac Surg, Langone Med Ctr, New York, NY USA.
    Feld, Sari
    Technion, Rappaport Fac Med, Canc & Vasc Biol Res Ctr, POB 9649, IL-31096 Haifa, Israel.
    Goparaju, Chandra
    NYU, Sch Med, Dept Cardiothorac Surg, Langone Med Ctr, New York, NY USA.
    Yang, Haining
    Univ Hawaii, Ctr Canc, Honolulu, HI 96822 USA.
    Hammond, Edward
    Zucero Therapeut, Darra, Qld, Australia.
    Zhang, Ganlin
    Beijing Hosp Tradit Chinese Med, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Li, Jin-Ping
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Ilan, Neta
    Technion, Rappaport Fac Med, Canc & Vasc Biol Res Ctr, POB 9649, IL-31096 Haifa, Israel.
    Nagler, Arnon
    Chaim Sheba Med Ctr, Dept Hematol & Bone Marrow Transplantat, Tel Hashomer, Israel.
    Pass, Harvey I.
    NYU, Sch Med, Dept Cardiothorac Surg, Langone Med Ctr, New York, NY USA.
    Vlodavsky, Israel
    Technion, Rappaport Fac Med, Canc & Vasc Biol Res Ctr, POB 9649, IL-31096 Haifa, Israel.
    Involvement of Heparanase in the Pathogenesis of Mesothelioma: Basic Aspects and Clinical Applications2018In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, ISSN 0027-8874, E-ISSN 1460-2105, Vol. 110, no 10, p. 1102-1114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Mammalian cells express a single functional heparanase, an endoglycosidase that cleaves heparan sulfate and thereby promotes tumor metastasis, angiogenesis, and inflammation. Malignant mesothelioma is highly aggressive and has a poor prognosis because of the lack of markers for early diagnosis and resistance to conventional therapies. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mode of action and biological significance of heparanase in mesothelioma and test the efficacy of heparanase inhibitors in the treatment of this malignancy.

    Methods: The involvement of heparanase in mesothelioma was investigated by applying mouse models of mesothelioma and testing the effect of heparanase gene silencing (n = 18 mice per experiment; two different models) and heparanase inhibitors (ie, PG545, defibrotide; n = 18 per experiment; six different models). Synchronous pleural effusion and plasma samples from patients with mesothelioma (n = 35), other malignancies (12 non-small cell lung cancer, two small cell lung carcinoma, four breast cancer, three gastrointestinal cancers, two lymphomas), and benign effusions (five patients) were collected and analyzed for heparanase content (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). Eighty-one mesothelioma biopsies were analyzed by H-Score for the prognostic impact of heparanase using immunohistochemistry. All statistical tests were two-sided.

    Results: Mesothelioma tumor growth, measured by bioluminescence or tumor weight at termination, was markedly attenuated by heparanase gene silencing (P = .02) and by heparanase inhibitors (PG545 and defibrotide; P < .001 and P = .01, respectively). A marked increase in survival of the mesothelioma-bearing mice (P < .001) was recorded. Heparanase inhibitors were more potent in vivo than conventional chemotherapy. Clinically, heparanase levels in patients' pleural effusions could distinguish between malignant and benign effusions, and a heparanase H-score above 90 was associated with reduced patient survival (hazard ratio = 1.89, 95% confidence interval = 1.09 to 3.27, P = .03).

    Conclusions: Our results imply that heparanase is clinically relevant in mesothelioma development. Given these preclinical and clinical data, heparanase appears to be an important mediator of mesothelioma, and heparanase inhibitors are worthy of investigation as a new therapeutic modality in mesothelioma clinical trials.

  • 273.
    Barash, Uri
    et al.
    Rappaport Fac Med, TICC, Haifa, Israel.
    Spyrou, Argyris
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Liu, Pei
    Shantou Univ, Med Coll, Shantou, Peoples R China.
    Vlodaysky, Euvgeni
    Rambam Hlth Care Campus, Dept Pathol, Haifa, Israel.
    Zhu, Chenchen
    Shantou Univ, Med Coll, Shantou, Peoples R China.
    Luo, Juanjuan
    Shantou Univ, Med Coll, Shantou, Peoples R China.
    Su, Dongsheng
    Shantou Univ, Med Coll, Shantou, Peoples R China.
    Ilhan, Neta
    Rappaport Fac Med, TICC, Haifa, Israel.
    Forsberg Nilsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Vlodaysky, Israel
    Rappaport Fac Med, TICC, Haifa, Israel.
    Yang, Xiaojun
    Shantou Univ, Med Coll, Shantou, Peoples R China.
    Heparanase promotes glioma progression via enhancing CD24 expression2019In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 145, no 6, p. 1596-1608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heparanase is an endo-beta-d-glucuronidase that cleaves heparan sulfate (HS) side chains of heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Compelling evidence tie heparanase levels with all steps of tumor formation including tumor initiation, growth, metastasis and chemo-resistance, likely involving augmentation of signaling pathways and gene transcription. In order to reveal the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the protumorigenic properties of heparanase, we established an inducible (Tet-on) system in U87 human glioma cells and applied gene array methodology in order to identify genes associated with heparanase induction. We found that CD24, a mucin-like cell adhesion protein, is consistently upregulated by heparanase and by heparanase splice variant devoid of enzymatic activity, whereas heparanase gene silencing was associated with decreased CD24 expression. This finding was further substantiated by a similar pattern of heparanase and CD24 immunostaining in glioma patients (Pearson's correlation; R = 0.66, p = 0.00001). Noteworthy, overexpression of CD24 stimulated glioma cell migration, invasion, colony formation in soft agar and tumor growth in mice suggesting that CD24 functions promote tumor growth. Likewise, anti-CD24 neutralizing monoclonal antibody attenuated glioma tumor growth, and a similar inhibition was observed in mice treated with a neutralizing mAb directed against L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM), a ligand for CD24. Importantly, significant shorter patient survival was found in heparanase-high/CD24-high tumors vs. heparanase-high/CD24-low tumors for both high-grade and low-grade glioma (p = 0.02). Our results thus uncover a novel heparanase-CD24-L1CAM axis that plays a significant role in glioma tumorigenesis.

  • 274.
    Barazeghi, Elham
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Studies of epigenetic deregulation in parathyroid tumors and small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Deregulation of the epigenome is associated with the initiation and progression of various types of human cancers. Here we investigated the level of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), expression and function of TET1 and TET2, and DNA methylation in parathyroid tumors and small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs).

