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  • 251.
    Rudner, Mary
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Karlsson Foo, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology .
    Notice of retraction: unintentional errors in "Phonological mismatch makes aided speech recognition in noise cognitively taxing." (Ear & Hear.2007;28[6]) in Ear and Hearing(ISSN 0196-0202), vol 29, issue 5, pg 8142008Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 252.
    Rudner, Mary
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Understanding auditory effort by measuring cognitive spare capacity2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 253.
    Rudner, Mary
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Working Memory Supports Listening in Noise for Persons with Hearing Impairment2011In: JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF AUDIOLOGY, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 156-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous studies have demonstrated a relation between cognitive capacity, in particular working memory, and the ability to understand speech in noise with different types of hearing aid signal processing. Purpose: The present study investigates the relation between working memory capacity and the speech recognition performance of persons with hearing impairment under both aided and unaided conditions, following a period of familiarization to both fast- and slow-acting compression settings in the participants own hearing aids. Research Design: Speech recognition was tested in modulated and steady state noise with fast and slow compression release settings (for aided conditions) with each of two materials. Working memory capacity was also measured. Study Sample: Thirty experienced hearing aid users with a mean age of 70 yr (SD = 7.8) and pure-tone average hearing threshold across the frequencies 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 kHz (PTA(7)) and for both ears of 45.8 dB HL (SD = 6.6). Intervention: 9 wk experience with each of fast-acting and slow-acting compression. Data Collection and Analysis: Speech recognition data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance with the within-subjects factors of material (high constraint, low constraint), noise type (steady state, modulated), and compression (fast, slow), and the between-subjects factor working memory capacity (high, low). Results: With high constraint material, there were three-way interactions including noise type and working memory as well as compression, in aided conditions, and performance level, in unaided conditions, but no effects of either working memory or compression with low constraint material. Investigation of simple main effects showed a significant effect of working memory during speech recognition under conditions of both "high degradation" (modulated noise, fast-acting compression, low signal-to-noise ratio [SNR]) and "low degradation" (steady state noise, slow-acting compression, high SNR). The finding of superior performance of persons with high working memory capacity in modulated noise with fast-acting compression agrees with findings of previous studies including a familiarization period of at least 9 wk, in contrast to studies with familiarization of 4 wk or less that have shown that persons with lower cognitive capacity may benefit from slow-acting compression. Conclusions: Working memory is a crucial factor in speech understanding in noise for persons with hearing impairment, irrespective of whether hearing is aided or unaided. Working memory supports speech understanding in noise under conditions of both "high degradation" and "low degradation." A subcomponent view of working memory may contribute to our understanding of these phenomena. The effect of cognition on speech understanding in modulated noise with fast-acting compression may only pertain after a period of 4-9 wk of familiarization and that prior to such a period, persons with lower cognitive capacity may benefit more from slow-acting compression.

  • 254.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Tomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Speech understanding in noise: the role of working memory capacity2012In: 41st International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering 2012 (INTER-NOISE 2012) / [ed] Burroughs, C., Institute of Noise Control Engineering , 2012, Vol. 10, p. 508-516Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 255.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Signoret, Carine
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. 4Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    On the development of a working memory model for Ease-of Language Understanding (ELU)2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Working memory is important for online language processing in a dialogue. We use it to store relevant information, to inhibit or ignore irrelevant information, and to attend to conversation selectively. Working memory helps us keep track of a dialogue while taking turns and following the gist. This paper examines the Ease-of Language Understanding model (i.e., the ELU model, Rönnberg, 2003; Rönnberg et al., 2008) in light of new behavioral and neural findings concerning the role of working memory capacity (WMC) in sound and speech processing. The new ELU model is a meaning prediction system that depends on phonological and semantic interactions in rapid implicit and slower explicit processing mechanisms that both depend on working memory, albeit in different ways. New predictions and clinical implications are outlined.

  • 256.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Karlsson Foo, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cognition counts: A working memory system for ease of language understanding (ELU)2008In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 47, no Suppl. 2, p. 99-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A general working memory system for ease of language understanding (ELU, Rnnberg, 2003a) is presented. The purpose of the system is to describe and predict the dynamic interplay between explicit and implicit cognitive functions, especially in conditions of poorly perceived or poorly specified linguistic signals. In relation to speech understanding, the system based on (1) the quality and precision of phonological representations in long-term memory, (2) phonologically mediated lexical access speed, and (3) explicit, storage, and processing resources. If there is a mismatch between phonological information extracted from the speech signal and the phonological information represented in long-term memory, the system is assumed to produce a mismatch signal that invokes explicit processing resources. In the present paper, we focus on four aspects of the model which have led to the current, updated version: the language generality assumption; the mismatch assumption; chronological age; and the episodic buffer function of rapid, automatic multimodal binding of phonology (RAMBPHO). We evaluate the language generality assumption in relation to sign language and speech, and the mismatch assumption in relation to signal processing in hearing aids. Further, we discuss the effects of chronological age and the implications of RAMBPHO.

  • 257.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    When cognition kicks in: Working memory and speech understanding in noise.2010In: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, E-ISSN 1998-4030, Vol. 12, no 49, p. 263-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perceptual load and cognitive load can be separately manipulated and dissociated in their effects on speech understanding in noise. The Ease of Language Understanding model assumes a theoretical position where perceptual task characteristics interact with the individual's implicit capacities to extract the phonological elements of speech. Phonological precision and speed of lexical access are important determinants for listening in adverse conditions. If there are mismatches between the phonological elements perceived and phonological representations in long-term memory, explicit working memory (WM)-related capacities will be continually invoked to reconstruct and infer the contents of the ongoing discourse. Whether this induces a high cognitive load or not will in turn depend on the individual's storage and processing capacities in WM. Data suggest that modulated noise maskers may serve as triggers for speech maskers and therefore induce a WM, explicit mode of processing. Individuals with high WM capacity benefit more than low WM-capacity individuals from fast amplitude compression at low or negative input speech-to-noise ratios. The general conclusion is that there is an overarching interaction between the focal purpose of processing in the primary listening task and the extent to which a secondary, distracting task taps into these processes.

  • 258.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Speech in noise and ease of language understanding: When and how working memory capacity plays a role2012In: Acoustics 2012, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 259.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid S
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Speech in noise and ease of language understanding: When and how working memory capacity plays a role2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A working memory based model for Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) has been developed (Rönnberg, 2003; Rönnberg et al., 2008; Rönnberg et al., 2011). It predicts that speech understanding in adverse, mismatching noise conditions is dependent on explicit processing resources such as working memory capacity (WMC). This presentation will examine the details of this prediction by addressing some recent data on (1) how brainstem responses are modulated by working memory load and WMC, (2) how cortical correlates of speech understanding in noise are modulated by WMC, and (3) how WMC determines episodic long-term memory for spoken discourse masked by speech.

  • 260.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    AIST - Ett test av lyssningsansträngning2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hörapparatsanpassning kan ses som en process för att minska en persons lyssningsansträngning, men det är oklart hur man bäst mäter lyssningsansträngning på ett objektivt sätt. Auditory Inference Span Test (AIST) syftar därför till att utvecklas till ett kliniskt instrument att använda vid hörapparatsanpassning för att mäta en patients ansträngning att uppfatta tal.

    AIST är ett kombinerat hörsel-, minnes- och bearbetningstest. Testet bygger på idén att ju mer kognitiva resurser som går åt för att bearbeta och förstå tal, desto mindre kognitiva resurser finns kvar för att minnas och lagra talinformation. Testet använder Hagermans meningar i brus, och försökspersonen behöver minnas och bearbeta informationen i talmaterialet för att kunna besvara frågor om innehållet. Poäng på frågorna samt reaktionstid mäts som mått på lyssningsansträngning. Data från pilottester visar på att AIST kan bli ett väl anpassat test för kliniskt bruk för att mäta lyssningsansträngning.

     

  • 261.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Testing effort for speech comprehension using the individuals’ cognitive spare capacity - the Auditory Inference Span test2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern hearing aids use a multitude of parameters to give the user an optimal speech signal. Fitting of the hearing aid becomes a handiwork due to the limited data of the patients hearing status (primarily an audiogram). A hearing in noise test (SNR threshold) is often used to evaluate the fitting. However, testing the SNR threshold as done in clinical use today is not ecological valid. Another way to think about hearing aid fitting is to ease the listening effort.