    In Paper I, an undetectable/very low level of 5hmC in parathyroid carcinomas (PCs) compared to parathyroid adenomas with positive staining, suggested that 5hmC may represent a novel biomarker for parathyroid malignancy. Immunohistochemistry revealed that increased tumor weight in adenomas was associated with a more aberrant staining pattern of 5hmC and TET1. A growth regulatory role of TET1 was demonstrated in parathyroid tumor cells.

    Paper II revealed that the expression of TET2 was also deregulated in PCs, and promoter hypermethylation was detected in PCs when compared to normal parathyroid tissues. 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine treatment of a primary PC cell culture induced TET2 expression and further supported involvement of promoter hypermethylation in TET2 gene repression. TET2 knockout demonstrated a role for TET2 in cell growth and migration, and as a candidate tumor suppressor gene.

    In Paper III, variable levels of 5hmC, and aberrant expression of TET1 and TET2 were observed in SI-NETs. We demonstrated a growth regulatory role for TET1, and cytoplasmic expression with absent nuclear localization for TET2 in SI-NETs. In vitro experiments supported the involvement of exportin-1 in TET2 mislocalization, and suggested that KPT-330/selinexor, an orally bioavailable selective inhibitor of exportin-1 and nuclear export, with anti-cancer effects, could be further investigated as a therapeutic option in patients with SI-NETs.

    In Paper IV, DNA methylation was compared between SI-NET primary tumors and metastases by reduced representation bisulfite sequencing. Three differentially methylated regions (DMR) on chromosome 18 were detected and chosen for further analyses. The PTPRM gene, at 18p11, displayed low expression in SI-NETs with high levels of methylation in the presumed CpG island shores, and in the DMR rather than the promoter region or exon 1/intron 1 boundary. PTPRM overexpression resulted in inhibition of cell growth, proliferation, and induction of apoptosis in SI-NET cells, suggesting a role for PTPRM as an epigenetically deregulated candidate tumor suppressor gene in SI-NETs.  

  • 275.
    Barazeghi, Elham
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Gill, Anthony J.
    Royal N Shore Hosp, Dept Anat Pathol, St Leonards, NSW 2065, Australia.;Univ Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia..
    Sidhu, Stan
    Univ Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.;Royal N Shore Hosp, Dept Surg, St Leonards, NSW 2065, Australia..
    Norlen, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery. Univ Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.;Royal N Shore Hosp, Dept Surg, St Leonards, NSW 2065, Australia..
    Dina, Roberto
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Hammersmith Hosp, Dept Histopathol, London, England..
    Palazzo, F. Fausto
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Hammersmith Hosp, Endocrine Surg, London, England..
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    5-Hydroxymethylcytosine discriminates between parathyroid adenoma and carcinoma2016In: Clinical Epigenetics, E-ISSN 1868-7083, Vol. 8, article id 31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Primary hyperparathyroidism is characterized by enlarged parathyroid glands due to an adenoma (80-85 %) or multiglandular disease (similar to 15 %) causing hypersecretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and generally hypercalcemia. Parathyroid cancer is rare (<1-5 %). The epigenetic mark 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is reduced in various cancers, and this may involve reduced expression of the ten-eleven translocation 1 (TET1) enzyme. Here, we have performed novel experiments to determine the 5hmC level and TET1 protein expression in 43 parathyroid adenomas (PAs) and 17 parathyroid carcinomas (PCs) from patients who had local invasion or metastases and to address a potential growth regulatory role of TET1. Results: The global 5hmC level was determined by a semi-quantitative DNA immune-dot blot assay in a smaller number of tumors. The global 5hmC level was reduced in nine PCs and 15 PAs compared to four normal tissue samples (p < 0.05), and it was most severely reduced in the PCs. By immunohistochemistry, all 17 PCs stained negatively for 5hmC and TET1 showed negative or variably heterogeneous staining for the majority. All 43 PAs displayed positive 5hmC staining, and a similar aberrant staining pattern of 5hmC and TET1 was seen in about half of the PAs. Western blotting analysis of two PCs and nine PAs showed variable TET1 protein expression levels. A significantly higher tumor weight was associated to PAs displaying a more severe aberrant staining pattern of 5hmC and TET1. Overexpression of TET1 in a colony forming assay inhibited parathyroid tumor cell growth. Conclusions: 5hmC can discriminate between PAs and PCs. Whether 5hmC represents a novel marker for malignancy warrants further analysis in additional parathyroid tumor cohorts. The results support a growth regulatory role of TET1 in parathyroid tissue.

  • 276.
    Barazeghi, Elham
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Gill, Anthony J.
    Kolling Inst Med Res, Canc Diag & Pathol Res Grp, St Leonards, NSW, Australia..
    Sidhu, Stan
    Royal North Shore Hosp, Dept Surg, St Leonards, NSW, Australia.;Univ Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Norlen, Olov
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Endocrine Unit, Dept Surg Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.;Royal North Shore Hosp, Dept Surg, St Leonards, NSW, Australia.;Univ Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Dina, Roberto
    Imperial Coll, Hammersmith Hosp, Dept Histopathol, London, England..
    Palazzo, F. Fausto
    Imperial Coll, Hammersmith Hosp, Dept Endocrine Surg, London, England..
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    A role for TET2 in parathyroid carcinoma2017In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 329-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) is rarely caused by parathyroid carcinoma (PC, <1-5% of pHPT cases). The TET proteins oxidize the epigenetic mark 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) and inactivation by mutation or epigenetic deregulation of TET1 and TET2 play important roles in various cancers. Recently, we found that 5hmC was severely reduced in all of the analyzed PCs and with deranged expression of TET1 for the majority of PCs. Here, we have examined the expression of the TET2 protein in 15 5hmC-negative PCs from patients who had local invasion or metastases. Cell growth and cell migratory roles for TET2 as well as epigenetic deregulated expression were addressed. Immunohistochemistry revealed very low/undetectable expression of TET2 in all PCs and verified for two PCs that were available for western blotting analysis. Knockdown of TET2 in the parathyroid cell line sHPT-1 resulted in increased cell growth and increased cell migration. DNA sequencing of TET2 in PCs revealed two common variants and no obvious inactivating mutations. Quantitative bisulfite pyrosequencing analysis of the TET2 promoter CpG island revealed higher CpG methylation level in the PCs compared to that in normal tissues and treatment of a PC primary cell culture with the DNA methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine caused increased expression of the methylated TET2 gene. Hence, the data suggest that deregulated expression of TET2 by DNA hypermethylation may contribute to the aberrantly low level of 5hmC in PCs and further that TET2 plays a cell growth and cell migratory regulatory role and may constitute a parathyroid tumor suppressor gene.

  • 277.
    Barazeghi, Elham
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Marabita, Francesco
    Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Reduced representation bisulfite sequencing of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors identifies PTPRM as a novel candidate tumor suppressor geneIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 278.
    Barazeghi, Elham
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Prabhawa, Surendra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery. Uppsala Univ, Uppsala Univ Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Norlén, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    A Role of TETs and 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine in SI-NETs2017In: Neuroendocrinology, ISSN 0028-3835, E-ISSN 1423-0194, Vol. 105, p. 18-18Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 279.
    Barazeghi, Elham
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Prabhawa, Surendra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Norlén, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Decrease of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and TET1 with nuclear exclusion of TET2 in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumorsIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 280.
    Barazeghi, Elham
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Prabhawa, Surendra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Norlén, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Decrease of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and TET1 with nuclear exclusion of TET2 in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors.2018In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 764Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) originate from enterochromaffin cells scattered in the intestinal mucosa of the ileum and jejunum. Loss of one copy of chromosome 18 is the most frequent observed aberration in primary tumors and metastases. The aim of this study was to investigate possible involvement of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), TET1 and TET2 in SI-NETs.

    METHODS: The analysis was conducted using 40 primary tumors and corresponding 47 metastases. The level of 5hmC, TET1 and TET2 was analyzed by DNA immune-dot blot assay and immunohistochemistry. Other methods included a colony forming assay, western blotting analysis, and quantitative bisulfite pyrosequencing analysis. The effect of the exportin-1 nuclear transport machinery inhibitors on cell proliferation and apoptosis was also explored using two SI-NET cell lines.

    RESULTS: Variable levels of 5hmC and a mosaic staining appearance with a mixture of positive and negative cell nuclei, regardless of cell number and staining strength, was observed overall both in primary tumors and metastases. Similarly aberrant staining pattern was observed for TET1 and TET2. In a number of tumors (15/32) mosaic pattern together with areas of negative staining was also observed for TET1. Abolished expression of TET1 in the tumors did not seem to involve hypermethylation of the TET1 promoter region. Overexpression of TET1 in a colony forming assay supported a function as cell growth regulator. In contrast to 5hmC and TET1, TET2 was also observed in the cytoplasm of all the analyzed SI-NETs regardless of nuclear localization. Treatment of CNDT2.5 and KRJ-I cells with the exportin-1 (XPO1/CRM1) inhibitor, leptomycin B, induced reduction in the cytoplasm and nuclear retention of TET2. Aberrant partitioning of TET2 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm seemed therefore to involve the exportin-1 nuclear transport machinery. Reduced cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis were observed after treatment of CNDT2.5 and KRJ-I cells with leptomycin B or KPT-330 (selinexor).

    CONCLUSIONS: SI-NETs are epigenetically dysregulated at the level of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine/ TET1/TET2. We suggest that KPT-330/selinexor or future developments should be considered and evaluated for single treatment of patients with SI-NET disease and also in combinations with somatostatin analogues, peptide receptor radiotherapy, or everolimus.

  • 281. Barbany, Gisela
    et al.
    Andersen, Mette K
    Autio, Kirsti
    Borgström, Georg
    Franco, Lucia Cavalier
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Heim, Sverre
    Heinonen, Kristina
    Hovland, Randi
    Johansson, Bertil
    Johannsson, Johann H
    Kjeldsen, Eigil
    Nordgren, Ann
    Palmqvist, Lars
    Forestier, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Additional aberrations of the ETV6 and RUNX1 genes have no prognostic impact in 229 t(12;21)(p13;q22)-positive B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemias treated according to the NOPHO-ALL-2000 protocol2012In: Leukemia research: a Forum for Studies on Leukemia and Normal Hemopoiesis, ISSN 0145-2126, E-ISSN 1873-5835, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 936-938Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 282.
    Barbuil, Tiziano
    et al.
    Osped Giovanni 23, Div Hematol, Bergamo, Italy.
    Tefferi, Ayalew
    Mayo Clin, Dept Med, Div Hematol, Rochester, MN USA.
    Vannucchi, Alessandro M.
    Univ Florence, AOU Careggi, Ctr Res & Innovat Myeloproliferat Neoplasms, CRIMM, Florence, Italy.
    Passamonti, Francesco
    Univ Insubria, Osped Circolo, Dept Med & Surg, Div Hematol,ASST Sette Laghi, Varese, Italy.
    Silvers, Richard T.
    Weill Cornell Med, Div Hematol Oncol, New York, NY USA.
    Hoffman, Ronald
    Mt Sinai Sch Med, Dept Med, Tisch Canc Inst, New York, NY USA.
    Verstovsek, Srdan
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Leukemia, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Mesa, Ruben
    UT Hlth San Antonio Canc Ctr, San Antonio, TX USA.
    Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques
    Univ Paris 07, Hop St Louis, AP HP, INSERM,Ctr Invest Clin CIC 1427, Paris, France.
    Hehlmann, Rudiger
    Heidelberg Univ, Univ Hosp Mannheim, Dept Hematol & Oncol, Mannheim, Germany.
    Reiter, Andreas
    Heidelberg Univ, Univ Hosp Mannheim, Dept Hematol & Oncol, Mannheim, Germany.
    Cervantes, Francisco
    Univ Barcelona, IDIBAPS, Hosp Clin, Barcelona, Spain.
    Harrison, Claire
    Guys & St Thomas NHS Fdn Trust, Dept Hematol, London, England.
    Mc Mullin, Mary Frances
    Queens Univ, Ctr Med Educ, Belfast, Antrim, North Ireland.
    Hasselbalch, Hans Carl
    Zealand Univ Hosp, Dept Hematol, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Koschmieder, Steffen
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Fac Med, Dept Hematol Oncol Hemostaseol & Stem Cell Transp, Aachen, Germany.
    Marchetti, Monia
    Hosp Cardinal Massaia, Oncol SOC, Hematol Day Serv, Asti, Italy.
    Bacigalupo, Andrea
    Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Fdn Policlin Univ Gemelli, Ist Ematol, Rome, Italy.
    Finazzil, Guido
    Osped Giovanni 23, Div Hematol, Bergamo, Italy.
    Kroeger, Nicolaus
    Univ Hosp Hamburg Eppendorf, Dept Stem Cell Transplantat, Hamburg, Germany.
    Griesshammer, Martin
    Univ Hannover, Acad Hosp, Johannes Wesling Med Ctr Minden, Dept Hematol & Oncol, Minden, Germany.
    Birgegård, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Barosi, Giovanni
    IRCCS Policlin S Matteo Fdn, Ctr Study Myelofibrosis, Pavia, Italy.
    Philadelphia chromosome-negative classical myeloproliferative neoplasms: revised management recommendations from European LeukemiaNet2018In: Leukemia, ISSN 0887-6924, E-ISSN 1476-5551, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 1057-1069Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This document updates the recommendations on the management of Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph-neg MPNs) published in 2011 by the European LeukemiaNet (ELN) consortium. Recommendations were produced by multiple-step formalized procedures of group discussion. A critical appraisal of evidence by using Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology was performed in the areas where at least one randomized clinical trial was published. Seven randomized controlled trials provided the evidence base; earlier phase trials also informed recommendation development. Key differences from the 2011 diagnostic recommendations included: lower threshold values for hemoglobin and hematocrit and bone marrow examination for diagnosis of polycythemia vera (PV), according to the revised WHO criteria; the search for complementary clonal markers, such as ASXL1, EZH2, IDH1/IDH2, and SRSF2 for the diagnosis of myelofibrosis (MF) in patients who test negative for JAK2V617, CALR or MPL driver mutations. Regarding key differences of therapy recommendations, both recombinant interferon alpha and the JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib are recommended as second-line therapies for PV patients who are intolerant or have inadequate response to hydroxyurea. Ruxolitinib is recommended as first-line approach for MF-associated splenomegaly in patients with intermediate-2 or high-risk disease; in case of intermediate-1 disease, ruxolitinib is recommended in highly symptomatic splenomegaly. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is recommended for transplant-eligible MF patients with high or intermediate-2 risk score. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is also recommended for transplant-eligible MF patients with intermediate-1 risk score who present with either refractory, transfusion-dependent anemia, blasts in peripheral blood > 2%, adverse cytogenetics, or high-risk mutations. In these situations, the transplant procedure should be performed in a controlled setting.