    Therefore, we propose the Auditory Inference Span Test (AIST) as a clinical tool during hearing aid fitting to assess the patient’s effort to understand speech. AIST is a combined auditory, memory, and processing test. It relies on the idea that the more cognitive resources that are required to process and understand speech, less cognitive resources are available for storage of the speech information. In AIST, sentences are presented in noise and afterwards the patient is required to recall and process the information from the sentences. Correctness and answering speed is measured and scores correlate to the effort required to understand the speech.

    Data from piloting tests indicate that the AIST is well suited as a clinical test for listening effort.

  • 262.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Testing listening effort for speech comprehension using the individuals’ cognitive spare capacity2011In: Audiology Research, ISSN 2039-4330, E-ISSN 2039-4349, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 82-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most hearing aid fittings today are almost solely based on the patient’s audiogram. Although the loss of gain in the cochlea is important, for a more optimal fitting, more individual parameters of the patient’s cochlear loss together with the patient's cognitive abilities to process the auditory signal are required (Stenfelt & Rönnberg, 2009; Edwards, 2007). Moreover, the evaluation of the fitting is often based on a speech in noise task and the aim is to improve the individual patient’s signal to noise ratio (SNR) thresholds. As a consequence, hearing aid fitting may be seen as a process aimed to improve the patient’s SNR threshold rather than to improve communication ability. However, subsequent to a hearing aid fitting, there can be great differences in SNR improvement between patients that have identical hearing impairment in terms of threshold data (the audiogram). The reasons are certainly complex but one contributing factor may be the individual differences in cognitive capacity and associated listening effort. Another way to think about amplified hearing is to ease a subject’s listening effort (Sarampalis, et al., 2009). When the speech signal is degraded by noise or by a hearing impairment, more high-order cognitive or top-down processes are required to perceive and understand the signal, and listening is therefore more effortful. It is assumed that a hearing aid would ease the listening effort for a hearing impaired person. However, it is not clear how to measure the listening effort. We here present a test that will tap into the different cognitive aspects of listening effort, the Auditory Inference Span Test (AIST). The AIST is a dual task hearing in noise test, that combines auditory and memory processing and is well suited as a clinical test for listening effort.

  • 263.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    The Auditory Inference Span Test – Developing a test for cognitive aspects of listening effort for speech comprehension2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Most hearing aid fittings today are almost solely based on the patient’s audiogram. However, more individual parameters of the patient’s hearing thresholds together with the patient’s cognitive abilities to process the auditory signal are required. Hearing aid fitting may be seen as a process aimed to improve the patient’s hearing thresholds rather than to improve communication ability. Another way to think about hearing aid fitting is to ease the patient’s listening effort. However, it is not clear how to measure the listening effort.

    Therefore, we propose the Auditory Inference Span Test (AIST) as a clinical tool during hearing aid fitting to assess the patient’s effort to understand speech. AIST is a combined auditory, memory, and processing test. It relies on the idea that the more cognitive resources that are required to process and understand speech, less cognitive resources are available for storage of the speech information. In AIST, sentences are presented in noise and afterwards the patient is required to recall and process the information from the sentences. Correctness and reaction time is recorded as measurements of perceived listening effort.

    Data from piloting tests indicate that the AIST is well suited as a clinical test for listening effort. In a future study to verify that the AIST is sensitive to cognitive capacity, the test will be evaluated with measurements of the subject's cognitive capacity as well as the subject's hearing thresholds. For a clinical test the requirement is that it is fast and easily facilitated. The AIST takes no more than fifteen minutes to complete, and the aim is to further shorten the time and adapt the test for clinical use. This ensures the AIST to be a useable instrument for testing listening effort using the individuals' cognitive spare capacity.

     

  • 264.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    An objective measure of listening effort: The Auditory Inference Span Test2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One aim of hearing aid fitting is to ease the patient’s effort in understanding speech, i.e. the listening effort needed to perceive speech in different sound environments. To obtain a good hearing aid fitting, knowledge about the patient’s auditory as well as cognitive abilities seems to be important. However, listening effort is usually not included as a fitting criterion, partly as it is not clear how to measure listening effort objectively.

    The Auditory Inference Span Test (AIST) is a dual-task hearing-in-noise test, that combines auditory and memory processing. The basis for the test is that when more cognitive resources are required for understanding speech, less cognitive resources are available for storage and processing of the speech information. In AIST, Hagerman sentences are presented in noise and the subject is required to recall and process the sentence information. Recall ability is tested with different cognitive loads. Button-press responses are recorded and used as an estimate of listening effort. In a pilot study, listeners showed decreasing accuracy with increasing cognitive load and longer reaction time at maximum cognitive load, suggesting that the test may be suited as a clinical test for listening effort.