  • 283.
    Barczyk, K.
    et al.
    Department of Immunology, Faculty of Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland; Institute of Experimental Dermatology, University of Münster, Münster, Germany.
    Kreuter, M.
    Department of Medicine/Hematology and Oncology, University of Münster, Münster, Germany.
    Pryjma, J.
    Department of Immunology, Faculty of Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland.
    Booy, Evan P.
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, and Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, Univ. Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Maddika, Subbareddy
    Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, Cancer Care Manitoba; Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics,University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada .
    Ghavami, Saeid
    Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, Cancer Care Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
    Berdel, W. E.
    Department of Medicine/Hematology and Oncology, University of Münster, Münster, Germany.
    Roth, J.
    Institute of Experimental Dermatology, University of Münster, Münster, Germany.
    Los, Marek Jan
    Institute of Experimental Dermatology, University of Münster, Münster, Germany Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, Cancer Care Manitoba; Manitoba Institute of Child Health; Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics; Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science, University Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada, .
    Serum cytochrome c indicates in vivo apoptosis and can serve as a prognostic marker during cancer therapy2005In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 116, no 2, p. 167-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite significant progress in cancer therapy, the outcome of the treatment is often unfavorable. Better treatment monitoring would not only allow an individual more effective, patient-adjusted therapy, but also it would eliminate some of the side effects. Using a cytochrome c ELISA that was modified to increase sensitivity, we demonstrate that serum cytochrome c is a sensitive apoptotic marker in vivo reflecting therapy-induced cell death burden. Furthermore, increased serum cytochrome c level is a negative prognostic marker. Cancer patients whose serum cytochrome c level was normal 3 years ago have a twice as high probability to be still alive, as judged from sera samples collected for years, analyzed recently and matched with survival data. Moreover, we show that serum cytochrome c and serum LDH-activity reflect different stages and different forms of cell death. Cellular cytochrome c release is specific for apoptosis, whereas increased LDH activity is an indicator of (secondary) necrosis. Whereas serum LDH activity reflects the "global" degree of cell death over a period of time, the sensitive cytochrome c-based method allows confirmation of the individual cancer therapy-induced and spontaneous cell death events. The combination of cytochrome c with tissue-specific markers may provide the foundation for precise monitoring of apoptosis in vivo, by "lab-on-the-chip" technology. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • 284. Bard-Chapeau, Emilie A
    et al.
    Nguyen, Anh-Tuan
    Rust, Alistair G
    Sayadi, Ahmed
    Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Singapore, Singapore.
    Lee, Philip
    Chua, Belinda Q
    New, Lee-Sun
    de Jong, Johann
    Ward, Jerrold M
    Chin, Christopher K Y
    Chew, Valerie
    Toh, Han Chong
    Abastado, Jean-Pierre
    Benoukraf, Touati
    Soong, Richie
    Bard, Frederic A
    Dupuy, Adam J
    Johnson, Randy L
    Radda, George K
    Chan, Eric Chun Yong
    Wessels, Lodewyk F A
    Adams, David J
    Jenkins, Nancy A
    Copeland, Neal G
    Transposon mutagenesis identifies genes driving hepatocellular carcinoma in a chronic hepatitis B mouse model.2014In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 46, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most common risk factor for developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). To better understand the evolutionary forces driving HCC, we performed a near-saturating transposon mutagenesis screen in a mouse HBV model of HCC. This screen identified 21 candidate early stage drivers and a very large number (2,860) of candidate later stage drivers that were enriched for genes that are mutated, deregulated or functioning in signaling pathways important for human HCC, with a striking 1,199 genes being linked to cellular metabolic processes. Our study provides a comprehensive overview of the genetic landscape of HCC.

  • 285. Bard-Chapeau, Emilie A
    et al.
    Szumska, Dorota
    Jacob, Bindya
    Chua, Belinda Q L
    Chatterjee, Gouri C
    Zhang, Yi
    Ward, Jerrold M
    Urun, Fatma
    Kinameri, Emi
    Vincent, Stéphane D
    Ahmed, Sayadi
    Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Singapore, Singapore.
    Bhattacharya, Shoumo
    Osato, Motomi
    Perkins, Archibald S
    Moore, Adrian W
    Jenkins, Nancy A
    Copeland, Neal G
    Mice carrying a hypomorphic Evi1 allele are embryonic viable but exhibit severe congenital heart defects2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ecotropic viral integration site 1 (Evi1) oncogenic transcription factor is one of a number of alternative transcripts encoded by the Mds1 and Evi1 complex locus (Mecom). Overexpression of Evi1 has been observed in a number of myeloid disorders and is associated with poor patient survival. It is also amplified and/or overexpressed in many epithelial cancers including nasopharyngeal carcinoma, ovarian carcinoma, ependymomas, and lung and colorectal cancers. Two murine knockout models have also demonstrated Evi1's critical role in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell renewal with its absence resulting in the death of mutant embryos due to hematopoietic failure. Here we characterize a novel mouse model (designated Evi1(fl3)) in which Evi1 exon 3, which carries the ATG start, is flanked by loxP sites. Unexpectedly, we found that germline deletion of exon3 produces a hypomorphic allele due to the use of an alternative ATG start site located in exon 4, resulting in a minor Evi1 N-terminal truncation and a block in expression of the Mds1-Evi1 fusion transcript. Evi1(δex3/δex3) mutant embryos showed only a mild non-lethal hematopoietic phenotype and bone marrow failure was only observed in adult Vav-iCre/+, Evi1(fl3/fl3) mice in which exon 3 was specifically deleted in the hematopoietic system. Evi1(δex3/δex3) knockout pups are born in normal numbers but die during the perinatal period from congenital heart defects. Database searches identified 143 genes with similar mutant heart phenotypes as those observed in Evi1(δex3/δex3) mutant pups. Interestingly, 42 of these congenital heart defect genes contain known Evi1-binding sites, and expression of 18 of these genes are also effected by Evi1 siRNA knockdown. These results show a potential functional involvement of Evi1 target genes in heart development and indicate that Evi1 is part of a transcriptional program that regulates cardiac development in addition to the development of blood.

  • 286. Barekati, Zeinab
    et al.
    Radpour, Ramin
    Kohler, Corina
    Zhang, Bei
    Toniolo, Paolo
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lv, Qing
    Zheng, Hong
    Zhong, Xiao Yan
    Methylation profile of TP53 regulatory pathway and mtDNA alterations in breast cancer patients lacking TP53 mutations2010In: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 19, no 15, p. 2936-2946Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated promoter hypermethylation of TP53 regulatory pathways providing a potential link between epigenetic changes and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations in breast cancer patients lacking a TP53 mutation. The possibility of using the cancer-specific alterations in serum samples as a blood-based test was also explored. Triple-matched samples (cancerous tissues, matched adjacent normal tissues and serum samples) from breast cancer patients were screened for TP53 mutations, and the promoter methylation profile of P14(ARF), MDM2, TP53 and PTEN genes was analyzed as well as mtDNA alterations, including D-loop mutations and mtDNA content. In the studied cohort, no mutation was found in TP53 (DNA-binding domain). Comparison of P14(ARF) and PTEN methylation patterns showed significant hypermethylation levels in tumor tissues (P < 0.05 and <0.01, respectively) whereas the TP53 tumor suppressor gene was not hypermethylated (P < 0.511). The proportion of PTEN methylation was significantly higher in serum than in the normal tissues and it has a significant correlation to tumor tissues (P < 0.05). mtDNA analysis revealed 36.36% somatic and 90.91% germline mutations in the D-loop region and also significant mtDNA depletion in tumor tissues (P < 0.01). In addition, the mtDNA content in matched serum was significantly lower than in the normal tissues (P < 0.05). These data can provide an insight into the management of a therapeutic approach based on the reversal of epigenetic silencing of the crucial genes involved in regulatory pathways of the tumor suppressor TP53. Additionally, release of significant aberrant methylated PTEN in matched serum samples might represent a promising biomarker for breast cancer.

  • 287. Barekati, Zeinab
    et al.
    Radpour, Ramin
    Lu, Qing
    Bitzer, Johannes
    Zheng, Hong
    Toniolo, Paolo
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Zhong, Xiao Yan
    Methylation signature of lymph node metastases in breast cancer patients2012In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 12, p. 244-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Invasion and metastasis are two important hallmarks of malignant tumors caused by complex genetic and epigenetic alterations. The present study investigated the contribution of aberrant methylation profiles of cancer related genes, APC, BIN1, BMP6, BRCA1, CST6, ESR-b, GSTP1, P14 (ARF), P16 (CDKN2A), P21 (CDKN1A), PTEN, and TIMP3, in the matched axillary lymph node metastasis in comparison to the primary tumor tissue and the adjacent normal tissue from the same breast cancer patients to identify the potential of candidate genes methylation as metastatic markers. Methods: The quantitative methylation analysis was performed using the SEQUENOM's EpiTYPER (TM) assay which relies on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Results: The quantitative DNA methylation analysis of the candidate genes showed higher methylation proportion in the primary tumor tissue than that of the matched normal tissue and the differences were significant for the APC, BIN1, BMP6, BRCA1, CST6, ESR-b, P16, PTEN and TIMP3 promoter regions (P<0.05). Among those candidate methylated genes, APC, BMP6, BRCA1 and P16 displayed higher methylation proportion in the matched lymph node metastasis than that found in the normal tissue (P<0.05). The pathway analysis revealed that BMP6, BRCA1 and P16 have a role in prevention of neoplasm metastasis. Conclusions: The results of the present study showed methylation heterogeneity between primary tumors and metastatic lesion. The contribution of aberrant methylation alterations of BMP6, BRCA1 and P16 genes in lymph node metastasis might provide a further clue to establish useful biomarkers for screening metastasis.

  • 288.
    Barlesi, Fabrice
    et al.
    Hop Marseille, AP HP, Marseille, France.
    Scherpereel, Arnaud
    Univ Lille, Ctr Hosp Reg, Hop A Calmette, Lille, France.
    Rittmeyer, Achim
    Lungenfachklin Immenhausen, Immenhausen, Germany.
    Pazzola, Antonio
    Osped Civile Santissima, Sassari, Italy.
    Ferrer Tur, Neus
    Hosp Son Llatzer, Palma De Mallorca, Spain.
    Kim, Joo-Hang
    Yonsei Univ, Coll Med, Seoul 120749, South Korea.
    Ahn, Myung-Ju
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, Sch Med, Seoul, South Korea.
    Aerts, Joachim G J V
    Amphia Hosp, Breda, Netherlands.
    Gorbunova, Vera
    NN Blokhin Canc Res Ctr Russia, Moscow, Russia.
    Vikström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Wong, Elaine K
    F Hoffmann Roche, Basel, Switzerland.
    Perez-Moreno, Pablo
    F Hoffmann Roche, Basel, Switzerland.
    Mitchell, Lada
    F Hoffmann Roche, Basel, Switzerland.
    Groen, Harry J M
    Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Randomized phase III trial of maintenance bevacizumab with or without pemetrexed after first-line induction with bevacizumab, cisplatin, and pemetrexed in advanced nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer: AVAPERL (MO22089).2013In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 31, no 24, p. 3004-3011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Maintenance therapy is associated with improved survival in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but few studies have compared active agents in this setting. AVAPERL evaluated the safety and efficacy of bevacizumab with or without pemetrexed as continuation maintenance treatment.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with advanced nonsquamous NSCLC received first-line bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg, cisplatin 75 mg/m(2), and pemetrexed 500 mg/m(2) once every 3 weeks for four cycles. Those achieving response or stable disease were randomly assigned at a ratio of 1:1 to maintenance bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg or bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg plus pemetrexed 500 mg/m(2) once every 3 weeks until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS) after random assignment.