    In an ongoing study, the AIST is being evaluated in relation to other auditory and cognitive measures: baseline audiometry (audiogram) and speech in noise test (Hagerman sentences) as well as text based dual processing and storage test (reading span) and updating (letter memory test), as well as subjective rating of listening effort. Data from this study will be presented.

  • 265.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Att mäta lyssningsansträngning2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 266.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Frequency discrimination and human communication2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The voice is the most common means of communication and tends to change, sliding up and down the pitch scale when forming phonemes and words, as different emotions and thoughts are expressed. Therefore the ability to discriminate frequencies is of importance for speech intelligibility in a communication situation. Furthermore, this ability is also of importance in speech recognition in noise, by separating the target and noise by spectral and temporal differences of the sources. The choice of rehabilitation is crucial for the frequency discrimination ability. Cochlear implants, for example, lack the ability to pass the temporal fine structure of acoustic waves to the auditory nerve, which in turn lead to reduced precision of phase locking, inferior frequency discrimination ability, and a relatively poor ability to understand speech when background sounds are present.The aim of the study is to investigate how frequency discrimination and temporal resolution abilities interact with performance in speech recognition in noise using a psychoacoustic, speech, and cognitive test battery. These tests will give insight to interactions between performance and hearing status, type of rehabilitation(hearing aid, cochlear implant, and electro-acoustic stimulation), cognitive capacity, and language ability. It is hypothesized that normal hearing participants have a better frequency discrimination ability than hearing impaired participants and by that, better understanding of speech. It is also hypothesized that type of rehabilitation effects performance on frequency discrimination, and that this performance correlates with speech recognition in noise. Finally, it is hypothesized that cognitive capacity and language ability can, to some extent, compensate for loss of frequency resolution in the peripheral auditory system. Preliminary results from the study will be presented and discussed.

  • 267.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Testing listening effort for speech comprehension2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One aim of hearing aid fitting is to reduce the effort of understanding speech, especially in noisy environments. For a good hearing aid fitting, knowledge about the patient’s auditory abilities is necessary, but knowledge about cognitive abilities may also be important.

     

    The Auditory Inference Span Test (AIST) is a dual-task hearing-in-noise test, that combines auditory and memory processing. In AIST, Hagerman sentences are presented in steady state speech-shaped noise at -2dB, -4dB or -6dB SNR and the subject is required to recall and process the information from the sentences by giving button-press responses to multiple-choice questions thereby assessing what the subject could infer from what was heard.

     

    AIST will be administered to 40 normal hearing subjects (29 to date) and performance related to speech reception threshold, working memory capacity and updating ability, as well as subjective rating of listening effort. Preliminary results show a greater SNR-related improvement in AIST scores at low SNRs than can be explained by improved audibility alone, consistent with release of memory resources due to reduced listening effort. There is also a trend towards a positive relationship between AIST scores and individual working memory capacity and updating ability.

  • 268.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Testing listening effort for speech comprehension2012In: Speech Perception and Auditory Disorders, Danavox Jubilee Foundation , 2012, p. 73-80Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 269.
    Röösli, Christof
    et al.
    University of Zurich.
    Sim, Jae-Hoon
    University of Zurich.
    Gehrig, R
    University of Zurich.
    Fausch, BC
    University of Zurich.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Huber, Alexander
    University of Zurich.
    Correlation between intracranial pressure and skull vibration in bone conduction of cadaveric human whole heads2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 270.
    Saremi, Amin G
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A physiological Signal Transmission Model to be used for Specific Diagnosis of Cochlear Impairments2011In: WHAT FIRE IS IN MINE EARS: PROGRESS IN AUDITORY BIOMECHANICS: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 11TH INTERNATIONAL MECHANICS OF HEARING WORKSHOP / [ed] Shera, CA; Olson, ES, American Institute of Physics (AIP), 2011, Vol. 1403, p. 369-373Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many of the sophisticated characteristics of human auditory system are attributed to cochlea. Also, most of patients with a hearing loss suffer from impairments that originate from cochlea (sensorineural). Despite this, today's clinical diagnostic methods do not probe the specific origins of such cochlear lesions. The aim of this research is to introduce a physiological signal transmission model to be clinically used as a tool for diagnosis of cochlear losses. This model enables simulation of different bio‐mechano‐electrical processes which occur in the auditory organ of Corti inside the cochlea. What makes this model different from many available computational models is its loyalty to physiology since the ultimate goal is to model each single physiological phenomenon. This includes passive BM vibration, outer hair cells' performances such as nonlinear mechanoelectrical transduction (MET), active amplifications by somatic motor, as well as vibration to neural conversion at the inner hair cells.

  • 271.
    Saremi, Amin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effect of metabolic presbyacusis on cochlear responses: A simulation approach using a physiologically-based model2013In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 134, no 4, p. 2833-2851Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the presented model, electrical, acoustical, and mechanical elements of the cochlea are explicitly integrated into a signal transmission line where these elements convey physiological interpretations of the human cochlear structures. As a result, this physiologically-motivated model enables simulation of specific cochlear lesions such as presbyacusis. The hypothesis is that high-frequency hearing loss in older adults may be due to metabolic presbyacusis whereby age-related cellular/chemical degenerations in the lateral wall of the cochlea cause a reduction in the endocochlear potential. The simulations quantitatively confirm this hypothesis and emphasize that even if the outer and inner hair cells are totally active and intact, metabolic presbyacusis alone can significantly deteriorate the cochlear functionality. Specifically, in the model, as the endocochlear potential decreases, the transduction mechanism produces less receptor current such that there is a reduction in the battery of the somatic motor. This leads to a drastic decrease in cochlear amplification and frequency sensitivity, as well as changes in position-frequency map (tuning pattern) of the cochlea. In addition, the simulations show that the age-related reduction of the endocochlear potential significantly inhibits the firing rate of the auditory nerve which might contribute to the decline of temporal resolution in the aging auditory system.

  • 272.
    Saremi, Amin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    How differently noise exposure and metabolic presbyacusis affect the cochlear response. A simulation approach using a physiologically-based model of the human cochlea2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 273.
    Saremi, Amin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Simulation of presbyacusis by a physiological signal transmission model of the human cochlea2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 274.
    Saremi, Amin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The effect of aging on cochlear amplifier: A simulation approach using a physiologically-based electro-mechanical model of the cochlea2012In: Canadian Acoustics, ISSN 0711-6659, E-ISSN 2291-1391, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 128-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The electrical, acoustical, and mechanical elements of the cochlea are explicitly integrated into a transmission-line model to develop a physiological interpretation of the human cochlea insofar. The model enables fundamental simulation of specific cochlear lesions such as metabolic presbyacusis. A sound pressure field in the air is transmitted via the outer and middle ear to the inner ear. It causes the stapes to vibrate resulting in a traveling wave along the organ of Corti propagating from base towards apex. As the endocochlear potential (EP) decreases, the MET produces less receptor current which, eventually leading to a decline in the force/displacement generated by the somatic motor. The CFs of the curves tend to move backwards in a presbyacusis cochlea, this result is consistent with Robles and Ruggem where in a passive cochlea, the CFs are shifted backwards.

  • 275.
    Stenbäck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Executive function and speech- in- noise perception: the role of inhibition2013In: Aging and Speech Communication, 2013 / [ed] Larry E Humes, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     

    Little is known about the relation between the ability to inhibit irrelevant information and perceiving speech-in-noise and the effects of hearing loss and ageing on this relationship. In settings where a listening task is difficult, individuals use both their hearing and cognitive abilities to process the auditory information. To perceive speech in noise, one must focus on the relevant information and at the same time inhibit the processing of irrelevant information. Results from recent studies indicate that older adults have difficulties singling out speech in noise, and selectively attend to target speech while inhibiting irrelevant information.

     

    The purpose of the project is to increase theoretical knowledge concerning the relation between age, perceiving speech-in-noise and inhibition. The pilot study involved the administration of a test battery consisting of audiological, cognitive and speech perception tests. The results of a series of ANOVAs and correlational analyses will be presented to show differences in performance and the relation between performance on the cognitive, audiological and speech-perception tasks. Upon completion, the results of this study will be used to compare younger individuals´ performance with older adults with and without hearing loss to determine the effect of age and hearing ability on the relation between capacity to inhibit irrelevant information and speech-in-noise recognition.