    RESULTS: In total, 376 patients received induction treatment, 71.9% achieved disease control, and 67.3% were randomly assigned to maintenance therapy, with 125 and 128 receiving single-agent bevacizumab and bevacizumab plus pemetrexed treatment, respectively. At a median follow-up of 8.1 months, PFS from random assignment was significantly improved in the bevacizumab plus pemetrexed arm (median, 3.7 v 7.4 months; hazard ratio, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.35 to 0.66; P < .001) per a stratified model. The PFS benefit extended across age, performance status, smoking history, and induction response (stable disease v partial response) subgroups. Any grade, grade ≥ 3, and serious adverse events occurred more often with bevacizumab plus pemetrexed maintenance. No new safety signals were observed.

    CONCLUSION: In an unselected population of patients with nonsquamous NSCLC who had achieved disease control with platinum-based chemotherapy plus bevacizumab, bevacizumab plus pemetrexed maintenance was associated with a significant PFS benefit compared with bevacizumab alone. The combination was well tolerated.

  • 289. Barrdahl, Myrto
    et al.
    Canzian, Federico
    Lindström, Sara
    Shui, Irene
    Black, Amanda
    Hoover, Robert N
    Ziegler, Regina G
    Buring, Julie E
    Chanock, Stephen J
    Diver, W Ryan
    Gapstur, Susan M
    Gaudet, Mia M
    Giles, Graham G
    Haiman, Christopher
    Henderson, Brian E
    Hankinson, Susan
    Hunter, David J
    Joshi, Amit D
    Kraft, Peter
    Lee, I-Min
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Milne, Roger L
    Southey, Melissa C
    Willett, Walter
    Gunter, Marc
    Panico, Salvatore
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Sánchez, María-José
    Overvad, Kim
    Dossus, Laure
    Peeters, Petra H
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Campa, Daniele
    Association of breast cancer risk loci with breast cancer survival2015In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 137, no 12, p. 2837-2845Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The survival of breast cancer patients is largely influenced by tumor characteristics, such as TNM stage, tumor grade and hormone receptor status. However, there is growing evidence that inherited genetic variation might affect the disease prognosis and response to treatment. Several lines of evidence suggest that alleles influencing breast cancer risk might also be associated with breast cancer survival. We examined the associations between 35 breast cancer susceptibility loci and the disease over-all survival (OS) in 10,255 breast cancer patients from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) of which 1,379 died, including 754 of breast cancer. We also conducted a meta-analysis of almost 35,000 patients and 5,000 deaths, combining results from BPC3 and the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) and performed in silico analyses of SNPs with significant associations. In BPC3, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was significantly associated with improved OS (HRper-allele=0.70; 95% CI: 0.58-0.85; ptrend=2.84 x 10-4; HRheterozygotes=0.71; 95% CI: 0.55-0.92; HRhomozygotes=0.48; 95% CI: 0.31-0.76; p2DF=1.45 x 10-3). In silico, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was predicted to increase expression of the tumor suppressor cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (CDKN1C). In the meta-analysis, TNRC9-rs3803662 was significantly associated with increased death hazard (HRMETA =1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.15; ptrend=6.6 x 10-4; HRheterozygotes=0.96 95% CI: 0.90-1.03; HRhomozygotes=1.21; 95% CI: 1.09-1.35; p2DF=1.25 x 10-4). In conclusion, we show that there is little overlap between the breast cancer risk single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified so far and the SNPs associated with breast cancer prognosis, with the possible exceptions of LSP1-rs3817198 and TNRC9-rs3803662.

    What's new? Genetic factors are known to influence the risk of breast cancer, but inherited genetic variation may also affect disease prognosis and response to treatment. In this study, the we investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are known to be associated with breast cancer risk might also influence the survival of breast-cancer patients. While two of the investigated SNPs may influence survival, there was otherwise no indication that SNP alleles related to breast cancer risk also play a role in the survival of breast cancer patients.

  • 290. Barton, Maria
    et al.
    Santucci-Pereira, Julia
    de Cicco, Ricardo Lopez
    Russo, Irma H.
    Ross, Eric A.
    Slifker, Michael
    Peri, Suraj
    Bordas, Pal
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Toniolo, Paolo
    Russo, Jose
    Long noncoding RNAs in the postmenopausal breast and their role in cancer prevention2014In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 74, no 19Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 291.
    Bartoschek, Michael
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Lab Med, Div Translat Canc Res, BioCARE, S-22381 Lund, Sweden.
    Oskolkov, Nikolay
    Lund Univ, Sci Life Lab, Natl Bioinformat Infrastruct Sweden, Dept Biol, Solvegatan 35, S-22362 Lund, Sweden.
    Bocci, Matteo
    Lund Univ, Dept Lab Med, Div Translat Canc Res, BioCARE, S-22381 Lund, Sweden.
    Lovrot, John
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol & Pathol, Karolinska Univ Sjukhuset Z1 01, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Christer
    Lund Univ, Dept Lab Med, Div Translat Canc Res, BioCARE, S-22381 Lund, Sweden.
    Sommarin, Mikael
    Lund Univ, Lund Stem Cell Ctr, Div Mol Hematol, BMC B12, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Madsen, Chris D.
    Lund Univ, Dept Lab Med, Div Translat Canc Res, BioCARE, S-22381 Lund, Sweden.
    Lindgren, David
    Lund Univ, Dept Lab Med, Div Translat Canc Res, BioCARE, S-22381 Lund, Sweden.
    Pekar, Gyula
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Div Oncol & Pathol, Skane Univ Hosp, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Goran
    Lund Univ, Lund Stem Cell Ctr, Div Mol Hematol, BMC B12, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Ringner, Markus
    Lund Univ, Sci Life Lab, Natl Bioinformat Infrastruct Sweden, Dept Biol, Solvegatan 35, S-22362 Lund, Sweden.
    Bergh, Jonas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol & Pathol, Karolinska Univ Sjukhuset Z1 01, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björklund, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Evolution. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pietras, Kristian
    Lund Univ, Dept Lab Med, Div Translat Canc Res, BioCARE, S-22381 Lund, Sweden.
    Spatially and functionally distinct subclasses of breast cancer-associated fibroblasts revealed by single cell RNA sequencing2018In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, article id 5150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a major constituent of the tumor microenvironment, although their origin and roles in shaping disease initiation, progression and treatment response remain unclear due to significant heterogeneity. Here, following a negative selection strategy combined with single-cell RNA sequencing of 768 transcriptomes of mesenchymal cells from a genetically engineered mouse model of breast cancer, we define three distinct subpopulations of CAFs. Validation at the transcriptional and protein level in several experimental models of cancer and human tumors reveal spatial separation of the CAF subclasses attributable to different origins, including the peri-vascular niche, the mammary fat pad and the transformed epithelium. Gene profiles for each CAF subtype correlate to distinctive functional programs and hold independent prognostic capability in clinical cohorts by association to metastatic disease. In conclusion, the improved resolution of the widely defined CAF population opens the possibility for biomarker-driven development of drugs for precision targeting of CAFs.