  • 276.
    Stenbäck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Informational masking in spoken communication - Developing the Swedish "Hayling" sentences2013In: 11th EFAS Congress.  Föredrags Abstract. Otorhinolaryngologia Hungarica, 59:2, 101, 2013, p. 101-101Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 277.
    Stenbäck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    the Speech recognition under adverse listening conditions in young normally-hearing listeners2015In: Third International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, Linköping, 14-17 June, 2015. Sweden., 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study we aimed to investigate individual differences in cognitive inhibition, WMC, and how they relate to performance on a speech-recognition-in-noise task. Sixteen young normally-hearing individuals were presented with a cognitive test battery, as well as a sentence corpus masked by 5 different maskers, targeting 80% speech-recognition. One masker was a slightly modulated (10%) speech-shaped noise (SSN), 2 maskers were constructed by modulating the SSN with the envelopes from a single female talker, and the international speech test signal (ISTS). We also masked the target sentences with the ISTS, and a single female talker reading a passage in a Swedish newspaper. Our results showed that cognitive inhibition is significantly related to performance when maskers with meaningful, semantic information is used. The results further indicate that young normally-hearing individuals can take advantage of temporal and spectral dips to fill in missing information. Our findings suggest that choice of speech material is of importance for the outcome in speech-recognition-in-noise tasks. We further propose that tasks of cognitive inhibition can be used to predict performance in a speech-recognition task.

  • 278.
    Stenbäck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Informational masking in spoken communication – developing the Swedish "Hayling"-sentences2013In: Abstract book: 2nd International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, 2013, p. 164-164Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 279.
    Stenbäck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Informational masking inspoken communication- Developing the Swedish "Hayling" sentences2013In: Second International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for communication. 16-19 June 2013, Linköping, Sweden, Abstract, p164, 2013, p. 164-164Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 280.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A model for prediction of own voice alteration with hearing aids2012In: Speech Perception and Auditory Disorders / [ed] T. Dau, M.L. Jepsen, T. Poulsen, J.C. Dalsgaard, Danavox Jubilee Foundation , 2012, p. 323-330Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 281.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Acoustic and physiologic aspects of bone conduction hearing2011In: Implantable Bone Conduction Hearing Aids / [ed] Kompis M, Karger , 2011, Vol. 71, p. 10-21Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bone conduction (BC) is the way sound energy is transmitted by the skull bones to the cochlea causing a sound perception. Even if the BC sound transmission involves several pathways including sound pressure induced in the ear canal, inertial forces acting on the middle ear ossicles and cochlear fluids, alteration of the cochlear space, and pressure transmission through the 3rd window of the cochlea, the BC sound ultimately produces a wave motion on the basilar membrane similar to that of air-conducted sound. The efficiency of the BC stimulation is largely dependent on the skull bone where the skull acts as a rigid body at low frequencies and incorporates different types of wave transmission at higher frequencies. The interaural stimulation difference is determined by the difference between contralateral and ipsilateral BC sound transmission: the transcranial BC sound transmission. To benefit from binaural processing, the transcranial transmission should be low, while the same should be high when using BC hearing aids for unilateral deaf subjects. By appropriately positioning the stimulation, high or low transcranial transmission can be achieved.

  • 282.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Advantage of using directional microphones in a BAHA device – the Divino2007In: 1st International Symposium – Bone Conduction Hearing and Osseointegration, Halifax, Canada, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 283.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Audiologiska mätningar för prediktion av nytta med CROS apparat för ensidgt döva2010In: Sveriges tekniska audiologers förening, 2010 Eskilstuna, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 284.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Benledningsforskning: Förståelsen ökar, men mycket forskning återstår2012In: Audio-Nytt, ISSN 0347-6308, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 10-11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 285.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Binaural hearing with bilateral bone conduction stimulation2006In: IX Biomaterials Club Meeting, Val Gardena, Italy, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 286.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Binaural hearing with bone conduction stimulation2011In: 3rd International Symposium on Bone Conduction Hearing – Craniofacial Osseointegration, Sarasota, Florida, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 287.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Binaural hearing with bone conduction stimulation – what is possible?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 288.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bone conduction and bone anchored hearing devices2004In: Middle Ear Mechanics in Research and Otology / [ed] K. Gyo, H. Wada, N. Hato, and T. Koike, Singapore: orld Scientific Publishing Co. , 2004, p. 394-401Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This work aims to facilitate the exchange of ideas between otosurgeons and engineers on common topics such as middle ear function, tympanoplasty, implantable hearing devices and ear prostheses. Due to recent advances in technology, gene-therapy and tissue-engineering procedures will also be important issues in the treatment of middle ear disease.

  • 289.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bone Conduction and the Middle Ear2012In: The Middle Ear: Science, Otosurgery, and Technology / [ed] Sunil Puria, Arthur N. Popper, Richard F. Fay, New York: Springer, 2012, p. 135-169Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With more than a century of research in the field of bone conduction (BC) hearing, the importance of the contributors for bone-conducted sound is not clarified and there is no consensus on the issues. However, the literature suggests that the inner ear fluid inertia is the most important mechanism for speech frequencies. But several other contributors are generally within 10 dB of the most important one, including inertial effect of the middle ear ossicles. Most pathology in the outer and middle ear that severely affects the air conduction sound transmission affects the bone conduction sensitivity only to a minor extent. So even if the changed bone conduction sensitivity in a middle ear lesion is helpful for understanding underlying bone conduction physiology, its clinical relevance is minor. Also, the use of BC thresholds for differential diagnosis of the specific middle ear lesion is risky; the Carhart notch is not always identifiable in cases of otosclerotic ears, and other lesions show BC depression similar to the Carhart notch. There are several pitfalls when conducting BC testing. The most common are occlusion of the ear canal, airborne sound radiation from the transducers, and unmasked or overmasked nontest ear.

  • 290.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bone conduction mechanisms and applications2007In: 32ND Annual National Hearing Conservation Conference – A Passion to Preserve, Savannah, Georgia, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 291.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bredbandsmätning av mellanörat2013In: Audio-Nytt, ISSN 0347-6308, Vol. 40, no 1-2, p. 24-25Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 292.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effect of the stapedius reflex on air conduction and bone conduction transmission in the human in HEARING RESEARCH, vol 263, issue 01-Feb, pp 243-2432010In: HEARING RESEARCH, Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. , 2010, Vol. 263, no 01-Feb, p. 243-243Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypothesis

    Contraction of the stapedius muscle affects sound transmission by air conduction and bone conduction differently.

    Background

    A contraction of the stapedius muscle decreases the sound transmission through the middle ear in the order of 10 dB for frequencies below approximately 1.5 kHz. It is not very clear how a stapedius muscle contraction affect sound transmission to the inner ear by bone conduction, but it is generally assumed that it affect the sound transmission by bone conduction less than it does by air conduction.

    Materials and Methods

    Growth functions of Auditory Steady State Responses (ASSR) in the frequency range 0.5 to 4 kHz was measured in ten subjects. The ASSR stimuli were either supplied by air conduction or bone conduction. Simultaneously, a noise stimuli designed not to interfere with the ASSR stimuli was presented to elicit the stapedius reflex. By comparing ASSR growth functions at different eliciting levels, the influence from the stapedius reflex could be estimated.   

    Results

    It was found that the stapedius reflex decreases sound transmission by air conduction by 5 to 20 dB at frequencies below 2 kHz and 0 to 5 dB when the stimulation is by bone conduction.

    Conclusions

    The stapedius reflex attenuate air conducted sound at low frequencies more than it does bone conducted sound

  • 293.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    EU-projekt AHEAD-III: Hörselscreening av äldre2010In: Sveriges tekniska audiologers förening, 2010 Eskilstuna, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 294.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hearing Impairment and its affect on the Ascending Auditory stream2007In: CKV, Stockholm, Sweden, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 295.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Human hearing from a biomedical point of view2007In: JSMA, Sendai, Japan, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 296.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hörseldiagnostik med elektrofysiologi – ASSR2006In: TeMA Hörsel 2006, Göteborg, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 297.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hörselscreening bland äldre2009In: Ålder och Hörsel – Audiologisk Dag, Linköping, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 298.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hörseltekniken – så ser den ut om 20 år2009In: Audio-Nytt, ISSN 0347-6308, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 16-19Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 299.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mechanisms of bone conduction and its use for hearing impaired persons2008In: International Hearing Aid Conference (IHCON), Lake Tahoe, CA, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 300.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nya trender i hörapparatteknologi2012Conference paper (Refereed)
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