  • 292.
    Bartoszek, Krzysztof
    et al.
    Gdansk University of Technology.
    Izydorek, Bartosz
    Gdansk University of Technology.
    Ratajczak, Tadeusz
    Gdansk University of Technology.
    Skokowski, Jaroslaw
    Medical University of Gdansk.
    Szwaracki, Karol
    Gdansk University of Technology.
    Tomczak, Wiktor
    Gdansk University of Technology.
    Neural Network Breast Cancer Relapse Time Prognosis2006In: ASO Summer School 2006 Abstract Book, 2006, p. 8-10Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a result of a project at the Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunication and Computer Science (Technical University of Gdansk). The aim of the project was to create a neural network to predict the relapsetime of breast cancer. The neural network was to be trained on data collected over the past 20 years by dr. Jarosław Skokowski. The data includes 439 patient records described by about 40 parameters. For our neuralnetwork we only considered 6 medically most significant parameters the number of nodes showing evidence of cancer, size of tumour (in mm.), age, bloom score, estrogen receptors and proestrogen receptors and the relapsetime as the outcome. Our neural network was created in the MATLAB environment.

  • 293.
    Bartoszek, Krzysztof
    et al.
    Gdansk University of Technology.
    Izydorek, Bartosz
    Gdansk University of Technology.
    Ratajczak, Tadeusz
    Gdansk University of Technology, Poland.
    Skokowski, Jaroslaw
    Medical University of Gdansk, Poland.
    Szwaracki, Karol
    Gdansk University of Technology, Poland.
    Tomczak, Wiktor
    Gdansk University of Technology, Poland.
    Neural Network Breast Cancer Relapse Time Prognosis2006In: ASO Summer School 2006 abstract book Ostrzyce 30.06-2.07. 2006 / [ed] J. Skokowski and K. Drucis, 2006, p. 8-10Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a result of a project at the Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunication and Computer Science (Technical University of Gdansk). The aim of the project was to create a neural network to predict the relapsetime of breast cancer. The neural network was to be trained on data collected over the past 20 years by dr. Jarosław Skokowski. The data includes 439 patient records described by about 40 parameters. For our neuralnetwork we only considered 6 medically most significant parameters the number of nodes showing evidence of cancer, size of tumour (in mm.), age, bloom score, estrogen receptors and proestrogen receptors and the relapsetime as the outcome. Our neural network was created in the MATLAB environment.

  • 294.
    Bartoszek, Krzysztof
    et al.
    Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg.
    Krzeminski, Michal
    Gdansk University of Technology.
    Skokowski, Jaroslaw
    Medical University of Gdansk.
    Survival time prognosis under a Markov model of cancer development2010In: Proceedings of the XVI National Conference on Applications of Mathematics in Biology and Medicine, 2010, p. 6-11Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we look at a breast cancer data set of women from the Pomerania region collected in the year 1987- 1992 in the Medical University of Gdansk.We analyze the clinical risk factors in conjunction with a Markov model of cancer development. We evaluate Artificial Neural Network (ANN) survival time prediction (which was done on this data set in a previous study) via a simulation study.

  • 295.
    Bartoszek, Krzysztof
    et al.
    Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg.
    Krzeminski, Michal
    Gdansk University of Technology.
    Skokowski, Jaroslaw
    Medical University of Gdansk.
    Survival time prognosis under a Markov model of cancer development2010In: Proceedings of the XVI National Conference Applications of Mathematics to Biology and Medicine, Krynica, Poland, September 14–18, 2010 / [ed] M. Ziółko, M. Bodnar and E. Kutafina, 2010, p. 6-11Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we look at a breast cancer data set of women from the Pomerania region collected in the year 1987- 1992 in the Medical University of Gdansk.We analyze the clinical risk factors in conjunction with a Markov model of cancer development. We evaluate Artificial Neural Network (ANN) survival time prediction (which was done on this data set in a previous study) via a simulation study.

  • 296.
    Baskaran, Sathishkumar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Department of IGP, Uppsala University.
    New Molecular Approaches to Glioblastoma Therapy2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common high-grade brain tumor diagnosed in patients who are more than 50 years of age. The standard of care treatment is surgery, followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The median life expectancy of patients is only between 12 to 15 months after receiving current treatment regimes. Hence, identification of new therapeutic compounds and gene targets are highly warranted. This thesis describes four interlinked studies to attain this goal. In study 1, we explored drug combination effects in a material of 41 patient-derived GBM cell (GC) cultures. Synergies between three compounds, pterostilbene, gefitinib, and sertraline, resulted in effective killing of GC and can be predicted by biomarkers. In study 2, we performed a large-scale screening of FDA approved compounds (n=1544) in a larger panel of GCs (n=106). By combining the large-scale drug response data with GCs genomics data, we built a novel computational model to predict the sensitivity of each compound for a given GC. A notable finding was that GCs respond very differently to proteasome inhibitors in both in-vitro and in-vivo. In study 3, we explored new gene targets by RNAi (n=1112) in a panel of GC cells. We found that loss of transcription factor ZBTB16/PLZF inhibits GC cell viability, proliferation, migration, and invasion. These effects were due to downregulation of c-MYC and Cyclin B1 after the treatment. In study 4, we tested the genomic stability of three GCs upon multiple passaging. Using molecular and mathematical analyses, we showed that the GCs undergo both systematic adaptations and sequential clonal takeovers. Such changes tend to affect a broad spectrum of pathways. Therefore, a systematic analysis of cell culture stability will be essential to make use of primary cells for translational oncology.

    Taken together, these studies deepen our knowledge of the weak points of GBM and provide several targets and biomarkers for further investigation. The work in this thesis can potentially facilitate the development of targeted therapies and result in more accurate tools for patient diagnostics and stratification. 

  • 297.
    Baskaran, Sathishkumar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Department of IGP, Uppsala University.
    Johansson, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Hansson, Caroline
    Sahlgrenska Cancer Center, University of Gothenburg.
    Spyrou, Argyris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Kalushkova, Antonia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Ramachandran, Mohanraj
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Atienza Párraga, Alba
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Nordling, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Elfineh, Lioudmila
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Martens, Ulf
    Cell screening facility, Science for Life Laboratory Stockholm.
    Häggblad, Maria
    Cell screening facility, Science for Life Laboratory Stockholm.
    Kundu, Soumi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Forsberg Nilsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Lundgren, Bo
    Cell screening facility, Science for Life Laboratory Stockholm.
    Krona, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Nelander, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Loss of transcription factor ZBTB16 induces cell death in patient-derived GBM cell linesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 298.
    Baskaran, Sathishkumar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Department of IGP, Uppsala University.
    Mayrhofer, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Kultima, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Elfineh, Lioudmila
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Cavelier, Lucia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Isaksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Nelander, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Primary glioblastoma cells for precision medicine: a quantitative portrait of genomic (in)stability during the first 30 passages: glioblastoma cells for precision medicineManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 299.
    Basu, Samar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Univ Auvergne, Univ Clermont Ferrand 2, UMR 1019, CRNH Auvergne,Unite Nutr Humaine, F-63000 Clermont Ferrand, France..
    Combe, Kristell
    Univ Auvergne, Univ Clermont Ferrand 2, UMR 1019, CRNH Auvergne,Unite Nutr Humaine, F-63000 Clermont Ferrand, France..
    Kwiatkowski, Fabrice
    Ctr Jean Perrin, F-63000 Clermont Ferrand, France..
    Caldefie-Chezet, Florence
    Univ Auvergne, Univ Clermont Ferrand 2, UMR 1019, CRNH Auvergne,Unite Nutr Humaine, F-63000 Clermont Ferrand, France..
    Penault-Llorca, Frederique
    Ctr Jean Perrin, F-63000 Clermont Ferrand, France..
    Bignon, Yves-Jean
    Ctr Jean Perrin, F-63000 Clermont Ferrand, France..
    Vasson, Marie-Paule
    Univ Auvergne, Univ Clermont Ferrand 2, UMR 1019, CRNH Auvergne,Unite Nutr Humaine, F-63000 Clermont Ferrand, France.;Ctr Jean Perrin, F-63000 Clermont Ferrand, France.;CHU Clermont Ferrand, Unite Explorat Nutr, F-63003 Clermont Ferrand, France..
    Cellular Expression of Cyclooxygenase, Aromatase, Adipokines, Inflammation and Cell Proliferation Markers in Breast Cancer Specimen2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 10, article id e0138443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current evidences suggest that expression of Ki67, cyclooxygenase (COX), aromatase, adipokines, prostaglandins, free radicals, beta-catenin and alpha-SMA might be involved in breast cancer pathogenesis. The main objective of this study was to compare expression/localization of these potential compounds in breast cancer tissues with tissues collected adjacent to the tumor using immunohistochemistry and correlated with clinical pathology. The breast cancer specimens were collected from 30 women aged between 49 and 89 years who underwent breast surgery following cancer diagnosis. Expression levels of molecules by different stainings were graded as a score on a scale based upon staining intensity and proportion of positive cells/area or individually. AdipoR1, adiponectin, Ob-R, leptin, COX-1, COX-2, aromatase, PGF(2a), F-2-isoprostanes and alpha-SMA were localised on higher levels in the breast tissues adjacent to the tumor compared to tumor specimens when considering either score or staining area whereas COX-2 and AdipoR2 were found to be higher considering staining intensity and Ki67 on score level in the tumor tissue. There was no significant difference observed on beta-catenin either on score nor on staining area and intensity between tissues adjacent to the tumor and tumor tissues. A positive correlation was found between COX-1 and COX-2 in the tumor tissues. In conclusion, these suggest that Ki67, COXs, aromatase, prostaglandin, free radicals, adipokines, beta-catenin and alpha-SMA are involved in breast cancer. These further focus the need of examination of tissues adjacent to tumor, tumor itself and compare them with normal or benign breast tissues for a better understanding of breast cancer pathology and future evaluation of therapeutic benefit.

  • 300.
    Basu, Samar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Oxidative Stress and Inflammation.
    Harris, Holly
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Vasson, Marie-Paule
    Wolk, Alicja
    Is There any Role for Serum Cathepsin S, CRP levels on Prognostic Information in Breast Cancer?: The Swedish Mammography Cohort2015In: Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, ISSN 1523-0864, E-ISSN 1557-7716, Vol. 23, no 16, p. 1298-1302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, and both low-grade inflammation and cathepsins might have important roles in breast cancer. We questioned whether prediagnostic circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), cathepsin B and cathepsin S were associated with breast cancer risk. Sixty-nine incident breast cancer cases diagnosed after blood collection and 719 controls from the Swedish Mammography Cohort were analysed for systemic CRP, cathepsin B and cathepsin S. Cathepsin S and inflammation (hsCRP) adjusted cathepsin S were inversely associated with breast cancer risk (cathepsin S: OR for top vs. bottom tertile = 0.46; 95% CI = 0.23-0.92; Ptrend = 0.02; hsCRP adjusted cathepsin S: OR of 0.44; 95% CI = 0.22-0.87; Ptrend = 0.02). hsCRP was significantly associated with increased breast cancer risk (OR for top vs. bottom tertile= 2.01; 95% CI = 1.02-3.95; Ptrend = 0.04). No significant association was observed between cathepsin B and breast cancer risk (OR for top vs. bottom tertile= 0.67; 95% CI = 0.32-1.40; Ptrend = 0.30). These observations lead to hypothesis that levels of cathepsin S and hsCRP observed in women who later developed breast cancer may provide prognostic information regarding tumor development and need to be evaluated in prospective studies.

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